(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Bruch-Kassel Collection. 1932-1977 Bulk: 1939-1950"

MiCROFILMED FOR 

The Leo Baeck Institute 
1 5 West 1 6th Street 
NewYork,NY 10011 



MiCROFILMED BY 

PRAXESS ASSOCIATES 

7 HOLLAND AVENUE 

WHITE PLAINS, NY 10603 



Film Size: 35mm microfilm 



Image Placement: IB 



Reduction Ratio: 12X-Varied 



Date Filming Began: 



AR 7229 

Bruch - Kassel 

CoUection 



■I n't-^'s, V- f -•( it -f^v "^ irr '.^ *' ' < "r- ■^'««•" , 1 „I •),V'— if,' fl-a'-tr A-1 ' '"'• </ '■<'-> \-\'^y^ J'f-rvf "./■ ',Ji%<-'' f ■> - .•» I' V) ■• * %v • % \ «jr%r-- II 



/ V -"^ 1 .*t ^ ^' " 1 t' 



^STrfTTr^ - ' '* " ^ ='■' Jt«^ 1 - "■> "J^-^Hrt-'AH- f /-^/Jt, -,-.«t« 1 ,-..«f»^pi;j'r- 




AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 

Phorie: (212)744-6400 

Fax:(212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Date: 12/21/2009 



Sys#: 000198685 



Box: 1 



Folder: 6 



-4^iiMlfMäi^^tM-ä 



U-^Aii, 



'y'ikiK^-' »•'■H^ 



^Sn^MSik^ttäf^&ä- 



.*i&!i:4!.-.>>y 



^sMiÄÄi' 



säXk^jjßäBitm 




■1L:^..^M<,^y ^Z^, y^Ct.^ -/('^V, 



-^1^ 







/ 



— »». «I* 




j 






-•-»-e *. *-■*/* -tt-f . 






'J 













'^-Tj^t.^ 




-^ '» »»tA»-». 



* • < t» 






•#"»»,.♦.•»*-- •*-»-»■ - 








-•^-j» *-X— t--gt ^ 






•>'--*»-# --f» 4Uf #■>, 




'■^.•^^^-♦"♦'y' 



►^»t */•• 



I 









^..^-. 



-^--^Ua^/^^^*^ -"-- ^"i^V^i^ ' r .T'^^ -T/V/" 



•»*-i5^-V>--«rH-».«-», . ^ 








-.-,^ 






♦•«••» ^^^^>."*^ •♦♦"•»«•^^,,^^, 



V^i/ 





'"t-y^ ^"»♦-»«»/■»>- , 






yi^ T^ujL ^ 






IyV^-"'^'/"/'^ A-ZV^ ---^ -.äL /-y^ Z...^. 








f^t^r^^-^^. ^^^^ 






->^ ^ 










><. 



i 





ü-U-j-f^-^ yMS.^J^'^ 









>• 

r:-^' 








0- '' Q" 








*»»♦- 















r 




J / 






/ 







/• 



w ^, 



*»-•» # *r#^- 



<^''^:^ "k^'A,^.^ /**^'r 

*r -y^t-vM W ar«»- -^ JiJ' Jr> jt' ^ J. 



\ 



'■*>*' 



^4^ 



y 



«-<4K. 



^^ 



ii* 



.• 



«r* 



^/ 



A^IÄN» 






Wf-J^ jTl^ii^, 






% 



\ 



-Äl'üf 



W». 






^tw 



•«*. 



«^< 



^i-^^^-d*-»^^ ^^-^.-y^ 









^^" /» »j ff ' V /i«* 



V /^^ 



^ 



^ % V 






Ä:^* 



/ 






^'^^ 




«\*i 



; ^-/ 






«■♦t* 








*# 









t^ 








"^^SSK 



m 



'FT 



..,jI^d^,XLT^U>fU^l 







/ -*:;Äit^ 



^■» l l^ » »» » *' 



> 






» \ 




€u 







^^ 



..r*.\ 



^\ 




% 






i«:-« «■• 



.V 



-V » 



f^oCf^H^ 



■**•-« «■ 



■■-»-• 









t\ 




» * 



V» r -»-v- 






i^-^lJ-'f-'-j;,^ 



'■ ♦ *-* V . y 



^^'^-t.-i-fri 



A •- 



\ t 



MN»^-««— ^ 






^ * i » • r ," # 



«♦* 



t^iCZl % 



4 •"«* 



♦■♦•** ] 



\ . V 






»r 



>r<4r>«-4 



■»^ er' 



[««'->■ 



> » * ' 



Xm 



:X^ 



r 






h 



ui 



n 



>J 



X^ 



-»»^-«•»v^ 



^^*-> 



t,r<V*ftr<- 



^/4^ 



'•^^§♦■»8.* 



w^. 



..^ v.* 



«<^- 



I"!* «♦ 



^^<H^ 






■*▼«-«» 



-<>►> 






v\ 



/ 



^\« 



>*r5k i/ ^..^1*.,.^ 1h. -V 



IL J <v 






wU ^v 



--rt' 









'< 



L^iK^-ir^ 






/• 









/ 



/ / 











(Pk 




ti/i/^^iut 












$1 




yf^^ ^^^Jf^ t^^i^J-Pi^ l^wUt^^^^pf^^AM^ 







tMtcn'pt^ 









^y^^oi^r^' 









^^^^€e^ 



'^t^^i^-^A^yf^^ 













t.^ 



/P4^ 








..- ,^. w- 









,£a0fh^^ 



■i^ 




m -yf/i'UPi^ 




,,,i,,i,,4i/ffi'</YJuyay^i^*^f- 



ti 






f^'y&z^i^^'^' ^' 













•y^ft^. 




• 1 ' •>■!■. •A- 






c^. 



'.^X^t^^^Vrtin^ ^l?^^^f^^<<^^<^ <^<^-^^*^*V^ 



,<:?f^^/i^h/^ (^tih^ytä4^^ 






;^<^. 








yt{i</14i^ 








./P<^P^. 





^('H^ 



■A.. 



ft^Uy^yf'^^- 



<:,.«^*^ -c^yti^ y^:U(4^ 5^^**^^^-^^^^ <^;*^«:i/:^^ 







.yU^lt^^ 



yi/i 



v-?'" Tv.^' 4.r Kt 



^i^H^ajit^ 



7 



-^f / 









/r/L. M.^>.t^L. 



,?i 'Jx^M^ 



Aj^ ^L ^t 



i»«*r **"*? 



/ 







'/-■»•■, 



-//- 



*^ i/'f.,*f^^ 



*»^.u^'^''T^t 



7 



•• »..*/' 



c/ 



fA^«>^l*>^«-*^^A jSO-Ä*^»'*- 'i^j^g.^iUvL^ "^ 




%S/' 



Vw- 






' -r "..»j'.: ■• -'■..»■ae "- 



,^-^i.!• , .^ i. ■ •<- •, 









,-,4-t.^*:. t , t 



1 Ir ■ f-f-r • .- '-/i^ />■■■>.(■: 




1 ,'1 - ;t.' —■■:■:,• ..4 * 



i-' ->*■ * >C*'^ ^'''^'^'t 



•j'r.%<'*-'47ik'»»;"»4-*.-r*- -^■►^■' 



M^^ 




/t4/>l4^/ll^i^ 






^ii<4i 





::^x2?^^'±S:S!rrÄ'^.r^^'' 






''i^^fH4^i^ic^ 



^^^UU^uky^^^ 



^A^i/U^"^ ^^-^4^ 



c^. 







/ /' 



^yf^^t^J't 




J^ 




%Ui7f.j^ 









T 



^^i^ 



^/''Ua-ptf 



'.jv^;«-^ 









^^fPV 




k 








^/^<^, 










^^^^ 








^^^'Ü'C.äCih^i4H^0^^ 








/:;4^„"^' 



i-a, 





^^^ ^'4^ ^'^; /V^.^ 

/JuUl ^^^^tAi^ ^^ ■<f-^i^ ^ '^, "^ y^/t4^ ^"^ 4^i*^ 




7 ^1 



/f ^ a^i^i^u^Onyi -^^i^'/ /^'i?^ ^yWs^ wÄ^;fc<i*, .tS^^^J^^-^^ 







ZU, 







£w^ 4.->^-^ /i^'^ ^-'^/- -^ ''''}JT;S hyj 



^ 



wi* 



f^^Ltui/U^^^ ^<M4.K 




Aj^o^iM^^^r^ ^i^'M, /l^^^^'^, c^ '-^ ^^"^'-^^ <'' ^'^ 



^1/1 



^,^/(uj^h^4^ 



( 



( 



T^:^5^yr=C??3»5HBriF?^ 










y^ 



>;^^^J^ 



i 



^ 



'/<^, 



/ 



^^t^^yf^ 




^<^ M^^'j 








\/m^ ZMtr^lk 



i *^ 



Jr4/LM 'ß> 




















^ '<- ^^<^^ ^5i>p^/*:^ 



/-'^H^ijf^VV^ 



$^iy(yC^-, 



^:^,u^^ •>- /■ /. ^^^ 



k//iH^^. 



M^ 



AA 







/JkM^ <^ '^/«' 











■ j" - , 



:"7h-«-" 




■■■,'■.- (>y,'—rx, 



T.; ,:?r.-;», 



"— «"7»-^ — -■'*• —>l^',t-> i^ yl»-^.-« ;»j(»r»tr«f w« ■ ■"*■• 




• 



4^^ 







''^'V- 



Ä-i-r 



^ 



-^ T- -r- t 







-f-^-t^j-V*-// 



1^ 








^r -»-*-«- -r* 




■« *-r 





^f<r 



z-*^«f-»-r 



/ •Je^ - 









^ß ^^ /ÜH^ /^^ 



-^-r -«^ 





'.-^tr-'t^ 



%i 






^ ^ V 



^ ^// ^-^ 




^7A ^-- A-^vy ^^ /^y ?^ ^ ^3 



^r^- 



/>-*-/ 




v^ (7V;<^ 



^J^ fe... -.wfV/^. ^4 






y. 



r 






/-V'-Tt.^t^ ^^U/^i-^^'^ -n^-7 . <^7^V ^^^-0-^' ^^Ti^y^ ^-b 










"ft-^ ^t-'t^-^-X-.-f 




t-/^^^^ -/-^-»-r /'/"'^-^ f^ f 



/. ^, ,, ,.,, , 





-^^-r^ 



'^-t'^i^ 






— »— /^^-t/i'V^ 



^f-*-^ ^"V^ -j'-z-f 




^^- 



-t'-t^-f-t^'t -^ 



/^ 



^ß> -^ v^ 






y/th^l-^^t^t^ - V 









-r 




y^-r-r^-ty' 




^ 



V/^t^ 





■:p,,>-^-».- v«rj^-<rir..-^-^Jr* «»"'>> ^- -f* ^'.-T' 






^1^ 



--n 




■.••"•<r.; ., ♦ ■'^--•,'. ,-/•... -.v- ^■•>^■ ^y.r'-yiy :'''"'•'"■.'•', i^- ■' ''-"-^ ~Mic*l^' 



2Zr 




'-^^'^^^^^44^ 










C/L^UP^ 



J- 








yl^t^ 



/ -^^vo» 



^. 






^^'»^ Ä^'/^'^ a^f'O^'^-cc^ c. 



/ 



/.^ 



/: 



■^^i^i-i^ 












■.r-.-xv-i.v^^'^'-r.-i"- ,.-^ ■.•■f^;^'.?' 



^U^-^ A 








^/w^ iy^,'i(d,^^ 









-iJ^-^^^^r #-^ ^W /*^ 






y 



^y '<^ 



^^<<^ 



^(^£,■6^ 



«^f^^Wi' 






^>^ ,ßu^,1^j^fi4. /^ 



Z 



^2-^<-*-> 



.4^ ^1 >^ .^ '^.^'^ .-fi^ V^(^ i> • /7 xß-^-^cy)^. 









pif-Ji^ 




v,/ ^^^«^ w^? ^> '^0'^^yu-e^ 4/^^ ,;%^^*^ 



/ 






fc^ev 



/? 



/ 



x^'^^ 



\^ ^y^-iJ^'Cc^ty^--'^^^^ 



/ 



yiotyiia^i/-;^^^C /^^'-^^^-^ 



''i^^^ 



•c;^;v-/' 



^ 



'j//'c/4 ^"'>/' /^M /^W^^^t-^ 



/U^6i-^ 



/U'^^^C^ 



^u^ 



^^^ 



t^ *^*v-7 



^-W*^ ^r 4<?^ l/fu-^a>^l..p,t^ \/;if ^p, , '( 






r> ^ .■,'^ ^ ^' ,f ^ T t^ 



■nr 



^'AA ./,H'PlA^*^^>^-*t^-i-? 




^ 



^, ^>PUr, ^ C 




^vt^C^ 



Jm4w^ 



VC 




/^ypu? 





-<j** 



■/i> 



^^^ a^uuÄ,-<ic-^ .j^ 









iJu^i^^ 












'< t-:» in » " ' J i'H • — ^iT "~"'f^TTV>** ^ - ''''-.vt-V-' .f »t- •♦ ■ .. »■.»^•.••.-•i *»; % 







%f:',.< 



4 •^t^ 



'i>/^ r^^^^. 




J^^^^ 



A 






■^^^^1/ 



^ 



VIA 



-t 




/ 







r^-UZ^ 







.Ä ...4^ ^.^f^ /i;Ä.^^^^'^-^^srV^ 











^ 













•* -TX^'. 









.::./: 














pi^fr-:-) *^ ?-^ 






4/Jt^\ 



■mt^. 






-t--- 













^1 




/v5 






.i¥ 



-s: 



y 






^\ A'i'*'^''' 7 vU'>^;( ■'h'if - ^-^'^ ':¥^<. -^^ ^^v^'"-* 



'-»^» i<*t 



'--C^ -»£.«--'* 



V^ *- 



''^.vt 



-r/''^^^ 










•^t^ 







^ 



^>n^ , ^^^4^ 







«^;:^ 



„^f-^^ 




*^<^ ^ülu-ri^.i. V 



f^''^ -^-^ .C^^^t^^^vW 






^^^u^ ^Uft^ y^ ^ 







\\ 



ia^^Jcx A(f'M, 






-"P^ 



^f'^^^^^-^t^PmU, A 




Jf-iWtJ^ 




Oit»^ 



A 



/ 



w^-^ 




t Irr. ^">^' f-^^^5¥^^.^ 



A^i^t 





>^ 









^ 











\ 



X 



'-'*%- * 



X^ - 



.s <" 



«. * • 









-^ 



V 



Pf*-*»*^ 








^^i^^^^tu^^ 




•J-. ..*■ 




■•"':;?■• 



\:Z^^<x/ 



yV-Mn^ aJUi "^^ "li^ct^^ /9^<^ /^a^t!^ , 

Yl/U^ i^ ClyiA4{ /^^ -^ Ä'->«^^^ l'^Z^^. Z^'J^ ,<^^^^c.A^ 

f 1/ / 



77 









^ 





i^z-C^ 






Jet/UiO'^^-<^ ^^^^^4/^i^ --i^a^Lc^ .'^, 



/ 



^ 



iJ, 




/lA/t^lA^^ 



^>L^:^c^ J^^jy^^ 






^ * ff J . ^ . / , 



^\£^ ' >2-^>^ ^ 






*^^1L^ ^tt'^ 




/ 



^ 



••%/< 



'^y 



•^ -^ 



hJ^ 




7 




^3F!S9fflBlp' 



'^*«WI? 



^ ^ #. 6. H- **l^ ^ 






4*JiÜÜ *^ 



¥Vr 







/X^U^^..^^C^.4^ Xa^ 



M-U^-^Jl-^ 










-4^iL^I^fl^Z 



^^/^^^-"^ ..-^H^l^ A-'^'-^^Ph-ff^'^ (^Hi^'-f^-^'i^^'^^ 



f ^ / y / 



>^^W-(^v^^^...-;^^^v^ 



^y(l'j/'-n'''iiii^ Tß-ff^'T't^^ 





^-'/Äi^ * ^/i i^ 



4£<j^ ^-^'^^ ^^^^^^ 






% r *•* ^yj . . y 



^A?^^^ ^^^^^y-y^-^y^ 









/^/-*''?^-->-^t^ /^k?**<>5l>'^ 




-n^y'-^-'f-f-t^ 







^.^^i^^tH^t^, 



Cr / 



\^H0^ 






^ \ ^/l / r 



>-'?^'^-^ 




/f: 












ri- 




^'^ xV^-^^-z^-^-^^^^ "y^**^ • 




.-Z^/^^-^^^-^^VW^ £^-U^ 4^J^ .-^.^r^^ft^cM-,,.,^^ A 



T .,/•■ t; , TZ, 




^y^M/y^^'-f^yC^^-^^ 



Y^ 



A 






.\ 



Ä 






k: 








/ / 



^ 




^^^^--^-^^ ^--''^^--^-^^^^^^^-ils-'?^^^ 



-ip-j^-^/^^ ^.^^t^-i^^-pt-t/i^-'t^^ ^^-iA^ A^, 




i. 



T^J'iS^t^r^^ 



'cd' 


















V-'i^-'?^^^^ 






z-^ 






^^-n^^-^^-^ß^^^^,.^ ^^p^'TiyCC^p.^'t^-^^ /^.^^--T^^^ ^^2/^^ .-W^ ..-x^^Uz.-^ 







V.^vp^^^'i^^'t^ 



i^tZ-^U-H^ 



^'--kf^^^ J.^^^ ^^^xi^-^^-T^ 



^/^ / ^ . ^ . Q^ f ^ ' ^ ^JJ 




c^/^/f^ 





r^ 



r^^:.e^ .--ft^^ 



^-^•^^^T/W^ß^« 



f. fy fa/ V ' 



(Ut^A^^.^^ %^ 



-tt-^*^ 



d^^^z^^A^ yLüiA^i^-i^y^ 



{.-j^^^*-^^^^^t<-^x*-^ 



^/Cht^-^jmAor^ 



\ 





.-^^T^^H^-K^/,^, 



-^t-^^t::^ ai^JU-^^ 






-r^^-^^^^^^^ 
















/ 



C^-V^ .--t^^^-'?-;»'^*--^ (^^'^^P^^t^J.-id^tß^j''^ 



'^^l/-^»<if^'-^^'^;;^ 



>^H--y-?^ ^.-^ 



-'^^•^^^>'j^' 



-.^^^-iJ^'^^-^^ 





:^t^ 






/ 






^^^uy^ku 



••••••••, 



• ••••••••, 



<\ 



ii 






y. 



• • 

:: 
O 






<> 






o 

• • 
« • 



•••••••• 






Julius Kassel 

Postscheckkonto: Bnß-Iau 9280. 
Fernsprecher BS^ 

OO 
O 



Schien 






(/c// 6* 6* ^-^* 









/9/ 




Totalansicht 












•.••.♦••••••••••••' 



Liebe Tante Cläre! 







Es freut mich sehr aus Deinen letzten lieb 
Zeilen zu ersehen, dass Ihr beide noch dem Sammeltransport angeschlossen 
werdet, 'rlas Du zu tun hast, kann ich mir vorstellen, aber ich bin entsetzt] 
dass Du nur 50 Kilo mitnehjinen da^rst, das ist aber doch pro Person.'' Na, scl^J 
slich ist ja das Wichtigste, *dass IXi bald wieder mit Deinen Kindern verei 
bist. Pur all das Schwere, was Du jetzt durchmachst ^ kommt der Lohn. Herr'i 
dass Max schon auf der Fahrt zu Lilo ist. Zu traurig, dass Onkel Bruno di 
V/ied rsehensfreude nicht erlebt und disse durch sein fehlen be*i Euch geti 
ist. Hoffentlich war Ruth stark genug, als Du ihr die bittere .Wahrheit s 
musstest. - Ich gebe mir wirklich Mühe, Dir v;a3 für Ruth zur l^J^äftiÄng 
besorgen. An Liesel sandte ich einen langen Bittbrief und legete glelfh 

geschriebenen Aufklebezettel bei. Da ich hiei^ichts auftreiben konn-tfÜ^ 

i 

ich gestern meinen Neffen, welcher heute wieder abgereist ist, nach I^ame 

■'♦, . . /- 1- 

zu einer alten Bekannten. Der dort abgegebene Brief hatte Erfolg, er kam 
einem :uhn zurück. Über Nacht hatte ich es wieder auf Eis und früli ging e 
als V/ertpäckchen, diese sollen angeblich rascher befördert werden, an Rut 
?r. Grczymisch ab. Es kostet 4, 20, mit Porto Boten Käse kostet alles 5 
Du hattest noch bei iins stehen 56. 40 davon ab 5,70 bleiben also 50. 70. 
Was soll mit diesem G-elde geschehen? - Dis andere^ beiden Päckchen waren 
selbstverständlich ein Geschenk für luth. Hoffentlich kam das Täubohen n 
gut an. Du kannst Dir garnicht vorstellen v^as bei uns für eine Nachfra^- 
Enteneiern und nach Jungvieh ist. An einem Tage waren 7 Anfragen, Heut<^ 
war ein grösserer Gutsbesitzer aus der Umgegend hier, am Mittwoch wir 
Kaffe zu uns kommen, und nächstens schickt er uns sein Gespann um uj 



•'>SV.' <l*»f^» 



.i^^^'Wy 




w^ 



5 ^. 






Ä! 






■>— ■'•\'n 



^¥*^aC^. 



"""r 



( 



# 



\ 



in die Kirschen holen zu lassen. Ganz angenehm ! Eben sagt mir Hanns, dass 
gerade wieder Sntel auskriechen. Es macht wirklich viel Spass, hlos verbringt " 
man zu viel Zeit mit den goldigen Tierchen, welche dann grausam abgeschlachte , 
werden. — 'Jenn ich Dich, liebe Tante Cläre um was bitten darf, dann vermittle 
bitte möglichst regelmässig die Verbindung zwischen J-ritz und uns, und wenn 
Kutter und ich raus müssen, so sieh mit zu, dass Du uns dabei behilflich sein 
kannst. Mr wollen aber hoffen^ dass sich alles zum Guten wendet, und dass 
wir uns in sorglosen Zeiten vergnügt wledsrs-hen. Wenn wir jetzt zum Abschied 
nicht nach B. kommen, lege das bitte nicht schlecht aus. Erstens können wir 
wirklich nicht abkommen, da keine Vertretung hier ist, und helfen oder was 
^"i!5"3°.^®^ ^'^^ ^"°^ nicht. - Gestern haben wir uns hier ganz schnell knipses 
lassen, morgen sollen die Bilder fertig sein, die wir Dir umgehend zu senden. 

vep'i.'isst Du. mit Ruth Berlin, und wann geht das"grosseGepäok" ab. 

Hsrds mir überlegen was ich gerne ?r. bestellt haben möchte imd es 
ganz Icurz mitteilen. Heute will ich aber durch unnöt.ige Erzählerei Deine' 
bare Zeit nicht rauben, Weiter nur alles Gute! 

Herzlichste Grüsse Euch allen, auch von den Meinen 









( 4 








*S9 ©ßpo^aq.sj[8i[ii?psq.oj 



r 



Xl^Ji^ 



/^ 



^ i i". ^. ^i 



,^?^v^!.^ ^"^^t^^ ' 



S^Jk wJUu/ 







/l 



^^^.^.^J^^^^ J^ ^^^J^^^^ 













>t^^^ 







' / i '^ / 







^"Tf^^f^P^ ^T-l/^'-At*^ ^^. 











rJjif^-^ 



i 




^[^ftt /^^<^t-^^-»^^-1^^ 



^^•^^-^f^/rTj;^ 



llif-v'f'l^ 



:-,,f**Arrr 




,.,.,_-,..., 



■^■^Itolt'I^J. 






■Fi. jJ.j . 



7y^ 





ff / f 



^^ 



'^^C^^t^^ 



m/ 














^^^--t^^^h-^ 



^^t4^^tf--f^ 







fjJ^M^^i^ 














>'gMIeäy. 










, ,- ^ -«;• Vi-n . 






',¥!'• '^"^^.■^'rfj^'^'^-^"'- ■■ - ■' 




Ä^iP-kA-'^-^ 









ia* 







/ 




'-^'-^ 



/^^ 

• 









■i • rf * 



v-.i- , ••,'-- •>/?.■.' ■ ■'.', 




AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 

Phone:(212)744-6400 

Fax:(212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbl.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Date: 12/21/2009 



Sys#: 000198685 



Box: 1 



Folder: 7 



„■jjC^; 



•iiisefmslmäsaismaiamff" 



■ m^asxsgsm: 







iflü 28, 1952 



With Gtamor and the Woman's Budget 



® 



No. 2417. R«gUt*r«d 
In Auttrafi« for tr«ns- 
miuion by pott «s « 
n«wspap«r. 



:*!?gf^: 




OUR GREAT NEW 
MURDER MYSTERY SERIAL 




■m 




Mrs. McGINTY'S DEAD 

by Agatha 

Christie 




'i%N 



I. • 



crrj:t 



.^v. 



5.U 





FIRST AID 

DRESSING 

FOR ALL 

MINOR 

7 INJURIES 

N«'v«'r n<»gl<'<i Ihr sriiallcsl 
njiirv ! A cul f in^cr. ;• 
scratrli. <i «;rjiz«' . . . all 
minor injurii's nrrd Ihc 
quick first aid <»f Harul- 
Ai<l A(lhrsi\< Haiida<![(s. 
llu' fiiK'sl nady mad«' fii-sf 
aid drossinp: yoiir rnoiK'v 
can bnv. i*n»l»'(fs. l<M)ks 



^^■■lÄ^^^^—lMYllfÄf« ival. |)r(>niol<'s hcaling. 

If .A ADHESIVE BANDAGES 




Carry spvrral strins wilh 

yoii «*\«'rv\vh«T<' . . . roady 

'^ for instant wm' .... for 

<*v«M"y suddrn nnri-gcncy. 

BAND- All) ADIIi:- 

sivi: H\M)A(;i:s 

a r<- a \ a i ia 1)1«' i n 
|.ark.'ls (►f 12, 24 or 
Ihr larj;«' cconomy 
park of 50 — plrnty 
f<»r all lln' fainilv. \sk 
for and insisl on 
IJand-\i<l Adli«'si\«' 
Randafjcs, j>lain. 
watrrpntof or ♦•laslir 
at CJicinists r»r slor«'s 
<'V«'rv\vluT('. 



A PRODUCT OF JOHNSON & JOHNSON 



TOO FAT or TOO THIN 



Your figure faulf can be remedied by correct 

diet. Yukl. WOMAN'S beauty expert. has 

;. crNA/-;^! P^Uorim/^ nio* Anrl A ^limmina DieK 
' 'r — -..-..- y_._._- 

Write for the one you need \o Yukl. C/o 
Woman, Box 4000VV. GPO, Sydney, en- 
^ ^ ^S v»(Li /k closinq a stamped. addressed envelope. 



THE EDITOR S PAGE 



BETllEl!^' OLRSELVES^ 

Remarkable recipe • • • eover moders 
Story • • • spinsters^ handieaps 

WE'VE always been fas- 
cinated by the word 




syllabub. without quite 
knowing what it meant. Some- 
thing vaguely frothy, wc feit, 
to be eaten with a parfait 
spoon (appropriate costume, 
Petticoats, panniers, a fichu 
and a Dolly Varden hat). We 
now learn from Philip Harben. 
a noted television cook and a 
suitably fat man, what sylla- 
bub is and how it's made. 

This light concoction is 
made from wine, lemon juicc. 
sugar and milk and it is the 
method of making it and not 
the ingredients that is remark- 
able. Harben quoted from his 
cookery book of 1784 which 
told the cook to take half a 
pint of sack (that is Sherry) 
and put it in a basin with the 
Juice and rind of two lemons, 
sweeten it to taste and then 
"find a quiet cow and milk as 
much milk from the cow as 
will make a stronß froth. Let 
it stand an hour, then send it 
to table." That is how it used 
to be done, when the jet of 
warm milk straight from the 
cow impinged on the other 
cold ingredients and beat 
them up into a foamy froth. 
which would set in due course 
because it was slightly curdled 
by the wine and the lemon 
Juice. 

Some time ago Harben tele- 
vised the makmg of syllabub 
and his problem was to find 
the quiet cow. She was dis- 
covered after much search 
but, not surprisingly, she did 
not take to being milked in a 
television studio at 9 pm in 
the middle of a mass of 
Cameras and cables. He even- 
tually had to humor her by 
going to her farm near Dork- 
ing and making a film of her 
and even then she had first to 
be chased all over a three- 
acre meadow. When she did 
at last stand still all was well 
and the syllabub was most 
successful but Harben offers a 
simpler and less arduous „^^^^^^^^ 
method of making it, for why Josephine 
should flat dwellers and other 
urban people who have no 
access to a cow, quiet or other- 
wise, be depnved of the 
luxury of syllabub? 

He advised them to take a 
tin of evaporated milk, half 
that amount of cooking sherry. 
two ounces of sugar, the juice 
of two lemons and the grated 
rind of one, and beat them all 
together for a good five min- 
utes. The resulting mixture, 
after stand ing in a cool place 
ovemight, can be poured off 
into glasses and is extremely 
good. 

But however delicious a 




These cute little nibber rainboots, calied Boot-ese, aum 
the US to Sydney as a present io a friend of this page. 
fold into the plastic black and red case and will fit an 
of shoe, as they have no heeis to complicate matters. T>* 
black on one side, red on the other, and if you*re tl 
that goes for Initials you can have yours stami 

inside of the ''collar.'* 



modern syllabub may be, it is 
a duU thing compared with 
one made by taking milk 



Our eover 




Our pretty cover 

'straighr'fronr''a (^u'iet) cow, ^5\"f j^vf"^ vouiS 
which mixes th. other in- ^^^^> ^lZ\Uv^ 



which mixes the other in 
gredients naturally and with- 
out further work on the 
cook's part. 



herseif and worked 
quickly into the big 
petitive field of 
modelling. On inside 
show pictures of i 
monstrating just ho' 
improved herseif ov 



The Emperor's Lady 

Since John Alden and his 

Company of players are in the ,„.j,.„,^„ 

news in Australia (and on the few years, and em 
move — so much so that they poised, dramatic m« 
won*t be returning to Sydney photographed on the rr^ 
or ,J^,elbourne for some ^er navy blue 
months)it's mterestingtonote cocktail dress was 
the pubhcaüon of Thz Em- j ßo^iss for th* 

peroT's Ladw a new novel by ^ especially Uke it 
II «• Kenyon pubhshed by ^leeverand tremem 
SkefTington s. The book is an 
adaptation of the radio serial 
Josephine^ Empress Of Sor- 
rows, which was heard over 
the Macquarie Network. John 
Alden played Napoleon and 
Margaret Christensen was 



\ 



Other historical novels by 
Kenyon, who is at present 
living in Auckland, NZ, were 
produced by AWA. 



Ran faster 

Depressing note 
Margaret Reekie, i 
unmarried women \ 
BBC: "The first thing . 
to realise if you'rc 
woman is that you*f 
natural unit in the e 
ity. One of your profc 
that you've got to b 
pleasant because yoi 
afford not to. Coup 
asked out, for instan 
cause they're couples 



We knew we had something __ 

good in The Murder of Mis$ X you've got to make , 

— but it's nice to hear that want you, make yoursc* 

other people think so. This sirable to your friends. ' 

novel by Mary McMullen, got to be amusing and |>? 

which we serialised recently, and interested in their 

was published in the United ren. In fact, you've 

States as Stranglehold, and it run a bit faster to get 

was recently awarded the same place as the * 

title of Best First Mystery woman — if you want 

Novel of 1951. there." 




LIBRARY LIST 

THE CHOCOLATE WEB 

(Charlotte Armstrong) . . . 
very creepy slory set in Cali- 
fornia sunshinc. Notable for 
well-sustained suspenseful at- 
mosphere. 

FROM HERE TO ETER- 
NITY (James Jones) . . . a 
two year's best seller in the 
US, and rather specially 
American. The language ap- 
pals, but the contents interest- 
ing. Too long — 800 odd pages. 

GIRL MEETS BODY r Jack 
lams) . . . a thriller to amuse 
husbands and fathers. It also 



amused us. The setting, New 
York and Long Island. Lots of 
humor. 

THE SECOND MRS. CON- 
FORD (Beatrice Kean Sey- 

mour) . . . this author always 
teils a good story. This one 
concerns a man and two 
women and their search for 
happiness. 

ALIAS BASiL WILLING 

(Helen McCloy) . . . semi-spy 
thriller, very ingeniously 
worked out in New York set- 
ting. Plenty of glamor. 



THE FINER THINGJR 
LIFE (Frances Gray 
' . . some of her sto 
appeared in Woman, 
be glad to meet an old 
and charming A n; et 
writer. 



■4 




k 



THE VILLAGE (Ma 

ita Laski) . . . ndd^ 
writien siory oi Tu«'« 
ing classes in W 
Gentleman's daught«^' 
workingman's son. ^ JT , 
not? ^'^ 

WOMAN, Jul Kj 








The Queen at a polo match in 
Malta in 1949 with the Mount- 
battens tirith whom she stayed 
while vistting her husband. 



IT is well known in British 
Court circles that the per- 
son who most influences 
Queen Elizabeth is her hus- 
band Philip, nephew of Earl 
and Countess Mountbatten, 
of Burma. 

When Philip was a small 
boy bis parents. Prince An- 
drew and Princess Alice, of 
Greece, entrusted his up- 
bringing to the Mountbattens, 
who regarded him more as a 
cherished son than a nephew. 

They gave him a home life, 
supervised his education, en- 
tert ained for him and pro- 
vided him with every oppor- 
tunity to achieve high stand- 
ing at the British Court. 

It is not surprising then 
that Philip idolises his famous 
aunt and uncle, and it is al- 
most certain that through him 
their influence will have a 
streng impact on the Throne. 

Earl Mountbatten, who has 
been close to the Throne since 
the day he was born, is prob- 
ably unimpressed by the emi- 
nent Position he now holds 
at Court. 

Bat I.ady Louis, as she is 

Gandhi showed his affection 
Louis as they entered the 
lodge. New Delhi, in 1947 




aflfectionately known to the 
British public, must some- 
times feei touched by destiny 
when she considers the dazz- 
ling prospect before her. 

For many years she has 
been one of the most admired 
women in British public life 
but now that her nephew has 
been elevated to the Virtual 
Position of Prince Consort she 
is in direct contact with the 
Throne and has a far more 
exalted status. 

The Story of this fascinat- 

ing woman's rise to fame and 

power — her gay, extravagant 

Mayfair days, her emergence 

as a Red Cross heroine during 

the war and her outstanding 

achievements as the last 

Vicereine of India, has all the 

elements of a best-selling 

n o V e 1. Especially as the 

heroine of this latterday 

romance is the granddaugh- 

ter of a German Jew who 

migrated to England at the 

age of 16 with one suitcase 

of clothes, a violin, £5 in his 

pocket and a fanatical am- 

bition to make a fortune. 

Her story cannot be proper- 

ly told without 

for Lady reference to her 

viceregal famous grand- 

for talks. father, Sir Ernest 

Cassel — the 

h u m b 1 e-b o r n 

European whose 

financial genius 

made her one of 

the world's riebest 

heiresses. 

P e o p 1 e who 
knew the remark- 
able Cassel say 
Lady Louis in- 
herited more than 
his millions. They 
believe her strik- 
ing good looks, 
shrewd judgment, 
keen brain and 
bold, d y n a m i c 



One of the most interesting women in the British Commonwea 
Nations today is Lady Mountbatten, born Edwina Ashley, granddaugh. 
a German- Je wish banker who became the friend of Edward VII. 

She is the woman who virtually "brought up" Philip, Duke of EJdinb 
now the Queen*s husband and soon to be styled her consort; her husban< 
man closest to Philip; she is immensely rieh, immensely vital and coi 
with public affairs; she has a strong will, a lively intelligence, inexh) 
energy. 

She is everything liberal opinion in England does not mean when *'■ 
publicly «ml privately, to the old Palace Guard. The link between the 
Sir Ernest Cassel, and Edward VII, once broken, is joined again i 
intimacy of the granddaughter of one and the great-granddaughter of tl 



Personality are "chips off the 
old Cassel block." 

Cassel's father. a small- 
time Cologne banker. sent his 
son to England in 1868 be- 
cause he considered the boy 
would find grcater personal 
happiness and wider scope for 
his talents there than in Gor- 
many which was even then a 
hotbed of anti-semitism. 

Ernest began bis career in 
England as a clerk in a grain 
merchant's Office for 15/- a 
week. He later moved to the 
London firm of Jewish finan- 
ciers BischofTsheim and Gold- 
tmidt (now defunct) and 
within a short while proved 
he was a financial wizard. 

At 25 he was regarded as 
one of the most brilliant and 
ambitious men in the world 
of international finance, as 
well as one of the most ruth- 
less. 

Work and a consuming lust 
for power filled his life com- 
pletely until at 26 he met and 
feil in love with a pretty, 
sweet-tempcred, unambitious 
English girl, Annette Max- 
well. They married in 1878 
and a year later their daugh- 
ter Maud was born. 

It was a perfect marriage, 
transforming the austere un- 
a p p r oachable businessman 
into a devoted husband and 
father and a delightful friend 
to the fcw people who knew 
him intimately. 

His wife, a Roman Catholic. 




Reg:ardless of current fashion (rends, Lady Louis 
wears her skirts knee-lenffth, This 11)47 pirture : 
with Lord Louis and daughter PameJa at Londo 



tried to persuade him to em- 
brace Catholicism but he 
laughed at her serious ap- 
proach to religion. 

"Why worry about heaven," 
he often told her. "isn't this 
heaven cnough?" 

When his wife died thrce 
years after they were married 
Cassel suffered a serious 
mental breakdown and was 



h' 



la. 



Mountbatten weddding group at Lady Louis' home. Brook House, I^ndon on July 
18, 1922. The Duke of Windsor, then Prince of Wales, was the best man. 



'li'irH 



''-'^"W 





4 '<^jt 



4 



unable to work for si 

When he did returi 
he laborcd with one 
to build a vast fortun 
motherless child. His 
taking business deal. 
him enormous proi 
carned him the n*s 
Kuig Midas. 

He was one of the r.aster 
builders of modern Egy t 'j" 
moulded the nation's fi , 
then promoted the 
Nile Irrigation sehe 
on the Assouan Di 
has since been the* 
Egypt's prosperity.^ 
knighted for this wo 

He reconstni' 
tinances of Argenl 
organised the Swec 
ways and raised Ch: 
after her defcat by . 
England he spow 
Central London JH 
original Tivopcnni^ 

In 1901 his dai " 
married Colonel 
Icy, MP for Blacl 
later became "Lop 
Temple. S% 

Cassel became 1 
ward VII's close fi 
when the fmanci< 
grandchild,^ Lady Ln 
born on Nuvoinber 



( 



» 




^ 



Wi-r 



% 



?i^ 








TESTS PUBLISHED IN AUTHORITATIVE DENTAL LITERATURE SKI 
THAT BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING WITH 

COLGATE DENTAL 

CREAM STOPS 

TOOTH DECAY BEST 

Most ihoroughly proved and accepied home 
method of oral Hygiene known ioday, 

Yes, and 2 years' research showed the Colgate way stopped more 
decay for rnore people than ever before reported in dentifrice 
history! No other dentifrice offers stich proof— the mosl conclusive 
proof ever reported 



for a dentifrice of 
any type. 

BUy THE 
BIG FAMILY 
ECONOMY SIZE 



USE COLGATE DENTAL CREAM 
y^TO CLEAN YOUR BREATH 
y/ WmUt YOU CLEAN YOUR TEETH 
y AND HELP STOP TOOTH DECAY BEST 



:oil 



«MEVU-S LAKEST -AISTUUA'S UttCST 
TUE WOlirS UIKECT SaUM KNTU CUM 



EVEN THAT «LLY CUCKOO 
KNOWS VOLARE &IVING ME 
A8AD TIME SALLVl GOSHI 
I THOUGHT VOÜR TIME WAS 
MY TIME » 




IT WAS 
TOM! 







Softasilk is absorbed al once. Put on Soflasilk before, while, and after 
working, preventing and relieving drying and chapping all the lime. 
Remember, loo, Softasilk is a wonderful powder base, and keeps elbows, 
knees and heels soft and smooth. 






Kmp SORASILK in your b«droom— 
your bathroom— yowr kÜclien 





i 




/r 



/ 



.\y^ 



MEDIUM • LARGE 
GIANT ECONOMY 



^SOFTASILK 



IT'S HANDIER IN A TUBE 





■-*^. 








r 



^ 



IROM OVR LOIVDOIV OFFICE 



«* ■• 



lU*' 




^^f%. 



riaiining to entertain on a 

'Sjk'.'iv.aie with his daughter 

ty Ashley as hostess, Cassel 

ght Brook House, a huge 

a«i«ion in Park Lane, Lon- 

m, ! (constructed it with 800 

>B (i marble and equipped 

^th every luxury and con- 

ce known to science. 

ilowever, the palatial home 
wap scldom used for the pur- 
poso he boußht it. 

Lady Ashley contracted 
tjiberculosis and after the 
Ih of her second child 
Mary, bccame seriously ill. 
She i'^d when Edwina was 
11 and her other daughter, 
Mary, six. 

At that time, when Cassel's 
f')rtune amounted to more 
U an 10-million pounds, a 
v/ell-meaning friend con- 
|ratulat»d him on his amaz- 
ing achic.vements. 

"MoiKy means nothing to 

me no\v" the old man said 

A ndly, "lelieve me, the things 

i|^jl^riw«^brst worth having 

^areiie things money cannot 

buy. 

Wl «n the Honorable Ed- 
wino Ashley made her debut 
she as described as one of 
Englnd's most beautiful 
' oun women. 

31i was tali and slim, with 
lark.air. large, widely-spaced 



P 



m- 



^' 






blue eyes, delicate 
features, and the 
kind of smooth 
translucent s k i n 
for which English 
women are 
famous. Added to 
these attractions 
she had charm, 
wit, and a v e r y 
high intelligence. 

Cassel, still 
grieving for his 
dead wi T e and 
daughter, tried to 
revive his interest 
in Society by in- 
viting Edwina to 
act as his hostess 
at Brook House. 

Hoping she 
vAould make an 
even more satis- 
factory marriage 
than her mother, he encour- 
aged her to spend fabulous 
sums on clothes and helped 
her entertain the most eligible 
young men in British society. 

He would have been de- 
lighted with her choice — 
handsome 21-year-old Lord 
Louis Mountbatten, son 
of a former prince of his 
own native land and cousin 



/ 



^^ 






<M 




"'W^*'^ 



Earl and Countess Mountbatten at a film 
ately known in Britain, is regarded as 

death cheated Cass>„i once 
a^ain. 

flo died a few months be- 
fore the wedding, leaving 
£6 million, most of which 
vvent in trust for Lady Mount- 
batten and her sister, now 
Lidy Delamere. 

The Mountbatten wedding 

on July 18, 1922, was 

the most spectacular social 

to the King of England. But event of the year in London. 

The Duke of Windsor, then 
Prince of Wales, was best 
man and most members of 
the British Royal Family at- 
tended. Among foreign roy- 
alty present were the Grand 
Duke Michael of Russia and 
Princess Alice of Greece. 
mother of Prince Philip. 

Lady Louis inherited Brook 
House and soon after her 
grandfather's death converted 
it into a block of luxury flats. 
She added a two-storey pent- 
house, where she and her 
husband lived during the first 
years of their marriage. 

Her country home, Broad- 
lands, a 60-roomed mansion, 
set in 6000 acres of beautiful 






Premiere in London in 1951. Lady Louis, as she is alTection- 
one of the world's best-dressed women. 

parkland at Romsey in Hamp- 
shire, was inherited on the 
death in 1939 of her father— 
the great-nephew and heir of 
the famous Lord Palmerston. 

In prewar years the 
Mountbattens were a gay ro- 
mantic couple who spent an 
average of £100,000 a year on 
parties. 

They introduced Mrs. Wal- 
lis Simpson — the Duchess of 
Windsor — to British aristoc- 
racy and during the anxious 
months before King Edward 
VIH's abdication, were the 
king's dosest confidantes. 

The Mountbattens' Brook 
House apartment, the most 
modern in prewar London, 
was unconventionally decor- 
ated in startling colors, and 
featured weird and unusual 
paintings by contemporary 
artists. Even the lifts were 
"different." 

Before guests shot up to 
the penthouse at the then fan- 
tastic speed of 10 feet a se- 
cond, they had to ring the 
Mountbattens' butler from the 
ground floor. If they were 



The Mountbattens arrivin? 
ät Westminster Abbey, in 
1950, to aitend memorial Ser- 
vice to Field-Marshal Snnits. 

Lady Louis, with the patients 
at the Perth Royal Infirmary. 
Scotland, in 1951, She has 
devoted herself entirely to 
public duties. 







Lady Louis, in London two months after their 

hey u ere leaders of fashionable prewar Mayfair sct. 

V ^8. 1952 



Rfturnin? to London in 1948 from India. the Mountbattens 
were «nrt by Dukp of Edinburfirh and two Indian officials. 





ff'J 



♦ • 



% 



Tbe wfiaii dise to tie tlroie cönt» 



:jv 



a» 








Lady Louis in official dress at a New Delhi function shortly 
before slie and her husband left India. Durin«: Lord Louis' 
terra as the last Viceroy she acted as his unofficial deputy. 



approved guests the butler 
stood on a certain floorboard 
in the penthouse which press- 
ed a concealed switch and 
sent the lift down to the 
ground floor. 

Blue blood did not predom- 
inate at the Mountbatten par- 
ties. Among guests, chosen 
for their ability to interest 
or amuse, were struggling 
painters and writers, stage 
celebrities, business men, doc- 
tors, lawyers, politicians, and 
musicians. 

When they were not enter- 
taining in their own home, 
Lord and Lady Louis patron- 
ised the smartest nightclubs in 
Mayfair and were continually 
in the social. Spotlight. 

The beautiful. immensely- 
rich Edwina, who behaved un- 
conventionally, chatted with 
servants, and entertained 
penniless nobodies simply be- 



cause she liked them, came 
in for a lot of criticism from 
newspapers and conservative 
British aristocrats. 

In her twenties, Lady Louis 
was an active sportswoman. 
She rode, played golf, drove 
her own car — a racing model 
— manned her own motor- 
boat and sailed her own 
yacht. 

After her two children 
were born, Patricia in 1924 
and Pamela in 1929, she spent 
most of the next eight years 
travelling extensively 
throughout the world. 

In the late 20's she visited 
America for the first time 
and received a tumultuous 
welcome, On her arrival, one 
New York newspaper said: 

"Society is excited over the 
arrival of Lady Louis Mount- 
batten, who will be the guest 
of the Vanderbilts at their 



palatial home in the fashion- 
able Summer resort of New- 
port, Rhode Island. Many 
entertainments and social 
events have been planned in 
her honor. New York So- 
ciety considers the beautiful 
Englishwoman as the most 
important foreign visitor to 
these shores in many months 
and New York hostesses are 
vying for the honor of enter- 
taining her." 

She formed a strong friend- 
ship with General and Mrs. 
Cornelius Vanderbilt, and in 
1940 sent her daughters to 
stay with them for the dura- 
tion of the war. 

During her travels Lady 
Louis visited many remote 
places never before seen by a 
white woman. In 1932 she 
toured Palestine and Persia 
with her close friend, the 
Marchioness of Milford Haven. 

In 1934 she visited South 
America with Lady Breck- 
nock, then flew to Rangoon, 
Malaya and Java 

The foUowing year she vis- 
ited Australia and New Zea- 
land for the first time, and at 
Tahiti chartered a 70-ton 
schooner to take a party of 
friends on a four months' fish- 
ing holiday during which 30 
Pacific Islands were visited. 

In Mexico City in 1931 she 
had so much luggage — 56 
trunks — that she was un- 
able to get suitable hotel ac- 
commodation. When her plight 
became known in the city she 
was invited to stay at the large 
home of Senora Martinez del 
Rio whose son was form er ly 
husband of the film star 
Dolores del Rio, 

After a 20,000 mile tour 
of Africa in 1937 with Lady 
Milford Haven she brought 
back to London a three months 
old lion cub called Sabi and 
received special permission for 
the animal to serve his quar- 
antine at her country home, 

Sabi, as devoted to her as a 
loyal dog. had the complete 
run of her country home until 
he grew out of the cub stage 
and had to be sent to the Lon- 
don Zoo. 

The outbreak of war in 
1939 marked the end of Lady 
Louis' gay times and the be- 
ginning of her career as a 
dedicated and highly efficient 
servant of the British 
Commonwealth, 

She loined the St. John Am- 
bulance Brigade and as an 
auxiliary nurse at West- 
minster Hospital worked side 
by side with London shop- 
girls and housewives. No task 
was too distasteful for her, 

Once when a Cockney shop- 
girl tried to relieve her of a 
particularly unpleasant .lob at 
the hospital Lady Louis was 
renorted to have said kindly, 
"What makes you think you 



are better qualified to do 
dirty Jobs than I am?" 

Her genius for Organisation 
was soon evident and in 1940 
she was appointed superinten- 
dent-in-chief of the St, John 
Ambulance Brigade which 
then comprised 60,000 women. 

During the London blitz she 
organised the ambulance per- 
sonnel and night after night 
toured shelters while bombs 
rained on the city 

One night she missed pos- 
sible death by a few minutes 
when a shelter she had just 
left was demolished by a 
direct hit. She immediately 
returned to the shelter and 
personally gave first aid to 
many of the wounded. 

Throughout the nightmare 
of the Battle of Britain she 
was on duty night and day 
taking time off for sleep only 
when she was near collapse 
from physical exhaustion. 

When a friend suggested lier 
war work was inspiring Lon- 



\y 




In a Tokio hospital 1»^^ 
March, Lady Louis has ^ 
regulation injection. Si^» 
chairman of St. John An»**" 
Cross, she toured Köre 

She made front page r^'S 
throughout the world Vi*^"^ 
she attended a Conference he 
tween the Viceroy and M^c ^toj 
Mahatma Gandhi, at l^^;];^ 
quest of the great 
leader. 

As he walked into the con 
ference room, Gandhi, feelm.. 
the heat, rested his weigiit oi 
Lady Louis' Shoulder like -i 
father being supported by '•> 
beloved daughter. 




Casually dressed, Lady Louis Visits a physio- 

therapy and rehabilitation centre for crippled 

children In India in 1947. She established many 

emerg^ency hospitals In India. 



The Mountbattens with daughter 

Pamela, 23, at opening of a London 

stage show. Eider daughter, Patricia, 

28, is married to Lord Brabourne. 



',/ 




**• 




Lady Louis, then 30, at a polo match in England. Lord Louis 
drinks from the Duke of York's challenge cup. Many yearsi 
ago he wrote a polo text book, which is still selling inJg;«*«)^^;;^^^^ 

don women to an almost 
superhuman effort, she said: 

"You're quite wrong. It's 
the other way round. My In- 
spiration Springs from the ex- 
ample set by the ordinary 
London housewife whose 
courage and cheerful n e s s 
make me humble," 

During her last visit to Aus- 
tralia in 1946 she told a friend 
she believed the people who 
won the war for Britain were 
not so much the gallant ser- 
vicemen who kept the enemy 
at bay but the housewives who 
stayed at home, helped each 
other repair their bombed- 
out homes, worked long hours 
in munitions factories and de- 
voted even their leisure time 
to some sphere of war activity, 

For her Service in the St, 
John Ambulance Brigade and 
her splendid work during the 
blitz, Lady Louis received the 
CBE and a warm handshake 
from the late King George 
VI, She held up the medal, 
glanced at her fr^mous hus- 
band Standing bes.de her and 
said: 

"For the first time, it's me," 

When war ended she was 
reported to have .said she couhi 
never return to her pre-war 
way of living. In work she 
found a satisfaction and 
happiness she had never 
known when as a young 
woman she had nothing more 
important to do than travel 
and have fun. 

The second vital turning 
point in her career as an un- 
paid servant of the Empire be- 
gan in 1947 when Earl Mount- 
batten was appointed last 
Viceroy and fu'st Governor 



1 - * T ^1 : . 



Describing this bistoric first 
meeting between Lady ..ouis 
and Gandhi, Allan Campaell- 
Johnson, then Press Atache 
to the Viceroy, says ir his 
diary Mission With Mmni- 
hatten: 

"Gandhi, by his action was 
doing no more and no •'»ss 
than treating La iy Lots m 
the same manner as hisov n 
grand-daughters on hj£ wa •/ 
to prayer meetirgs. ".ver> 
gesture he mak- s has -o^ - 
sciously or other ise syr 
meaning and this afteoi_ 
it was spontan '^ous fj »id- 
ship." 

Älthough Lad Loui.< • on 
the instantaneou resp 
affection of Gan iii sh< 
first distrusted by 
friend, anti - Iriti 
Socialist leader MrL 

Gandhi severe y r 
ed Mrs. Asaf AU wh» 
clined Lady louis' * 
to the Viceroy s hom^ 
time he visited thiT 
battens be took Mrs 
him and whisM. "^ 
Louis: • 

*'I hear she 
vitation so I h] 
with me." 

Mrs. Ali's 
thawed rapidl> ur 
pact of Lady -ouis' s? . 
and warm cou: esy and 
the meeting concluded '] 
Indian woman s frie: '^ •" 
ner suggested she ' 
siderably less anti-Bi » 

"Lady Louis appea: 
a rare natural tr 
diplomacy, ' said o 
ob.server, 

"It is quite imp« 
dislike her <k feel 




/. 



4u:„ — 

eil IJ* lllltl^ 

tion " 



*kn. 




[€*r eourage and fearlessness neon widespread 
ad^niration at a mob dewnonstration in India. 



On April 28, 1947. when a 
Moslem League of 70,000 near 
i^eshawar planned to storm 
(lovernnient House to put its 
snevances before the Vicerov 
Earl Mountbatten made a split 
second decision to drive to 
the scene of the demonstration 
in the hope of averting a 
dancerous Situation. 

Although Lady Louis was 
advised to keep clear of the 
danger area she insisted on 
accompanying her husband 
when he climbed up a steep 
railway embankment over- 
looking the seething mass A 
perfect target for snipers. 
I>ady Louis, dressed in a khakf 
skirt, open-neck shirt and flat 
heeled shoes. stood smiling and 
at ease before the assembly, 
apparently completely imper- 
VI GUS to the hatred levelled 
against her and her husband. 

Anybody who has seen the 
terrifying spectacle of a ian- 
atical mob demonstration will 
realise what tremendous eour- 
age she displayed on that 
occasion. 

The sudden appearance of 
the Mountbattens. unarmed 
and unguarded. their calm 
/iiendly gestures and com- 
plete disregard for the immin- 
ent danger to which they were 
cxposed, had an immediate 
soothing effect on the crowd. 

It quickly djspersed and 
during the drive back tc 
Government House the 
Mountbattens were cheered by 
the same people who one hour 
before were prepared to make 
a violent attack on their per- 
sons. 

Lady Louis made her name 
immortal in India by her pro- 
digious efforts to organise re- 
Hef for millions of starving 
refugees. 

As leader of the Indian 
United Council for Relief and 
Weifare she made extensive 
lours to every State and Pro- 



vince and established many re- 
lief centres and emergency 
hospitals. With the expert 
knowledge she gained during 
the war she trained scores of 
Indian women in every aspect 
of welfare work. 

Shortly before the Mount- 
battens Jeft India. the famous 
Indian Congresswoman Saro- 
jini Naidu, Governor of the 
United Provinces. paid a warm 
tribute to Lady Louis. 

In a handwritten letter ad- 
dressed "to the Governor-Gen" 
eral's Lady from a mere Gov- 
ernor," she said: 

"I have been watching your 
work and am filled with deep 
admiration for your untiring 
and infinitely fruitful spirit 
of compassionate and effective 
Service. No woman in your 
place has ever put herseif be- 
fore in touch with the people. 

"You have not been afoof 
and condescending in your 
well-doing. You have been 
gracious and intimate and per- 
sonal. The last of the Vice- 
reines is creating her own im- 
mortality in the hearts of suf- 
fering India." 

Nehru, Prime Minister of 
India, was probably more im- 
pressed by Lady Louis than by 
any other Western woman. 
They had many friendly dis- 
cussions and in a public ad' 
dress thanking the Mount- 
battens for their Services to 
India, Nehru said Lady Louis 
possessed "the healer's touch." 

Looking directly at her, he 
said in his quiet cultured 
voice: 

"Wherever you have gone 
you have brought solace, hope 
and encouragement. Is it 
surprising therefore that the 
people of India should love 
you and look up to you as one 
of themselves and should 
grieve that you are going?" 

Lady Louis' two last public 
acts in India were visiting the 



two largest refugee camps, 
Kurakshctra and Panipat 
where more than 300,000 
refugees were sheltered. One 
of her Indian women ADC's 
reported that the refugees 
gathered around her in thou- 
sands and wept bitterly when 
she said good-bye. 

In many other camps 
refugees collected anhas to 
buy a railway ticket for one 
of their members to make a 
farewell visit to Lady Louis 
and present her with a small 
gift as a token of gratitude. 

The Mountbattens were 
among the chief mourners at 
the cremation of Gandhi who 
was assassinated on January 
30, 1948. Lady Louis sat cross- 
legged beside her husband on 
the dusty ground only a few 
yards from the fire. 

She wore a grave dignified 
expression but nearby mourn- 
ers noticed her eyes, focused 
on the fading embers. were 
brimming with tears. Shortly 
after her first meeting with 
Gandhi she was reported to 
have said to a friend: 

**You can't imagine how 
proud I am. I think that great 
man likes me." 

Their mission in India com- 
pleted. the Mountbattens re- 
turned to England where Lady 
Louis resumed her work with 
the St. John Ambulance Brig- 
ade. 

She has since returned to 
India to see many old friends. 
including Nehru and to get a 
first hand Impression of the 
country*s development since 
the transfer of power. 

She caused wide romment 
in June when she sailed with 
the Mediterranean Fleet on 
its summer cruise. She was 
on board the despatch vesel 
Surprise with her two 
daughters Lady Pamela 
Mountbatten and Lady Bra- 
bourne, and her son-in-law 




Lord and Lady Louis in London in 1946. She received the CBE 
for wartime Services in the St. John Ambulance Brigade. 



Lord Braborne. Lord Louis, 
Mediterranean Commander- 
in-Chief, flew his flag in the 
cruiser Glasgow. 

An Admiralty spokesman 
said that the presence of 
women on board the Surprise 
was not a breach of the 
Queen's Regulations because 
as a despatch ship, Surprise 
did not take part in the fleet 
exercises. The Commander- 
in-Chief had complete dis- 
cretion in using such ships in 
furthering his command re- 
sponsibilities, both operational 
and social. 

Lady Louis is still such a 



young woman and still so 
vitally interested in world af- 
fairs that it is unlikely she 
will retire from public life 
for many years. 

It is believed she strongly 
Supports the Queen in her 
desire to retain the title 
Prince Consort for Philip, on 
the ground that it is a tradi- 
tional Royal title. 

It will be interesting to see 
how far her influence will 
affect the Throne, through 
Philip. 

Friends now regard her as 
at the height of her vital ity 
and ambition. 



^'Now I know ! Even 'problem' floors will come up 



shiny-bright with 



VELVET 



soap 



says MRS. S. HARP of WOOLAHRA. N.S.W 



to 



Scrubbing a kitchen floor can be the housewife*s 
hardest task, but when Aunt Jenny visited Mrs. 
Harp at her modern home she found her 
making light work of this chore. Mrs. Harp 
uses mild extra-soapy Velvet for all the rubbing 
and scrubbing, and her hands teil her how 
gentle Velvet is. 






"I uscd to find ttiH>r scrubbing and 
piilishing a fnghtlul chorc until I uscd 
V'clvct. This rubbcr HiM>r secmcd ti> gct 
dirty quicker than any in the ht>usc," Mrs. 
Harp lold Aunt Jenny. 

*'! can see how quickly you'rc doing the 
Job !" exclaims Aunt Jenny. 

**Vcs ! .And with<iut pohshing, Velvet 
bnngs back the brand-new lustre to my 
rubbcr Moor". 





"T his beautitul cloth came from Singapt>rc. It's 
one of my prized pt)ssessions. I wouldn't dream 
of washing it with anything but \'elvet ". 

"Yes," adds .-Xunt Jenny, "yt>u can trust the 
hnest things lo Velvet, and isn't it wondcriul 
the way Velvet-washed linens last !" 



Pure mild Velvet is so kind to your 
hands— -so gentle to your clothes. 







f ABRICS WASHCD 

WMH OROINARY 

SOAPS - seen under 

ook frayed and worn 
out because hard- 
rubbinj IS necessary 
*vilh skimpy. inferior 
lathe« And look how 
those weary-wi''y 
suds leave dirt ;n- 
f^rained in the wc«^«- 




>;'.v\j.t'^<'i,\' •:! 



FABRICS WASHED 
WIIH VELVET SOAP — 

seen under a majnifymj 

. t . . . .... 

wash after «vash because 
nohaidrubb'ogis needed 
yet not .« tr.nc of d'rt 
'S left behind '"•elvt-tA 
rxlra soapv »ud» ate ki"d 
to the most <r'icite *k p 
at»d gentle »o /o«<. 
clothe», tuo' 

V 199 AöSi 



'-'OMAN, Ju'y 28, 1952 



r 

\ 



L 




Beifitiftiiig oiir qreai netv irhodunH 




■'3C4- 



•-^ss-»' 



jp 



'<»K 








i^ 





ERCULE POIROT came 
out of the Vielle Grand'- 
mere restaurant into 
Soho. He turned up the col- 
lar of his overcoat through 
prudence, rather than neces- 
sity, since the night was not 
cold. "But at my age, one 
takes no risks," Poirot was 
wont to declare. 

His eyes held a reflective, 
sleepy pleasure. The escar- 
gots de la Vielle Grand'mere 
had been delicious. A real 
find, this dingy little restaur- 
ant. Meditatively, like a well 
fed dog, Hercule Poirot curled 
his tongue around his Ups. 
Drawing his handkerchief 
from his pocket, he dabbed 
his luxuriant moustaches. 

Yes, he had dined well . . . 
And now what? 

A taxi, passing him, slowed 
down invitingly. Poirot hesi- 
tated for a moment, but made 
no sign. Why take a taxi? 
He would in any case reach 
home too early to go to bed. 
"Alas," murmured Poirot to 
his moustaches, "that one can 
cnly at three times a day 



his bafflement, his stupendous 
astonishment when he at last 
porceived the truth that had 
been clear to me all along. 
Ce eher, eher ami! It is my 
weakness, it has always been 



"A Mr. Spence, sir." 
"Spence." The name, for 
the moment, meant nothing to 
Poirot. Yet he knew that it 
should do so. 

Pausing for a moment be- 



my weakness, to desire to show fore the mirror to adjust his 



off. That weakness, Hastings 
could never understand. But 
indeed it is very necessary 
tor a man of my abilities to 
admire himself — and for that 
one needs Stimulation from 
outside. I cannot, truly I can- 
not, sit in a chair all day re- 



moustaches to a State of per- 
fection. Poirot opened the door 
of the sitting-room and en- 
lered. The man sitting in one 
of the big Square armchairs 
got up. 

"HuUo, M. Poirot, hope you 
remember me. It's a long 



ff 



course." Poirot 
warmly by the 



flecting how truly admirabie time Superintendent 

I am. One needs the human Spence." 
louch. One needs — as they 
say nowadays — the stooge." 

Hercule Poirot sighed. He 
turned into Shaftesbury Av. 

Should he cross it and go 
on to Leicester Square and 
spend the evening at a 



cinema? Frowning sligßtly. *''S!.;?S' "^^Z 



But, of 
shook him 
hand. 

Superintendent Spence of 
the Colchestpr police. A very 
interesting case that had been 
... As Spence had said, a long 



.he shook his head 

"The truth is," Poirot re- 
flected as he turned his steps 
homeward, "I am not in tune 
with the modern world. And 
1 am, in a superior way, a 
slave as other men are slaves. 



Poirot pressed his guest 
with refreshments. A grena- 
dine? Creme de menthe? 
Benedictine? Creme de cacao? 

At this moment George en- 
tered with a tray on which 
was a Whisky bottle and a 



ff 



For afternoon tea was a 
meal to which he had never 
become acclimatised. "If one 
partakes of the five o'clock, 
one does not," he explained, 
"approach the dinner with the 
proper quality of expectant 
gastric Juices. And the din- 
ner, let US remember, is the 
supreme meal of the day." 

Not for him, either, the mid- 
morning coffee. No, choco- 
late and croissants for break - 
fast, Dejeuner at twelve-thirty 
if possible, but certainly not 
later than one o'clock, and 
finally the climax: Le Diner! 

These were the peak 
periods of Hercule Poirot's 
day. Always a man who had 
taken his stomach seriously, 
he was reaping his reward in 
old age. Eating was now not 
only a physical pleasure, it 
was also an intellectual re- 
search. For in between meals 
he spent quite a lot of time 
searching out and marking 
down possible sources of new 
and delicious food. La Vielle 
Grand'mere was the result of 
one of these quests, and La 
Vielle Grand'mere had just 
received the seal of Hercule 
Poirot's gastronomic approval. 

But now, unfortunately, 
there was the evening to put 

Hercule Poirot sighed. 
"If only," he thought '*ce 
eher Hastings were available 

ff 

He dwelt with pleasure on 
liis remembrance of his old 

"My first friend in this 
country — and still to me the 
dearest friend I haye. True, 
often and often did he en- 
raee me. But do I remember 
that now? No. I remember 
only his incredulous wonder, 
hi«: ooen-mouthed apprecia- 
tion o"f my talents— tue ease 
with which I misled him with- 
out uttering an untrue word, 



My work has enslaved me just siphon. "Or beer if you prefer 



it, sir?" he murmured to the 
visitor. 

Superintendent S p e n ce's 
large red face lightened. 

"Beer for me," he said. 

Poirot was left to wonder 
once mofe at the accomplish- 
ments of George. He himself 
had had no idea th-.it there was 
beer in the flat and it seemed 
incomprehensible to him that 
it could be preferred to a 
sweet liqueur. 

When Spence had his foam- 
ing tankard, Poirot poured 
himself out a tiny glass of 
gleaming green creme de 
menthe. 

"But it is charming of you 
to look me up," he said. 
"Charming. You have come up 
from ?" 



as their work enslaves them 
When the hour of leisure 
arrives they have nothing with 
which to fill their leisure. The 
retired financier takes up golf, 
the little merchant puts bulbs 
in his garden, me, I eat. But 
there it is, I come around to 
it again. One can only eat 
three times a day. And in be- 
tween are the gaps." 

He passed a newspaper- 
seller and scanned the bill. 
"Result of McGinty Trial. 

Verdict." 

It stirred no interest in him. 

He recalled vaguely a small 

Paragraph in the papers. It 

had not been an interesting 

murder. Some wretched old 

woman knocked on the head 

for a few pounds. All part of 

the s e n s e less, 

of "these da"ys.'"'' SERiAL B\ AGATHA CHRiSTME 

Poirot turned . . •. t f a j 

"Kilchester. I'll be retired I.* And 



into the courtyard of his block 
of flats. As always his 
heart swelled in approval. 
He was proud of his 
home. A splendid sym- 
metrical buildmg. The lift 
took him up to the third floor, 
where he had a large luxury 
flat with impeccable chro- 
mium fittings, Square arm- 
chairs, and severely rect- 
angular Ornaments. There 
could truly be said not to be 
a curve in the place. 

As he opened the door with 
his latchkey and stepped into 
the Square white lobby his 
manservant, George, stepped 
softly to meet him. 

"Good evening, sir. There is 
a — gentleman waiting to see 
you." 

He relieved Poirot deftly of 
his overcoat. 

"Indeed?" Poirot was aware 
of that very slight pause be- 
fore the word gentleman. As 
a social snob oeorKe w«»& äPi 
expert. 

"What is his name?'* 



of my marrows last year," said 
Spence with enthusiasm. "Col- 
ossal! And my roses. I'm keen 
on roses. I'm going to have — " 
He broke off. 

"That's not what I came to 
talk about." 

"No, no, you came to see 
an old acquaintance — it was 
kind. I appreciate it." 

"There's more to it than 
that, I'm afraid, M. Poirot. 
ril be honest. I want some- 
thing." 
Poirot murmured delicately: 
"There is a mortgage, pos- 
sibly, on your house? You 

would like a loan " 

Spence interrupted in a 
horrifled voice: 

"Oh, good Lord, it's not 
money! Nothing of that kind." 
Poirot waved his hands in 
graceful apology. 

"I demand your pardon. * 
"I'll teil yoü straight out — 
it's damned cheek what I've 
come for. If you send me away 
with a flea in my ear I shan't 
be surprised." 

"There will be no flea," said 
Poirot. "But continue." 

"It's the McGinty case. 
You've read about it, per- 
haps." 

Poirot shook his head. 
"Not with attention. Mrs. 
McGinty — an old woman in a 
Shop or a house. She is dead, 
yes. How did she die?'; 
Spence stared at him. 
"Lord!" he said. "That takes 
me back. Extraordinary . . . 
And I never thought of it until 
now." 

"I beg your pardon? 
"Nothing. Just a game. 
Child's game. We used to play 
it when we were kids. A lot 
of US in a row. Question and 
answer all down the line. 
'Mrs. McGinty's dead!' 'How 
did she die?' 'Down on one 
knee just like I.* And then 
the next question, 'Mrs. Mc- 
Ginty's dead.' 
*How did she 
die?' «Holding her 
hand out just like 
there we'd be, all 



in about six months. Actually, kneeling and our rifjjt arms 



I was due for retirement 
eighteen months ago. They 
asked me to stop on and I 
did." 

"You were wise," said Poi- 
rot with feeling. "You were 
very wise . . ." 

"Was I? I wonder. I'm not 
so sure." 

"Yes, yes. you were wise," 
Poirot insisted. "The long 
hours of ennui. you have no 
conception of them." 

"Oh, I'll have plenty to do 
when I retire. Moved into a 
new house last year, we did. 
Quite a bit of garden and 
shamefully n e g 1 ected. I 
haven't been able to get down 
to it properly yet." 

"Ah, yes, you are one of 
those who garden. Me, once, I 
decided to live in the country 
and grow vegetable marrows. 
It did not EiJCCPpfi ^ have not 
ihe temperament." 

"You should have seen one 



held ou't stiff . And then you 
got it! 'Mrs. McGinty's 
dead.' 'How did she die?' 'Like 
THIS!' Smack, the top of the 
row would fall sideways and 
down we all went like a pack 
of ninepins!" Spence laugh- 
ed uproariously at the remem- 
brance. "Takes me back, it 

does!" 

Poirot waited politely. This 
was one of the moments when, 
even after half a lifetime in 
the country, he found the 
English incomprehensible. He 
himself played at Cache 
Cache and Le zoulanger in 
his childhood, but he feit no 
desire to talk about it or even 
to think about it. 

When Spence had overcome 
his own amusement, Poirot 
repeated with some slight 
weariness, "How did she die?" 

The laughter was wiped off 

denly himself again. 

"She was hit on the back of 



the head with some Sharp, 
heavy implement. Her sav- 
ings, about thirty pounds in 
cash, were taken after her 
room had been ransacked. She 
lived alone in a small cottage 
except for a lodger. Man of 
the name of Bentley. James 
Bentley." 

"Ah, yes, Bentley." 
"The place wasn't broken 
into. No signs of any tam- 
pering with the Windows or 
locks. Bentley was {lard üp, 
had lost his Job and owed 
two months' rent. The money 
was found hidden under a 
loose stone at the back of the 
cottage. Bentley's coat sleeve 
had blood on it and hair — 
same blood group and the 
right hair. According to his 
first Statement he was never 
near the body — so it couldn't 
have come there by accident." 
"Who found her?" 
"The baker called with 
bread. It was the day he got 
paid. James Bentley opened 
the door to him and said he'd 
knocked at Mrs. McGinty's 
bedroom door, but couldn't 
get an answer. The baker 
suggested she might have been 
taken bad. They got the 
woman from next door to go 
up and see. Mrs. McGinty 
wasn't in the bedroom, and 
hadn't slept in the bed, but 
the room had been ransacked 
and the floorboards had been 
prised up. Then they thouf^t 
of looking in the parlor. She 
was there lying on the floor 
and the neighbor fairly 
screamed her head off. Then 
they got the police, of course." 
"And Bentley was event- 
ually arrested and tried?" 

"Yes. The case came on at 
the Assizes. Yesterday. Open 
and shut case. The jury were 
only out twenty minutes this 
morning. Verdict: Guilty. 
Condemned to death." 
Poirot nodded. 
"And then, after the ver- 
dict, you got in a train and 
came to London and came 
here to see me. Why?" 

Superintendent Spence was 
looking into ' his beer glass. 
He ran his finger slowly 
around and around the rim. 
"Because," he said, "I don't 
think he did it . . . " 

There was a moment or two 
of silenoe. 

"You came to me " 



Poirot did not flnish the 
sentence. 

Superintendent Spence look- 
ed up. The color in his face 
was deeper than it had been. 
It was a typical countryman's 
face, unexpressive, self-con- 
tained, with shrewd but honest 
eyes. It was the face of a man 
with definite Standards who 
would never be bothered by 
doubts of himself or by doubts 
of what constituted right and 
wrong. 

"I've been a long time in 
the Force," he said. "I've had 
a good deal of experience of 
this thst 2nd the othcr. ^ 
can' judge a man as well as 
any other could do. I've had 



"i»fr.v. IfleGinty-s dead^ how did she die? Sticking her nech out^ just like I< 



99 



B 



WOMAN. July 28. 1952 




'T^msse^' 



t«^<>>jj|)R«Mv;,B t!^x.:*^m.z irvr-.ikci^Mii^ifiNfU-J&sy. ff^UMMUg^S^.AS^fi'^- '-' 



P--1* 



PHILIP 

ARGUS SPECIÄI 
SUPPLEMENT 







/).' 



vi 
n 



rn 
:k 

0- 

as 
er 



li- 
ier 



he 

2l- 



•w 



uy 

on 

ch 

lal 

•^or 

cl- 

vali 

ry. 

>n-| 



II 




■V ,-»— 



'Em? 




iQueen Elizabeth has a unique position in a troubled world. Her seven 
Thrones link millions in history's greatest Commonwealth of Nations. 



Page 2 THE ARGUS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 



AT TME BETTER FASHIOK STORES AND SALONS THROUGHOUT 

AUSTRALIA 

or buy your suit in the Suit Dept., 

ond your coot in the Coot Dept. 

AT THE LARGER STORES. 



OCR QCEEI^ 

FACES 
BIG TASKS 



T was Winston 

Churchill who said 

at Britain Stands at 
e conjunction of three 
ircles. First, there is 
e circle of the British 
'ommonwealth. Then 
here is the particular 
tlantic circle that in- 
ludes the United 
States. And there is the 
hird circle of Europe, 
n w h i c h Britain is 
)laced both by geo- 
raphy and common 
raditions. 

Queen Elizabeth then has a 

articularly responsible and 

erious Obligation in her unique 

losition in the structure of the 

nodern world. Winston 

Ivhurchiirs remarkable thought 
mderlines the gravity of the 
2sk she now faces. 
For the n e w 
^ueen, there are 

i e V e n Thrones, 

mited in one, seven 

^rime Ministers and 

;even Cabinets to 

>erve her. In New 

^ealand and Aus- 

ralia, in Pakistan 

,nd Ceylon, in South 
Africa and in Canada there are 
Cabinets, as well as the Cabinet 
that sits at the far end of St. 

ames' Park frorn Buckingham 
Palace. They are all advisers to 
the Queen. 

Queen Elizabeth, while still 
a Princess, had to take an ever 
greater part in the actual go- 
vernment as well as the cere- 
monial of the British Common- 
wealth. Let it not be thought 
ihat the Council of Regency 
was a light bürden. The Bri- 
tish System of Government 
does not spare its Throne. All 
over the world, appointments 
are made on the Recommenda- 
tion of Her Majesty's Minis- 
ters. Each of these appoint- 
ments comes to the notice of 
the Palace. 

Queen Elizabeth has suc- 
ceeded to a Throne such as has 
never before been known. And 
the modern world puts particu- 




lar strains on the British Royal 
Family. The 20th Century is 
out of tune with the idea of 
privilege and monarchy, pomp, 
and Courts and ceremony. That 
is a generalisation that we can 
all accept. All over the 
world, the British family ex- 
pects its Royal personages to be 
democratic, to be seen, rather 
than to be haughty. 

Our Royal Family, desplte 
this modern democratic ten- 
dency, has brought the Throne 
to a higher eminence of dlg- 
nity and profound respect from 
all peoples and classes than 
ever before in history. 

The key to the achievement 
of the late King George, his 
Queen, and their children was 
thelr success at behavlng as 
an ideal family, sharing the 
tastes and aspirations of mil- 
lions of families all over their 
dominlons. At the same time, 
they all managed to go out and 
about, being seen, being re- 
ceived, being decorated, feted, 
and honored, while 
preserving this 
simple aspect of the 
cordial, human 
British family at 
home. 

Queen Elizabeth 
now has the task of 
a statesman. She 
has to remember 
that loyalty to her family 
unites people of extraordinary 
variety of opinions, thought, 
and language. 

For this, she is already well 
fitted. We can remember the 
tour of South Africa, when the 
"Republican" and Afrikaans- 
speaking city of Bloemfontein 
cheered the Royal Family. We 
can note that, as Princess, 
Elizabeth was Colonel-in-Chief 
of the Regiment de Chaudiere, 
and can speak to her French 
Canadian subjects In their own 
language. * 

T^HE responsibilities of 

Royalty are greater today 
than at any time in history. 
Queen Elizabeth has been pre- 
pared by training, and a fine 
education, for a position that 
demands immense knowledge, 
unrelieved patience, a n ü 
supreme tact. 




She has recently returned 
from a fabulous but hurrled 
tour of Canada. If there is a 
lesson that should be drawn 
from that tour — ^which included 
a remarkable departure to 
Washington — a successful ad- 
venture in Winston Churchill 's 
"second circle" — it is the lesson 
that the new Queen is a mature 
person of good taste. 

It is certain that her father's 



A resolute womui rules in 
England now. This Queen 
of ours was once a shy 
girl who dedicated her life 
to the Service of her people. 



mantle falls fittlngly on hei 
slim Shoulders. All Britain and 
all the Empire can ask no more. 

— ROBikT TiMPLE 



THE ARGUS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT Page 3 



I 



lil 



in 

tn 

ip 

1^ 

=y 

m 

iL 
tlV 
Ü- 

as 
er 
6f 

•re 

ad 
n- 

ler 

he 

51- 

;r- 

•w. 

ly. 

ice 

ny 
on 
ch 
lal 

"or 
el- 
iral 
ry. 
»n- 




THIS pledge, giyen by a girl just 21, was an 
inspiraHon to an Empire. Now .> is fo be fulf.lled. 

*0Ma€l help nie nuake 



g^f^€l nufß f^off? 



r,_^^r 




ROM Capetown, on 2 Ist 
April, 1947, Princess 
— Elizabeth, as she was then 
made a world broadcast for her 
coming-of-age, She said: 

"On my 2ist birthday I welcome the 

ific British Commonwealth and Emoire 
whereyer they live, whatever race fhev 
come from. and whatever lan^ua/e ^7y 

"Let me bcg^in by saylnj 'Xhank Yott' 




to all the thousands of kind people whn 
nave sent me messa^es of ^oodwill. 

"This is a happy day for me. but it is 
also „ne that brings serious thoughts ~ 

ts^"ha. ' "' "'" '^^-"'"^ ^'»^^d ^^th all 
its challenffes and with all its opportunity 

knot^ th",?*^ "'"^' '^ '^ ^ ^»-^at help tc 
an round th/'" ^L" '"uititudes of frienda 
an round the world who are thlnkinp^ nt 

and I am deeply moved. 

rL^^« ^^"''''' ^^^ Rhodesla. my 

WKen to the heart of their oeonl*- 
and made to feel that we are ^t^ 
much at home here as if Je h^ 
lived among thrm all our llves 

fathers subjects. from the oldest to 
the youngest. whom l do not wish 

ZiLJl I," ^^^ y°""S men and 
same ?iml!^° "^^'^ ^^"^ ^bout the 

"r* . "*P '"e. in the terrlbl*» ann 
war"""*?;?"' °' »«' »econd worid 

hcfifT«i*^^^ ^** *^« Coming to iran- 
we^t w ,^°"ianhood, it & sSrSy a 

* De able to take some ol the 



o 



t -v-if 



* V'.' 



•« «y. 



Kr.'<-^\ 







Eliiobefh mode this broodcost 
from Q gorden in Copefown, 
t^urmg fhe Royal Tour of 
South Africo. Her words hove 
becomc porf of the greof 
frodition of British royolty. 



Page 4 



THE ARGUS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 



.M *"" ^^^ J^^ Shoulders 

hcod. We must not be daur 
the anxletles and hardshins n 
war has left behind for e?erv 
Ol our Commonwealth 

"Let US say with Rupert 
Now God be thanked Wl 
matched us with His hoür ' 

Hi'J ^I" ^"•''^ ^^«^ vou will si 
difficulties in the Ught that] 
them. as the great opportun 

n the history book.s the prou] 
ing of William Pitt, that E 
had saved herseif by her ex« 
and would save Europe bl 
example. \ 

tJ^^^.l^P^ ""^^- we may sal 
World first. and has now ta 

hT u ^I?^"" ^^^ ^«"^e »s wor 
thmk that is an even finer ■ 
than was done in the days otj 
and it is for us who have groV 
m these years of danger and 
to see that it is accompllshed ii 
long years of peace that we all, 
Stretch j^head. ^ 

"If We all go forward with um 
wavermg faith. a high couragel 
and a quiet heart. we shall be »r 
make of this anclent Commonwii 
which we all love so dearly anl 
grander thing _ more free, 
prosperous. more happy. and a 
powerful influenae for good in 
World than it has blen in 
greatest day of our forefathers [ 

To accomplish that we 
give nothing less than the wh< 
ourselves. 

"There is a motto which hasl 
borne by many of my ancesloi 
a noble motto: 'I serve ' 
words were an Inspiration to 
bygone heirs to the throne, 
ihey made their knightly dedit 
as they came to manhood. , 

I 1^ cannot do quite as theyl 
but through the inventions of sei 
I can do what was not possibll 
any of them. I can make my sof 
act of dedication with a wholei 
pire hstening. I should Üke to 
that dedication now It is 
."^imple. 

"/ declare before you all thc\ 
noble life, whether it be lont 
'^hcrt, shall be devoted to your] 
ince and the Service of our greai 
perial family, to which we all be 
But I shall not have strengt 
carry out this resolution aloinel 
less you join in it with me. a^ !\ 
invite you to do. \ 

"I know that your Support wi\ 
nn/ailingly given. God help m 
make good my vow. and God bla 
fif you who are willing to shai 
it.- 




%> 



Queen Elizabeth, in tours abroad, tias already met 
many people, great and humble, in three continents. 

HER 

WOI\ THEM 



1 



'%m 



fi 



^K 



i^t/ 



^ .1 



*^^ 



^ 



# 



!% 






W.\. 



:tsfi 



,V/ 



'4*^ 






^ .- 



^'^\ 



rr^ 



<.. 



/ 



/♦- 



mW 



>)L 



'^h)A 



.i'-, 



V, 



-•^i;:; 



> 



if' 



■v ,« 



■%:^ 






.%■-■ 



t^. 






L R E A D Y, Queen 

hizobefh is an Ambas- 

idress for Britain and 

fic Empire. ABOVE: 

\t Loatsi, South Africa, 

lizabefh inspecled 

frican girl guides dur- 

tg the 1947 tour. In 

lose crowded weeks, 

[ie Queen met thou- 

fands of peuple of a 

,ozen races, charmed 

<iem all. TOP RIGHT: 

ast vear's visit to 

LVashington was a 

^jprcmc fest. But this 

icture of Queen Eliza- 

eth with President 

ruman shows the easy 

iroce with which ihc 

ueen took all before 

per. RIGHT: Elizobeth 

Ud Philip, in 1948, 

e received in Paris 

t the füll honors 

[)f a fricndly nation. 



^'-Ä'wtfii 



•«♦.■vPl 



I 



■%.', *'>. 



^**tl 



'^ 



I 



«>.. 



•Ä 



*^N^^.*\ ». 






\0 \t 



;|64h^ 



? . 



^ I 



1 - 



J> 



^1», 









:*. (- 



f 



\ 



THE ARGUS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT Page 5 



i 



f 



m 
ip 

*n 

IM' 
0- 

as 
er 
6f 

ire 

ad 
n- 

ler 

ho 

;r- 

'W. 

ly. 

ice 

ny 

on 

ch 

lal 

^or 

el- 

i^al 

ry I 
►n-i 



II 



PHILIP, PRINCE CONSORT, HAS MADE A NAVAl CAREER OF HIS OWN THE HARD V 





IFE in the rugged 
little ports along 

and's Moray Firth 
doesn't c h a n g: e much 
through the years. The 
fishing boats c r o w d 
about when the season 
is on, and through the 
hard winter lie idle in 
the picturesque inlets. 

There have been some who 
have gone from this coast to 
more ambitious careers on the 
seven seas. There was one lad 
who spent his school days 
there in the thirties. 

A sturdy, fair-haired young- 
ster, he spent hcurs listening to 
the tales of the fishermen. He 
helped them scrape weeds and 
barnacles off their boats, and 
came away paint smeared and 
grubby. 

That youngster was Prince Philip 
of Greece. later Ueutenant Philip 
Mountbatten. R.N . today the Prince 
Consort, Duke of Edinburgh. 

Ever since those carefree days at 
school in Scotland. the young 
Prince has had the unmistakable 
stamp of the sea about him. He buüt 
h)m<«if a distinguished naval career 
the hard way and rose to command 
his own ship. RelucUntly, he has 
given up the sea for his Royal 
duties. But if ever he is able to re- 
turn, he will. For the Duke of Edin- 
burgh is a bom sailor. 

In January. 1940. he went off to 
sea as a midshipman in the battle- 
ship Ramlllies, a far cry from the 
Cutters and sailing boats he helped 



A SAILOR IS 

BESIDE 
THE THRONE 



build and sail, up on the Moray 
Pirth. 

After just one year at sea, the 
young midshipman was back on a 
battle-ship. this time the Valiant. 
And ifc was with her at the Battle 
of Cape Matapan that he first saw 
action. He was in Charge of search- 
light control, and for his work in 
illuminating the Italian battle fleet 
during the night action was men- 
tioned in despatches. and received 
the Greek War Gross. 

During this time, Philip went 
through a sub-lieutenanfs course 



and won four firsts and one sec- 
ond. After a gunnery course, he was 
appointed a sub-lieutenant on the 
old destroyer Wallace, in 1942, and 
soon after was promoted First- 
lieutenant to become. at 21. the 
youngest officer second-in-conimand 
of a big destroyer. There was more 
action along the North African coast 
and in July. 1943. he took part in 
the Sicily Invasion. 

He grew a lieard. a füll, golden 
aflfair. and took it with him Into 
the Japanese theatre when he was 
transferred to the destroyer Whelp. 



OFF TURKEY, tke Duke 
sfroked his own wkoler crew to 
victory in tke Fleet Regotta. 
Mogpie won tke title of Cock 
Skip in tke Mediterronean. 




Page 6 THE ARGUS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 



L E F T : Lieutenant 
Mountbatten inspects hii ^ 
at Corsham Naval TramL 
Centre. RIGHT: On H.M.S 
Magpie in the Mediterran««! 
the ship's Commander r^wi- 
the Sunday prayers on d«di 

*. 

serving with the Eastern Fleet > 
later the British Pacific Fleet.' 
was there tili the end of the Jan 
ese war and sav. the surrend» 
Tokyo Bay in 1945. 

K^^^^L .1^^^^ ^^^^^' Ueuten 
Mountbatten put in at Melbou 
with the Whelp on the way back 
England. ^^ 

Back in England the Duke | 
command of the Whelp for thel 
two months to pay her oflf tnUi 
serve. Then he joined the Ito 
Navy Training Establishment. HA 
Glendower, in North Wales, a » 
where only ofHcers with the t 
leadership records were appol9( 

Oflf duty, Lieutenant Mountb«* 
went to local dances and pl»^ 
skittles in his shirt-sleeves ft 
brother officers at the local pub. 
against the local team '^ 
know him as Philip there 
the cricket and hockey fl 
well. 

It was while he was at v^«jh< 
that he became engaged Andl 

was at Corsham right up 

wedding. His last night as a 
was with bis naval friends 

Towards the end of 19 
Duke was promoted Lieutena. 
mander, and took command 
frigat^ MagDi3, which wal 
based at Malta. 

Life at the Malta statio« 
good. The Duke said it w 
best year of my life." The 
long crutses and exercises 
Home and Mediterranean FL 
all the interest of a first co.. 
Elizabeth, like so many Navy 
joined him at MalU when sh 
and the round of enga 
ashore was as attractive for 
his work at sea. 

But it had to end. On Ju 
last year. he relinquished his 
mand and returned to Lond<^ 
share with bis wife the bu" ' 
Royal engagements. made - 
by the illness of the King, l«'? 
on to half uay again. and not 
indefinite leave from the Navy, 




)5i,; 



Here's a picture of a 
sailor Prince: "Calm, 
competent, untiring, a 
jolly good ciiap, besides." 




HAT is Philip like, as a 
sailor, as a man? Ashore 

and afloat, they say he's a 

"jolly good chap." 

At sea, he was above all eise 
a naval officer. In the eyes of 
his crew, he was "Jimmy the 
One," not a Duke, when he was 
First-Lieutenant of Chequers. 
As Commander of the Magpie, 
he was the "Skipper" or the 
"Old Man." 

His first few days as captain ol 
the Magpie were tricky. He was 
the most junior in rank and com- 
mand in the fiotilla, but by the time 
he left the Magpie, she was at the 
peak of her peacetime reputation. 

When the traditional regatta day 
came at Valetta Harbor, Malta, he 
saw to it that Magpie men won six 
of 10 events. 

He is magnificent at seamanship, 
and cool . . . but knows all the swear 
words. He took Elizabeth aboard 
once on the way to Greece. He wan- 
ted to show her how some equipment 
worked. It wouldn't. Philip used 
a non-dictionary word. The crew 
was horrified. Elizabeth looked 
blank. 

Shrewdness is part of the Duke's 
naval competence. No ship wants 
'bad hats." but som3 ships have 
got to have them. It was noticeable 
that the Magpie had none. *'Very 
crafty is the Old Man," the older 
ratings said. "Very fly indeed." 

He is a friendly man, but since re- 
turning from Malta he is much more 
mature, restrained. and authorita- 
tive. He is better groomed, too. 

He refuses flatly to wear the tra- 
ditional bowler with lounge suits. 
On official occasions it is sometimes 
carried. bat iiever put on. He uses 
easy, half-slangy language, and likes 
a glass of beer ashore or a pink gin 
afloat. 

Sports? Cricket, squash, snooker, 
sailing, polo, swimming. and driv- 
ing. 

There's an age-old tradition that 
Britain's Kings and Princes should 
be men of the sea. Philip is already 
a part of that tradition. There's a 
sailor at the Queen 's side. 

— BRETT OLIVER 





WHEN PHILIP ASTOmSHED THE SCIENTISTS 



"N 



DINBURGH, on the night 
lof August 8, 1951: the 
Italian-style McEwan Hall glit- 
tered with color like some 
medieval court. Ncarly 2,000 
robed and gowned scientists 
rustled to silence as the young 
Duke of Edinburgh moved to 
the rostrum, faced microphones 
and television cameras, and 
began to speak. 

Forly-five mmutes later: tbc preat 
hall rang with (he thunderous ap- 
plause cf an andience astonished be- 
yond words. carried away with what 
they had just heard; incredulous, 
pioud. A trtumph for the speaker. 
And, with Jlriking: siRnificance, a 
triumph for the young Duke. 

That night in Edinburgh, when 
Philip gave his pres'denüai address 



to the British Association, famed 
heart of British scientific thought, 
he revealed for the ürst time the 
calibre of the man who has risen 
from compaiJitive obscurity to 
the exacting position of 
Prince Consort. He showed 
his metile, unaided. be- 
fore the merciies« scrutiny of 
science. 

The Speech proved what 
many have come to realise in 
the last four years; that in 
Philip Britain has a man of 
unusual stature. 

Edinburgh was his chance 
to show the world he is a 
force in his own right. He 
took it. For his subject 
he chose "The British (Kontribution 
Ic Srience and Technology in the 
Fast 100 Years" — ^a formidable topk:. 
Night after night while he was com- 
manding the frigate Magpie in the 




Mediterranean, the Frince swotted 
up bis knowledge, aided by a pile of 
text-books. He wrote the whole 
Speech of 7,000 words himself, using 
Navy Signal pads. 

And when he deiivered it, 
probably no Single brain 
among his listeners was fa- 
miliär with all the alleys of 
science he had explored so 
thoroughly. It was said at 
the time that hr blinded them 
with science. But it was not 
a parrot-fashion recitation of 
text-book gleanings. 

Throughout he presented 
his own interpretation, and it 
was feit that if he had said 
no more than "The advance 
of science should be greeted not 
with arrogance, but humility." 
it would have stamped him as a man 
of deep and original thought. 

His discounte took him into re- 



mote scientific corners. Those who 
heard the speech haiied it as a bril- 
liant survey of the interdependence 
of science and social ^ progress in 
Britain. And the Prince spoke with 
£uch modesty and charm that the 
u^ually undemonstrative scientists 
were rcused out of their seats. 

Everything Prince Philip has done 
since his marriage has been weighed 
and related to bis new position as 
Prince Consort. His Is an extr^mely 
dtfücult role. There are always those 
Feople of importance who are only 
too ready to criticise a mah iti his 
Position. It could be a hard road 
fcr Philip, but Ihrough his natural 
qualitie>: — industry, knowledge, inde- 
pendence of personality. iniegrity. and 
a «incerr interest in the scrious 
afTairs of life — it seems his post as 
Consort will be one of much happi 
ness. 

— CLIPPORD RHODES 



1 

i 



I 



THE ARGUS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT Poge 7 



;n 

ip 

1^ 

^y 

•n 
Ic 
;ie 

fi- 
as 
er 
bl 

ire 

ad 
n- 
,er 

he 
;1- 
rr- 

'W, 

ly. 

ice 

ny 

on 

ch 

lal 

^ori 

el- 

ry. 
•n- 

tR\ 

II 




Tjm^^T 




"VXL lAD BORN TO 6E KWG" IS A FAIR 
HAHtED DIISE-YEAR-plD WHO UKES TO 
BANG A SAÜCEPAN Wp A WOODEN SPOON 






CHAKL 

fmm\ BOY 



F LAXEN - H Ä I R E D »n the park, routinc for them, is a 
■•--•■ ' - thrill for passers-by. 




little boy of three, with 
a taste for mechanicai 
toys, is now Heir Ap- 
parent to the ßritish Throne. 
He is His Royal Highness 
Prince Charles Philip Arthur 
George, Duke of Cornwall. 
Some day, probably when he 
turns 18, he will be Prince of 
Wales. Today, in his nursery, 
he is just: "Charles." j 

Prince Charles and his year 
old sister, Princess Anne, are 
being brought up lilce any 
other children of a well-to- 
do family. Their parents 
have insisted that they 
should be treafed with 
natural common sense. 
Queen Elizabeth swept 
awoy the old trodition of 
the household stoff curt- 
seying to the Royal child- 
ren. Prince Philip has 
offen Said thot he wonts 
his son to be a mon's man. 



They are being shielded as 
iong: as possible from the 
effects of their special Position. Too 
much attention would interfere with 
the simple, natural development 
planned for them. But, unlike 
other children, the clothes they 
wear and the way they part 
their hair are closely watched - 
and copied^by mothers the world 
over. Their clothes set the fashiom 
for children everywherc. An outin^ 



THESE TWO could be any children, 
rooking ouf for Mummy. Prince 
Charles and Princess Anne were 
arriving in London by train last year. 
Behind them is their nurse, Miss 
Helen Lightbody, who was carlier 
nannic to ihe Gloucester family. 



Page 8 THE ARGUS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 



Prince Charles is a sturdy little 
boy, with the same color eyes as his 
mother — that bright, clear blue 
which has repeated itself again and 
again throughout the Royal Family. 
His half is thick, but very stralght, 
and there is nothing to remind one 
of the glorious curls his mother had 
when she was a small child. He has 
a most bewitcbing smile and a great 
sense of humor. 

"Matey, and entirely without fear " 
is the way Sir William Gilliatt, one 
of the Royal Family's doctors, de- 
scribed him. Charles is also ex- 
tremely inquisitive, and an incessant 
Chatterbox. He besieges visitors and 
showers them with ques- 
tions. Still blissfully un- 
aware of his exalted Posi- 
tion as Heir Apparent, he is 
never at a loss for friends, 
and chatters to everyone 
from the head cook to the 
gardener's boy. 

At the moment, Prince 
Charles' greatest interests 
are mechanicai toys, draw- 
ing extremely surrealistic 
pictures with bright crayons. 
and collecting stamps. For 
his third birthday last No- 
vember his parents gave 
him a miniature steamroller, 
tractor, and bulldozer. Yet. in spite 
Ol the many. many presents he has 
received of the best quality and most 
up-to-date variety, his favorite toy 
lor a long time was an old saucepan 
and a wooden spoon witVi which. by 
all accounts, he could make as much 
noise as any three-year-old— if not 
more. 

Prince Charles is immenselv proud 
ot his sister, and takes great de- 
^ght in introducing her to everyone. 
^omplete strangers Walking near 
öirkhall. the family estate in Scot- 
Jand. have been met by a determined 
small boy, who seized their hand 
and commanded that they "come and 
meet my sister." 

Princess Anne herseif is a pink- 
cheeked baby with periwinkle-blue 




Tbl» batifc, the 
•Prince « f 
W?les' Feathers" 
te that of the 
Heir Apparent. 




eyes. She is now sltting up in her 
pram. Likeness between Princess 
Anne and her mother is gröwing 
more marked every day. She is not 
as serious as Prince Charles was at 
her age. and is described as a "really 
pretty little girl." She is perhaps 
the more fortunate one, for future 
responsibilities do not cast their 
shadow on her. She will be the one 
who bothers less about constitutional 
history and the duties of monarchs; 
she will be the Princess Margaret of 
the house. 

Queen Elizabeth is a firm believer 
in thrift. Her own cot and pram 
were used for her children, and 



Prince Charles' layette was used for 
Princess Anne. 

Both children, like their mother, 
love animals; they are growing up 
entirely without fear of them. Their 
mother's pet corgis are their constant 
companions. 

Before she succeeded to the 
Throne, crowding duties made pre- 
cious the time that Queen Elizabeth 
could spend with her children. Now 
Royal duties will press more heavily 
than ever, but the Queen will never 
see her family life neglected. 

And the lad born to be king will 
have a time yet to play with his toy 
steamroller. — DOROfHy BARKLEY 



PRINCE CHARLES, 
in this p i c t u r e« 
shows G strong 
likeness to his 
father. He has his 
m o t h e r's eyes — 
brighf, blue, clear. 
As the eldest son of 
the reigning sove- 
reign, Charles be- 
comes Duke of 
Cornwall. When he 
turns 18, Royalty's 
coming-of-age, he 
will be created 
Prince of Woles. 



i 

J 



t 

in 

it 

ht 

cy 
rn 
flc 

a.s 

1er 

6i 

ni. 

Ire 

od 
li- 
ier 

i^e 
el- 
2r- 

)W. 

dy. 

\ce 
iny 
ion 
ich 
nal 
?or 
cl- 
val 
Ty. 
>n- 



THE ARGUS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT Page 9 « ) 



}• ■ _ 



;fe'. \d: 



?^ 



JtBV^'^Vr'»^:«' 



:■:*:.'<■ 



«fi'^iss^T^Ä» 



^ 



Imported Autumn 



Co AT Elegance 




There's a wonderful ränge of NEW CO ATS at . . 



Page 10 THE ARGUS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 





T was natural for 
{young Michael 

Parker to enter the 

Navy when he left Xavier 
College, Melbourne, in 
1938. There was the 
example of his father, a 
Royal Australian Naval 
c a p t o i n. And young 
Michael had an inborn 
love of the sea. 

It was no surprise when, 
at 18, fresh from College, 
he became a naval cadet 
and went to England. No 
surprise either, that he did 
Mrell, and saw service in 
nearly every theatre of 
war. 

But there were some sur- 
prises — and they changed tlie 
«hole course of his lit'e. One 
of theni came in 1942, when 
he was a sub-lieiitenant on a 
destroyer doing convoy work 
off England's eastern coast. 

He Struck up a friendship 
with another sub-lieutenant, ori 
another destroyer— a tall, biond 
young fellow who was making 
a name for himseif. The othn- 
was Prince Philip. 

The frisndship grew, and con- 
tinuej after the war. The tlme 
came for Lieutenant-Commander 
Michael Parker to return to Austra- 
l«a and settle down to civllian life. 
In 1947 he made arrangements to 
leave England with his Scottish wife 
and young son. but he never left. 

At almost the last moment he re- 
ceived a .^urprise reque.^t which he 
could hardly refuse. And so he be- 
came Equerry-in-Waiting to his war- 
lltne friend, Prince Philip, the Duke 
of Edinburgh and to the Duke's 
wife, Piincess Elizabeth. 

Today. Commander Parker is just 
as much the Duke's "cobbsr" as he 
was In the days when thty were 
both serving in the Navy, it any- 
thing, they are even greater friends 
than tefore. 

His Position as Equerry and pri- 
vate secretary to the Duke of Edin- 
burgh broueht Commander Parker 
Into an entirely new fleld of experi- 
ence. His Job means acting as Jhe 
Royal couple's personal assistant. 
handlin? their mass of engagements 
in London and wherever they travel. 

Commander Parker was last in 
Sydney In 1945, and there is a story 
about that. A wartime navy is al- 
ways on the scrounge for paint. and 
ifs the Job of a ship's First Lieu- 
tenant to find it. It is cne of those 
Jobs where he has to keep his eyes 
cpen and grab what he can. 

It so happened that Commander 
Park3r got to know a dockyard fore- 
man in Sydney who was apparently 
most accommodating. As a result. 
Parker's ship. the destroyer Wessex, 
showed up well. 

The foreman was invited aboard 
to be thanked. and, to retum the 



Lisutenant-Comraander Michael Parker went from 
Melbourne to become the friend and eqiieri^ of Philip 

XAVIER BOY 
VS ms AIDE 




• HIS RECORD: 

Eorn June 23, 1920, son 
of Captain C. A. Parker, 
C.B.E., R.A.N., MelbQiKrrie. 
He at{ended the X>vier Col- 
Itffe. Melk&urne. In 1938 h« 
jcjned the Royal Navy as a 
cadet and went (o Eng^land. 
serving his cadetshiii with 
H.M^. Vindictive. 

Just before the war he 
joJned the battleship H.IVLS. 
Hcod as a midshipman. He 
served with her until Mav. 
1941, He was then transferred 
to the destroyer H.M.S. 
Eikimo. A weck pfte; his 
transfer H.M.S. Hood was 
lunk. 

Lieut- Commander Parker 
sat for his sub-lieutenant's 
exan-.inatton at Portsmouth. 
and in May, 1942, he joined 
Ihe destroyer H.MjS. Lauder- 
dale, was quickly promoted to 
lieutcnant and appointed first 
licutenant. He was in the 
Sicily Invasion of 1943. and 
was thcn transferred to the 
new Fleet Class d' trovcr 
H M.S. VVesfex. and served 
with the Far Eastern and 
Brit sh Pacific Flcrts tili the 
cnd cf the Japanese War. 

He then returned tc En?- 
fand and becan:e Eauerrv to 
Princess Elizabeth and the 
Duke of Kdinbu'yh. !?-> wa.<s 
leccntlv with the Duke of 
Edinburgh in the Mediterra- 
ne«n in H.M.S. Cheoue.s and 
H.M.S. Ma«:oie. 

In 1943 Lieut. -Commandi»r 
Parker nranied Eileen xMar-a- 
ret Annr Allen and nou has 
a son and a dau;;hter. 



I 

i 



i 



> 






i 



•.V 



:j 



; 



compliment. h« invited Commander 
Parker home for dinner. Parker 
went. and took along his friend 
Lieutenant Prince Philip of Grecce. 
who was serving in the sister de- 
stroyer Whelp. Ths dinner was a 
great success. And there is one 
dcckyard foreman's wife who has 
entertained a Prince Consort to din- 
ner. 

Like the Duke, Commander Par- 
ker had many exciting experiencss 
durin? the war. His early days as 
a cadet were straightforward 
enough. He flnished colleg« at Mel- 
bourne and sat for a special ex- 
amlnation in Australia for entrance 
to a Royal Navy tralning establlsh- 
ment. Hs passed and ^erVed his 
cadetshlp on the tralning ship, 
HMS. Vindictive, in England. 

Just before the war, Parker Joined 
(be battleship Hood as a midship- 
man, and served with her tili May, 



} ., f^ Y^^ *"^r ^e left, trans- 
f~rred to the destroyer Eskimo, the 
Hocd wa& sunk — with all but two 
or three hands. A freak hit from 
the Getman battleship Bismarck, 
nerself sunk not long afterwards ex- 
ploded in the Hood's magazln^'and 
she went down in a few minutes. 

From the,' Eskimo, Parker went to 
Portsmouth. to sit for his sub-lieu- 
tenanfs examinations. After courses 
In gimnery; navigation, torpedo war- 
fare and seamanship he was ap- 
pointed to the destroyer Lauderda!« 
as a sub-lieutenant. This was in Mav 
1942. ' 

Soon, he was promoted First Lieu- 
tenant — and he met his opposite 
numbcr on the destroyer Wallace 
Lieutenant Prince Philip 

After convoy work along the be- 
sieged sea lanes leading to Brltain 
the Lauderdale and Wallace went to 



the Mediterranean. and lock par* t 
the Invasion of Slclly in 1943 an-l •- 

^ Vi. ^Vl^}^^' ope-atlon.s riuring a f 
North African campaign 

While this work was going on .. 
new bunch of d-stroyers. the PI^h- 
class was being fitted for servic*' ':n 
tne Japanese war. PHpr^^. ^hihi.' 
and Parlcpr were appouued iü tht 
same flotilla. one to the Whelp. the 
othei to the Wessex. and off tr*v 

Sfilf ^ f^7^ "^^^^ ^^« f^ar Eastern 
Feet and later the British Pacl^c 
Fleet. At Tokyo together for tVe 
Japanese surrender and on leavo uj- 
gether m Sydney . . And so lt\vas 
Jäte-, In England, after Commander 
i^rker had been invallded out br 
the Navy and the Duke was f ralnin^ 

^ffinr^K^^'^^P^^y °®<=^^« ^^ shore 
cstabl?shments. 

Then came the Royal wedding and 
Ihe request from the Duke and Prin 
cess which postponed Commander 
Parkers retum to Australia, 

Slnce then,. there has been the 
rush of dutlss In London, the wel- 
come to naval llfe In the Mediter- 
ranean. the tour of Canada and now 
the pressure of the Roval tragedy' 
followed by th(? Queen's accesslon 

Michael Parker knows the Prince 

fn^ hir« ^A ^^,* 8^^^^ admlratlon 
lo. nim. And his respect eoes murh 
deeper than that found in^ a nSJma^ 
employer-employee relaticnship Por 
Commander Parker, who left MeU 
l:ourne as an ambitious voung naval 
cadet and b3came a Royal Equerry 
IS a hrm friend of the Prince Con- , 
^" — BRETT OLIVeRl 



THE ARGUS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT Page 1 i 



1^^:' 




Page 12 THE ARGUS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 




THE ARGUS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT Page 13 




'^•SfCA 




T is fitting that the family which 
will probably give its name to 

future rulers of Britain should 

already have a place in British naval 
tradition. 

The family, the Mountbattens, once 
the Battenburgs, are also so closely 
assodated ivith royalty that their 
name is a household ivord in five 
continents. 

Ninety-nine ycar« ago, thcre was born to the 
younger son of a German Grand Duke a boy 
from whom all the Battenburgs and Mount- 
battens of today are descended. How did this 
quite obscure family in a Europe overcrowded 
with titled younger sons rise in three genera- 
iions to positions of eminence? The family 's 
history is a tale of energy and talent. 



"^^■^fS 



This is an adaptabie family. 
ünlike some other aristocratic 
hoiises, it has come to terms 
with the modern world. 

Prince Philip, who has 
»ravelied the world as a naval 
OiTicer. and earned his promo- 
ticns on merit, is an example in 
this generation 

Four Battenburgs and Mountbat- 
tens have married members of the 
British Royal family. Prince Louis 
Ol Batienburg married Victoria Al- 
bcrra. granddaughter of Queen 

Victoria Another Battenberg mar- 
r!ed Ahce, a daughier of Queen 
Victoria. Henry Maurice of Batten- 
burg married the E»rincess Beatrice. 

And now the Duke of Edinburgh 
is married to Queen Elizabeth. 

In the Victorian age, the many 
daugliteis and gfanddaughters of 
the Quoen must have presented a 
Problem to the Royal family and 
Its advisers. It was still the day 
of arranged marriages, and the 
descendants of the Queen coqld^not 
go out.':ide a very small circle of 




A worid-iamous 
coup/e: y i c e- 
Admiral i a r I 
Mounibatten o# 
Burma and his 
wife, idwina. 




THE HOUSE OF 
MOUNTBATTEN 



Royal-connected persons in their 
search for husbands, 

As it turned out nothing could 
have been more briJliJ-r.t than the 
marriage of Princes Victoria .*Jberta. 
Her young bridegroom was a sei vlng 
naval officer — like Prince Philip. 
A year after his marriage he was 
promoted Commander at the age of 
31; six years later he was a füll 
Captain. The following, year he was 
recalled from his sea command to 
co-ordlnate naval and military pollcy, 
at the Admiralty. 

In those days there was no war, 
and promotions were slow, The 
Lords of the Admiralty did not pro- 
mote Royal husbands out of flatCery. 
On merit. the German- born Prince 
became Naval Aide to the Queen. 

In that Position he became a 
friend of the Prince of Wales, who 
was to succeed to the throne as 
Edward VIT. It is well known that 
Edward VII vied with his cousln, 
Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany, for 
the naval supremacy of the world. 

It was Prince Louis of Battenburg 
who bullt the greatest navy the 
world had seen — the force that, 
under Jellicoe and Beatty, defeated 
Germany In 1917. At tlie outbreak 
of the war, this brilllant man was 
First Sea Lord at the Admiralty — 
one of the most powerful men In 
England. He had spent his carecr In 
the Service of Britain. But peoplc 
talked; "After all he Is a German." 
The Prince of Battenburg reslgnea 
his Position. 

The family had many Royal con- 
nectlons — but, Ü there can be such, 
It had more than that. It had tena- 
city and determlnatlon. Durlng the 
First World War there was a natural 
desire on the part of the Royal 
Family to signal Its British charac- 
ter by abandonlng, all conncctlons of 



name with the dynastles that origi- 
nated, at least in some branches, in 
Germany. 

So the house of Hanover became 
the House of Wlndsor. And the 
family of Battenburg rellnquished 
formally all its f orelgn- sounding 
tltles. For twenty mlnutes. there 
were only some "Mr. Battenburgs." 
Then King George V. created the old 
counsellor of his father and his 



LEfT: Sir Ernest Cassel , wealthy 
grandfather o« the Countess of 
Burma. RIGHT: Prince Henry 
et Battenburg, grandfather of 
Prince Philip. 




grandmother to be First Marquess of 
Mllford Haven, with the name 
Mountbatten. 

THE family entered the 
stränge period between 
the wars with a new 
name and high reputation. 

For the following flfteen 
years, the dosest connection be- 
tween the Royal Family and 
the Mountbattens was the firm 
friendship between Edward, 
Prince of Wales, and Lord Louis 
Mountbatten, son of the great 
Admiral of the Fleet. 

Lady Alice, the sistcr of Lord Louis, 
married Prince Andrew of Greece, 
and her fortune was llnked with that 
of the Greek Royal family. They 
had four daughters before their son 
was born on Jun? 10, 1921. He was 
christened Philip. 

Before his engagement to Prln- 
cess Elizabeth was announced. he 
took a sptrial oath of allegiance and 
renounced his Greek tltles and 
Claims. 

One of the greatest and most sur- 
prlslng marriages of the Immediate 
"back-to-normal" period after the 
first World War was between Lord 
Louis Mountbatten, the uncle of 
Prince Philip, and The Hon. Edwtna 
Cassel , the daughter of Lord Moi-it 
Temple. The bride was one of the 
greatest helresses in Britain. Her 
grandfather was Sir Ernest Cassel. , 
personal banker and adviser to 
Kings. 

The mllUons Sir Blrrest Cassel 
Invested In railways and Industries 
throughout the world are still bear- 
ing fruit. 

Lord Louis, llke his father, was a 
brilllant servlng naval oflßcer, but 
war. whlch ended the career of his 
father, was his opportunity. 

When the toughest Command of 
the war came along, he became head 
South East Asla Command. Lord 
Louis had a band In the fate of 
Indonesla; he turned Burma upsldfe 
down; with the war over. he re- 
turned to London. 

Suddenly it was proposed that he 
should go to New Delhi as the last 
Viceroy. His mission there Is now 
over, and he Is back to his sea 
command. And that is where so 
many of the Mountbattens would 
always like to be. 

— CYNTHIA ROBB 






\ 



I 



j^- 



f 



K 




QUEEH MARY I 




IX women have ruied Britoin 
before Elizabeth II succeeded 
to the Throne. Under the Queens, 
Britain knew victory in war, revoit 
at home, golden years of peoce, 
uneasy times of trouble. Two of 
the reigns were tragic. Two were 
glorious. But all of the women 
who ruIed were remorkoble. 

The first British Queen proclaimed 
in modern history had a tragr.'c, nine- 
day reign. She was the Lady Jane 
Grey, daughter of the Duke of Suf- 
folk, who was put on the Throne in 
the uneasy days after the death of 
Edward VI. She had married a 
scion of the great Dudley family, and 
her accession was a move to unseat 
the House of Tudor. 

But Enjcland would have none of the 
priace politics. There was an outcry, and 
Lady Jane wa.s dethroned. 

Her Tcign had lasted from Juiv 10 to 
19. 1553. Mary Tudor. daug:hter of Henry 
VIII and Catherine of Aragon, reigned in 
her stcad. 

The talented, scholarly. bcautiful Jane 
died on the block a year later. 

Mary's had been an unhappy childhood, 
and history has tended to make her appear 
a vlilaincss. But the name of "Bloody" 
Mary is unjust. Her faults were rcally 
those of inexperience and conviction. As 
a pirl »he had to face ccnstant rcorn from 
her father. sclely because she had not been 
born a boy. 

Mary's bid to restore the Roman Catholic 
Church in Bi itain brou^ht her into con- 
flicts throuj^hout the land. In her reifet 
nothing pro: perrd in Britain. and thcre was 
bad fortune overseas. It was a melancholy 
time. Mary died, embittered. in 1558. 

Eng:land had a new Queen — Elixabcih 
Tudcr, a woman with the wisdom of ■ 



-•*-••- 



LADY JANE GREY 
7553 



QUEEN MARY II 
7689-7694 




QUEEN ELI2ABETH I, 
15587603 



QUEEN ANNE 
1702-1714 



QUEEN VICTORIA, 1837-1901 

serpent. the manner of a man. the tonitur 
of a flshwife, and the foresight of a sage 
Above all. though. she was a rallying point 
for the nation. Here began a gloriou.t 
relgn. 

For 45 years Eliz:^beth wooed her people, 
teased her enemie:-, fought wars und woki 
then?. and saw her country rise to great - 
ne.s. Ever since her time, men have 
studiod her ways. wiitten books about her, 
rxamined the secrets of her success. But 
she is still as much an enignia as she was 
to the people of her own times. 

Elizabeth died in 1603. Ei»hty-six years 
later theie was a°:ain a Queen on England'5 
throne — Mary II. daughter of James II. II 
was clear wh»le Charles II was still allve 
thi»t Mary would succeed, and the girl was 
married to William. Prince of Orange, 
after much heiitation. She ruIed England 
from 1689 to 1694 Jointly with William. 
.Mary was able. shrewd, and determined. 
She waf a wcman of dignity, in both pri- 
vate ."nd public life. In later years her 
health was pocr. She d'ed of smallpox. 

Britain's next Queen was Anne, the last 
of the Stuarts. She was an amiable. 
plc.-'sant woman of no great gifts. but con- 
siderable charm. But she could be ob- 
rtinate. and the had a Stuart sense of the 
Divine Right of Kings. 

Anne died in 1714. and it was nearly a 
Century before a woman ruIed again. In 
1837, Alexandrina Victoria, a girl of 18. 
lesj than five feet high, sentimental, ob- 
.stinate, gracefui, but not beautiful. became 
Queen of Britain and, later. Empress. 

Hi.vtory's judginent of Victoria is that 
she was not clever. But in her reign 
Bi itain grew grealer and wealthier. whlle 
her integrity kept the Throne dose to 
the people. As a girl she was the least 
legal cf figures. Ar an Empress. she became 
the mor t regal of rulers. 

Victoria died in 1901. a small. immensely 
dignified, but lonely old lady who had seen 
two jubilees. From her Throne she had 
seen a great Empire grow. She was more 
than a symbol. She was a woman wilh an 
imp^iial mirsion, a great Queen. 



Page 14 THE ARGUS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT 



THE ARGUS SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT Poge 15 




7AA^m 



DECEMBER 2, 1954 

- " Regisrered o/'thc G.P.O., Melbourne, for 
^;^L;on5mi$sio/ by post os o newspoper. 



^:;:::S'^;^v^,«''l^ 



WALTHAM'S Bargain Gifts for "THE HOBBYMAN" 



1 



a toV.'VIi? V ^eclsicn^h" U*1n*5t^^^^ hlkers and Buy Sfcouts. Not 

liquid damped or dry caid TheT ComDasVes T^^^^ be suppUed in two types, either 

htted with speciaJly ßround viewinc prism and hair-line rain.rat^r} i« V^ w ^"** *'^'''' ^'^' 
Model. £6/10/-; Liquid Damped. £14/10/-. Postage and PaSlnK'*^3/6!^n\?r.sU^^4/6. ''' ^*'** 

^ Te!^pVo^e^:h^^^';^^'';ls;'•;;ra.%:^lir;ee?7^^^^ '%tHe best type 

recent Korean campaiRn. Entirely self-contained unft Jtth^ «J? k»^» °iL.Y"""' '"c""«*»"« »he 

double-action loud-^nglng beuV. a^d thrÄr band cranV'Sener^^^^^^^^ Sttl7 w^^ft^^J^' 

P.M.G. hand-set. Can be used successtullv nvpr rfi>;fon/.oQ ..^ «^ ♦ . rliied wlth Standard 

constructed to withstand rouRh usage and all tyj^s cf cUmate ^^0^1,^2^*^«/^^/ '"*"^ SturdUy 

batteries. Other niodels and equipment availaWe. Call tnd in^jISf ^*/"/- «»<=h. tncluding 

9 

manufactured a.f fts^hinS rod^'lnd are *sS Äg and DläVle'' fhl^'th.'^'^ ''"«*"»"?' 

*.L*;^'*^'**"'' ^*^* *2ft. of super-tempered tubulär steeL Two tvpei a^ailahle* Amp^I^ 

K^W'^a^rWel^h'ra.'ri^St.rsZ-ni-tra':*^ ^'^ ^^"^^ s.ott?? t^^"*Si% ^"r^^^T 



4 



rtartVn v«il?. VAI.VK Kl^CrYCl.OPAKlJIA. The mcst comprehcnsive bock of 

nrnf^«)^^'»^ *^^/ P""'«l- An invaluable book of reference for the amateuTand 

ThKll"*« '"^/^"k "»«^hanic. Comolete with Instructions in flfteen l^guages 

Tomnilt-"'?'' °' ^I** many iK>oks on radlo technique handied bv us We have a 

oT?^^'^^".*^*'.*'/ DuWications from the construction of a crvstal sei to^ the mast 

advanced televlsion construction. Call and inspect. £3/3/-, postage 2/- 

J? i^^^"!'"*' TKI.KSCOPES. Magnlfication X5 to XI5 This is un- 

^^rnnf^^ Vi^ ^"*.f Telescope bargain we have ever offer^ Sturdily c^- 

Äi'n Originally used by the Armed Forces for aircraft spSTting 'S 

modet has two adjustments. one for altering the magnlfication and one for 

l*^."hi^.^ ^" .'**S*M*" ^"»^ «-Iflemen. bird watchers.amateur astronomers 

yachtsmen and hshermen. Dimensions: 2 feet long by 2V2 inches dlamete?' 

approx. Made by W. Ottway. Eng. PRICE: £15. aiameter 

5 .'''■^^'o<^'n*J/' ^lOTOH.««. We speciaüse in small low-voltage 

Ä.wial?«*"!^** voll AC/DC. The.e Motors ^re ideal for mode^rSway 

enthuMasts. photographers; and many other purposes. Can Ije operated 

very successtully from a mains transformer. thus rendering them lafe 

for use by children. PRICES from Z9/6 to £3/10/-. . 

Interstate 8/6. -1-3/10/-. Postage and Packing 6/-. 



8 «-\Y<ir.\ 

t'YI.IMJKRS. 

These Cylinders 
have b e e n con- 
structed under Gov- 
ernment Inspection 
to withstand a work- 
ing pressare of 650 
Ibs., and have a cubic 
capacitv of 2.1001n. 
Dimensions: 24in. iong 
by 12in. dia. Welght 
18 Ibs. Constructed of 
non-shatterable stalnless 
Steel. In "lew of the 
slze of the Cyllnder it 
is Ideal for use wlth 
spray palnting, or storage 
for ga.ses for la>x)ratories. 
or as an alr-pres.sure 
cyllnder for use wlth in- 
flatable rafts. etc. PRICE: 
£6/10/-. 






tttC^^' 









.•-^ 



m- 



:n-4 



8 



9 ,\\VI<;.%TIO\AI. 

r«Mi».\ss. TYPK o:sii. 

The famous BnglLsh Aircraft 
Navigator's Hearing Compass. 
This fs one of the biggest bar- 
gains we have ever ofTered. 
Original cost to the Government 
was £35 each. Liquid damped. 
fltted with specially ground prLsm. 
complete wlth light fllter. and 
hou.sed in special .shcck-proof casp 
Dimensions: 6>2in. dla. BVzln. deep. 
Ideal for yachtsmen. etc. OMLY A 
FEW LEPT TO CLEAR. PRICE: 
45/- each. Parked welght: 12 Ibs 



\ 



\ 



II 



X 



10 



10 »''IKI' 

■*' Fl Ml'.s. 

Brand new. manu- 
factured by Thompson 
of America, foremost 
manufacturer of this 
type of equipment in 
the Ü.S.A. This Is a 
vane-type pump and Is 
suitable for pumping 
water or any other 
liquid. Ideal for draln- 
ing flooded cellars, bilges. 
or for use with fish ponds, 
small Irrigation Systems. 
Model illu.strafed— capacity 
400 gallons per' hour — 
£3/10/-. Fitted with 24- 
volt Motor, for ii.se with 24 
or 32-volt home-lightinj 
Systems £15. Larger 

model - capacity 700 gallons 
per hour - complete wlth 
24-volt. Motor. £16/10/-. 

I 1 woRi.i) . iia\<;f: 

HAniO RKCKIVP.ItS. 

This set is the re.sult of exten- 
sive research work by Govern- 
ment laboratories throughout the 
Empire, and was Standard com- 
municatlon equipment in aircraft. 
We have been successfui In pur- 
rhasing five hundred of these He- 
ceivers. each Receiver has been 
overhauled. tested. and reconstructed 
for u.se an mains. There is no set 
to equal this for reception of 
European broadcasUs; a fact numer- 
ous buyers will substantiate. We have 
only a limited quantity left of our 
original buy. DONT DELAY. ORDER 
TODAY. This Set uses eleven Standard 
• 3 fllament valves. and has a frequency 
coverage from 140 Kcs. tn 20 Mcs. 
Complete with loud-speaker in attractlve 
leatherette ra.'^e. PRICE: £34/17/6. 



We cordially invite you to call and inspect our enormous ränge of ex-service equipment, which U readily 
adaptahle for many other uses. If unahle to make a personal inspection^ send for a copy of our latest 

catalogue. (Enclose 3d. to cover postage,) 



WALTHAM TRADIIV« CO. 




-IC 

-^ 
-It 

-K 
•Ic 
-Ic 

-IC 

-Ic 

-IC 

-Ic 
-Ic 
-Ic 

-IC 

-K 
-IC 
-Ic 

-IC 
-IC 

-Ic 
-Ic 

-IC 
-IC 
-IC 

-Ic 

-IC 
-IC 
-IC 
-IC 
•IC 

-IC 
•IC 
-IC 

•Ic 

•IC 



ps 



Then watch 
your figure! 



After 30, many women have 
sefiously to face up to it, that 
their figure is no longer what 
it used to be. Fat forms over 
the hips, the waist line goes, 
legs and arms grow fatter, the 
bust needs more support, a 
"double chin" begins to show. 
Now you can restore your 
slender youthfulness, easily 
and quicIUy. A scientific treat- 
ment recommended by the 




highest medical opinion, tested 
and proved in Hospitals 
throughout the U.S.A., is 
obtainable in Australia. It is 
sold under the proprietary 
name of A.S.T. — American 
Slimming Tablets. Completely 
safe, containing no purgatives, 
they entirely supersede harsh, 
old-fashioned methods. You 
take one tiny tablet, three 
timcs a day, after meals. In 
no time that flabby fat. that 
dangerous overweight will dis- 
appear, and you'll feel 
healthier, look healthicr. Ask 
your chemist about A.S.T.— 
American Slimming Tablets. 
8/6 a bettle. 

Pr epared in Australia by 

A.S.T. (A/sia.) PTY. LTD. 

Newcastle. NSW. 




yk- 

>f 
jf 
jf 
jf 

yk 

yh 
y^ 

yk- 
y^ 









»» 



HOTEL OXFORD 

427 SWANSTON ST., MELB. 



I 



Famed for Cuisine 
Superlative Wines of all Nations. 



SERVICE 
F J 3 9 8 9 



; 



STAMP C'OI.I.KC'TORS 

77 dlir. Foreign Stampi Crom many eountries 

% ly in H l.tktn "free.""'" 

AHIMOI.I». WIIKKI.KR Ä <'0. 

Cwllins St.. .MKLBOUKNI-: MB49I3 



^ Interesting focts about unusuoi People ond Things 

snipped from current bes»-sellers on Hie world's bookshelves. 



N 



r all the money in 
ingland could sove fhe 
ife of Ernesf Cossers 

wife, Annette. She died of 

consumption in 

1880, three yeors 

oftei' their mor- 

rioge, ond with 

her died Ernest 

Cossel's heort. 
Until their meet- 

ing, he had been a 

tight-faced fanatic- 
ally hard - working 
robot who, landing at Liverpool 
as a German immigrant in 1868 
with nothing but a carpet bag and a 
violin, had risen from a 15s.-a-week 
Clerk to be manager of an imporcant 
firm of I.x)ndon bankers at the aee 
of 22. 

He' had never doubted bis brain 
power. On bis appointment as mana- 
ger his Chief suggested the salary of 
oC500 a year. "You mean £5,000," 
retorted the young man. And jG 5,000 
/'/ had been. 

When his wife died leaving him a 
cne-year-old daughter, he retumed to 
the World he understood— the heaitless 
World of finance. 

For ten years he served the firm of 
Bischoffsheim & Goldschmidt in the 
City of London. Then, at thirty-two, 
he was ready to stand alone. 

He hnanced railways in North and 
South America. He acquired mining 
interests on the Continent. He in- 
vested where others feared to tread. 

And always he worked alone. "A 
partner is a man who can conunit you 
to things and I don't mean ever to be 
committed by anyone." 

BY THE TIME HE WAS 
THIRTY-EIGHT HE HAD MADE 
HIS FIRST MILLION. 

GOVERNMENTS mrned to him for 
aid. He issued loans to Mexico, to 
China, to Uruguay. He straightened the 
financial affairs of the then Prince of 
Wales. He boosted British intetesis 
in Egypt and received a kni/shthood 
from his grateful sovereign. 

Each transaaion brought more 
wealth and power to Sir Ernest CasseL 

He did everything expected of a 
rieh man. He built a mansion — Bipok 
Housc, Mayfair — and imported 800 
tons of marble from Italy to line its 
walls. Even the six kitchens were of 
marble. 

He coUeaed rare porcelain, silver, 
jade; so rare that most of it was not on 
dispiay but under lock and key in a 
bascmcnt strongroom. 

He bought valuable paintings, pay- 
ing 8,700 guineas for a Single portrait. 

Yet he cared for none of these 
things. They were mere stepping- 
stones into the high reaches of Ed- 
wardian society. They were the keys 
to a World which could offer bim 
uothing — but everything to bis only 
child, Maud. 

For her he stubbornly taught him- 
sclf to shoot and ride to hounds. For 
her he bought a magnificent country 
estate where the aristocracy came to 
view his racing-stables and Edward VII 
spent his weekends. For her he enter- 
tained sumptuously, hiring wholc 
ccean liners to accommodate his guests. 







DUm» 



rfneist 





■ t f 

H 


1 


1 


1 i!i 






■H 








1 


[!ii 


m 



On her marriage to 
the grandson of the 
*Earl of Shaftesbury, Sir 
Emest's t r i u m p h 
seemed assured. The 
King himself attended 
the wedding, and later 
stood godfather to her 
first child. 

Perhaps the far-see- 
ing finander had an 
inkling of what was to 
come. To appease 
malignant f a t e he 
donated heavily to 
charity. The largest 
Single item was 
X 200.000 to a Sana- 
torium for ' consump- 
tives. 

All-powerful as Sir 
Ernest was in the world 
of fi na ncie, he could noc aven personal 
tn^edy. 

His daughter omitTacted the disease 
which had killed her mocher. Her dis- 
traught father tried every remedy. 
Eminent spedalists were oonsulted. The 
patient was taken to Switzerland, to 



I i rfil i ll 



|»UI»<:' .- :i: 





C ^ n ada, to the hot, dry dimate of the 
Easc 

But she died in 1911, shortly after 
the death of the King, her father's 
only dose friend. 

By DOW, Sir Emest's wealth was 
legendary. Throughout the war years 
and afterwards. he gave it freely — to 
homes for disabled soldiers, to hospi- 
tals, to educadonal bodies. In all, he 
gave away £2,000,000. 

OisCMctions wet« s^owetc^ on klm 
He tecenrerf lo«r Bntäk mmd aerem 



w«s 



m i m g immä. 



nitke 



lyiGHT after night he dined in soli- 
11 tary State in his vast dining-room, 
designed for a hundred guests, his only 
companion a sokmn, staring Pekingese. 
For a Short while in 1919, Brook 
House came to lifo again, when 
Edwma Ashley (the present Countess 
MoundMtten) came to suy with her 
grandfatfaer. 

But it was too late. Sir Ernests 
health was failing. 

Doctors recommended a stay in the 
South of Franoe. In a desperate hid 
for hfe. he bought the beautiful "Villa 
of the Cedars" at Cap Ferrat, for 
£88.000, in August, I92I. 

He never set fooc in it. On Sep- 
tember 21. 1921, at 5.30 pjn.. his 
butler found him dead, slumped over 
his desk. His band stretched con- 
vulsively towards the bellpush. His 
fingers never reached it. 

— RFNF.F. HAI A4 




Monday night is ladies' night at this pub 

A In a quiet, almost English-like atmosphere, mums, wives 
ond girlfriends enjoy the friendship and competition of o 
qame of quoits, and a beer or two, right up to 10 p.m. closing. 




wives along and left them in George\s 
cosy lounge, and it was not long be- 
fore the mums in the back room drifted 
into the bar to cheer dad. There is no 
law against ladies entering a public 
bar in Tasmania. 

But the boys were not always on tfie 
peg. The girls thought the game was 
easy and they set out to take them 
down a peg or two. Family "grudge" 
matches resulted, played according to 
the rule book. 

Somebody suggested that the girls 
should have a club of their own and 
competitions. Now Monday night is 
ladies' night at the Star. More than 
thirty regulars are members of the 
quoits and beer club. 

An entry tee ot two shiiimg gives 
cveryone a chance to win a worth- 
while prize. Ladies with a steady aim 



can win pressure cookers, table lamps, 
^lassware and cnina. 

Now the bar is crowded with men- 
folk on Monday nights. The atmo- 
sphere is happy. The ladies in the bar 
can enjoy a drink with dad, play 
quoits, maybe collect a prize or two, 
and return home aware of that fact 
that their hotel is not just the place 
where husbands go to get away froin 
their wives fof an hour or two. Ther;.*'s 
no rush to beat the dock and drunks 
are a rare nuisance. 



• When this edition went to 
press, N.S.W, wcre solving their 
hotel closing problems. Let's 
hope the Sydneyites have 
learned something from this 
lesson from Tasmania on 
sensible drinking. 




Yaur CHRISTMAS 
GIFT PROBLEMS 

Salwyed in S wninutes! 



Here's an easy wav to glve your frlends plcasure all the year 
solve your own Christmas Gift problems at once and save money lor 
yourself. Just de what thousands of other POST readers do: NomlnM 
your friends as subscribers to POST and get a Christmas Box far r 
seif in the form of a SEVEN SHILLINaS REDÜCTION In the 
scription rate. Here is Post's offer: 

One subscrlption — 52 / - ; 

XMAS Gift rate: Minimum of TWO 
subscriptions — 45/- each, saving 
you at least 14/- on the two. 

To get this concession, all you need 
do is write TWO names and addresses 
(including your own if you wish) In 
the vouchers bclow and post them now 
with your remittance to cover cost to 
The Clrculatlon Manager, Australa- 
sian POST. An attractive gift-card 
with your compliments will be sent to 
your friend and from then on POST 
will be delivered to him (or her) 
every week for a year. 




Ermry Posfs a Wi 



CUT HERE 



AUSTRALASIAN POST 



CHRISTMAS 
CONCESSION VOUCNER 



"1 



The CirculatUm Manager, 

Australasian POST. Box 244B, G.P.O.. Melbourne. 



l 
I 



Please register two persons named below as subscribers to Australaakm POST S 



1 



for one year, for which I enclose £4/10/- to cover total cost. , 

NAME I 

ADDRESS ! 

I 

,, •• •• •■ •• >• •* •• •» •• •• ** ** ** **B 

——^ I 

I 

NAME • 

• 
I 

ADDRESS 

a, •• •• •• .■ .. .. .. .. •• .. •• •• •• «. 

■ ■ • 

SENDER'S NAME * 

ADDRESS .... 



BOX 244B, G.P.O., MELBOURNE 



2 



Ausinlasian POST, December 2, , 7954 




AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 

Phorie: (212)744-6400 

Fax:(212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Date: 12/29/2009 



Box: 



Sys#: 000198685 

Folder: Q 



September 18, 1972 



i-ETtiflS TO THE EDITOR 



o 



Unwarranted attack on 
Victorian Bar integrity 



SIR, — In this morning's "The 
Age" (16/9), you published a lei- 
ten concerning barristers' fees, 
which I would like to answer as 
it constitutes an entirely unwar- 
ranted attack on the integrity of 
the Victorian Bar. 

It is of vital importance to the 
Community that it has available to 
it the Services of able, inde- 
pendent counsel, of complete 
integrity, who will act for any 
Citizen, no matter what counsers 
personal views may be, to protect 
and enforce that citizen's legal 
rights in the courts. 

It is my belief that the Vic- 
torian Bar does provide this Ser- 
vice to the Community. 

Perhaps it is not generally 
recognised how exacting the work 
of a barrister is and how much 
time and thought is taken up in 
the preparation of each case. 

A normal working week for a 
barrister includes not only the 
time spent in court during the 
day, with Conference before and 
after court, but also many hours 
of work every night of the week 
and on every Sunday. 

Everything that counsel does, 
except secretarial work, has to 
be done by him personally; there 
is no delegation. 

Every client's case requires 
anxious consideration of questions 
of fact and often on questions 
of law. 

By 1971, the level of barristers' 
fees had fallen well below what 
was reasonable, having regard to 
the rapid fall in the value of 



money and the extent to which 
the earnings of other sections of 
the Community had risen. 

In 1972, to bring the fees up 
to reasonable levels, there have 
been substantial increases in the 
amount of barristers' fees in all 
jurisdictions and the simple facl 
is that fees are now at a level 
which is fair. 

As an instance of the need 
which existed for an increase and 
of the reasonableness of the in- 
crease made, I would point out 
that fees in the County Court 
had not been increased for nine 
years before 1972 and that, even 
when increased, they were still 
below those in some of the other 
States. 

It is only just that counsel who 
bear the bürden of caring for the 
interests of their clients should 
be entitled to reasonable remune- 
ration. 

I assure the members of the 
public that they may have com- 
plete confidence in the honor and 
integrity of the Victorian Bar. 

W. O. HARRIS, QC (chaimian, 
Victorian Bar Council). 



nrr 



unera 



detail! 



-I 



are available 

SIR, — Historians need not worrv 
about the Australian Govern- 
ment's refusal to release docu- 
ments about the brutal treatment 
of the internees on the Dunera. 
The British Government released 
all this Information in 1941. It 
can be found not only in Hansard 



rcports of debates in the House 
of Commons on the Dunera scan- 
dal, but in the English newspaper 
reports of the court martial which 
foilowed, when the commanding 
ofRcer of the Dunera, Major Scott, 
and two sergeants faced charges 
which included ill-treating the in-* 
ternees and robbing them. 

I cannot understand why the 
Commonwealth Archivist, Mr. 
Dunner, after giving me permis- 
sion to see the list of the in- 
ternees, cancelled the permission 
immediately afterwards on the 
grounds that the Home Office had 
requested this. I had repeatedly 
given Mr. Dunner an assurance 
that in my forthcoming book, no 
person would be mentioned if he 
did not wish it. 

On August 2, and again on 
August 20, I asked Mr. Dunner 
to give me the name of the official 
at the Home Office, who allegedly 
overruled the decision of the 
Australian Government. So far 
Mr. Dunner has been too busy to 
answer these letters. 

CYRIL PEARL (Paddlngton, 
NSW). 

Do something about 
battered babies 

SIR,— The plight of the battered 
baby is brought to our attention 
once more. Before it falls back 
into oblivion again, as far as the 
general public is concerned, let us 
do something about it,.and not 
just elect boards of inquiry to 
"look into the matter," and in- 
tellectualise about it. 



T 



—w ' 



^^ •it^:-( '^ 



Refcrence to the record discloses 
this is a fa;t. 

If my vicw is correct, many 
things flow *rom it: — 

(1) Service.nen who suffered 
injury in tht alleged war have 
a proper action for damages 
against the Government or Stata 
which forced taem to go to war. 

(2) Dependants of deceased ex* 
servicemen have a similar right 

. of action as dependants. 

• (3) Men subject to an illegal 
call-up are entitled to disregard 
the call-up. 

(4) Men serving sentences for 
failure to obey a call-up are en- 

, titled to an immediate release and 

: to sue for damages. 

^ I remember sitt.ng under Pro- 
fessor Charteris, Challis Professor 
of Public International Law with- 
in the University of Sydney, who 
made it quite clear to us that a 
proper declaration of war must 
precede a legal State of war. No 
such declaration was ever made 

, in respect of the long-standing 

: so-called war in Vietnam, which 
has made the United States of 

i America and its allies a by-word 

[ for illegality and savagery in 
South-East Asia. What a demon« 
stration of Christian behavior ! 

I am hopeful that some of my 
brothers in the law will tak© 
action in the High Court of Aus-« 
tralia to test the legality of our 
part in the alleged war. 

Ordinarily, I would insist on 
anonymity in a letter to the press. 
On this occasion. I sign mv name 
and professional Standing with 
pride. 

GAVIN BAILLIE, LLB (Barris- 



■■yi -■ 



■.<r-- 



'r': -^'»E., •"••""" ■ 



..Vi- 



""-'-''■HfeST 



■-^^••«^ 



- ..—«,.„ acn jiaui euijouiojd put twnoojd 'il« «-- ""^ 



nat s so secret about the internees of 1940? 




lELEN FRI7PI I y ' o gathcnng aln^ost rcn^Mscent of 



By HELEN FRIZELL 

WHY ALL THE secrecy 
about the ship Dunera? 

Since June 18, ]971, Mr 
Cynl Pearl, the author has 
been asking the Com- 
monwealth Archivist, Mr J. P 
Dünner, for a complete list of 
the Dunera's 2,639 passengers 
who were mainly German and 
italian internees. 

hn^' ^^l'^' r^^° '^ ^^'ting a 
hook on the Dunera, has given 

this British ship would be 

wi'hlir-^^^;^,,!^^ ^- 

planations being, fjrst, that 
this was an Australian Cabinet 
dec.sion then that it was the 
-h^of the British Home^ 

Finally, the Minister for the 
Environment, Mr Howson, 
said on Tuesday that Dunera 

"Ägr'" "^ ^-"^"'^ '" 

;;;.o i,f.,re -en^ o?^„;S 
^> 'he ,sh.p's Dersonnel. 

^1r Howson said the 



Cruelty and 
terror on 
the prison 
ship Dunera 



an RSL get-together. 



The Dunera left England 
about six weeks after the 
evacuat.on of Dunkirk. Three 
internees dicd on the way out 
One •conimitted suicide dur- 
mg an exercise period by ium- 
Ping pverboard." Two dicd 
irom natural causes." 

Two torpedoes missed the 
Dunera during the voyage. Of 
the prisoners' behaviour the 
^'oloncl rcplied: "I would 



clad only in a blood-sodden 
snirt. His eyes were black, his 
nose mjured. 

serLZV ^''° ^"^S^^ that the 
a m.ddle-aged internce's finger 

BHtlh"'^,/'^'""^^ that one 
British soldier shouted, "You 

severely reprimanded." 

f.T^^ ^P P'eaaed not guiltv 
to two charges. The first was 



S?ar In t ''^ '^^ Arandora 
.hin' ^u'^""^^ torpedoed this 
Z?' Jhfre was panic as 

storm the hfeboats. 

the3' ^^-^ ^"^ ''^^^t some of 

them, said a British soldier 

wno survived r'Herp.iH " 

July 5 1940). of I,Uo in'e'r- 

t'e'Atlanti?.""^"^ '^^^"^^ - 

infil^? "^"^^ "^^"^^ that more 
internees were tobe put tosea 
from England, there was 
panic, says Professor Maver 
Those chosen for the trip tried 
to bribe others to take their 
Paces. But some Arandora 
Mar surv, vors were put on to 

led iT''''- ?^y ^^^^ terri- 
tied. Jt IS vital, says Professor 

Mayer, to remember the times 

the rumours, the fear of sub-' 

marines, drownings and shoot- 

fhJn '"ternees went aboard 

n^ S?f ^ "' Liverpool, wait- 
ing in a long queue. 

... "^"17 ^ayer (classified as 
^;['^"^'y enemy alien") and 
others h.d banknotes in their 
body onfices. All his s Iver 
was taken. ^ 

Internees thought they were 



'll . 



authorities made an inquiry 
into the charges. Suggested? 
There was an inquiry. Details 
of it can be found in Hansard 
reports, in British newspapers 
of 1941, and in "The Sydney 
Mornipg Herald." 

The Dunera (unnamed be- 
cause of wartime censorship) 
reached Sydney on September 
7, 1940. 

"War prisoners arrive from 
England . . . shipload of Ger- 
mans and Italians . . . dra- 
matic incidents on voyage." 
werc the headÜnes. 

The prisoners, some POWs 
and some internees, were 
loaded on to trains and sent to 
a camp at Hay. On the voyage 
out, their guards had been 
"0" troops of the British 
Army. 

The commanding officer 
was a Lieutenant-colonel des- 
cribed by the "Herald" as "an 
impressive kilted figure." The 
CO and troops got a great wel- 
come in Sydney, where the 
colonel spoke to Legacy and 
laid a wreath on the Cenotaph. 

It was a dreadful year. 
Western Europe had fallen to 
the Nazis. German submarines 
skulked the seas. The Battle of 
Britain was raging when the 
Dunera reached Sydney. 

The colonel was a Dun- 
kirk Veteran. Three of his bro- 
thers had been killed in the 
war, and two others were 
interned in Germany. 



They had — as it transpir- 
ed. 

After a court of inquiry 
into allegations of ill-treatment 
of German and Italian intern- 
ees aboard the Dunera, the 
British Secretary for War, 
Captain H. D. R. Margesson, 
ordered the trial by court-mar- 
tial of the CO and of the regi- 
mental sergeant-major and a 
Sergeant. 



Dismissed 



An acting RSM and a Ser- 
geant appeared before a 
field court-martial ("Herald," 
May 21, 1941). The prose- 
cution alleged that internees' 
suitcases remained piled on 
deck . . . that suitcases "were 
apparently broken open," that 
"contents of some were strewn 
about the deck." 

The RSM found not guilty 
on four charges or larceny and 
five of receiving, was found 
guilty ("Herald," May 22, 
1941) on two charges relating 
to distribution of money. Sen- 
tenced to a year's imprison- 
ment, he was dismissed from 
the Service ("Herald," June 
25, 1941). 

The Sergeant allegedly 
had recaptured an internee 
who tried to escape in Mel- 
bourne. Allegedly, this 
internee was left in his cell 




■:^,m)i0»<»<'"- 






^•, l»*<«»:>x»:.; ^t i| » | l ii ^ . ,^ 






The Dunera at Chcular Quay on September 8, 1940. Released 
records will not include the passenger list or inquiry into 

ill-treatment of internees. 



cd troops on paradc in the Du- 
nera, saying: 

"I am aware that if we were 
in the position of these intern- 
ees we would be lucky if our 
belly buttons were left after 
being searched, so I will close 
my eyes to any petty offence 
of purloining. 

"I am an old soldier and 
know that the British Tommy 
regards a time like this as an 
opportunity to help himself." 

Charge two was that the 
colonel or major (different 
ranks are given) fai'ed to en- 
sure a proper inquiry into the 
Violen t treatment of one 
internee. 

The CO was found guilty 
on these charges and was 
"severely reprimanded" 

Australia treated the intern- 
ees well. Many joined the 
Army's Eighth Employment 
Company. After the war, 
many stayed here. They be- 
came scientists, photographers, 
actors, academics. Among 
them were Professor Hugo 
Wolfsohn, Dean of LaTrobe 
University's Faculty of Social 
Science, Mr Franz Stampfl, 
the athletics coach, and Pro- 
fessor Henry Mayer, Professor 
of Political Theory, University 
of Sydney. 

Each year. on September 4, 
in Melbourne, former Dunera 
internees hold a reunion, a 
gathering almost reminiscent 
of an RSL get-together. 

Professor Mayer has not 
gone to the reunions. Many 
Dunera men, he says, would 
teil more horrifying stories 
than he. As a child, he had 
been given a humanist, agnos- 
tic upbringing, and trained in 
detachment. 

"What happened on the Du- 
nera happened to me, but did 
not happen to me," he trics to 
explain. He was not a refugee 
from the Nazis, as so many 
were. but had left Germany 
six years before the war to go 
to school, then to work, in 
Britain. 

After Dunkirk, Britain, 
fearing fifth columnists, 
rounded up aliens and put 
them into camps. Some sailed 



segregated. Rumours flew. 

Guards 'brufaT 

Professor Mayer says he 
saw a British soldier hack off 
an internee's finger with a 
bayonet to get the man's wed- 
ding ring. The man was alive. 
He also saw other soldiers 
knock out internees' teeth for 
the gold fillings. 

"Guards were brutal," he 
says. "I was forced to go in a 
working party which brought 
internees' baggage up on deck 
from the holds. Soldiers went 
through it, took what they 
wanted, then tossed the bag- 
gage into the sea. 

"Some of the luggage con- 
tained Nansen passports 
(international identity certifi- 
cates for displaced pcople) and 
entry visas to the US — docu- 
ments which Jewish refugees 
had given all they had to gain. 
Several attempted suicide after 
the papers went overboard." 

The prisoners were ex- 
ercised every day. 

"We were made to run 
barefoot along the upper 
deck," says Professor Mayer. 
"The troops played little 
gamcs with us. They shot over 
our heads, and thrcw empty 
Whisky bottles in front of us, 
so that we had to jump over 
the glass." 

He adds: "I can quite 
understand how the Britishi 
soldiers feit towards us on thfj 
Dunera. They made no fif»| 
distinctions between NaziH ar 
anti-Nazis. To them, we w^ 
all bloody Germans." - 

Only the Indian seam^ ''" 
board were compassioniK ^^' 
arrival here, the iiiterife<.'> 'j-' 
ceived a ■treoient^^'^V^^ 
favourable impressiflii of ^ 
Aussies," who gavib ciff""^^'^" 
and showed friendfiness- 

Professor Mayer says: ^^^ 

any war, human ^^'"J^L^s 
shows itself — and the ^^^^ 

tardry can be shown ^^ '^J^^ii' 
bers of any nation. B*-';^^^ ^^;, 
does Australia fear »/^.f^Q^J 
lease of the records- ,^ 
knows! I can't Imagin^ a^^^^ ^^^ 
good reason. I'm •", j'*„e.i • 
the records bcing released 



EDITORIALS, FEATURES 





Friday, September 15, 1972 

Preparing for 
new policies 

PREPARATIONS for defence make most 
sense when a possible aggressor can be 
identified — even unofficially — and there 
is a sense of urgency in providing for the 
country's protection. The Minister for Defence 
(Mr. Fairbairn) has neither of these aids in 
selling bis report to Parliament and to the 
public, and we should be the happier for this. 
Since the end of Indonesian confrontation we 
have been unable to find an enemy to arm 
against. Neither the Chinese with their 
southward drive nor the Russians with their 
Indian Ocean fleet offers an imminent peril 
of vote-winning proportions. Mr. Fairbairn has 
frankly reported that he is looking ahead to 
the needs of the 1980s and beyond, which is 
a long, long way ahead. 

This political good fortune offers the 
Government a breathing space to plan ahead 
for a decade and more while the nation, one 
hopes, continues to develop its industrial 
sinews. The main direction of our defence 
policy, necessarily blurred and tentative, was 
sketched out six months ago, leaving one large 
gap to fill in — the detailed planning which is 
being undertaken to prepare us to resist 



boarding-parties if any should appear over the 
horizon. It was already made clear that Aus- 
tralian defence policy would be framed along 
the lines laid down in the Nixon Doctrine, and 
Mr. Fairbairn has repeated this. America will 
help those who help themselves, always pro- 
vided that it feels this is in its national interest. 
The ANZUS Pact still has our fervent support, 
but it is no longer the lifeline that it was. 

In a period of rocketing technical advance 
a Defence Minister has an unenviable task. He 
has to commit huge and expanding sums of 
public money to the acquisition of hardware 
which will not be delivered for years ahead 
and may be obsolescent before it is delivered. 
The decision to build three light destroyers at 
a cost of $355 million (at current prices) will 
apparently be the major load on the Budget 
over the next 10 years, but Cabinet is hesi- 
tating over the escalating cost of a fast combat 
Support ship which the navy wants to make its 
fleet fully effective. Having encumbered itself 
with the cost of the troublesome F-UlCs, the 
Government appears to have decided against 
replacing the Mirage, while it still ponders 
over the offer to buy the "bargain" Phantom 
F4s which it has on lease. 

This hardly adds up to a convincing 
picture of clear and detailed forward planning. 
Mr. Fairbairn Claims that the preparation of a 
new force to satisfy current requirements and 
prepare for the future has already begun. 



Perhaps it has, but the evidence has not yet 
been placed before the public Mr. Fairbairn 
and his departmental secretary (Sir Arthur 
Tange) may have received assiirances that their 
grand plan will receive formal approval but it 
appears that several of its components are still 
being batted between the service experts, the 
Treasury and Cabinet. In Strategie terms we 
are sensibly aiming at a force suited to a mari- 
time and archipelago defence in co-operation 
with well-disposed neighbors. This is where 
our limited forces can be of most use — when 
we have finally decided what weapons to 
build or buy for present or future use. 

Councils are a 
money problem 

THE 317-page Voumard report on local 
government, tabled in State Parliament on 
Wednesday, is a wide-ranging and important 
document. Its main message, however, can be 
reduced to three basic propositions: local 
government in Victoria is geared to the horse- 
and-buggy era; local Councils need more 
autonomy in decision-making; they also need 
access to much greater funds. 

To anyone involved at all closely with 
local government, tliese propositions are 



These men are dangerous, they said: they were wrong 

How the Dunera 
helped Australia 




fairly self-evident. It is a rare municipal or 
shire Council which is not starved for funds or 
deeply in the red today. All have demands 
placed upon them which they find almost 
impossible to fulfil. 

The Problem, as the report notes, is 
historic in its origins. The forms and financial 
structure under which local government is 
forced to operate were dictated by an 1874 act 
of Parliament. The main tasks of local Councils 
then were drainage, road building and bridge 
construction. Today their responsibilities are 
far wider and far heavier. Municipal Councils 
are called on to provide a large variety of 
social welfare Services. In some cases they are 
also asked to bear part of the huge cost of 
freeway and highway construction. Financially, 
such tasks are well beyond them. 

While the reporfs diagnosis of financial 
under-nourishment may be correct, there is a 
touch of unreality about some of the curative 
methods which are prescribed. Indeed, two of 
them were rejected fairly summarily by the 
Premier (Mr. Hamer) yesterday — road tolls 
to finance major highways and a 25 per cent. 
increase in motor registration fees to help 
pay for road improvements. Whatever the 
merit of such suggestions, they are, it seems, 
politically untenable. Ratepayers could be 
expected to react just as sharply to Mr. 



Voumard's Suggestion that many Councils 
could increase their rates. The proposed 
accommodation tax on hoteis, motels and 
guest houses will not get a rousing reception 
in a number of quarters either. 

How then is the leeway to be made up 
and the $70 million, which the report says is 
needed, to be found? The Minister for Locaf 
Government (Mr. Hunt) had a quick answer to 
this question: the Commonwealth Government. 
Without massive assistance from the Common- 
wealth, he said, the report was "no go". 
Passing the bück to the Federal Government in 
this way is a stock response of State Govern- 
ments. Nonetheless, there is one way in which 
the Commonwealth can help out: by making 
local government a party to Loan Council 
meetings, decisions and allocations. The Labor 
Party has suggested the Loan Council should 
be expanded to include local Council 
representatives from each State. It is an idea 
that bears close examination. 

In passing, the report urged that 
responsibility for freeway and road construction 
be taken from the Board of Works and 
entrusted to the Country Roads Board which 
would be reconstituted. There is logic in this 
Suggestion. There is logic. too, in the call for 
a critical review of municipal boundaries 
throughout the State. Two hundred and ten 
separate Councils operating within a State the 
size of Victoria may possibly be wasteful. 



THE strängest boatload of 
migrants ever to reach 
this country arrived in Syd- 
ney on September 7, 1940. 

HM transport Dunera, a former 
British India liner of 11,000 tons, 
sailed from Liverpool on July 10 
with some 2400 civilian internees 
on board, plus .300 German and 
Italian prisoners of war and mer- 
chant seamen. 

Among them were 500 surviv- 
ors of the White Star liner 
Arandora Star (of which more 
presently), torpedoed a week pre- 
viously off the Irish coast. The 
Dunera itself narrowly escaped a 
torpedo attack on the convoy m 
which it was travelling. 

The "passengers" were guarded 



the Australien National Univer-" 
sity, was interned in Canada, re- 
turned to England at the end of 
1940. and joined the University of 
Sydney after the war. 

Mr. Harry Seidler remained in 
Canada, qualified as an architect, 
and after the war moved to Syd- 
ney, whose appearance he has 
done much to change. 

At the outbreak of war in 1939 
there were> more than 74,000 
people of German or Austrian 
origin living in Britain. Some had 
been there for 20 or 30 years, 
but the great majority were refu- 
gees from the Nazi regime. 

The British Government set up 
tribunnis to scrse*^ "ü "on/»*v«tr 
aliens" into three classes, A, B 
and C. A class was defined as 
those about whom there were 



A report by SOL ENGEL, Professor of 
Sociology of- the University of New South 
Wales, on the prison ship Dunera and the 
internees it brought to Australia in 1940. 
The Dunera this week was labelled a 
"horror" ship. Brutality, theft and other 
ill-treotment by guords has been alleged. 
The Federal Government hos refused to 
give any details of the voyage or its pas- 

senaers. 



\ 




^c[^Mi>-r' 



't- -j - .«■ 



• •• 



• • 









\^v-. -^ ... .^^ .. • ■.•/■.•..\,:-— *V-V*- • . • 




. . "My compliments to Ihe King of Cocos - onnounce the orrivol of the 20th Century!" 



TJfvmF 



Suffolk regiments and the Royal 
Army Service Corps, many of 
whom had beer» at the evacuation 
of Diinkirk. The Sydney MominR 
Herald of September 7 described 
them as "men of maRnificent type, 
well-built, smart, kcen and alert". 
A subsequent court of inquiry 
was less complimentary. 

As forthe passengers, the Daily 

Telegraph of the same dato was 

concerned with the danger of 

admitting both Nazis and com- 

munists to Australia. These Men 

are Dangerous, said its headhne. 

None of the papers feit it neces- 

sary to mention that the biggest 

group among the internees vvere 

. Jewish or part-Jewish rcfugees 

■ from Flitler, and that many of 

them vvere no more than boys. 

Many of these inadvertent im- 
migrants became Australians by 
choice, and their contribution to 
Australia's economic and cultural 
life has been extraordinarily rieh, 
although it remains largely un- 
acknowledged. 

The Canadians, who also har- 
bored several thousand internees 
; shipped from Fngland at the same 
'. time, are better informed. Barbara 
' Moon, a staff writer for Maclcan's 
,' Magazine, Toronto, published a 
. long and carefully researched 

• article in that Journal of February 
: 10. 19()2, aboLit Canada's Wel- 

• come Enemies, of whom 972 had 
elccted to stay in Canada. 

Incidontally, a few of these for- 
mer Canadian internees have 
come to Australia, just as a few 
of (hose who vvere sent to Aus- 
tralia are now in Canada or the 
USA. 

Professor Heinz W. Arndt, of 



those who were clearly trust- 
worthy. B was an intermediate 
category. 

Of the total, 600 were put into 
A class and interned; 64,000 into 
C class and given complete free- 
dom; 7000 into B class and placed 
undcr restriction as to their free- 
dom of movement. 

In addition, some 55,000 were 
separately classitied as "refugees 
from Nazi oppression". 

With 120 tribunals operating, 
the basis for Classification was 
sometimes highly suspect. After 
numerous protests about the in- 
clusion of anti-Nazis (e.g. former 
members of the International Bri- 
gades in Spain) in B or even A 
class, a revicw was ordered by 
the Home Office. 

But it did not start until May, 
1940, and only after a quarter 
of the B-class cases had been re- 
viewed when the collapse of the 
allied front in Europe brought 
an abrupt change of policy. 

This change dated from May 
12, 1940, vv^ien a vvide coastal 
belt stretching from Inverness to 
the Dorset coast w^as declared 
"protected", and all male 
Germans and Austrians aged 16 
ito 60 living in the area were 
interned. 

Francois Lafitte, author of the 
Penguin Special The Intern- 
nient of Aliens, noted that a 
number of scholars at Cambridge 
(including staff of the London 
School of Economics, housed at 
Cambridge during the war) were 
caught in this net simply because 
Cambridge was in the coastal 
belt. 

Four days later, all male 



AUCTION 

SATUROAY, 23RD SEPTEMBER. AT 1 1 A.M. 

Executc < Ss . ■» Auf um Ro««i. HAWTHORN 

AUBURN HEIGHTS 

TlLfeü BRICH RESIDENCE 

Close Carev. MLC. Genaiz.ino. J Btdrms. and Dct.irh<?d Room, SpacIou< LIvIngrm., 

Den, Well-fitted Kit. .ind Bathrm. Laundry and Double Garage. Land: 54' x 150 

•ipprox. Terms; 10% Dep.. B,»l. 60 days. 

KFITM C. MILLER. AUCTIONE^R 
363 Burwood Road. Glcntcrrtc. Opp. Town Hall. 81 3071, A.H. 92 S791. 



SATUrtD.AY H(h OCTOBER AT 2 P.M. 



56 COCIIRANK ST.. 



BRICHTON 



Good posit. cur. L"lm Grove. just south of North Rd.. 

EXCELLENF ATTRACTIVE SOLID BKICK RE.SIDENCE 

sct in deligh'ful, wallod-in, easy to maiiitain marden. Comp. Hall, beautiful 
(ieorgian louiiije D/D lo laiye sunny livingroom with solid doors to 
loveu'd Paiio, Diiiin>;room (all en-suite) 3 Bi-dtoorns, Kitchen, biithrm., Int. 
& e-\l. t.-)ilots, I lumfry oloc. 120 gal. Fl. WS. Dblo paraKC, Exceiient condllion. 
Many cxtra.s. Land 63 x 133 OPF.N FOK IN.SPECTION. Wednesday 2-3 p.m. 

or by appointment. 

J. K. niXTOiV PTV. LTD. 

S31 GLENHUNTLY ROAD, ELSTERNWICK. 53 0255. 



ELWOOD 



Saturday, 2Sr'' S«pt. at 2 p.m. 



7 Byron Strcef 



Solid Brick Tlled Villa. Cnr. Cyrit Street, dose Tram, Schools. Comp. 7 Spaclous rms. 

Sult excell. larcc (amily home or converslon to flats. Ind. 2 Toilets, G.irage. Süperb 

Future Corner Fiat Site 42 x 120. Open for inspection Sat. & Wed. 2-3 p.tn. 

J. R. BUXTON pTY. LTD.. 331 GIcnhuntty Road, Elttcrnwick. 53 02SS. 



BOX HILL — WATTLE PARK 

For Säle by Public Aucfion 

198 Elqar Road, Wattle Park 

on Saturday, 16th September, at 11.30 o.m. 

or\ ihe pioncriv. adjaccnt Shopping Centre 

Substantial Double Brick Villa 

with TC. T;lcs comprlsiiiH Entrancc H.\ll loiingc and Sep. Dlningroom. Oil hcating, 

2 spac. bcdrooms, wcll-<ippoinle«d kitchen, tiled bathroom and shower. int. toilet, 

laundry, bnck garage under housp. L.ind 58" x 170' .ipprox. Access side R.O.W. 

Terms: 10'\, Dep., b.^l.^nce 30 days 

V. J. BÜRDEN PTY. LTD. RESI 

Tram Terminus, Wattle Park 
288 1965, 288 3S0b. After Hours: 288 4418. 89 2808 





Mr. Felix Werder 

Germans and Austrians from 16 
to GO in B class, numberin^ 2200, 
were rounded up and inlerned. 
This policy went on, iintil by 
mid-June ahout 7000 men and 
3800 women were in internment 
camps; by mid-July, a total of 
20,000 men had been interned, 
almost entirely at the discretion 
of the local chief constables. 

As Lafitte commented, "the 
vast majority of genuine refugees 
from Nazi oppression vvere con- 
sidered too potentially dangerous 
— i.e., too \ve// ilisposcd Unvards 
Hitler — to be permitted any kind 
of freedom at all". 

AT the end of June, the depor- 
■^*- tation policy commenced. Be- 
tvveen June 29 and August 2, 
wrote Barbara Moon, some (wOO 
men were landed in Canada — 
an indiscriminate mixture of 
PoWs and internees. Ihv PoWs, 
protected by the Geneva Conven- 
tion, travelled flrst-class; the 
internees travelled steerage. be- 
hind barbed wire and guarded by 
machine guns. 

Among those who went to 
Canada were scientists such as 
Professor Ma.x Perutz, the 1962 
Nobel Prize winner for bio- 
chemistry. Professor Herman 
Bondi, who later returned to Lon- 
don University, and Klaus l^ichs, 
whose later history may not be 
unconnected with his experiences 
at this time. 

Among those sent to Australia 
vvere Franz Borkenau, one of the 
best-known anti-Nazi and anti- 
communist writers of the time, 
author of The Communist Inter- 
national and many olher books. 

The treatment of the refugees 
on board the Dunera was the 
subiect of a court of inquiry set 
up by the British Government in 
1941. At the recjuest of the Bri- 
tish High Commissioner in Aus- 
tralia, a memorandum was dravvn 
up by internees at May, in the 
Riverina, where the Dunera-ites 
remained from September, 19-10, 
to May, 1941. 

This "Dunera Statement" is still 
retaihed as a souvenir by some 
of them. It recalls the induce- 
ments held out to the internees 
in England to make them "volun- 
teers" to go on the Dunera. 

Some were told they were going 
to Canada, some that they vvere 
being transferred to permanent 
camps in Fngland. Some were 
promised release on their arrival 
overseas, and also that their 
families could join them. Some 
vvere told that they would be able 
to contribute directly to the war 
against Nazism in their new 
home. 

As soon as they embarked, all 
were searched. and many of their 
belongings were never returned. 
"All these searches." observes the 
Statement, "were carried oul with- 



Mr. Harry Seidler 



out any discrimination, accom- 
panied by acts of violence and 
resulted in the loss of an enor- 
mous amount of money, valuable 
articles, toilet necessities and ini- 
portant documents which have 
never been recovered." 

Further details vvere given to 
the House of Commons in Icb- 
ruary, 1941, by Colonel Jo.siah 
Wedgwood (Labor), who had re- 
ceived official and unofficial re- 
iports from Australia about the 
treatment of the internees on the 
ship: 

"The internees were kept bclovv 
decks under very crowded con- 
ditions and only allowed on 
deck one haif-hour once or 
twice a day. Brutality seems to 
hav: been displayed by the mili- 
tary guards on the slightest or 
no provocation. Some of the 
internees suffered from serious 
physical violence, resulting in 
broken noses, facial injuries, 
bodily bruises, &c., from the 
fists, rifle butts and boois of 
their guardians. 
"In addition, the internees were 
robbed of most of their posses- 
sions and anything of value was 
'souvenired' . . . Some 1200 
wrisilet and other watches and 
hundreds of gold wedding rings 
disappeared . . . on the grounds, 
apparently, that as they were 
'dangerous enemy aliens' they 
were legitimate game for ex- 
ploitation . . ." 

The lirst bright Spot for the in- 
ternees after they landed in Svd- 
ney was the ättitude of the 
Australian soldiers under whose 
guard they were placed. This has 
been described for us in an os- 
tensibly fictional account by Wal- 
ter Kaufmann published in 
Mcanjin Quarterly in 1954. 

Mr. Kaufmann describes the rail 
journey to Hay, on which Aus- 
tralian guards. realising that their 
charges are refugees from Hitler, 
fraternise with them and offer 
them tobacco which many of them 
have been craving for "weeks. 

Life in the internment camp at 
Hay has been described in another 
article by a Jesuit priest, the Rev. 
Fr. Walter Konig. 

Fr. Konig was one of a 
Rroup of Jesuits expelled by Hit- 
ler in 1939. He taught at a 
Cathohc school in Sheffield, and 
was mterned on the Isle of Man 
in May, 1940. 

The camp, ob.serves Kon ig 
wrylv. was not "the luxury camp 
we had been told about during 
the tnp through the Indian Ocean 
— set on an Island in the sea, 
>n the shade of waving palm 
trees and provided with a .sandy 
beach and every modern com- 
fort . 

^^ Instead, they found themselves 
isolated on the edge of a bound- 
le.ss, almost treeless piain. On 
the far-ofT horlTon, the air trem- 
bled in the heat". 

The internees were divided into 
two camps, known officiallv as 
7 and 8. Camp 7 was essentially 






Prof. Hugo Wolfsohn 



Prof. Max Perutz 



Jewish: Camp 8 included the poli- 
tical refugees and Christians as 
well as a number of Jews and 
part-Jews. The guards nicknamed 
them the "kosher" and "commun- 
isi" camps. 

There was no direct connection 
with the outside vvorld for nearly 
,a month because of an embargo 
Lm niail, but by the end of Sep- 

cniber various religious denomi- 
KUions and welfare groups had 
nade contact with the pnsoners 

nd they began to receive a flow 
visitors, comforts and assist- 

nce. 
The Roman Catholic Church 

as particularly activc, and Arch- 

i.shop Mannix obtained the ap- 

roval of the Commonwealth 
^overnment for the liberation of 
riie Wolkenstein boys, who were 
."fent to Xavier College. 

' Parliamentary questions began 
t.0 be asked in December, 1940, 
vvhen the Labor member for Hun- 
t^r, Mr. James, raised the matter 
(üiring the debate on the Esti- 
inates. 

'The ättitude of the Menzies Go- 
vernment was that the disposal of 
tl)e internees was entirely a mat- 
I4r for the British Government, 
a^d it refused to take any action 
oil its own account. 

VARIOUS I^bor members pur- 
sued the matter through the 
early months of 1941, but the 
(iovernment continued to stone- 
utll, though it was pointed out 
that the internees included a large 
niunber of skilled tradesmen and 
ti'Chnicians whose value to the 
war effort could be considerable. 

On the other band, the fire- 
eatmg Mr. Archie Cameron, 
l iiited Australia Party, member 
for Barker, thought the Govern- 
ment was being too gentle in 
liandlmg aliens with a "feather 
du$ter". 

. On April 2. 1941, he declared 
in the House of Representatives 
that too much hot air was being 
talked about Jewish refugees: "I 
have ^ heard talk of 'friendly 
aliens* ] do not know what a 
friendly allen is. I know that 
wnen my country is engaged in 
a '"e and death struggle with 
üprmany and Italy any man of 
Gcmian or Italian birth is an 
cnomy allen. If he is friendly to 
this country then he must be a 
traitor to his own, and I do not 
thinK it IS our part to encourage 
treason. • 

In the meantime the internees 
a; nay vvere doing their best to 
copti vvith the unaccustomed heat 
and dust, which afTected the 
he:iiih of many of them (several 
hiinared were sent to Orange, on 
l"^' ?u^l!^^ Western slopes of New 
Soiith Wales, in 1941 for health 
rea>ons). 

With such a wealth of talcnt 
among them, they organi.sed an 
extensive cultural life. This was 
focused on the "camp university". 
llKTG were lectures on chemistry. 



astronomy and atomic research, 
on mathematics, economics and 
langauges. English was taught as 
well as French, Spanish and 
Russian. 

A former professor of mathe- 
matics made a relief map of Aus- 
tralia for teaching geography. 
Exhibitions of paintings and arts 
and crafts were organised. 

Record concerts were held on 
Sunday momings; Sundav even- 
ings were devoted to alternate 
lectures and dramatic produc- 
itions. Some of the items from 
these productions became well 
known to the general public in 
later years when they were per- 
formed at war-time revues and 
benefit shows. 

One of the most populär songs 
ran as follows: 

You can scream and you can 

shout. 
Theyll never let you out. 
it serves you right, you so-and- 

so, 
Why weren't you a naturalised 

Eskimo? 

The turning point for the in- 
ternees came with the arrival 
from England of a Major Layton, 
a liaison officer appointed by the 
new Hf-ne Secretary, Herbert 
Morrison, under whose regime the 
Britih Government did much to 
make up for what had already 
happened. (Sir Alexander Pater- 
.son, the famous chairman of the 
Prison Commissioners, was sent 
to Canada on a similar mission.) 

Among other things. Major 
Layton arranged for the investi- 
gation of the ill-treatment of the 
internees in the Dunera, which 
led to a total amount of £80,000 
being voted for restitution. 

He also persuaded the Common- 
wealth Government to move the 
internees south to the more 
salubrious district of Tatura, in 
the fruit-growing district of the 
Goulbum Valley, where they ar- 
rived in May, 1941. 

Major Layton offered those in- 
ternees who wished to return to 
England the opportunity of doing 
so, provided those whe were of 
military age agreed to join the 
British forces and were found 
acceptable. About 300 returned 
to England in driblets as shipping 
accommodation became available: 
some of them vvere lost at sea 
when three of the ships were 
torpedoed. 

No decision had been reached 
about the rest of the internees 
when the Pacific war broke out. 

In February, 1942, Major Lay- 
ton ofl^ered all those who were 
fit and willing the opportunity of 
being drafted into an employment 
Company in the AMF. or of work- 
ing in essential vvartime Indus- 
tries if thev were specialists. 

The largest group, some 500 in 
number, joined the 8th Employ- 
ment Company (the other seven 
companies were largelv made up 
of "friendly aliens" and "refugee 
aliens" who had arrived in Aus- 



tralia under happier circum- 
stances). They spent the rest of 
the war loading and unloading 
supplies at rail junctions in AI- 
bury and Tocumwal, and at Camp 
Pell (Royal Park, Melbourne). 

Royal Park, where Camp Pell 
was situated, is only a few min- 
utes* walk from the University of 
Melbourne, and this encouraged 
those who were interested in fur- 
thering their education. Al- 
together, some 40 members of the 
8th Company graduated at Mel- 
bourne. 

The tradition started as far 
back as Hay, where two of the 
younger internees, K. E. Baier 
and F. H. Gruen, had been ac- 
cepted as external students. They 
were encouraged in this endeavor 
by Miss Margaret Holmes, secre- 
tary of the Student Christian 
Movement in Victoria, who helped 
many olhers as well. Most of 
them completed their courses un- 
der the Commonwealth Recon- 
struction Training Scheme. 

Since the war many of these 
men have made notable contribu- 
tions to Australian life. Fragmen- 
tary Information permits only a 
sample listing. In business and 
commerce a number have pio- 
neered new Industries or intro- 
duced new ideas and techniques. 

i^NE of tJie best known is Mr. 
^^ Walter Heine the ship owner. 
In the arts there is the composer 
Felix Werder; Werner Baer, an 
ABC director of music in NSW; 
the writer Walter Kaufmann; the 
draughtsmen Erwin Fabian and 
Klaus Friedeberger. After the war 
Mr. Fabian's adverlising designs 
broke new ground in commercial 
art in this country. 

Academic life has received a 
particularly large Infusion of tal- 
ent from the Dunera. Among this 
group are two professor.-^ of 
philo.sophy, Kurt Baier and Peter 
Herbst. Another philosopher, 
later at Cambridge, is Mr. Gerd 
Buchdahl. (While in the Dunera, 
Messrs. Buchdahl and Herbst 



pa.ssed some of the time drawing 
up a Constitution for their future 
camp; for want of writing 
material, it was written on lava- 
tory paper.) 

Gerd Buchdahl's brother, Han««, 
was later professor of theoretical 
physics at the ANU. 

Political science has also gained 
recruits from the 8th Company, 
among them being Profe.s.-^op 
Henry Mayer, of Sydney Univer- 
sity; Professor Hugo Wolfsohn, of 
La Trobe University, and many 
others. 

Also attached to Melbourne 
University is the well-known 
sporLing coach Franz Stampft, 
who returned to Australia in 
195G to direct the Beaurepairo 
Sports Centre. Other sports have 
also benefitcd from the activitie.«? 
of ex-internees, particularly ski- 
ing. 

(The internees who were at 
Orange teil the story of a table- 
tennis player among them. One of 
the camp officers, who had played 
in the NSW State team, heard 
there was a player among the 
internees. He invittd him to a 
game. and was beaten 21-5. In- 
credulous, he a.sked for a return 
game, and lost 21 -.3. The officer 
then asked the intornee vvhether 
he had been practising hard. The 
internee replied in the negative. 
The officer then asked hovv long 
since he played last. "Not since 
the vvorld doubles championship 
in 1939." "And how did you get 
onV" "1 won.") 

The Commonwealth Public Ser- 
vice has also recruited some 8th 
Company boys, notably Mr. G. O. 
Gutman, until recently of the 
Department of Territories. Others 
are vvorking as research scien- 
tists. as technologists in industry, 
in the medical and legal profes- 
sions, and in more far-flung occu- 
pations. One was last heard of in 
Mt. Isa. 

• This article via."? ori^imdly 
published in NATION. 



Flut 8, 12 LuusvU R(L 



TOOItiK 

SELECT O.Y.O. APARTMENT 

w th garden outlvsck. 

Strata Title, Ducted Heating. Securitv System 

S9.1'*'- ^.'"'"Sroom. Dlningroom, 2 bcdroom^. 2 bathrooms. Excellenl 

Kitchen. Dble. Carport. L«e. Storerm. & own Laundry cxteiient 

AurTfAilf^; Carpctv curtamv blli.ds, w.ishing machine and dryer. 

AUCTION: Saturday, 23rd. September. Harn 

In^pett Sunday. 2-^ p m. 

Ptars & RIchardson. 

64 Elizabeth St.. Melbournt, 63 8728. 

K. Gardner & Lanq Pty. Ltd. 

Malvern Offtc« SO 8541, A.H. 24 7398. 



SOUTH YAHHA 



(Cnr. St. Leonard's Court, overlooking Botanic Garden«) 

UNIQUE CORNER DEVELOPMENT SITE ^^'fcnsi 

WITH LARGE TWO STOREY RESIDENCE. 

LAND: 75' x 130' approx. 

ZONEO: ■■Res;deni;^l A '. 

TERMS: 10 per rent. Deposit: Balance 90 days. 

AUCTION: Tue^day, 26th September 3 p m. 

K. GARONER & LANG PTY. LTD. 

Malvcrn Offtce, 50 «541, A.M. 24 26S2. 



I'i2 Aiulvrson Strevt 



SOUTH Y4RRA 



106 Leopold Slroot 



(Close Botanic Garden«. City 4 Shops) 

ULTRA. MODERN SINGLE STOREY HOME 

Centrally heated. Victor'an terraced. 

COMP.: Exe. ent. area of livinqrm.. dm.ngrm.. Ige study de5lon«d 

• round courtyard garden, plus enclosod patio. modern kitchon & Iduidry. 

5 bedrms.. 2 bathrooms. 3 car paiking 

t\\S:VPJ*' S't'ir(),y 7rh October at 11 am. 

CIBLETT & ROBINSON. 

226 HInh St. Ashburton. 25 6454. 

K. GARDNER & LANG PTY. LTD. 

Maivtrn Office, 50 8541, A.H. 83 4378, 24 2652, 



SOUTH YARRA 



279 Domain Rond 



(Cnr. Murphy Street) 

UNIQUE LATE VICTORIAN BRICK RESIDENCE 

9 Main rooms on excellont (orner sito 

2°tXs,Vub1;Tarp|rt""""'"^'- '"• "'''^"' ^^'^'^ '""' ^ ^^^^^'^^■' 
LAND: 128' x 70'. 

I^.''J)??' ^^ P^' ^*^'^^- «l'-PO'.lt balanre 90 davt. 
AUCTION: Saturday. 7th October, at 1 1 a ni 
A.H. Mr. Browncll 29 5951. 

K. GARDNER Cr LANG PTY. LTD. 

?27 Colllns Street Melbourne. 

185 GIcnfcrric Road. Malvern SO 8541. 



"THE AGE" published by Divfd .Syme & Co Limited. 

Head Offlce: 250 Spencer Streot, Melbourne. Vidoria, 3000. 

Branclies: 39-41 York .Street, Sydney. Now Snuth W.jU-s, .^000. 

United Kmgdom: The Times Building, Piiniing Houic bquarc, London E C 4 




^CA-Ji 



Internees' war 



voyage 

to stay secret 



The Federal Govern- 
ment has decided against 
releasing documents 

about alleged ill-treat- 
ment of wartime in- 
ternees transported from 
Britain to Australia. 

The Minister for the 
Fnvironment, Mr Howson, 
disclosed this in the House 
of Representatives. 

He was replying to a 
question asked by the for- 
nier Leader of the Opposi- 
tion, Mr A. A. Calwell 
(Vic). 

Mr Calwell asked 
whether the Government 
yvould releasc the list of 
internees from various 
European countries who 
were sent from Liverpool, 
England, to Australia 
aboard the transport ship 
Dunera in 1940. 

He also asked whether 
the Government would re- 
lease the report of an in- 
quiry into claims that 
some of the internees were 
ill-trcated. 

Mr Howson said he as- 
sumed that Mr CalwelTs 
question was connected 
with author Cyril Pearl's 
plan to write a biography 
of pcople involvcd. 



Mr Calwell: "100 per 
Cent right." 

Mr Howson said he had 
found that the British 
Government had a firm 
policy of non-disclosure of 
fecords which would cause 
distress or embarrassment 
to anyone living. 

This matter definitely 
feil into that category, he 
Said. 

It was necessary to 
weigh up the value of 
historical research on the 
one band, and the wishes 
of individuals on the 
other. 

Mr Howson said the 
Australian Government 
had decided that the docu- 
ments should not be re- 
leased "because there are 
too many individuals who 
have been personally 
affected." 

But he said Mr Cal- 
well's question would no| 
doubt draw the matter to 
the attention of some 
people who had been in- 
volved. and they could get 
in touch with Cyril Pearl 

Mr Howson said he 
hoped it would not be 
many weeks before other 
war-time records would be 
made available for public 
examination for the firstl 
time. 





b 



.r-- 







•ö "G ^ -^ r 



^ äi o 



w:3 



^ 



"2?3 






"* <— ^ ^ 1/; 

c 



S " »-• .-« 

4) «A H 



c 1 ^ ß ,« § 



w *^ oS 
O (D d 



a> 



d *i :3 2 *-• ß rt 



cS 



I ■"* •'^ »rt WD 

.• t; « «ö ^ J-" 






ö SiS'üj >^t5 *-• fl ß y, « 



es 



3 



< i^ 



vl> 







cfl c1 -r^ -^ • -H 



« cb c1 ^ — - - 



S? 



f 03 



0) 



bC'"' 



S-ö 






is^iaP^S 



(U 



o ö :3 -^ ß c2 5 



oS 



> o n o iij "z: c! 

^Ä «ä cJ 5 P 



ö ^ eö 0) 

W Ü3 p Ä 

^ " S"^ 

bO nj tiO OT ti 

- -^ ß 



> O ffl "^ '-1 O ( 



s 5 ß ^ 



O , _i 

Ꭰ<y fc i6 
ecj w ri P'Ä ""^ 

^^ o tS « -j? G i3 rt 
■ > ß ^ o '^ J" 

^^«^ .--rtB-^ß 
«SS^ü^ß^o^ö 

w ;■:: ^ w w E -t^ O 5^ "S 



^ß 






o?^ bß 

>-° <ü5 

a «5 o cö 

:« 4j eö i:: OÖ ^, 
O <1> O ^ > •>-> 
O S w "-^ OrJ 
'S ß bß S 

O ß (ß 1^ t/5 O 
ß OJ 



^ c-, ^ v: C> 



c »^ ?• 




^ 



... — ^y 



3 S ® « -d 
3 «u ^ M 





r«4 



;3^." 






"d 



T) 



^ >> 



'.2 P ö> 



(ö w 2 ^ 
0) es * 

il3 ca . 



00 



° « ß ^ ^ a> 3 ^ 

ßboag-g^ Ö5S 

ß«7? Rl »H 03-" 






ü 



%^ 



2 \-' ■■ 




"^ 



S^ 



U 



3£ 2SW^ 



bc 



ß^ 





I 03 



o> 



^ 



C/5 



u — 



.Ä O) © 



V 





t>^«^^^ I 










Q ?^ 






ß ^11 

■< IQ 



Sß 

•o O H 
XI . . 

•t Sil ^C 4) 



Q 



— u 

. <ü tf ß " r#, OS >>-I=^ 

ß o o_- 



w _: D. 
cj T3.t7 

? ^-^ 
i^ >H 03 
-u» > -«J 

« aß 

"ß o 

Sag' 

CO nj , 

S03 "-^ 



Ö e5 » _: 0^ 

Utas- 

^ OT . 03 

^ 03 -Ö fe C3 

•^ a ^ ^ 



rt 1/1 hfi 03 
«^ ß J;1 

t> .ß 03 



ß 

o; 



T3 

25 »^ °' -*j 

03 0*0 O 



ß ^ 2 «^ 

•^ .S -^ -^ 

— ) ?J ' — ■ 



^ ß ^ 
"^ Oj CO 



« 



gJ 



w 



^Si 



-a ^-^x^ 



u 



-«-> 






03 03 

ß 2* '^ f^- '^ 
o ^ 



B^':^^ 



w (ä 



.teS 



cc 



-öS ^2 



ö 



03 



O 



.0. 



CO 



&'^:"' 



w hß'O a 

w cd 03 
^ ß .ß -l-» 

^ 03 • W 

CS t^ :f^ 

u '^ o a 

«> '^ ß ° 

03 5; ^ 
0->ß O q; ?: 

ß -^ +j "::; o 

t/j ^ -^ .r-< M 

03 H ^' a 
4_> ,Q rt .^ 



ß 03 
03 .?5 
03 u 
^ C/3 

03 o 

►-• — i 

OJ 
-^ß 

rt a 

s I 

ti 03 

9 ^ 
^ tß 

inj t/3 

a o 

03 

Q 
V-( <-> 

O cö 

o£ 

O 0; 



> 

03 

o 

ß 
CS 

!/2 

u 

03 



03 

03 
ß 

03 
03 



tJi^ cö 
o o 

cd pC 

o^-b 2 
^ w ß 

f^ 03 ., 



P. 



03 U 
03 ^*-5 



03 






M 



a ß S g 2 § 



■* * 

^ 



cö 



«3 f" 



w 



•o 



vo 



u 




».,..-' i 










t<\ 



' \ff 










^f=.^ 






' ' ..'-t^y^ 



/ 



«Vf ■■^'^■^ 






%(^//<'//Z'i'/i^yymtt< '^ 



Vi 



*»»*:. v:4 






CO >4 



s-'-giar 



•o 

es ^ ?, ö 3t3 
--ä-o^ ß . ' 

O rtT3 Bio 
Hg 



■g 






^Ö§ ggö-o 

03 S i! 3 °iJ ß 

£^5|a^-§g 

W 03 «4 S o » 
O ■«-• C3 -«-> T3 OS t^ 



03 



•5 



l-ö' 



^ ^ 



lt., t— • «^ 4-3 

o « ß ß 
ü a> o 

W 08 ^ O 

f^ ••Ö 03 

OCQ ä > 

^ ^ bfi 

03 : ■*-' 

^ O ►J '^ 
•»-«CO 

ca*^ S 03 
— P »^ 



T^ 






O 03 txfj 
t/3 »H _ .üi 



o 

t/3 



•Ö w 



* ^ 
^ ^ 



03 



CO 
73 



•^ ß^ 



n TJ ß 

2 « f^^ 

^ 03 eJ t3 
>>4«1 ß' 
ß :ß = . aj 

c? ^-^ - 
dj 0^ c 

p-4: a.o 

OT f^ ß 
60 83 "^ ?J 






O 



^feß- S 



o 



^•Ö 



öS" 



09 n 03 



; ß o O r, 



gßaorßui.ß«?^«* 

- 03 "^i^i ^ ß tä 

SX3 rT o B I-. o ^ 



»4 -*j 



03 
t^ 03 



4J 'CJ > • 

•-j «n 03 ^ 
^ •-' P-« •»-• 



o«ö^ 



K ^ CO 



o ^ 



o 



3«Mjß 

K e8*a 



03 



W i3 C3 C3 to 
Ü j^_03 ^, 

« Ö ??'Ö 03 

^COfHÜS-cOl>03? 



*i o ?i ö ^ 

o-^ii-g 03 "s 

g CO,-, ,_, e3 

o ß 03 03 Q 

2 o S 5^ > 
^ :ß ^ ß 

o «i «^^ g 

*^ o3 *3 03 O 
ß 0) ö 5 *-• »H 

S M ÖX3 0) 03 






w 



ß^ 



12Z3 o ° OÄ ^ ß 



c; 



03 



-Ö 



O, H o 



CO 



03 



ä'^'2 03 

g^ O 03 rj 
^ fe-^^ O ß 
S^ ß <^ 

•^ ^ß^ ^ 

>>rt ^ rf ^^ 



bfi c; 

oö r^.ii - 



ß ^H ea . 

e: ß-»-> 03 
»^og ß 

03 J3 "" -»^ 
S .«03 



~ W" »-• 

•ß-s ^ 

•^^ flj P—H 



gs s 



cn 



t/: 



a 



03 



93 



03 __ 

OJ C3 <^ Cd 



i/: 



(O 



bc 



c 



CO 



«,' 05 O 
ß ^ 



(/3 «^ 

•^ .ii 03 d 

bo o 1/3 ö B 

ß"-:2 ß ß »H 



03 



ri <ö 



.a 



a- 



-5^ 

b cd 

g,ß 



". .i-* Vi 

ßH-^: 



, .ß i3 "O ,0 

I c ^ 

' S O ,« OJ 

3 K n^ tC 

f.]? 2i Cd 

3 ^ ß^ 

' •-*■>; V cd 

I« ^ 03 dj 

I b». 0; cfl n 

11/3 a) u 



•Si9^ 



cd 






8^' 



(O 03 

^H c3 bJ) t3 

cd C3 p <; 

ß u . 

CJ t/3 

-o ß-cCS 
ß ^ ß x; 

03 j2 eä -4-> 



I 



a 



sj w 



S C =3 

a§ o tA 
a^ Cd jr 

03 ^ •-' 

l^gs 

OtB 



cd c3 x: bJ3 

03 -«j a ß 



bo 



2.i^- 



oCU g 
bo: ? 



■ .0 tä* 



P>t!0 






«J g »^ c) C S 



g'iS'« 



O^ <U "O w o 

g ^ H .^ a 

2:ßt^gT3 W) 




>> 5i co_. 2=3 



O 3 



O-, 






& od 

C/3 

-, 71 fcl ^ ö> 




C/3 



S bCoi 
ß ß O 






. «i H 0« O) t- 



^ " ^ ö 

^ ß^ iä 03 
ß 5 r1 r^ 0> 



^"SißS^ 

||g.2S 

uf.ßä> 

^ Ö IJ rt 'Q3 

ö '-^ >, a 8 

cd ±f cö 

^^3 o o 

ß t^K i^ 03 

00. o 
^--. 03 



c/3 CO ^ 03 I 



>> OT S 



•31 






03' x: ^ 



^ ß5 2 

•9* ?S -^ 5 rf r 

W^ 03 ^ X3 ß 

03 <-• "^ cd ß Q^ 

J-; G cd -»J ü ß X! 

-^I3_ O^ ß"^ 
5 ß fe"^ 03^ <=> 



Ol C ''^ I 03 

^ ;£ 03 03 

,03 t. >,^ o 

'X3XJ ß^ 



f/3 



ca.! 



ci; 



CS CO 



O 1*» 






d rT A3 ß 5 C C4.f~. X. %lI15'ujOfl)Hi-«Oö.-i5:'=^ »-n *.>ß(/3«tOM103.ß 



:ä^ 2 td 0-2 03 .0 
_ .;_r u '^ »H !/: CO H S 



'^ßgsl 

&^ ß-2 



,Q w a ß 
^ a o) 

»2 -ß 03 »-> 
cd X! 7;! oj 

a o +j 

3 C3 -k^ o 

e3 od w ^ 
cu 43> 



ß 03 ' 
'=>Jd^. 

<^ S Cd 

a ß 2 
-2 S 

03 CO {2 
■t-i ^^ 



03 



Cd ß 03 

x; O^ 

-t-> 03 cd 
w . 

03 



W 4J .— « 



m 



U3 



0; *^ --< 

O 03 



03 

x: 



ß 
o 



»1 
ü 

CO 
03 



O) 
O) • • 



>^^ ß^ 



Cd 03 ß 
o 



o 



od bc. 



CO ?i o 13 •" 






O 03 



" ß 



o 
to 



0> 

o 



ß o 
oxi-ö 

cdT: >i 

^ cd 



a 

03 

4J j«l :r: o 
. S-" «J x: 

cd 



jm 






03 

03 



cd -»J "O cd 
X!^ 



-ät^';^ 03 



C3 O 



ij 0^ wo J^ -A cj l> o S J«l o tS o 



sssSi'^Sä-gä^S 



|"S§ß55ü2S 



'>S ^5 o ts ß 5 cd o &^ S 



Q ß 



03 



03 



ß t«-^ t^Tl ^!'5 JG 



>Hx: 



5» 



03 



CJ 03 XJ 



^ ß ßö^O * ß 



-^ O *^ ß »H 

O << 03 

CO »•-• T^ ^ ft^j« 



CO 
03 
t3 

ß 

cd 

x: 

ü 
o 

ß 

10 

03 

Cd 

•^ >^ 

£ ß 
--^ 

o ^ 

03 

03 x: 

i1 03 



a 



o o *i C 



x: 03 (liMXi 

-j a> cd *■ j:< 



to 



10 



03 
J3 03 



X; 03 03 .S« W t>i . c3 ^ 



ir^P fc! r-iß-'x: ^ 






O T' — • 



w a 



03-0 



CO NJ 



^ r»» t/} aj ^_ _. 

Cd 03 t^ 03 03 

"ß ß 03 CCO 



> ^. 2 N> "i 



CO 



ß h 



03 03 W «Ö 5 "^ -S 

xix: 3 c ^ 

♦J -tj bo B {/) 




-== ^r" 



Kultura 



Oll Herbert Israel Fri}< 

Die Kulturarbeit im Kitchener C 
.st, wie das Gemeinschaftsleben dort* 
haupt, von eine* einzigartigen un^ einm«! 
Problematik. Iweieinhalbtausei.'^kiidi 
Männer — und bald mehr — le^pPöor 
ind ausgewandert und doch noch nie 
irem Wanderungsziel eingewandert, 
aben ein Land verlassen und sind noch 
ndgültig angekommen; für sie ist ein 
tand, was für andere nur vorübergeh 
^.evegung ist: „transit" — „unterwegs". 

Das hat nichts mit der englischen 
freundschaft zu tun, nichts zu tun mit 
eibungslosen Betriebsmaschinerie und 
)rganisation, die tadellos funktionieil/an 
'ührung und Haltung dieses Lager^ist n 






. -"fc 

gev:hiil^li^''-^ 
Umfang der Int 

tKtPpi'n hiO?^i 



M iMr-hc Fach 



timreil: 
nscnucbietc. 

sich /.u inttrncn Arbcits- 
JtmeTns'chLirfrcn zusaminc'n«i.->rhlossen, so z. B. 
Se A^^Xdie ihre Meinungen mit .■nMlischcn 
Sw^n austauschen, die Ingericure. die 

iKer. 
-'D-io Zionisten h;.bon ^'^^\'"^, "^'^'' 
dbr Paläs na^reunde" zusammengefunden um 
^tf^n sich -c-llwöchentlich zu Hefera en und 
y... .Aussprachen (vo • kurzem sprach ein Ver- 
W 4.tr«t«r der „Theodor-Herzl -Society aus Lon- 
>^%i^-'^T^ Anläßlich de. Tocostage. von Herzl 
'.einer Seite hin KrilFk zu üben. iM'd denn^j- un<. BialiV: veranstaltete der -K^-^^^ dc^ ^^- 
~ wenn auch der Sommer in Kent von eÄ>1 läsl ine freunde" eine Feieistunde. ^" «ei imei^ 
rfrischenden Schönheit ist -yfdie GespriiJle • vierhundert Besuchjr erschienen^ J;^;^^ S:^P;^_ 
der sind J«hnlich denen in /er jüdischen Ger l,. Ott)r.^sier und em hchraischer ^^^"^ J;«"^,;^^;^^ 
meinde, aus der man vM: wann gehtls» f teil, die h.braisvhen und deutschsprachigen 
weiter? Denn der Aufenthalt in Camp aet4^Äli«nk reden, 
ine Wartezeit, und giCwartet haben sie al 



Jv1K5rhcstcr wird bei heiteren Abenden^eme 

\J^X T:: fp or t - O f f i e e untersteht 

^^5em Recreation-Department. In vielen Sport- 

8lgen konnten sich Camp-Mannschaften 

lOn mit englischen Team§. messen (m die- 

Zusammenhaig siQcK auch Pmgpong. 

ia£e- und SchacWurniere zu erwähnen). 

Und ein KilT 

Einen wichtigcnimyn der ^^^f ^^^^"^.^ 

limmt das ^'fW^'^ "*"" 
großzügige Sp^«* 







tors in London 
Beisein vieler en 
simlichkeiten 
Camp-Mitglicf^ 
einmal wöchetlttR 

Jenseits d&^^ 
englischen und»^! 
wesentliche ^fiÄk^^ 
englischen S 
Ein Sorgd 
Bühnenaulführu 
Fassunßsver 
r.ur Verfüi^uc« 
kunstabend^,"« 
gen, doch veMUgjt 
Ambitionen lujraf. 
handenen BfeiOTbÜr 
volleren Sc 
Allmona 



a ein, das — die 
idisehen Filmdirek- 
enigen Wochen im 
und jüdischer Per- 
ffnet wurde. Jedem 
Besuch dieses Kinos 

Itung erfüllen die 
nischen Filme eine 
der Einführung zur 



nach Amerika oäev Palästina oder Austral».?, , gc^rtments. ^le Fulle^ vo^^ mus^.l^a^i^^^^^^^^^ 
Sie ade müssei/noch einmal anfangWI-^Ee- »Bähungen und J^^'^f.'^^^^^j^^^" ^j'^^^^ be- 

urd fie brennen daraufe,«nclU«h »t^lgn&en «m:T *^^lichen K^,^»? "-^^i/»^^" '"^Xn benach 
dfffoii. ^i,. iM'^..i>Ä^iiK£» / ^^M>.. ;^f: ^^fWohltatl?.keitszw?4.keauchmdcnbenacn 





P»C'„.^,^,. ^ 

^ :'r-C.^m'r 

.4 V lläj%tJ^-co.\-xv^ ^.-r.d. nooV) drüben, d«e l^Viii^-i«^' 

oder dlV Elterh. Ist «s gelungeji (un(^ es ge- J 
lingt Vielfach), bei entsprechenden Voraus- I 
Setzungen der Frau ein DomcsUiü^P^riDit nach ^ 
England zu verschaffen ;ünü '^;^ '-';::' y'/^j 
einem der noch ofTenen ^«f ß^^^^^^^"!^ ^[^'^ 
her 2u bringen, so sind die Familien sich 
zwar nahe, aber dennoch getrennt. 

Die Freundlichkeit, mit der man 
Camp-Insassen überall begegnet, laßt ni 
vergessen, daß dieses Lager aus öffentUch 
Mitteln errichtet ist und daß jeder einzel 
drinnen aus öffentlichen Mitteln erba-«^ : 
wird. Das ist eine Belastung für ^'^^^l^^^ntlT j 

gewöhnt sind, sich und ihr^^gfä^Ttom zumal 

eigener Kraft ein Le^^^JlTen vielfach un- 

das Schicksal -'"*•'*" 

gc\^^^T,^i^ eine Seite der Problematik^ 
-^ "^^^ ^t fcht von Voraussetzungen aus. die 

^•^ l".^r 'rtsche"dend für das Gemem- 



,en Städten Sandwir|h, Ramsgate^and Mar- 



,.<5t';^as Theaterspiel. Für 
fcUht ein Saal mit einem! 
fast tausend Plätzen| 
Hij^d schon einige Klein- 
' -und Parodien geUm- 
gerade auch hier, di( 
'^stecken und die vor-l 
„«^.„_.. in einer anspruchs- 
äDleJiSjeit zu fruktifizieren. 
bk ' 4.#heint in englische! 

Sprache die ^^^^^^^^^"^ r^" n^?nsafse 

phiertes Blatt, f^^ä^^^" . ^J'"'^'J"'^h 1 

ür die Camp-X%i|^chrieben ist und i 

dem sich das^^.||®?|^ Leben des Cam 

widerspiegelt. " «^AiS, . ««u^« -in 

Den religiösett'P^l^nissen geben ein 

liberale und elnC'C%odoxe Synagoge Rau 

und Anregueng 



i.-^^iki^ 



'"*< 



„«»' 



.j-j. 



ng. 1 




t 



^tr eines pa,ästinens^sche^n^K,b^ 

ruscht-setnrriens'^ch:; nicht aus e. enti^H 
nicht nach einer gewissen Zeit, um an 



sie 



wie 



iv^rp stelle neue Menschen zu bringen, 
es im Charakter eines Transit-Camps hegU 
Wal aber noch wichtiger ist: der Kibbuz 
^,^ht sich seine Menschen .us. Die Menschen- 
sucht sich sein iciiglich wände- 

--Ä^[-^sc^^^CejK..spu^^^^^ 

Ä"t r ViXn'v%n*U«.9cK.,<i1cn una 
Nuancicrungen. f^ 



Vfangei an Einheitlichkeit 



K.f engem Raum i^^.^^X J^f.^^jf.i,^:^. 
geutv^r Homogenität ^m für die Kultura rb^^^^ 
besonAvs schwieriger Faktor >mfru(>^u^ar 
>vivken ., können, muß sie diese U^veic m 
barkeit <i. Interessen und Ansp-..xhe ebei 80 
wie das Pr.iem des ..Transit" ry ubcru^lnden 
suchen. Zw,/|to|ttli««4ieJi«"^JL^..;tW^^ 

soRHi therapev^ut^lMj« y ^^^ ^t, o^ 

abhängig von V>vreu^«^ß^^,^7der srößte Teil 

ausgebaut), Selt>.stzw,^. ' ^vc >mi üu- Aut- 

^abe Mensc>'^"' die /t lange Zeit aus cieu» 

Arboitsore^^'^ ausge^haltet waren, wieder in 

riio Diszi^"'^ einer -estgefügten Beschäftigung 

v^r/''^"' ^^^ ^* darüber hinaus die Auf- 

^^^^lese Morschen durch Gewöhnung an 

^^5feiie TäMSikeit auf ihr Wanderungsziel 

*fzuDereitert una Dezweckt als letztes, (ja» 

,>eelische und körperliche Gleichmaß ,<Ilfi^ch 

/^ eine gesunde Beanspruchung der I^jnikeln und 

Gedanken intakt zu halten. < ■•■ 

Die einzelnen Departements •; 

Auf ahnlichen erzieherischen Motiven ist 
auch die Kulturarbeit aufgebaut. Schon ihre 
Zweiteilung in ein „Educational-Dcpartment" 
und ein „Recreation-Departmcnt" deutet ihre 




\ 



bkr-«»^»'^. 



mmmmmm 



m^ 



' " * • :i!•!:•|i^?:•:iif^U*tit*ir:^i•-i^i•^;:- 




-yg. 



(Cultura 

on Herbert Israel FrlJ 



Die Kulturarbeit imKitcijenerC 
4, wie das Gemeinschaftsleben dor 
aupt, von einÄeinzigartigen un4 ein 
roblematik. Tweieinhalbtausei : 
länncr — und bald mehr — le)(P^Oor 
ind ausgewandert und doch«noth nie 
irem Wanderungsziel eingewandert, 
aben ein Land verlassen und sind noch 
ndgültig angekommen; für sie ist ein 
land, was für andere nur vorübergeh 
Bewegung ist; „transit" — „unterwegs". 

Das hat nichts mit der englischen 
rcundsehaft zu tun, nichts zu tun mit 
eibungslosen Betriebsmaschinerie 
Organisation, die tadellos funktionier 
ührung und Haltung dieses Lj 
einer Seite hin Kritik zu üben. 
- wenn auch der Sommer in K*nt von 
irfrischenden Schönheit ist 
lier sind ähnlich denen in^Jer jüdischen 
neinde, aus der man l;|&;/:''wann geht 
Denn der Au^^hthajt fn pamp 



.^.-*4ii 



>w 





trhfa^s II o^'r't. Office untersteht 

Rccreation-Departmcnt. In vielen Sport- 

en konnten sich CamD-Mannschaften 

mit englischen Teann »essen (in die- 

Z^sammenhaig siQ<r auch Pingpong, 

- und Schacl^urnlere zu erwahnön). 



ftneHÄ-Tw»^^ 



f 



cqii:Kli?r^ Thep^Tumreißin den gi oben 
iSgder InUjr^ngebiete Manche Fach- 
lÄn h^^ sich i^u internen Arbeits- 

tis(hi«ften zusammengeschlossen, so z. ü. 

ÄVe ihre Meinungen mit englischen 
1 austauschen, die Ingenieure 



die 



ike;. 



veiter? 

!ine Wartezeit, und abwartet haben sie -„-j^ j^. . ^ , , i^tij^ 

chon, Monate oder,/&uch.Jahr^ Und di|,^^_ gM gebilaet 

,011« \VnrtP7Pif srhifr>ht die Entscheidung?' ?*läl ^ w>- v , ,^ 




ß lionlsten haben sich im ,, Kreis 
läsnafreunde" zusammengefunden und 
'steh allwöchentlich zu Refera «n und 
achen (vo- kurzem sprach em Ver- 
der „Theodor-HerzLSociety" aus Lon- 
An^ßllch des Todestages von Herzl 
ialilc veranstaltete der -Kreis der Pa- 
ifreimde" eine Feierstunde, zu der uoer 
mindert Besucher erschienen. Das Camp* 
:^ster und ein hebräischer Chor unirahm- 
[%[e hebräisvhen und deutschsprachigen 
kiede^i. f .. ' 



neue Wartezeit scl^Kbt die Entscheidung^ 
n der Bewähruijjg um eine neue Exis 
iegt, wieder hinaus. Wann geht es w 
lach Amerika cxfler Palästina oder Auslra, 



;ie alle müssor/ noch einmal an 
u(iÜ;U ,>Mad HiimaAi;Mfti *M^ 



^xf^^&iMMÄ 









j^emCamp-CXrchester sind wir 
^beim Arbeitsgeb).et des Re^^eaüon- 
HcTSrtments. Die FüUel von musikalischen 
pbungen und Beru{3musikern innerhalb 
fCamps hat das OjJbhester zu einem be- 
glichen Klangins.r/ment '^^''^^^^'^J^l 
!vohltätigkeitszw»4<kc ^uch in f^-^\°J"^,. 
'^en Städten Sanäwicjh, Ramsgate *ind Mai 



I. . Und ein Ki 

Einen wich 
limmt das C 
-Großzügige Sp 
lors in Lond 
Beisein vieler 
Fönllchkeiten 
Camp-Mitglle 
einmal wöche 

Jenseits 
englischen u 
wesentliche 
englischen S 
Ein Sorg 
Bühnenauff 
Fassungsveri 

7.ur Verfügi 
kunstabend 
gen, doch v 
Ambitionen^ 
handenen 
volleren S 

Allmona 

Sprache die ,^C 

phiertes Blatte 

für die Camp-I 

dem sich da^^ 

widerspiegelt. ' 

Den religi ^ 
liberale und eine 
und Anregueng. j 





n der Unterhaltung 
[a ein, das — die 
idischen Fllmdirek- 
enigen Wochen im 
und jüdischer Per- 
ffnet wurde. Jedem 
Besuch dieses Kinos 

.Itung erfüllen die 
ni sehen Filme eine 
der Einführung zur 

^» Theaterspiet Für 
iht ein Saal mit einem 
fast tausend Plötzen 
schon einige Kleln- 
5 und Parodien gdwn- 
. gerade auch hier, die 
stecken und die vor-| 
In einer anspruchs- 
it zu fruktmzleren. 
eint in englischer | 
iw", ein hektogra- 
,en Cnmp-Insasser 
chrieben Ist und li' 
Leben des Cami 



,^ niesen geben einl 
odoxe Synagoge Raun 



,^ 






.t^iji i , » . »■ » t , ' tJ l i ^tMmn\t l -üm-ma 






?rJ: 







.-.'-• »v^^. ■ 




^^^ ^ mor-Cc^ 

.VcT^^oj^ f^tf^ t\o«V> iirübon, d«e J^U*« 

oder #«' EUerti. -Jft es gelungen (und xs ge- 
linit vielfach), bei entsprechertden voraus- ^ 
aef^tiflti«n der Frau ein Domestik-Permit nach 'ii 
Engjand zu verschaffen ahö^dte K:nd3r-aufv. ^ 
i»ittt^ der noch offenen Wege gleichfalls hier- 
her zu bringen, so sind die Familien sich 
zwar nahe, aber dennoch getrennt. 

Die Freundlichkeit, mit der man 
Camp-Insassen überall begegnet, , ^läi^i 
vergessen, daß dieses Lager au3,^tfent)lii3h 
Mitteln errichtet ist und daß jecter einiein 
drinnen aus öffentlichen Mitteln er" "^ 
wird. Das ist 
gewöhn* sind 
eigener Kraft 
das SchicXsat^***f* 

.|5^as'*1st die ^ine Seite der Problematik. 
Die andere geht von Voraussetzungen aus, die 
gleichfalls entscjheidend für das Gemein- 
schaftsleben und die Kulturarbeit im Camp 
sind. Die Leidens form des G am p i s t 
der eines palästinensischen Kib- 
buz am ähnlichsten. Aber ein Kibbuz 
tauscht seine Menschen nicht aus, er entläßt 
sie nicht nach einer gewissen Zeit, um an 
ihre Stelle neue Menschen zu bringen, wie 
es Im Charakter eines Transit-Camps liegt. 
Was aber noch wichtiger ist: der Kibbuz 
sucht sich seine Menschen ?.us. Die Menschen- 
auswahl für das Camp ist letftglich wände»- 
rungstechnischen GesichtspuÄteu -unter*- 
werfen, bildungsmäßig wie m%tahsjph»>tlich 
besteht eine Vielfalt vyn l«HprWi«!en and- 
Nuancierungep. ^ *^^ 

Mangel im Einheitlichkeit ' 

. Kvif en^flii Raima ist dieser Mangel «n 
geutv^et Homogenität ein für die Kulturarbc»^- 
beso»4d«rs schwieriger Faktor. Um £ruc>tbaf 
v/irken u können, muß sie diese Unvereinp^ 
barkeit dvt Interesffen und AnsprSU;Yve e 
wie^4das Prftviem des „Transit" r< übeiw 

suchiii^, zvii^'^ ' " 

lügung,, yn, 

Auch' 







S 



t.inlc ei 

sojKar therapevi^w,ii»iti.« *■ " '^Vi5^l. uä,«' 

abhftngig von i^^tv ^f aßnahmc - ^^^-pj^^ 

der Curn43-Anl'=»ceT>- V{';Mlg8,,l?Ji„e„ /n?awen 

ausgebaut), Seifc'stzvktji; «i« Yiat die Auf- t. 

gabe^ Menschen, die/^ lange Zeit aus dem I 

Arbeitsprpf* ausg«4ftaltet waren, wkd^TSi i 



die 
zu 



Oie einzelnen Departements 

i^ .h "i/ ähnlichen erzieherischen Motiven ist 
puch die Kulturarbeit aufgebaut «SrK^« u 
^rweltellung In ein ..EducaCal-DepaZinr 

'thunK imd 



■MituiiK «n; 




tftmtt» niMi 








4a^ua >M 




liiciHMi KlangiusM /^ment entwickelt, das 
'*2Woh!t;jtißkeitsz\v>4*-kc &uch in den benach- 
i^en S{in\U:n Sandwich, Ramsjgate«md Mar- 



Den religii} 
liberale und 
und Anregucng. 






1 



I 







■ :-;«c 



Oder dftrElterh. Iit es gplungep (und es ge- 
lingt vielfach), bei entsprechenden Voraus- 
•etzunwn der Frau ein Donicj^.UK-I'crmit nach 
England zu verschaffen oJiu uic liw.v^.. ^^^ 
cfnem der noch ofTcnon Wege gleichfalls hier- 
her zu hrinRen. so .sind die Familien sich 
zwar nahe, aber dennoch getrennt. 

Die Freundlichkeit, mit der man de 
Camp-Insassen überall begegnet, läßt nuht 
vergessen, daß dieses Lager aus öffentlichen 
Mitteln errichtet ist un 
drinnen aus öffentliche 

wird. Das ist eine Belastung lur ^^^""^'-.^wir 
gewöhnt sind, sich und ihi^^^^lgfaTunzumal 
eigener Kraft ein Ue^- ^-^^^ Vielfac'h un- 
das SchickspJ *^* 

^^^^s^tst^^die eine Seite der Problematik. 
Die andere geht von Voraussetzungen aus. die 
ßleichfaUs entscheidend für das Gcmcm- 
fchaftsleben und die Kulturarbeit nn Camp 
s[nr Die Lebens form des camp ist 

der eines p a 1 ä st i n en s i s c h e n K i b - 
buz am ähnlichsten. Aber em Kibbuz 
tauscht seine Menschen nicht aus er entlaß 
nach einer gewissen Zeit, um an 
Menschen zu bringen, wie 
eines Transit-Camps liegt, 
wichtiger ist: der Kibbuz 
^cht sich seine"Menschen ?us. Die Menschen- 
luswahl für das Camp ist le.iiglich wände- 
runistechnischen G-ichtspufüctea un e r - 
werfen, bildungsmäßig wie wÜtah^tnÄbiKh 
besteht eine Vielfalt von UÄM^^hiÄen una 
Nuancierungen. 

Mangel an Einheitlichkeit 

Auf pn^em Raum ist dieser 





sie nicht 
ihre Stelle neue 
es im Charakter 
Was aber noch 




Mangel an 
rbe 



*. engem ,, ,, ,. . ., 

geisUser Homogenität ein für die Kulturerbe- 

besonders schwieriger Faktor bmfruc>tbar 

Wirken lu können, muß sie diese Ux.veicm- 

barkeit d^T Interessen und AnspM,.<cne ebei so 

wi* das Prc.\)lem des ..Transit • 7/.( überwinden 

such^^ Zwü'mflll«i4ö< stehen ^> zu? Vci- 

^ die 





•JaIaml^-^-; 



ihren 

I fOTN 

Selt^sizw 



der Ca'Pvi.-AT.l'^r- virs)^^^^ 






(der i^rc 
,. . Hoinon Insajscni 
■ fcive Uux. die Aul- 

deu* 



aus 



t'^hf Tensc^^"' die ^ft lange Zeit 

A vT'isoro/''^^ ausge-chaltet waren, wieder in 

^ n Sr^'" einer «estgefügten Beschäftigung 

r; ;^'n, sie h^t darüber hinaus die Auf- 

^^^"^Jiese Me»schen durch Gewöhnung an 

ga'^felle Tät^keit auf ihr Wanderungsziel 

fzubereitf** und bezweckt als letztes, d-"»« 

seelische und körperliche Gleichmaß ^ '^w'rh 

eine gesunde Beanspi uchung der ^jiisXeln und 

Gedanken intakt zu halten. « 



?Hf:-j?iHi5;^: 




•?? . 



Tt: 



>^.! 



.ijt: 















•■'-# 



Die einzelnen Departements 

Auf ähnlichen erzieherischen Motiven ist 
auch die Kulturarbeit aufgebaut. Schon ihre 
Zweiteilung in ein „Educational-Department" 
und ein „Recreation-Department" deutet ihre 
zweifache Zielrichtung an: Erziehung und 
Unterhaltung. 

Dem Educational-Departmcnt unterstehen 
die Sprachkurse, unter denen die eng- 
lischen dominieren. Jedes Camp-Mitglied ist 
verpflichtet, täglich zwei Unterrichtsstunden 
in Englisrh zu besuchen, von denen die eine 
von einem jüdischen Emigranten, die andere 
von einem English Teacher gekitcl wird. 
Vorträge, Konversationsstunden und .vclilicß- 
lich eine Library mit engHschen Büchern, 
Zeitschriften und Zeitungen ergänzen die 
Kurse. Palästinawanderer haben zusiitzlich 
täglich eine Stunde Iwrith, anderen ist Ge- 
legenheit für spanischen, poitucirsischcn und 
französischen Unterricht gegeben 

Dem Educational-Departmcnt gleichfalls 
unterstellt ist die Camp-Universiiy, 






t« :;:<.- 



^m'» 

:^i'.' 






• »i;«; 

• —^Z-, 






:-r«i- . 



■\i'. 



«--'•- 






mmmmmtm^ 



*i I ^mmmmm 



««•f 



... . • 



.■.•■;S; 






mßm 



;•:• 



I ...•?! 




.•.*.. 






/ 



man' «<*v?ilr, "' 'he ^i^v^"».''.!.« 



^a in. 

not ex- 



"c hart n ^^t ex 



"'-"ts on K '^^^ public nl -^"«f as 
„ A dos» ne, ,n ' , '^ '■'«"</ 

Edward 'fri^rtavfr?/^" '•«^"ked 
f j]appinp^s K . *"^ "Joußhr, hj« 



. Cosnio 
»v blrth 







ppIltJc»! c«*.i; gr'PäratJon for , 
tureed to the owL '*""'" h- 

hÄ'lL'"''» "»«mJ In V w'-"'*'- »»• 

;gj««i vföÄ. •;•;?;,• ffiheior. 

s. <7„ 7"-i.nii Bn nin„:. '•_'•. "' gri 




[His 



Hl 



ed 



??" ^^n/) r ^""no Gor 






l^,!«'"» S^Cr;-«' X,?-«?.' 

bcslde the dying Soverl^Pn o»;i 

WS deaih. He then annSunce^ S 
the Prlnce of Walcr. hl« acce^inn 
U) the Throne. • ^^^^^-^ston 




The Archbishop regardcd the vm 

jR» of an cntirely different mould 

from his father and soon au^l. 

[ward he declined a dinner Invtta- 

•E*J?i^ Sf- i?'«««'« Palace bccaiwc 
, MTB Wallji, Simpson wrs to be pr«. 

SiJt*^^'" ^^ threatencd to wlth- 
i5?.l.-.^*^I"Pl^"^^" 'rem Edward bc- 
'2«i!L^'..5 ' condunt. The Kin« 
{nP"Ä'* ^Plcasc remember that j 
[;wn tne head of your Church " 
i' *j£v^°^"l? ^*"i^ preslded at a 

hUh^n^w.H «»»^icatJon, the Arch- 
2,.!l?P T^'^ "'^^ '•«Icnt toward Ed- 
ward In one o/ his famouÄ radio 
oroadca^« »h? , same month. hc 
^" . •'turn to reUi,ion. 

-. o«\i. tor a r. . *'"'•' .^^d Mrs 

msUncw »nrt >■"" 

1 Not AngUcan-ß«"" 

' C«mo Uan. *- "S/Ä 

^^''-"^ An £^O^KJl 
Utudled law In P5.J.^*^.uen hc s^w 

TfÄrt of his «•"'^.7„"* i;u»e that 

!h#. wa« the wp^ f^nfcrred_»t 
Lord l^»^K ^once susBCslrrt 




8 LETTERS. FEATURES 



THE AGE, Fridaj 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



SIR, — Recent Statements by the 
Victorian Minister for Health (Mr. 
Rossiter) and the Federal Minister 
for Primary Industry (Mr. Sin- 
clair) on the subject of mercury 
contamination of shark cannot be 
allowed to pass without com-, 
ment. 

The present maximum permit- 
ted level of mercury in fish (0.5 
ppm) is over 16 times higher than 
the limit accepted for all other 
foods (0.03 ppm). The Study 
Group of Mercury Hazards of the 
USA Department of Health, Edu- 
cation and Weifare reported in 
1970 that "The Swedish actionable 
level of 1.0 ppm is considered 
too high ..." and that with fish 
having mercury levels in the 
ränge 0.2-1.0 ppm (i.e. lower than 
those in flake) no more than one 
meal of fish should be eaten each 
week. To quote low per capita 
Ingestion of fish in Australia as 
a guide to setting the limit of 
mercury is meaningless, as a sig- 
nificant number of individuals 
regularly consume flake over 10 
times per week, 

Mr. Sinclair argues that the 
mercury content of fish is derived 
mamly from natural sources and 
therefore the acceptable limit for 
mercury should be reviewed (i.e. 
mcreased). By the same specious 
lügic one could argue for the 
sale of (naturally occurring) 
poisonous toadstools. 

However, the major source of 
mercury contamination of shark 
is very much open to debate. It 
has been estimated that, on a 
World scalc, mercury pollution of 
the environment from industrial 
processes and the burning of coal 
exceeds that released by natural 
weathering by a factor of 25:1. 
Such mercury pollution tends to 
be concentrated in estuarine and 
coastal waters \/here marine life 
abounds. Results of the recent 



September 15, 1972 



It's playing with ^oison 
to raise mercury 



survey in Victoria show signifi- 
cant variations in the mercury 
content of shark taken in different 
areas. These findings have yet 
to be explained in terms of 
natural phenomena. 

It is now almost 20 years since 
120 persons were poisoned and 
46 died as a direct result of 
eating mercury-contaminated sea 
food from Minamata Bay in Japan 
and the tracing of the mercury 
pollution to a plastics plant. Why 
has the Department of Health 
not performed survevs on fish 
prior to 1972, in view of the fact 
that industry has been freely 
dumping waste into our waters 
for so long ? 

(Dr.) J. T. BELLAIR (Eagle- 
mont). 

A very tired 
TV Programme 

SIR, — Adventure Island Is a very 
/tired Programme. Its voices are 
excruciating and its stories so 
predictable that my children rush 
to turn off the television as soon 
as Playschool finishes. 

Certainly Adventure Island wa.«? 
enjoyed by the children for the 
first year or two, but its ideas 
and characters are simply worn 



out. At a public meeting held in 
Canberra last year to discuss 
children's television it was hoped 
that the Programme would be 
pensioned off at the end of 1971 
not 1972. 

Please spare us the repeats, 
which would be the worst of all 
worlds ! Preschool and infant 
schoolchildren are well catered 
for with Andy.Pandy, Playschool, 
Sesame Street and assorted Car- 
toons and puppets. I would like 
to register a strong plea for the 
half-hour made available by Ad- 
venture Island's demise to be 
devoted to the much-neglected 
eight to 12-year olds. 

Cannot the talents of Adven- 
ture Island's production team be 
used to produce much-needed 
new, up-to-date programmes for 
this age group ? Switched-on Set 
is a very good Programme for 
older children, but it is only half 
an hour per week. 

The primary school child is at 
a peak of enthusiasm, ready to 
learn about the world, to try out 
new ideas, to accept new atti- 
tudes, to experiment in art forms. 
With the time, talent and finance 
freed by Adventure Island what 
has the ABC to offer ? 

JOSEPHINE VANDERMARK 
(Canberra). 



r 






i 



limit 



Dunera conditions 
are exag-gerated 

SIR, — The • Silence on Prisen Mor 
ror Ship does not deserve spac 
on the front page of your pape 
(•*The Age", 13/9). Only ih 
search for Sensation or for 
profitable book story seems 
"warm up" those 32-year-o 
events. 

As a former German-Jewish in- 
ternee on the Dunera, I can assure 
you that the expression "horror 
ship" exaggerates our conditioni? 
on the boat, overcrowded as ic 
was. We shared a certain food 
shortage with the British popula- 
tion left behind, and the food was 
certamly not as good as the armv 
rations received after that in Au.s-t 
tralian internment camps. But we 
did not really starve and onlv 
louts could 'Tight for an extra 
prune". The excesses committed 
by British soldiers (after the cx- 
perience of Dunkirk) are not to 
be excused, but cannot possibly 
be called horror during a war, 
which led to mass extermination 
of civilians and uncounted othcr 
examples of inhuman cruelty. 

We were lucky to be shipped to 
this country just before the Luft- 
waffe Started bombing London in 



I 



August, 1940, facing the possi 
bility of a German Invasion. The 
Germans, had they succeeded, 
would not have given Hugo Wolf- 
sohn 32 years to complain. 
^ E. LEFFMANN (St. Kilda)» 



1 



f 

!• 



J 



Sickness surprises \ 
the railways 

SIR, — A public inquiry should be 
held into the chaotic State of 
peak-hour railway Services in the 
Melbourne metropolitan area. 

I find it incredible that as ex- 
Dandenong trains are cancelled on 
most mornings, the lame excuse 
is given that the disruption is 
caused by unanticipated sickness 
of drivers and/or guards. This 
would imply that sickness is a 
new experience for railway staff, 
because as far as I recall, train 
cancellations have never previ- 
ously been attributed to sick- 
ness, 

The trouble seems to be due 
to inept planning on the part of 
the Railways Commissioners in 
training new staff, or perhaps dis- 
ruptionist union leaders have con- 
trived a subtle plan to further 
inconvenience the travelling pub- 
lic. The fact that the railway 
unions have refused to discuss 
the Problem with the Victorian 
Minister for Transport (Mr. Wil- 
cox) would suggest that the latter 
is the case. 



victims of criminals than on cri- 
minals themselves". 

Confining myself to the last of 
these "quotable quotes", the 
VCCL has been pressing for com- 
pensation for victims of crimlnal 
attacks for some time by way of 
letters to newspapers, Statements 
on TV, and deputations to Minis- 
ters. The Government accepted 
representations by the VCCL that 
people injured where assisting 
policemen should receive compen- 
sation and then asked that the 
same principle be extended to all 
victims of criminal attacks, 
whether the assailant could be 
identified or not. 

The VCCL accordingly wel- 
comes the recent Statement by 
the Governor (Sir Rohan Dela- 
combe) that the Government in- 
tends to legislate to provide such 
compensation. Compensation 
schemes alreadv operate in New 
South Wales, the UK and New 
Zealand. Under the New Zealand 
and NSW schemes, there is a 
limit to the amount of compensa- 
tion paid, namely £1500 Sterling 
and $2000 respectively. In New 
Zealand only specified crimes at- 
tract compensation — thus robbery 
and arson are both umitted. In 
New South Wales compensation 
is payable only where the assail- 
ant can be identified and criminal 
proceedings are instituted. 

The limitations in the New Zea- 
land and NSW schemes do not 
apply to that operating in the 
UK. The cost of the UK scheme 
(the most expensive) during its 
first 20 months of compensation, 
was less than £500,000. 

Transposing these figures to 
Victoria and assuming that the 
present court System is used in 
determining compensation, the 
annual cost in Victoria of a 
scheme modelled on that of the 
UK would be less than .$80.000, 
or to use th 



FACES OF POVERTY - Parr 4^ 



^ ^ il 



:*A:a»!Ä\^«v:< 



I 




Maureen Howard, 19, with Drew, 14 months, and Corey, three 







railways. This is 1.4 per cent. up on last year. 

State primary, technical and secondary schools 
will get $411 million, universities $39 million, Col- 
leges of advanced education $35 million, agricultural 
education $2 million, and grants to independent 
schools $11 million (up $2.4 million). 

The Budget provides $1.6 million this financial 
Economists gave us the year to offset the loss of school income by abolition 
concept of gross national of the much-criticised composite fees. 

Mr. Hamer said that from the start of the next 
school year the Government would provide special 
grants totalling $3.2 million a year, to primary, high 
and technical schools. 

The Director General of Education (Mr. F. H. 
Brooks) said yesterday that composite fees in secon- 
dary schools averaged about $10 to $15 a year. 

They were fixed by the school. 

Mr. Hamer said the charges were relatively small 
and' the 'purpose of l^e U^- [''J'^^T^'^ ^'^^^^^ ^^^ "^^^^ significant in secondary 
seif — of ihe relationship ^cnoois. 

of man to his environment They were used to buy and maintain equipment 

and the world in which he and materials used by pupils as a group. 
lives '^" j f r o T 

These are words that "^^^ example, they may cover the cost of sports 

inese are woras mav ^^^grial and equipment, maintenance of students' 
were never heard in the 17 i^ckers, supply of paper towelling, replacement of 
Budgets brought down by ij^rary books, and the purchase of additional curri- 
Sir Henry Bolte. culum material such as teaching kits for a class," 



Repeatedly 

Mr. Hamer's "quallty of 
life" approach is stated re- 
peatedly in the preamble 
and is implicit throughout 
the Budget. 



product and interest has 
centred on the rate at 
which that grows," he said. 
"Is it time to think more 
about 'Gross National 
Wellbeing' ? 

"Is it time that our pro- 
per concern with growth 
should be tempered with 
greater emphasis on the 



But on one issue at least 
the sentiments expressed by 
Mr. Hamer could as easily 
have been those of Sir 
Henry. 

Mr. Hamer said the fu- 

ture of Australia's Federal 
System depended more on 
finding an answer to the 
question of the division of 
taxing powers than on any- 
thing eise. 



Way 



Take the Proven 
to Career Success: 

Over the past 74 years, M.R.f. has tralned fbousands 
of students to examination success through its 
unique programmed home study method. You can 
save time and money by iearning at home, at your 
own pace from H.R.I. texts. H.R.I. texts are Copyright 
and are specially written to cover the examination 
syliabuses of the professional bodies related to the 
lollowing courses: — 

# ACCOUNTANCY 

# MANAGEMENT 
m ADMINISTRATION 

# SECRETARYSHIP 

# SALES & MARKETINQ 

# BANKING 

For complete detafls of the H.R.I. exciusfve tralning 
programmes, telephone your State H.R.I. Office, or 
post the Coupon below. A personal advisory service 
te avallable without Obligation to discuss your study 
Programme in your own home. 

Post the coupon today. 

HEMINGWAY ROBERTSON 
INSTITUTE 

rHEMlNGWAY ROBERTSON INSTITiiTE' 

_ Bank House. Bank Place J 205 

■ Melbourne 3000. Phone 60.1671 

I Please send me complete detalls on the H.R.L.^ 

I course. 

Postcode............^....Phone.....>. ^.^ 

Employer or school ,„.»^,^ 

' Educational Standard «....- Age ., 



Mr. Hamer said. 

"A special grant now proposed will be paid to 
the schools on the understanding that parents will 
not be expected to pay such charges in the future." 

But the Student would still be expected to pay 
the cost of text books, readers, school papers, exer- 
cise books, writing materials and other items of 
personal property. 

Mr. Hamer said the Government hoped schools 
would still get voluntary contributions which parents 
made apart from composite fees. 

The new grants would be 
based on the number of 
pupils and would be paid in 
quarterly instalments. 

Mr. Hamer said one-year 
teaching bursaries at forms 
five and six would be abol- 
ished next year. Instead a 
$10 book allowance would 
be paid to all form five 
students who held no other 
scholarships. 

Mr. Hamer has allocated 
$6.5 million to the 
new Department of Con- 
servation, including $2 mil- 
lion for the Environment 
Protection Authority. 

Mr. Hamer said legisla- 
tion would be introduced 
soon to get payroll tax re- 
bates to approved decen- 
tralised Industries. He did 
not give details. 

• Editorial — 9; It's a 
"happy" Budget; Premier — 
12. 




aiissM 



'Embassy' up again 
then puUed down 

From MICHELLE GRATTAN 

CANBERRA. — Police early this morning pu lled down the "Aboriginal embassy" oppo- 
site Parliament House — just over eight hours after it was re-ereeted. 



Drug squad 
to police 3 
east States 



Drug squad detectives from 
three States will form an elite 
force of special constables 
patrolling the entire east coast. 

Members of the force will 
have authority to arrest drug 
offenders on the spot in Victoria, 
Queensland and New South 
Wales. 

The move foUows talks in 
Sydney this week between police 
commissioners from the three 
States. 

Announcing the new "drug 
patrol", in Brisbane yesterday, 
the Queensland Police Minister 
(Mr. Hodges) described it as "an 
east coast strategy" to combat 
illegal drug traffic. 

He said drug squad members 
in each State would Supplement 
squads in other States following 
the Interstate moves of drug 
offenders. 

The Queensland Police Commis- 
sioner (Mr. Whitrod) said that 
Queensland detectives would be 
sworn in as special constables 
when they moved into either 
NSW or Victoria. 

This would happen on a three- 
way basis between the States. 

He said offenders were known 
to move from State to State each 
season. Detectives would be able 
to follow them along the east 
coast. 



About 30 police moved in on 
the embassy by torchlight shortly 
before 1 a.m. 

The drama foUowed a ruling 
yesterday afternoon by the A.C.T. 
Supreme Court declaring that the 
ordinance under which police tore 
down the 'embassy' last July was 
inoperative. 

The court said that the ordin- 
ance which the Government 
gazetted in July had not been 
notified in accordance with the 
procedure which the law re- 
quired. 

Two hours after the judgment 
was handed down, the embassy 
was re-erected by four Abori- 
gines and an official of the 
Builders* Laborers' Federation. 

The court's decision threw the 
Government into confusion be- 
cause it means that many ordin- 
ances covering Government in 
the A.C.T. are likely to be in- 
operative. 

After conferring with the At- 
torney-General (Senator Green- 
• wood) and officials, the Minister 
for the Interior (Mr. Hunt) an- 
nounced in the House of 
Representatives at 11.15 last 
night that an ordinance would 
be gazetted immediately and the 
demonstrators would be asked 
to move. 

Mr. Hunt's announcement 
sparked off an angry debate in the 
House. 

Mr. Hunt said that the Go- 
vernment was "acting to place 
beyond doubt the effective Ope- 
ration" of the ordinance. 

The ordinance was gazetted at 
about midnight 

When police moved in on the 
•embassy* they told the seven resi- 
dents — including four Aborigines 
— to move their tent. 

When they refused, the police 



puUed out the tent pegs and cart- 
ed off the tent. 

There was no violence and no 
arrests were made. 

The small crowd surrounding 
the 'embassy' jeered and cheered 
as police drove off in two wagons 
and several cars. 

While Inspector Kent of Can- 
berra police talked to the demon- 
strators, Labor MHR Mr. Kip En- 
derby addressed a line of police 
in front of the 'embassy' and con- 
demned its removal. 

One demonstrator told Inspec- 
tor Kent: "We cannot pull down 
something we are fighting for." 

Mr. Bob McLeod, an Aboriginal 
member of the 'embassy' hung 
ithe wooden 'Aboriginal embassy' 
sign around his neck after the 
tent had been pulled down. 

Demonstrators told police the 
Police Association had supported 
the 'embassy' and so they should 
not remove it. 

Police took demonstrators' 
names and addresses. 

The demonstrators dispersed 
soon after the police drove off. 

Police first removed the 
"Aboriginal embassy" which 
was established outside Parlia- 
ment House on January 26, as 
a Protest against the Govern- 
ment's refusal to grant Abori- 
ginal land rights — during a 
violent clash with demonstrators 
on July 20. 

Eight people were arrested 
and several police and demon- 
strators were injured. 

The 'embassy' was re-establish- 
ed for Short periods during two 
later demonstrations. 

The four Aborigines who re- 
established the "embassy" yes- 
terday are all due to appear in 
court in connection with charges 
arising out of these earlier 
demonstrations. 



Silence on prison 'horror' ship 



By BEN HILLS 

A man died fighting for 
an extra prune on the 
Australia-bound prison 
ship Dunera, a survivor 
claimed yesterday. 

"Conditions were appal- 
ling . . . men fought like 
animals for a little extra 
food," Professor Hugo Wolf- 
sohn said. 

Professor Wolfsohn, 54, 
dean of La Trobe Univer- 
sity's social sciences faculty, 
was one of the 2700 inter- 
nees shipped from England 
to Australia on the Dunera 
in 1940. 



In CANBERRA earlier, 
the Federal Government re- 
fused to release any infor- 
mation on the Dunera case 
— claiming it could cause 
distress or embarrassment 
to survivors still living in 
Australia. 

The former Opposition 
Lead«r, Mr. Arthur Calwell, 
asked the Government to re- 
lease the passenger list — 
and the report of the in- 
quiry into allegations of ill- 
treatment. 

The Minister for the En- 
vironment, Aborigines and 
the Arts (Mr. Howson) said 



he assumed Mr. Calwell's 
question was connected 
with author Cyril Pearl's 
plan to write a book about 
the Dunera. 

Mr. Pearl said that the 
Commonwealth Archivos 
had first agreed — then 
refused — to give him a li^^t 
of the 2700 passengers oti 
the Dunera. 

He säid that many of tha 
800 to 1000 ihternees wh<) 
had stayed in Australia haJ 
become leaders in educa- 
tion, the public service an I 
commerce. 

Mr. Pearl said there haci 



been a "tremendous stink" 
about the fate of the refu- 
gees. The British Govern- 
ment paid some compcnsa- 
tion — but the Australian 
Government "would have 
nothing to do with the 
case". 

Prof. Wolfsohn said that 
the internees, many of them 
German Jews, had been told 
they were being taken to 
Canada to be released. They 
did not find out their real 
destination untll 10 days 
after the ship sailed. 

During the eight-week 



horror voyage two men died 
— one from a heart attack 
during the fight over prunes. 
The other committed suicide 
by jumping overboard. 

Prof. Wolfsohn called on 
the Federal Government to 
release a secret report on 
allegations of ill treatment 
on the ship. He claimed: 

• British s 1 d i e rs 
"frisked" prisoners on the 
Dunera and stole rings, 
watches, pens and other 
valuables. 

Contlnued — 2« 



Senator out 
after 
aecusing PM 

CANBERRA. — A Labor Senator 
was suspended from the Senate 
last night over an allegation of 
improper conduct against the 
Prime Minister (Mr. McMahon). 



Page index 

World ncws 6-7; (efters 8; ediroria($ 9; 
Comics, TV, crossword, weother, shipping 
law lisf 16; omusements, Tafts (No. 604» 
17; Accenf 18-19; Business Age 20-24; 
Sydney quofes 23; Melbourne quotes 24; 
Sports 25-28. 



Classified index 



-29 



mmmm^mmm 



nnfti i i iy MHWBno iii > niwwk% ifVtf »riTo y Tnrifrrrf¥tfVV k Tw a ww»Qf^^ 

CITY: Showery and windy. Expected 
top Q cool 1 3 (yesterday 20) . 

Details — 16 



Senator Georges (Lab., 
Qld.) was suspended for 24 
hours after refusing to 
withdraw an allegation that 
Mr. McMahon had displayed 
patronage and favoritism to 
an aircraft Company and a 
Sydney Stockbroker. 

Senator Georges said he 
had raised the instances of 
patronage in questions in 
the Senate. 

He said he had asked 
about the purchase of a 
number of aircraft for 
Cambodia by the Depart- 
ment of Foreign Affairs 
from the aircraft Company, 
Jetair. 

Mr. McMahon was the 
Minister for Foreign Affairs 
at the time of the purchase, 
Senator Georges said. 

He said the purchase was 
an unusual decision because 
tenders had not been called 
through the Department of 
Supply. 

Difficulties 

Jetair was at the time in 
considerable difficulties. 

Senator Georges said one 
of the Chief executives of 
Jetair, Mr. Alexander Bar- 
ton, had close contacts in 
high places in the Govern- 
ment. 

"I merely made the State- 
ment that here there ap- 
peared to be patronage on 
the part of a Minister of 
the Government to suit a 
particular powerful friend, 
and a leading Stockbroker," 
he said. 

Senator Georges said that 
in a further series of events, 
a firm of Stockbrokers had 
challenged a taxation 
assessment, their appeal had 
been refused, and the 
assessment had been re- 
ferred to the taxation com- 
missioner in Canberra. 

The assessment, involving 
about $2.5 million, had been 
withdrawn. 

Senator Georges said 
there had been a represen- 
tation to Mr. McMahon by 
a Mr. Dowling, of Patrick 
and Partners. 

"Mr. Dowling was able 
to take advantage of his 
connections within the 
Liberal Party to have his 
assessment withdrawn," 
Senator Georges said. 

The President of the 
Senate (Sir Magnus Cor- 
mack) warned Senator 
Georges of a standing order 
prohibiting Senators from 
imputing improper conduct 
to a Member of Parliament. 

• Continued — 5b 



Radiata Pine 

häsa I 
special quan 

^ _ 



houseframing 




It is kiln 
seasoned to prevent 
shrinkage problems. 




Radiata Pine. Kiln seasoned. 

Graded to S.A.A. specifications. 

It's Australia's 

premium construction timber. 

Insist on it for your 

houseframing. 

radiata pine 

association of australia I 

Bank Building, Bank Street, Adelaide 5000. 



4 



mm 




t' ilia. 1 

.„.iiibjltil 

ii:niiiilliä»^NP79 



lg 






^:r 



xi. 



PERANNUM 

YOUR FUNDS 
ARE READILY 
VVITHDRAWABLE. 

•ASSBOOKS ^ 

Lip" " i 

SOCIETY ■ 
I, Victoria, 3189 | 

' savings ■ 

I 

I 



to 



lur 



rom i5Y 
(official) 
to pigs 
(unofficial) 



The split between "offi- 
cial" and "unofficial" art. 
that which we expect 
artists to produce and 
that which affronts our 
expectations, is sharply 
illu^trated in a number of 
exhibitions this week. 

If the large exhibition of 
contemporary portraiture at 
the Joseph Brown Gallery 
(5 Collins Street) doesn't 
represent the extremes of 
official portraiture where ar- 
tists double as morticians, it 
does epitomise one official 
expectation of artists: to 
produce recognisable images 
of the famous and the in- 
famous the nong and non- 
entity. 

One sees in these port- 
raits a succession of adjust- 
ments being made to 
accommodate official expec- 
tation to aesthetic respect- 
ability. With Sir William 
Dargie's stunned portrait of 
a doctor as a base line, the 
adjustments vary from 
overheating academic art, 
and thus boiling off some of 
the fat, to lodging the image 
within an abstracted, de- 
coratively organised sur- 
face. 

The overheaters of aca- 
demic art include such 
manic pieces at Albert 
Tucker's early portrait and 
John Howley's Faustian 
Portrait of John Percival. 

Both use the methods of 
academic art and subject 
them to expressive pres- 
hures. 

Tucker's abrasive shifts 
of light and dark and How- 
ley's liquid chiaroscuro take 
the stiffness out of the aca- 
demic without surrendering 
the firm sense of particular 
sitter. 




IMPORTANT 
ANNOUNCEMiHNT 

NEW TOYOTA CROWN SE MODELS 
Anyone wishing to purchase a 
new TOYOTA CROWN are advised 
to contact Mr. Connor tor a special 
offer. 95 2222. 





1 


STCODE. 






1 

■ 


--- 


1 ■ 


NP30 






M 


1 



Art Exhibition 

THE SEVEN YEAR ITCH 

(1965-1972) 

From the beninn to the brazen. 

A conglomcration of notcworthy 

work by known jtrtists priced 

for new konn collcctors. 

12th SEPT. -Ist OCT. 

Nrs. Tues. Through Sundays 

11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

AVANT GALI ERY 

342 PUNT ROAD 
SOUTH YAT.RA. 
Phon« 26 2009. 




John Brack's desiccation 
of academic art whereby he 
gets volume without mass 
and pins his sitters to the 
surface suggests the variety 
of adjustments which can 
be made within the accept- 
able ränge of portrait 
styles. 

However impressive one 
finds some of these adjust- 
ments, they don't match, 
pictorially, Clifton Pugh's 
early portrait style, repre- 
sented in this exhibition by 
the süperb portrait of Mar- 
got Knox. 

There the figure is fully 
absorbed into the surface of 
the painting, not just de- 
picted upon it. A lesser but 
charming try at this theme 
is Constance Stokes* por- 
trait of Phyl V/aterhouse 
where bad color ruins the 
design. 

A third line of contem- 
porary portraiture — the 
expressionist sketch — is 
well represented here with 
Works by Ann Hall, Arthur 
Boyd and Fred Williams. 

The mode avoids both the 
question of modelling-up the 
sitter and of fulfilling the 
whole painting decoratively. 
The sketchiness bails the 
portraitist out of trouble but 
at the cost of a certain 
insubstantiality. 

A group exhibition at 
Pinacotheca (Waltham 

Place, off Church Street, 
Richmond) throws the or- 
thodox idea of an exhibition 
into doubt, never mind the 
content of the art itself. 
No concessions are made to 
the tasteful installation of 
one sympathetic work with 
another. This is no avant- 
garde simulacrum of official 
art. 

The waywardness of the 
exhibition bears out the 
character of the art being 
exhibited. Mike Brown 
paints two cloudscapes on 
two walls of the gallery; 
Ross Grounds instals a live 
pig in a pen. 

Other works distribute 
cow faeces in a neat regulär 
pattem, thus showing that 
art regulates nature. 

But one wonders whether 
unofficial art should look it 
so readily. We expect the 
avant-garde to look like 
this now. 

The latent tendency of 
the Pinacotheca group to- 
wards fragmentation here 

of it is merely amusement 
art. The alternative to that 
seems a self-imposed rigor 
which looks increasingly 
doctrinaire and rigid. Offi- 
cial art provides us with 
enough of that. 







Jt.^, "*»*«»(»* 



''•>*^:*> 



''*****»»^ 




^SJ^^^WÄ^IWi^v 



Professor Hugo Wolfsohn Stands in front of a painting depicting life 
aboard the refugee ship Dunera painted by a fellow refugee. 

Canberra silent 
on 'horror' ship 



FROM PAGE ONE 

• Guards on the ship as- 
saulted prisoners, and 
smashed beer-bottles on the 
decks where they had to 
walk bare-footed. 

• There were heavy 
punishments for minor of- 
fences, including two 
prisoners bound with chains 
and put in the ship's gaol 
for Insubordination. 

• The internees were 
half-starved on a diet of 



iniisic 



FELIX WERDER 



Guitarist 
presents 
skill and 
elegance 

Guitarist Emesto Bitetti 
presented playing of the 
highest order of skill and 
elegance at the Town Hall 
last night. 

I particularly like his 
classical bracket, in which 
he managed to be accom- 
plished and fluent as well 
as intellectually involved. 

In Gasper Sanz's Spanish 
Suite (1692) he demon- 
strated soft, luxuriant quali- 
ties that evoked the 
mysteries of the early Tole- 
doean mannerists. 

His Bach suite, a trans- 
lation from the 'cello suite 
No. 1, incorporated a great 
variety of moods and col- 
oristic sonorities particul- 
arly in the glorious Sara- 
bande. 

The rapid finger work 
across the strings in the 
Upper lagen, as well as the 
frieze work in the chording 

In passing, one should 
mention a delightful Per- 
formance of Sor's varia- 
tions on a theme by Mozart 
which delighted with its 
easeful control and master- 
ly insight. 



rancid margarine, soup and 
prunes. Drinking water ran 
out at one stage. 

• Pri.soners' luggage was 
left on the decks to rot 
after British soldiers 
ba.yonettccl open suitcases 
and rifled valuables. 

• The 2700 prisoners, 
some of thcm boys of 16, 
were kept below decks be- 
hind bars and barbed wire 
for days on end — in spite 
of sea-.'^ickness and out- 
breaks cf diarrhoea. 

Prof. Wolfsohn said that 
the British Government 
after the war had paid out 
more than £10,000 compen- 
sation. "All I got was £1 
for a travelling clock and 
10 handkerchiefs," he said. 

"I can t think why the Go- 
vernment won't release the 
documents — they would 
be of immense interest and 
importance to many schol- 
ars. 

"It is certainly not the 
survivors who would be em- 
barrassed — I wonder what 
is in the reports that could 
embarrass the Govern- 
ment. 

'There was a rumor that 
a Melbourne rabbi had ask- 
ed the army not to release 
US from the internment 
camps because he feared 
this would lead to an out- 
break of anti-semitism . . . 
how true this is I don't 

know." 

Professor Wolfsohn, now 

married with two children, 
lives in Burwood. 

He was born in Berlin, 
fled Nazi Germany in 1937 
and went to England in 
1939. "Like most of the in- 
ternees 1 was category C— 
friendl.v allen Status," he 

said. 

"After Dunkirk feil in 
1940 the British Govern- 
ment began this huge round- ' 
ing-un Operation of foreign- 
ers. 1 think they interned 
600 0(>0 people altogether in 
can'ips all over the country. 

«1 was at my rooms in 
North London with my girl- 
frienJ when they came for 
mo .r «."^O one moming. 
"pivf. Wolfsohn said 
he as sent to an intem- 
men: camp in Liverpool 
before being shipped to 
Au-iralia on the Dunera. 

. vVe were told we were 
going to be sent to Canada 



to be set free, and most of 
US believed it. We were 92 
per cent. European Jews od 
that^ ship. 

"After we salied I met 
this man who had been a 
boy scout and he had a 
compass. He kept taking 
bearings and telling every- 
one we were going south. 

"We didn't really believe 
him until we peered out of 
the lavatory window and 
saw the soldiers being 
issued with their pith 
helmets, 

Then the captain an« 
nounced over the loud- 
speaker that we were going 
to Australia . . . it was the 
worst moment of my life." 

Prof. Wolfsohn said that 
as the internees filed on 
board the 9000-ton Dunera 
at Liverpool docks British 
soldiers "frisked" them and 
took their valuables. 

Prof. Wolfsohn said: "The 
stealing and the robbing 
went on for most of the 
voyage. 

"The food was terrible. I 
remember there were 16 
strict Orthodox Jews on 
board who could only eat 
kosher. It was a miracle 
to me that they survived 
the entire voyage on prayer 
and cheddar cheese." 

Prof. Wolfsohn said that 
when the ship reached Fre- 
mantle Australian doctors 
went on board. "They were 
horrified at the conditions 
and things were immediate- 
Jy improved. 

"This whole thing reflects 
little credit on the British 
or the Australians. No won- 
der they want it hushed 
up," he said. 



(<iitiin«n«mi i 

Want to moke morc sales ar<i f^oncy? Wont to 
handle objcctions morc effcct'v^^'V^ Wont to 
dose morc solcs? Comc to c ♦rce provicw of the 

Dole Carnegie Sales Course Scpt^'^^^!^. .?_ 



THE AGE 

INTERSTATE 
PRICES 

MONDAY-FRIDAY 

Retail prlces by aJr ar« 

Canberra area, cooma, 
NSW, Tasmania, King 
Island, SA. 



Brisbane, Gold Coftst, 
Sunshlnc Coast 



7C 
8c 



North Q'land, Perth. 
Alice Springs. Kadicrine 10c 

Port Moresby, Darwin 20c 



Adve 



THE ABC, In December, 
will drop Adventure 
Island — the phenonien- 
ally successful local 
series which currently 
attracts 2000 children's 
letters per week. 

The commission yester- 
day refused to give me any 
reason for its bemusing de- 
cision. 

However, as five-year-old 
Island is the most populär 
and educationally stimulat- 
ing children's Programme 
produced in Australia, there 
will be streng moves to 
save it. 

Already, the Council for 
Children's Films and Tele- 
vision, the Country 
Women's Association and 
the TV Make It Australian 
campaign are preparing 
protests. 

For producer Godfrey 
Phillip, this week's decision 
came out of the bureauro- 
cratic blue. 

He received it in a terse 
note from an obscure offi- 
cial, quite unknown to him, 
The letter cooUy thanked 
him for his efforts. 

Adventure Island*s de- 

mise will throw 12 cast 
members, writers and tech- 
nicians out of work. 

It will also shut off 
afternoon TV's only source 
of practical creative Stimu- 
lus to the young. 

Phillip told mer "We 
offered no prizes, but we 
motivated hundreds of 
thousands of kids into 
sending us drawings. 
modeis and toys they'd 
made themselves." 

Added scripter John 
Howson: "These youngsters 
will now switch over to the 
passive pleasures of old 
Superman and Bugs Bunny 
movies." 

Although its ratings are 
smaller than those of 
Island» and its teachings re- 
flect foreign mores, Sesame 
Street will be retained by 
the ABC. 

I suspect that one major 
reason for the U.S. imporfs 
survival is that it's cheaper. 
Producer Phillip, who 
seemed more wearied than 
angered bv it all, observed: 
"This could be the first nail 
in the coflin for idigenous 
children's shows. 

"If the ABC can't produce 
a continuing kids' series, 
how can the Control Board 
expect commercial stations 
to do it?" 

All an ABC spokesman 
would say was: "The con- 
tract for Adventure Island 
expires at the end of this 
year. However, there will 
be repeats well into next 
year. 

"There are new local 
programmes to replace Ad- 
venture Island. Many will 
come from' the Young 
People's Programme De- 
partment in Sydney." 

Writer Howson, who also 
plays Clown, is regretful 
aboiit those Island repeats, 
planned for 1973. 

"The children, thinking 
they're new shows, will 
tni:^tingly keep sending pic- 
tures and letters," he said. 
"And their mail will end up 
in limbo." 

Howson still wants to 
write for Australian TV. 

But he feels he'll do it 
most successful ly from 
California. "Anything ema- 
nating from there," he ex- 
plained, "is snapped up". 



TN frozen darkness, 500 

miles north of New- 

foundland, floated a stupen- 

dous mountin of ice — a Taj 



nn 



tomorrow 









Mahal 
wind-shai 

Towai 
berg thej 
— a 10- 
ton gaui 
man in 

In the 
enne, ti 
creepere< 
ticket 
white wl 
enjoyed 
oysters 
meats. 

In the 
each tii 
ner of 
tage, 
chatted 
Russell- 
that thei 
discover 
port or 
master 
The shi 

the stai 

knots. 

The 
several 
giant pi 
Marconi 
to trai 
warn ing» 

But tl 

Marconi 
too bus3 
fuIIy en| 
passeng( 
London. 

And 
noticed 
ture w£ 
ping . . 

Until. 
Officer 
"Iceberg 
yards ah( 

The 
could n( 
the ice 

Hurtlii 
cal mom( 



iUlllllli 



KN< 











AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 

Phorie: (212)744-6400 

Fax: (212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Data: 12/30/2009 



Box: 



Sys#: 000198685 

Folder: ^ 



-\v'<^?^M^ft6j^!»it^'t-^'^V.^t/!^^F»'y^.,:.^^^^^^^ 



''^>f-r.n'AMj--'->-.i.r-^':- i^'r'^'^^-'.i-:-.'.;.--,*^ ■■. 



Dr. med. Fritz Herrnsfadf S.A. 



Ende Januar starb inNathania, seinem Wohn- 
sitz, mein Jugendfreund Pritz Herrn^stadt im Al- 
ter von 83 Jahren. 

Pritz Hermstadt wurde Im Jahre 1893 zu 
LlÄsa In Posen geboren als Sohn des hochange- 
sehenen SanltÄtsrates und Stabsarztes der Re- 
serve Herrnstadt. Vater und Sohn waren keine 
Kinder des Glücks, das zeigte sich sogleich nach 
der Geburt des kleinen Pritz: seine Mutter starb 
im Kindbett. Nun war guter Rat teuer: der Herr 
Sanitätsrat brauchte neben einer Klnderpflegerin 
auch eine Dame, die ihm das Haus führte und 
später den Sohn betreute. Es fand sich der nahe- 
zu ideale Mensch für diese Stellung in der Person 
einer Cousine meiner Mutter. Adele Wolff war 
das ältere Fräulein aus gutem Hause, wie es im 
Buche des 19. Jahrhunderts stand und heute nicht 
mehr gefunden wird: sie war vornehm, kultiviert, 
stUl, warmherzig und anhänglich, leider aber we- 
nig jüdisch fundiert. Sie hat für Fritz gesorgt, als 
wenn er ihr eigenes Kind wäre und ist um ihn 
gewesen bis zu ihrem seligen Ende in hohen 
Jahren. 

An dem Kinde Fritz zeigte sich bald, dass er 
der rechte Sohn seines Vaters war: er war gleich 
ihm ein guter Lernkopf, imd er war gleich ihm 
nicht eben das, was man einen Sonnenschein 
nennt. Beide Herrnstadts, Vater und Sohn, wa- 
ren keine freundlichen Menschen; sie hatten auch 
wenig Grund, glücklich zu sein. Fritz ging glatt 
durch die Schule und begann dann wie sein Va- 
ter, das medizinische Studium. Da brach der er- 
ste Weltkrieg aus. Vater Herrnstadt wurde so- 
gleich als Stabsarzt eingezogen, hatte sehr viel zu 
tun, überanstrengte sich, der kein Jüngling mehr 
war und starb in noch relativ jungen Jahren und 
ziemlich plötzlich. Der arme Fritz war nun mit 
Anfang zwanzig Vollwaise. Er hatte an Positivem 
die Tante Adele und keine Geldsorgen, sodass er 
nach Erledigung seiner Dienstpflicht bei der Sa- 
nität das Studium in Ruhe beenden konnte. Er 
war nun Arzt und ging mit Tante Adele nach 
Qlogau. Da er ein besonders guter Diagnostiker 
war -— die Behandlung steht schliesslich in Bü- 
chern — so schuf er sich bald eine gute Praxis 
und wurde von Kollegen als Consiliarius hinzu- 
gezogen. Ich sah ihn in Deutshland ziun letzten- 
mal bei der Beerdigung von Tante Adele, als ich 
in Glogau meine Mutter vertrat. 

Erst etwa ein Jahrzehnt später traf ich ihn 
kurz nach meiner Alijah auf der Hauptstrasse der 
Unterstadt von Haifa zu meiner üeberraschung 
wieder. Im fremden Erdteil, in fremdem Lande, 
in fremder Stadt einem alten Bekaxmten zu be- 
gegnen, war eine Freude: wir hatten einander viel 
zu erzählen. Er hatte inzwischen geheiratet, eine 
christliche Freundin, die zum Judentum überge- 
treten war und sich Ruth nannte. Er hatte von 
ihr einen kleinen Sohn Jakob. Er schien wohl- 
habend zu sein, nahm sich in Haifa eine hübsche 
Wohnung und machte mit der Hanotea einen 
Vertrag über den Bau eines Hauses In Nathania. 
Dieses Haus wuide sehr schön und geräumig: es 
hatte wohl fünf oder sechs Zimmer, zudem eine 
Treppe auf das Dach, das einen prächtigen Blick 
auf das Meer bot. Räume Im Souterrain baute 
Fritz für seine Ordination aus. Frau Ruth richtete 
im Hause eine koschere Pension ein, in der dau- 
ernd ein Beamter des Rabbinats herumsass. Mit 
zwei Berufen hätte ihre Zukunft eigentlich gesi- 
chert sein müssen. Aber leider war die Lage des 
Hauses für gewerbliche Zwecke nicht günstig. Das 
alles ist heute kaum mehr vorstellbar. Das Haus 
lag auf der Rischon Lezlon Strasse, die damals 
die letzte Strasse vor dem Meere war; sie hatte 
damals wie heute keinen direkten Zugang zur 
Ussischkinstrasse, die man nur durch Umgehung 



der Rischonstrasse erreichen koimte. Die Jabo- 
tinskystrasse war angelegt, aber noch nicht be- 
baut. Wo also hätte auf der Rischonstrasse viel 
Verkehr herkommen sollen? Die ganze Strecke bis 
zum Meer hin war Wüste, restrlcted area, das 
nicht bebaut werden durfte. Man hatte also leicht 
versprechen, dass keine andere Strasse vor der 
Rischonstrasse gebaut werden würde. Dass dieses 
Versprechen nach dem Befreiungskriege nicht ge- 
halten wurde, weiss jeder, der Nathania und die 
Oad MÄchnesstrasse kennt. Das Ehepaar Herrti- 
stadt hatte In Nathania kein Glück: dl© Pension 
ging schlecht und die Praxis überhaupt nicht: 
Fritz hat bis zum letzten Tage seines Lebens die 
hebräische Sprache nicht erlernt und im Umgang 
mit Menschen war er nie fein Meister gewesen. 
Zudem entwickelte sich bald ein weiteres Erbteil 
seines Vaters, der sehr kurzsichtig gewesen war: 
ein Augenleiden, das sich trotz Behandlungen und 
Operationen stetig verschlimmerte. Das machte 
den an sich stark Invertierten Menschen vollends 
weit- und menschenscheu. 

Die Jahre vergingen. Wir sahen uns selten: 
wir wohnten weit entfernt von einander, und in 
der Sandwüste von Nathania war nichts zu holen. 
I5er Sohn Jakob wurde erwachsen und später ein 
Auditor In Nathania, die Eltern aber gingen nach 
Deutschland zurück, um weitere Augenbehand- 
lungen zu versuchen. Die Mutter hing sehr an 
dem Sohne und besuchte Ihn gelegentlich, Pritz 
hatte nie eine rechte Einstellung zji dem Kinde 
gefunden, das er sehr sti-eng erzogen hatte. In 
Nathania aber gesjshah mittlerwelle sehr viel : die 
herrlichen Promenaden entstanden und die Trep- 
pe zum Südstrand, der bald dem Nordstrand an 
der Schlucht grosse Konkurrenz machte. Es wur- 
de ungemein viel gebaut und die Gad Machnes- 
strasse angelegt. Damals hatte die politische Par- 
tei Mapam das Grundstück neben Herrnstadts 
"Haus Ruth" erworben und yroUte dorthin Er- 
holungsheim' für die Mitglieder bauen. Dieses 
Grundstück aber war für ^re weltreichenden 
Zwecke zu klein, und so suchten sie, das Haus 
Herriistadt dazu au erwerbea. per VericauX kam 
tatsächlich zustande, und so geschali es. dass das 
schöne Haus von Fritz Herrnstadt vom Erdboden 
verschwand und an seiner statt das riesige ♦'Ho- 
tel Klbbuz" errichtet wurde. Jakob, der Sohn, nun 
gleichfalls verheiratet und Vater eines Kindes, 
konnte den Ertrag nicht nach Deutschland trans- 
ferieren und nahm eine schöne Wohnung auf der 
langsam entstehenden Jabotinsky Strasse. Die El- 
tern fanden auch In Deutschland keine Ruhe oder 
Hellung der kranken Augen und kehrten nach 
Nathania zurück, wo sie sich eine hübsche Woh- 
nung nahmen. 

Hier nun begann der erste Teil von Fritzens 
wahrer Lebenstragödie. Er war nun nahezu blind 
und sah nur noch ganz wenig. Das Laufen fiel 
Ihm schwer, aber er hat uns noch vor zehn Jah- 
ren In unserm Hotel besucht. Leider verschlech- 
terte sich sein physischer imd psychischer Ge- 
sundheitszustand fortwährend. Dazu überkam Ihn 
eine Art verzweifelter Lethargie, eine Inaktlvltät, 
die durch nichts zu durchbrechen war. Wir wa- 
ren jeden Juni In Nathania, und Ich sah Fritz in 
diesen Zelten regelmässig. Es gibt dort eine wun- 
derbare Institution, ein wahrer Segen für alle, 
die sie brauchen: die von dem blinden Dr. Ludwig 
Cohn gegründete Central llbrary for the blind. Sie 
verschicken Bücher in Brailleschrift und Tapes zur 
Unterhaltung von Blinden. Die Leiter des Instituts 
haben sich um Fritz sehr bemüht, und ich habe 
ihn Immer wieder beschworen, von Ihren Ange- 
boten Gebrauch zu machen, und nicht nur dazu- 
sitzen und den ganzen Tag mit dem In der Tat 
bösen Schicksal zu grollen. Er machte es sich 



selbst und der Frau Ruth nicht leicht, die redlich 
für Ihn sorgte. Erst als sie Ihn allzu zeitig und 
unerwartet verlassen hatte, erkannte er, was er 
an Ihr gehabt hatte und betrauerte sie ehrlich. 

Von da ab begann der zweite und letzte Akt 
seiner Lebenstragödie: blind, verwitwet, seiner 
Beine kaum mehr mächtig, von Schwiegertochter 
und Enkeln durch die Sprache getrennt, dem 
Sohne, der sein Geld verwaltete, von jeher ent- 
fremdet, war er nun wirklich In einer verzweifel- 
ten Lage. Das ausgezeichnete Pflegehelm an der 
SUdgrenze von Nathania hatte leider keinen Platz 
frei, und so kam er In die Wohnung einer frü- 
heren HausgehUfln. Ich habe Ihn dort nie gese- 
hen, sondern Immer In der eleganten Wohnung 
des Sohnes Jakob. Noch J975 riet ich Ihm zu grös- 
serer Aktivität, 1976 aber war sein Zustand nach 
einem Schlaganfall ein derartiger, dass Zureden 
keinen Sinn mehr gehabt hätte. Er war teil- 
nahmslos und sehnte, wie schon im Jahre vorher, 
nur noch den baldigen Tod herbei. 

Noch weitere dreiviertel Jahre hat er leiden 
müssen, bis der Tod endlich ein Einsehen hatte. 
Ich kann seinen Helmgang nicht beklagen; das 
war kein Leben mehr. Aber Ich traure um den 
Verlust meines letzten Jugendfreundes, zu dem Ich 
sagen konnte: weisst du noch? denn Fritz hatte 
trotz allem ein glänzendes Gedächtnis, das bis zu 
75 Jahren zurückreichte. 

Möge er Im Gan Eden die Ruhe finden, die ihm 
Im Leben versagt blieb. Walter B. Goldstein 



Dr. MORDECHAI BEN-ASCHEB (Max AMsher) 

Der Vorgenannte Ist Ende Dezember 1976 im 
Alter von nur 64 Jahren einem Herz- Anfall erle- 
gen. 

Dr. Ben-Ascher ist in Breslau geboren und war 
Schüler der jüd. Schule am Rhediger Platz. Schon 
während seiner Schulzeit konnten seine vielseitigen 
Fähigkelten erkannt werden: Er schrieb ein so 
schönes Hebräisch, dass ein hebräischer Aufsatz 
von Ihm nach Israel, damals noch Palästina ge- 
nannt, zur Beurteilung geschickt wurde, Dr. Ben 
Ascher hat noch das Abiturientenexamen In Bres- 
lau ablegen können. Bei dem Im Mai 1976 statt- 
gefundenem Treffen der Breslauer zeigte er sein 
Zeugnis der Reife -Prüfung, sowie die hebräische 
geschriebene Bescheinigung über die gleichzeitig 
abgelegte Prüfung In den hebräischen Fä- 
chern. 

Über England kam Dr. Ben-Ascher ins Land 
und lebte sehr lange im Klbbuz "Misra". Ex- war 
dort Lehrer und hat im Klbbuz srfne Frau ken- 
nengelernt. Erst spät konnte Dr. Ben-Ascher sich 
es erlauben, seine akademischen Studien zu be- 
ginnen. Er studierte In Jerusalem, hauptsachlich 
hebräische Philologie, und seine Lehrer, die seine 
Fähigkeiten erkannt haben, haben Ihn als Lehrer 
der hebräischen Philologie an die Universität. 
Haifa, empfohlen, wo er bis zu seinem Tode tatig 
war. 

Er galt als ein sehr beliebter Lehrer, der es 
verstanden hat, seine Schüler zu fördern und für 
sein Fach zu interessleren. Er hat Bucher und 
Aufsätze über sein Fachgebiet veröffentlicht und 
Hegel Ins hebräische übersetzt. Von einen Büchern 
seien erwähnt: 

nu^inn nnnya T'annn D-»jry p 

Dr. Ben-Ascher war ein ernster Forscher und 
seine Veröffentlichungen werden welter gelesen 
und zitiert werden. 

Er war voller Humor, Immer bereit, zu helfen 
und ein sorgender Familienvater. 

•rnDnu^ö ab) inaKi bv bin 

Es ist schade um diejenigen, die nicht mehr 
sind. 







T 



Jiwil- liT7 ^ 



7 



/r.^ M.^y 




% ' » 




o o 



tn 






p 



w 



n) 



05 



o 



ö 



o 



0) 



;r. & 



o 



o 



I — ' 

CO 



o 






W S ^ 



& 



>-• N 



M 



W 



fT> 



tfl 



O 



«Ü 



fj 



n) 



w 



a ^ R. C: JS ^ O O: d $ 






LH t/1 

fD 



ti r ^ !^ 

c ö3 J5 er 



2. o. 
o \^ 



liJ. n> 



p 



o. 

C: ^ G- ^ „ ^ 

g- s .- s- & - 



3 W 



Ul (T) 



r/i 






w 



a 



TO QTQ 



5 'IJ 



3 & 



OQ 






C: M 






&B- 



(D 






Ori 






tn 



w 



(73 



cn 



P^ 



r/j 



O 



B* 2j TO CO 



Vi 



O: 



a> 



ffi 



c/i 



OJ 



fO 



03 O 



3 P. 



w 



03 ;i. 






n> 



o 



t/1 

05 









05 



fD 



w 



:i. 3 



w 



a> 



O 

03 



oT 

N 



Q 



03 c^ n R 



cra CO r<- 



<-^ 



^' (D 



^ 






n> 



(T) 



(D 



&0Q 3- 



(U 



CL 



3 (TO 



(D 






it 






et- I 



w 



ft> 



3 oi 



a 



-^ 3 B' ^ 



t— • 'jj 



/k' 03 



c/i 

CT- t" 



0) liJ. S 03 
3 C r;»- w 

^ »-< IT* A* 



03 



(T> 



2. 3 



cp t^- 



B-S « 



% 



Ifl 



v> 



&II 



n> 



1 fi} 



o 



<^ Q ^ 

1*0 § 




3 g-ffi 

^ ^ '^ C/5 

B-^ 3 S 



-VLjflft/ 




D 



S «T» 



t tr:' 



g-B- 

f-l CD 
H- 3 



W 



FT 

e-t- 



X 



C/1 



^' (n fx« t:*' 

5S S-3- 



• •>.>:.■: 



a> 



n 



O 



m 



o 



Wl 



wB- 



3. ü 



*t> 



o 3; 



W 



OTQ (5, 



VI 



3 3 



N 



»-S O JU 



t/) 

(D 



n> 



rt> 3' 






fp 



M» 



Cfl c 



Ü» 



? 



B-s- 

ro 2. 



B- 



o 



ro 



3 - 



ro 



tn 



r^ Oj >-•• 



H^f 



t» 



w 



OQ 



C/2 



& 



äE.3 



OQ 



w» -^ ö a 



N 



3 2 



w 



^2- 



0) Co t-. 

»"t ro t« 



ro o 
3 ui 



C '1 03 'O 
"T 05 O DJ P^ 

^ w 3. ' 5 S- 
? 3 a & S ro 

^ r*;- D o < ^. 

3 Jh W 5- :=: 3^ 

3 1-1 »j «_i. »-■•• rx 

3 d ä l'-c 

L"i >-• ro hi o 

-*-^ 3 5' g- a 
~ ?/> ^ w 
< er 3 r/, ;^. CO 
o ro Q^ ^ (15 

2 t/1 00 ffq ►-So 

3 jü er •— ^- er i 
^ tüi ^ (T> &q "'• • 

3 O: o 2. r 

•1 d- a 3 ro_^3 - 

■" /^ r^ o. er 3 r- HS 
n) 3 d- 3 



& ^ 2. » P ^ a jr. 
S d 5 2. g 5 :? 3 

"1 o 3 ^ t; »^ ro 



3 



O CT 2- 

o ro r- O 
ro M. 









C wi 3 c 

«^ »^ *s 5 ? ro 
ro -r 3 (R C 2 






h 

I 

ro 
00 



2. Sg-sro^a^S 
» ^ I Ä S ^ 2 ^ 

;^ I 5- :x c £• - - 
^ § a M 3- r 



ro 



3 ^ 



"• K-. ^. 



c 2. o 

CT 3. 
JJ W Ä 

ro 5^ -* 

&< &:>• C' 

r 2. 2 3- 5* O 

^5*3 a: 

ro e 3 D. J 



55 ia- ro = Iji s ^ n 



(/> 



«33 

ES {« ro 



S» a 3 a J "o c 



• S 3 5^ r« ro* 2. ro -t 

ö 3 ^ ro «H ^ 

;:? 3 p ^ 3* i'j 

o ro » 5. 5 C 



o 



ro 



1^ 



w 



3 . ro 



f 



*-< c ro 



i? 5 



ro 



er orq 

r«. ro 



ro 



in- ro 



ro 



-! ro 



ro 






CA 

ro 



ui 



Qj I-; 



Od 



ro 



OT 



3: p 
ro 3 



3 K ?, 



er ^'. 



3a2 C:fla,§^-2. 



N 



w 



ro 



Ü S^ er 

x ^ ro »-• 

2 ^ 3 ISL 



ro 



ro 



ro 



•— Oi ro 3 
w ro 3 ro 

ro 



O) 



ro 



p 



a:i 



V) 



w 



3 — 

ro 






SS 



(_< l-b 


Ö 


ro 3^ 
er ro 


9 


«-*-ou 


r'- 


»tf 


ro . • 




h. 




3:ro 





ro ►^ 


3 


M» 


^^ 


2 r* 


ro 


3 c 


S 



S p O: W ro ro )^ 05 p: ^ 

>ol ' 3:^S ^=3^^ 
M 03 . "-♦ ^-' • ro r/) >_, 

§, rJ 3 ^ w ßj. S S; <. 

?rro(Ki3Q-r->-ci. rfl3 
►1 o 05 3*(T> „ t;-^ S 



Od O. 
ro ro ^ 

sr-5 ö 



cn 



c-t- CO 

trro 
ro 3 



tu 



ro 



2. O 



ro 



ro 



ro 



§■ 



ro £ 3- ^ H-. 

3' 3^ 2 3 O CO 
3 3 0< I I c-t- 



a 3 
ro OTQ 



P 



OQ 



3* ?" <^ 

crem S*b 

g Sr 05:3 

3 CO ro 



ro 



W 2. 



2 -j 

3 p 



ro 



du 
ro 



(7» 



OQ 



ro 



ro >^ 



ro D-p 
"4ro3 



3^ci 



»-, 3". M 



►L. 3 



(/) 



P 



a 



p 



N2 



p: "-l Cfl 73 

OU P g. 
<o - ^ 

2:-^>ttcoB 

CD . • 

3" 



S-.IS 



C/) 



§31^ 



ro 



ts3 



^ ._- ro 
ro ^Ti-j 



W 



TV w/ 



Ö-o =i 



g&roas 

3. P rt- r-K ^ 
W HS • tu O 
CO «^ PT 3 

o itoy 



3 S-aro c 



OB 

L 



p 



. n 



W) 



V) 



p 



ro 



C=r«f«Pn5 

-. S* 3"j> 



33 

m ►-' 



<4 tn IS3 Hrl t-t, 

§ o *. K P 

M ro S cr^ ro CL 

^oanw^roS^S 
^J^J!? 2.f?3 3- •• 

Q SLro ap H-£,3 HH 
►3 ro ^ ro 3 c3p3 ffi 



Cfl 



1% 



>-} C/3 



<-* - ? ^ &■: g^- 



t/3 



- ^ r: "^ 
^ ^ ."^oq £f G. ^ 



ÄJ 



C J23 M 2 • P ro 

3-cr!='^33-3W3P<W 

^ j^, w' m' w 5 OQ oa p ■ 
crororon)g>-i^3cj,CL 



oi^ 3 



*—• Cid 

^■( i Tb-. 



3 



-•o-, 



ßj: 



ro 



JQ 



P 



3(w ' 

3 o 



W3 013 ?? 

9g"s^3-^ 



ts3 



03 O 



p: 



P 






tra 2-P 



►i "-j t-i tn 



f-1 W •-• Co 



I 



~a 01 



ro to^o 
►1 p trg 

, I I 3 OJ 



c -» n er .^ w 

§ C &P o ^ 

c/1 ". 3 ?r a ro 

I 1 I I I •-{ 



8. 3 ^ ea rn % SB ^ 

ro -^ 2: Sj o tH K 2 
^ p." 3 c -^3 

2. ro ■" 

3 3: "^ w n ." 
o p Cfl 3- £5' 

2 o ^ -, 
to 3 



01 



»: 


'S 


•Ü 


^ 


\i 


23 


=t, 


«0 


^ 
















N> 










tji 








C^ 






t^ 


n 




■B *^ 




1 


as 




mfa 


M ^n4I v-J\l *-J 




\\m 






»; 








« 




K 






u * 






C3 


1 








VI 








^ 








Cb 




BBHZ 









3 "^ 



^ tJ. 3 5 a ro 

■«•II 



•g 



l 



CO 



Cfl 



Cfl 



p 



Qp OQ La 



3 3'-^ 
3^3 

10 o u. 

•— "ir* »-^ 

o "^ ^ 
trt ■— ro 

ro ^' 

»ö • < 

ro h-S 

JU ro 
d cfla 



3::^'i' 

o 00 ro 

ro i| 

tti •-- i;:' 
ro 2. 

3-2: «^ 

a^N ro 
ro 3 c 3 

^S^2 w 



cn 



^ 



aq 



Co ^_4 y-. „ 

-°^^ro3 

2 w 



OQ (u 3^ 
00 3 -!- 

o 3. ' 

^'^^ 

° ^ro 

to P trt 



ro o ? 



ro . . 



,<J Et 



o Cfl I 

— Ol*». 



< 3 -^ <T> 
ro 5 ^, '♦^ 
»2 ro ~3- 



cn 



n 



n 



N 



:t^R ö2 



- w 



ro Hp 
s*»^« 3 
fr* \' 3 ro 



^cr X^ 
w ? 5'^ c 



Cfl H ^ 

ro 3. 

S* r+,3 ro 

5 OQ cn 

" ro c 



^r>i 3 



CO 



rt 



3- o 



3 P 



^- t J 



s>l 



-. ^ Cfl o 2 2 

t3 3^ Cfl 
" M 3"CS 3 " 

^ O rm ro 3 3^' 

~-^ ro _ 3: ^ 
o 3" < aro J^ 

— 3 3- 3 

j 3 333 
^««•ä^cr^g- 

< (ro ro Ol ►-$>—• ro 

to ^^ I CO I I 3 



V-/1 



CO ►< 3 >-- ro 

Sro 3 ^g-e« 

P 3 ;;• a 3 o 

ro 3^ 

ro [jja'^ OQ P 

v?2-Sg. 

- 3 fti T5 ro 



rt- -' n 3^ 
ro ^ ro 
3 a!^3 

N3 MN 

3 5$ 

'S < n> ^ 
ro < CO 

^3 < 3 
ro t— o (D 

5^*5 3 3 
pro 



piS: I a 

ro 3 jL^ 



2. 3 -^ 



:a 



CO 



Ol 



ro 






CO 



rsi 



Q »- 



Oi 



CO 



C 

3 

CflOQ 
^ OQ- 

•-, 3^ 1 P 
I I I 3 



00 



ro 
^3 

J^cra Cfl 
•-• ro i_, o 
o t-s t7 £, 
3* C: X - 
:« 3 ro 

: 2 2. ^' w 

'w ro ^ Ol 

• N^ ^ 
OQ Cti t^ 



3-0' 
OQ 3 2 

ro o -* 



3. 5- 3 2; 

|'J?S'3 
3 3 --J 3 

!-*> 3 

o _ 3 3 ( 




Cfl 



so 

«^ ro * " 
•-•^ro M 

•— • ä* 

3 j-i° 32 
^ "^ 3 

F ro Hi 



tTl 



?=. 



ro 






ro 

o "7 3 

' ro C.P 

I-« OQ ^ 

oiP -^ 1> 

►-• !^. 3 3- 
3 ro pro 

CO 3 

I ex K ? ►-! 



&. 



"^ 


1^ 


p 

3 


»4 


N 
0: 


9 


M 


n 


52 


s 


ro 

3* 
ro 


a 


^ 




p 




1 





o 



p 3 - ro 
■* 5» oi3 
o ►-* ?r 
■ ?''>-« 
c!^ OQ ro 

§&=" 

p o. "-^ 

' ß» Ol'" 
t— ' 

t?^ ro 
ro Cfld Cfl 
2roi^p 

to~ ^- 



CJH, 






'1 &• 




2 <o 



^1 »■• K« 



Ol 



!^K- 




p: — 



C/5 



» 



i;e 



1^. n> S^ 



w Cfl D3 



CO 






r^ ffiS 



ro 



c» o 















ro 



^-2. 



ro 



c» 



3 



CO 



CO 



P 



S 3 



ro 'T' 



2. S 

^^ 
ro ro 

3 ^ 

<^ ro 



ro 



< S? ö. 3 3 

ro n> ^<^ 
,/, ro ro '~t , 

Cfl M 03 ' 

33-203 

3 3 ^3"^ 

2. ^ -• < 

M t^ O OQ ►-• 

r^ J^ 3 3 ro 
ro p- 3 H, 

S c rt ü^ hfl 





■ \\Ov\V\ 













n 



- ?l 



70 



n 


ro_ 


p 


M 


H-^ 


3 


i*-ft 




CO 
CJI 




ro 
t/1 


C: 


p 


er 


CT 


ro 


ro 


f-j 


h- 


1—« 


•^ 


ro 


3 


Otl 


p 


ff) 


t-' 


3 


w 


3 


a 




»— •• 


e-t- 


ro 



N9 



ro 



a % 



^ 



t^ 



^' ro ro 
<T> 3 3; 



ro 3. 



p;: 5 3 3 3 3 
B ro "^ ro jJ; 



«"2-3 j- 

ro ;-i-' 14. <-^ ;i 
3; ro 3, ro 
3 3 ft) Q* 3 

3- 3- a 3 g- 

3 3 CO ro 

^►HP ^ 
3 ^3 ro'5 

X OQ <J 

ü ^a«) ro 
sr^ 3 DJ 2 





ro 



3 3 



ro 



?^§:? 



S-^ 



.. OQ ■ ■ 

3-ro ro 

ro c-r 
Oberer 

2 ro ro 

3 »1 I 



a,ro ^ ^ 
''^ ro 3- •-! '^ N 

P O" 3 r^ p 

3* 3^ ro ßj 
^3- ro i-j ü Hj 



I 



3 p t* '^ S 

ro OQ f^ 3 i^- ro ro 3 J-- 
►^ I ro •-« I • • ' *■ 



ro p 
••-1 tfl 



ro 



c^ ro 



ro 
ro 



ro 



rt» 



ro 



% 



<-^ ^ ^ 
^ 2 f^ 

ro I I 

r o P 3 



ro »r* 



W 



ro i-K 



N 



ro 



C/l - 



f?l 



Ss.3 

ro !j " 

►-{ p ^ 
p p 

3 2. a 
3 3 

3 ro ro 



t-3 p. ^05 
< 5* 3 l:^- 

^ g W 3 2. 

»— ' 3 ro 3 j5 
p P >-( Qfq fo 

cj • Cfl ro ro ,^ 
^(^^-p^, t3^f5p 

£^ w a B ro 3 a 3 <§ 
fDFi_ot3Cx5 zL. 

p . q?. p^ c^ a ^ ° 



« K 2 »> ^ 

-^•<3S'33'-t 
*» ro 5. o 3 g 

-. P*n3'^"2.»* 

- Ä^r i'«^ 2. c« d o 



3^ M *i S" ? 5* P ro 



e 3 3 ro 

3 >-* o 3 



o tr 



C/3 



ro o 



5 2, ro ti? 3^ ^. 

3 ro ^ 
Ol 2i "^ 
•-" 3" ro 



® • a 

3 ro o- -, ^ 

!r* ro ro M "o a^ 

S 2 3 N-ö ^ 

^ X 2 -*• 3: 3- 

K r 3 2 « « ro^ 



CD 



W 



B-s 3:^9.^ o ;^ 

o 



ro "1 i_< 

•?> 2- !^ 



= r=. 



W fD N 

o I d 



M, ro ro 
M» ro c/i 



3 ^3:;?-, 3 03p g.D.3; 
"52.^, roCiPi:. ro«ö3'o3* 
roj^-Nc/iroSc^inS. rtifi 
CA :; I I •1 i4- ro 



V) 



CO 



ro 



►ü 



ö 
ro 



rT> 



ro 
ro 




a 



p 



ro 



ro 2. 



oa 



o 



g| 



Cfl 



p 

N 



ro 



fL 3 

p- p 
3. 1--" 



ro 



p d 



cn 



ro 



tu: 3. 



•d OQ 



O. 



ro. 5 



ro 



>~i ro 



3- 



tfl 



I ^ 



3 P 



a y 



w 



ro 



^ K- ^: »r- 



■> -» 



5 

3* 

ro 



ro >— I 



•-i- ro 



ro 2 



p 



ro 



&; 



3- ro ro i^ 



p 3 



p; 



p 



cn 



a 



ro 



tn 

ro 
ro 



ro p 



tn 



ro 



ro eo 

r-f ro 



p 



d: 



CO 3 »j» 



cn 



£3. 



ro 



ro Sj 
3^ ro 




p» ro 



d: 



Hj ro 

^ K* ^ 

p ^ ro 

3 «- er 

ro CO ?7 

3- c» '-» 
^ o 
03 o ro 

3-3 2 

ro »'S 
3 p 

^ ^ 
ro cn 

ro 



CO 



>rn 



^3 



c- 2 p 

OQ P 3 

ro '/j ^ 

ui in ^f^ 

ro ~ 

3 ^ 

ro «^ 



o I — 



d p 3^ 



t/J 



ro 



■Z. 1) 



ro 



ro 



ro ro >" 3. 
^ a 3 3 

9 P O Q3 



ro ^ 

^ Q tn 

O: •'Z P 

3^ 2- OQ 

p o ^ 

s 3' 

ro t:» 

•-1 K^ 



p 



r 






3: Cfl 



CD 



ro 



>5, 



ro »^^ ?r 

3^ 3 S- 
I I (J 




o o 



J^ 



ro »^ 



ro 





OQ 


3 


ro 




tyi 


ro 
3' 



OQ 


ro 




3 


d 


CL 


3 


ro 


CL 



3 3";}. 



3 ro 
^ ^ § 

Sro S 

P. CL P 

o ro ^ 
M 2. £ 

^ a.> 

t/1 ^ £;; 



ro 



r: p: ►— ' 



p ro w 



fi9 



p 



P •-< QfQ 

OQ OQ . 



ro o 




/tT" ?<' 



ro 



p 



C/l p 



'::. 



=•3 



ff 



ryi 



2. EB- 



^ ^ O 

03 3 

i3 ro ?: 

^ ^. p 

o- ^ 3 
ro CL -, 

^ <^ 

O ro r/j 

•-. 3 'yi 

CL r-^ P 

t I I 



M. ^ 




<-f- 03 



3* cn 



d 3 



03 



^g3. 

CO JT c-^ 

ro :::? tn 

>-: ro 



?r a 



p 



:i CO 

ro ■ 



ro 



cn 



ro 



cn 



5- 0) - 



ro -' 

'J cn 



<5 



Cfl 



ro 



N ro 



ro 



ro 



X 



a^S^' 



P 



W M CL P 

P cn o ro 

►-J ro t-5 p^ 



ro 



fe. öc 



2. ro 

3^ rn 



V) 



ro 




ß. roj^ ro?2:oS-| 



d" p^ o y ö y 
OQ ro ^ g ^ 



Cfl 



ro 

3 B3 ro 3 



p 3 p N r ^ ►^ 

ro 3 
'" 3 



O P* i-» •-' >" 

3-pO^ A3 



<1 •*» 

'^^JG. CL2^0Q3i5.. g 

r/irororo^-'p ,«-»^0 

Mro3irQ<jro,^3-!-,- i 



«!f ;•_ c-r rv --• v^ 

*• iS. ^. «B ^ g. g 



3q 



cn 



OQ 



3 o 3^ 2 W B* « 

w 3-J^ yji O'^^. o oin 

■top- ro ^ 2 ^ 2. 3 .-^ 
t— •iTNroCLa.jir/j 

— cL.'-s'-i ►_.■_. .^1 er 



^'"- ^ 'S WC/2 3- 

3 P ro H, t3 3 
'-' p " p ^■ 
1 ro Q. er Cfl ro , 

•»3 ^ p Li; 3* 5r* 
I ^ 3- t:' ro c 

s- S ^ 3 5 3. 
' I r g* " ^ ^ 

•^ ro p t-h -r •— 
3- ^ g: - J^ 

' 1^ §• 3 ä 5- c. 

ro >->, Q o p 
p, 3 CO :3r' 

C/l jn 3- C/J ^■' O 

Li ro <j ° 3 ■'' 

3^ ^ 3 OQ 

ro ►_ ro »^ "^ rr 

^ g- 9l P 3 § 
3 cn 3 3 



2 ^ 

3 3 



ro 



3- ro 



o 



92 §^3 



ro 



5" > ^ 

2 2 3- 

- 3 ^ 

3- Cl 3 




< ^ c: -- Q- 



ro d: 



• ro w ?r ^ 

■-'• 3 3 ro 

er . 2 CL 

ro > -« 
p t3 •_,. 

'£. ro a — 

n 3: ro "^ 

^^ 3 q 

3 3 i^ 2 



o f? 2. 



p 



M ar 



'5 w 



3- 3 



N 



PT o Q^ 



r-t- "^ 



^-'* ^ 3 



3. '^ *" 

ryj' ro 33 

3" — 2. 

3 2 3- 



ro 



ro 



N a 3- 2. tfl < 
^ - 3' 3 fj) § 



1 O 3- > 

;. 3 05 3 
rra .— . 3 



•-s ro 3 



•^j 3 



ro 



ro 



2. 3 ^ CO " ro 

§ 2 3 ä, a S I 
"• S" ;? g- 2, S = 

o " H p . 
3 „ p er: 

•^ -* OQ <! 

^ CL ^ CL 2 3- 

a 3^ ro 3l 3-5 ^ 

'^ 03 =^ ^ 2 '^ 
3 P »- rr 'n 

?? 3 3 p 0^ 2 ^ 

3- £? Ei d 3 2 ro 

'•^ TT C 

3 2 2 

5 f-^ 3- »—> 

OQ ro' ^ 

, . ro X 

• -^ 03 ^ 5^ S- 



'fl 



•1 «3 



^3 



ro"?r^g.d 
I g- 2 p ^ ^ 

3 7 r^ . n 

1 Q ro ^ 2 



D 





► ' 


ro 


ro 


>r 




3* 


^ 


C 

h«4 


ro 


3 


(-*• 


• 






3 




ro 


C/3 





3- 


ro 
3 


^ 


r/1 


ro 


n 


CL 


p- 


ro 


P 


g 


r-r- 




3 




>>* 


& 


a 3 


ro 


p 




3 



ro 



K K tr :^ 

(-• KT ^ C 

r* ;;^ o ro 
2 3 3 

P >-, CL 
ro 



'^ § - 

s;- ^ 2 



2. 7^: ro "^ ro 
35' 3: 




a&> 



ro 



CO 



a c 



T* cn 

3 P _ 



5 ?^ä 

p 2. 3* 

t»^ ö- ü 5" 

3 N O g- 

O: d 3 g 

r-* 3 3. -' 

^ <(^ - 

tn <-', ' S^ 



OQ p ro 

3 3p 

p j::;' — 
3 vj 

3 f^ 3' 
3^3 
3 o 



C Q ö 5 

2 o ''^ C: 

3 2. ^ OQ 

j;- D. H- 3: 

ro — ' 

3 N 



3 OQ »-^ 3^ 



b P 3 



ro 




3 GQ 



^3- 



ro 



^ r~»- c~^ %*^i* ^'j 

ro ro ro CO ^ 
3 »n •-» I < 




tn 



3.$- 



(JQ re 



2. 2 



ri JL ^-^ 

2-2. 

»-t» *Tl >-*> 

d: P 3- 

3- (/3 ^ 

3 CO 3 

a; OQ 

r» ro' 3 
3 ro 

g ^ o5' 

»^^ tn ro 

^'2-3 

3* a 

— -» ro 

f^ ßj: ro 

3* 3: 
Q^ 3 y, 

ro 3; ro. 

tn 






3 ro 

•-' ^ *-" 

a a c 3 3 

ro p 3 ►! •• 

I Cfl 3 7 



Xr^ 



a 



■^ ro ro^ 



c 
3 
3 

63 



rt 
3 

> 

•3 



Ol 

o 






a 



«» 





00 
90 



C/5 




J 




2*0 a s 



Cd s: 

C 9 

(0 t7) 

n 

■ n 



(0 o, 

lre«a 



,ö c 5* 2 
-in 



in p. 



™,«3 



tß" 3.- 



» •-» 



er- g- 
o ■-* 



CO 



ö 2 



o > - 



c e 



Ol n B< 



Ä. « ►? 



cu 



«2 •" 



^ 



n 



2 Cr >< 



o 



fo 2 



Ps: 



S:w 



IQ "« M 

ti- e e 

o: • • 

ti e 






*."• 



N 

(0 dl 

2 S 



I5? 



ST 5^ 



> s 

^ S 

es 

s. es 

Sf o 

2. B 



r« 2 



Q> et 

c:. o 

o «a 
M ff 



r 




< 

o 




o 


Ol C: 






er 


o 

t-f- 




£ 


o 

£3 

er 


< 

fO 




E 


> 

IQ 


3 

O: 


o 
a 


3 

o: 


(T> 


►1 




(0 


g 


n 

3" 




2 

% 


in 


2. 
B' 






•-• 


tu 

1— • 

g 


03 
PI 
P. 
rr 


N 










2 
«3 


?r 


m 


V 




Ol 






fD 

a 
m 

3 


O 


3 

3 




3 
er 

•Tl 
Ol 
CT 






z 


n 


« 


o 








z 


»-n 


s 


•1 




■ 





g O m 5- ? 



^ <T) fO 



tQ m 



er V 



CO 
Ol 
CO 






tu: 



o N 



Z ^ 1^ 



Z w 



ir w < 



Qi 60 . 






S • ■ w 



o> 



w 



0> 



n 



3 ^ ex 



03 

Ui 



^. 



n> 



(0 

(V • 

ui ^ ^ 

^ -3 



Z N Z 



CD 

er 



Im ff 



^? 



> 


O 






D 


Q 






ST 


aa 






3 
N 


3» 


ö 


iS 


• • 
4k 


c CD 


o 

D 

9^ 






sr er 


1 


.^0 


00 




o 



g 


H Sa 

ET S. 


t/1 


last 

429944 


• 


sr 


JS 


C 


^ 






or 


^3 






*i 


• 







ß 



8 S: 



CJ» 



?r 



B BS" ^ 



cr 



CA 



CO 



n 



CD 5 



p 

«S 

3- CD 



OTQ 



Cl. 



^I M^ &) 



CD 



s^ 




^■^'S 



ft 



?N ^.c tr 



a^c 



n> 



o K a 



•? o. 



a ßj c 



C/3 C/} fi) M N 



►-b 



o 



rt) 



5 sr 



p 



J^< 



^ K '^ 3 ?D 



*?*■ rn 



P ?-3 



J:;- -< ü :;;< 



f?, D. q tr 2 



o 



^-IZJ.O 00 K 



UJ 



o 



y- r3 öj 



rt» 

<D Ö D p* »3 



C3 C 



03 "-S 
ffQ 



O 



fD 



N 



o "tj f- 



fö rD 



p 



P. c 



fD 



^ '^ -s 



5 O J-i- tr- 



e»:' IL) 






f-* >-< »-^ »-K «; -? »-i J-" ~ >-• iJ C . C3 O ' •• TZ rs 



C3 <1) 



ö tr G? tu 



S&^'I^S;«^^ 



M 



rt) 






a 



►i. CO 



ft) 



& S Ä ?• ? 



3 3 



ö t: 



rt> 



3 Q4 h-- 






3 a 



J^ ft> W ft) 



Orq 



N 



fD 3 



a fö 3 
3 cm 






3 ft) 



tu 



CO jr C -• 



K Ä 

^ P t::: 



■_'' r/' !-^' o. /^ ►-• >~t 



N 



M» 



Vi 



o 



fD < 1? 



ft> 



o 



3 

a 
3 



tu •-« 



a 



ffq 



tu 



c 5 



5- ^ J§ 



&J? 



ona 






ro tu 



fD W CD 
3 O 



DJ i^ ^ 



f& 



tu 
c f5 



ürq fD o 3 ^r* 



fD tu 



tX 



tu 






CL 2 3 



tu 



tu 



tLV 



3 H S^ 3 .^ ?|^ g 



fö 



N3 o 






"I V) w 



r/) 



D 



Co JU 



P 






BS «- 53 



P 



'-'• '^ in h^ li ^ ai '•f> Iz '^ •-> •'^ ^: n •ri!?' 



3 "^ '* 



n "t 

^ s; 2 58 ;;• c 



o 3 



2.S'g 



U) 



a 



N 



fP 



!n tu 3 



tu 



?r 



fD 



fD 

o.aq 

fD 



a a 






vi 5 



fD p;- 



fD 



S-Ii 



M 



P fD 



O* fD 



sr:^o 



fD 



P 



^ H 



3 3 



►^ p 



V) 



N 

ft) 



5:^ > ;? W 

qp 3. 



c c 



Q. 



< P c 
fD .r» 3 



jr; fD 

p 



o 



►^ f/3 »-1 

f5 ci 



3 o 



3 (m 



p 

CO 



3 'v) 



rs 



'/) 



P 



^1 C t> p 



tl- irr 3- P^ tr fc 



fD W 



3 "^ o 



fD 






O if 



fD 



w 3 O 



M fD 3 



a Jlt f^ 



r^ m c/i 



ö 3 S 



a 



►1 Oq 



fD 



►-' .-e. 



Oq 

o 



w 



S^ 



aq :r 15 
pj p M 



31-1 
fD 



er 

K— I 



3 W 



fD 

w (/q 

^t ffq 



»O fO 



o 



?^ 



p 



!5 

oq 

P 



X- a 



3 3^ 



h3 



2:^ 



S S ^- b' a a 



fD 



5 S-S 



- 5 
^ f5 p 
O n. 13 



fD 






!? <w S 



c/3 ^ 



^!? 



09 



a:: 



^ !r* »r IM "-• 



^ 



ffi < 



3 s 2: — 



w 



00 



(9 



00 



»» • ä 3 3 



S-2--- 



— fD 



a >~t 



M 






o er 






c::- Q. ^ 



p er 



&b^ 



S- 03 

-, --1 UM fD P 



^ 



^ fcr 2 ^ 

ffq 
• ^ -, (D 

fD p a 3 



fb 



(D 

3 g- 






fD 



a t^- <D fD ft) 

^ ' '^ 3 3 



3^^ § B 



p 

CD 

a 



fD V2 O 



P: 



fD 
c/i 



&^ 






p o 
c a 



ft) a ^ 



p 



t- P; 



O 'n -• 3^ fD ft)" ffq "^ Crq ßJ cr 

O. <?> 3 m l-ir. " I-! 50 ►— ' h-" 



fD 



3 3 ^ 






c« O 3 



-. »? du 



3- ' *.- 






orq 



t N 



o ;r. P o 



O ti.od 



— l/q M 

c-^ VI '^ 



ar- 



tr r 



a 3 ir 



c «^ ^ 



6» 3 o 



'-0 »^ 






ft}' P a ft> 3 ft) oq 



3 ^ 



a 



a o 



N 



*~i fD 
P 3 



W 



3- 2 Ji' 



a 3 ?;• o a c: 



C: O 



1^. ^ 






►-T*. ft) 3 



<D 



tÖ 



a 



oq 



p rD 



(U 



•-< >-t 



S 5' 2: < ^ t; N a 

»r^ A r< «D rr /h 



fD a 






S- a a S- c y § 



in 



W ^ 






fyi 



3 3 



fD ^ 



'-^ 3 



fD 



p 



fD 
r/1 

t3 



fD <t> 
-< 3 



5ia 



o 



W 



s:5? 



«^ 






<ö »-< 2 "^ 



S c fj tr J=^ n 



W 



fV fö 3 



fD 



(7q 



•-■• »-•. 3 



p. 



KA 



. Öq w 
c/i 



3 na 

Ofq 
P 



c^ fD 

a- 
3 £ 



r-t- " 

(D 



?r ö- 






P 



S^l5f?Sg_g.5- 



H OT S 



a 



e-«- 3 a 

fD 



a OQ 
(t> 

C CT 



^a c:'^Scrqft)a 



S^ a W > o- 3 a = ,. 

33j:::cJ5opmo 

ta (t> CLQQ 3C5'-J h-. 3* 



3 N W <. 
w t- O fD 






•CS» 

3* -» -"^ •« 






1 t/j 



c» 



p 



3 ^^c- 



;^ 



r^ 



c/: 



r^3 



3 O CT 

V rr Q. -• -^ 



c r« 



rb pj 



S-^ w'^^a 



i. rt 



2.a 



w. ^ — — - — 



s ^ g o 



t'' N p a 1^ 
»-J C 3 ^ ►- 



g'S§3|B'wS,g|;g;s.^o 

ii: 3 D • ^---MOp^Oqr» 



a 

O fD 



b3 rt> 



Q oq 



»-« ^. 



N 



s-s^ 



oq 
fD 






^ ^ W s 



3T':?''bp2'* 

"^ ' "* ■ ■ 3 rs 






rD 



•-J P w 



O 2 >r^ OS O. 2 



(!) 



<D f^ 



cn 



(5.^2,^ ^• 



C: JD ^ (D r< 



S3 



W rj- o. ►— 

P fD 



r^crSi 



o 



- - rtS'^W^ Pr3- 

W oq 3 ^ 3 ;^ 3 S. O: 3 



e-^::s.- -^s 



fD 
fD 3 



a -« 3 

/T) 



kpB- 



3 - 



(t) 



<u ft) 



a w 



fD 

t/j 



o a 



7*- N r: 

^ 1= cr 



B-^ 



?r 



p 






fD 



uj (T> ►-' 

<D 



ti 3 



(D 



a/? 



CS 



9- 



Wl 



W3 



ö C 



P_ 



3- 's^A^. w2. ^^i^^^^^^ rt 



^-. fD 



oq Ca 

fD *~i 

^ K ^ ^ 

3 3 c^ ^ 



fD fD fD 



»-; r/1 ►-■ fD 



3 ^ 



rt» a T* lü 



fD fD 



c/i 
t/1 



C/1 



<D f^ ^ 



fD 



(t h: ?L ►^ 



a 

p 



HÜ. fD 

3 3- 
fD ►^ 



b f" 3^ 3 

3ri fD P. 
tl. >fc p iJ 



fD 



c/i c:^ >-( a 



> fD — 5* fp 
? 3 



3* 3 •-« ^ 



C 2. 3- 



Ss-S- 



%^^ 



(D 



P 

cfl »-s a 



fD 



<T) 



p 3 



tjj iD 51 ^ D- 



•-^ t:!" *''• 1-« ►-! . . 
2i59cW'-d<c: 



oq 3 fD fD 



CT 3 W 3 



fD ^ 



fD 



c« 



HS a 

< £=: fD 



3^ fD 3 3 

p 3- a 



fD n "-S c-> 



fD 



o ::? 

fD 



3 7; 



e c 



p 



&-=s^.^l = =& 



C/^ N 3 q 

a c:-. 



p: 



p P 



»^ 



3SOfD"3qqqqS- 



Lo 



fD 3 •-$ BJ 



p 



oq -- ^ 5- 



P 



t/3 

N 



3 ►-■ 



P 

WJ' CD i^. 

a 



w 



fD O 



fD 3 
t- O 



fD 



P 



P 



fD 3 



(D 



(D 



fD N 



P KH 



a p 3 ^ 



3 CA 



p C/1 



2.2 

fD 



►J ja 



w Od 
P 



fD tr 

3 <D ÜJ 3 3' 



fD 



fD 



O: f^ 



fD 



fD 
fD 



fD 

?D 3'> 

3 w !^ 



►^ ri, a GO 



a a £ 



P: 



fD 



fD 



i-o fD p 



pr (73 



^ 3 



fD 



•-« M o ;^ 

-r fP 



1^ p l!s. (D w 



£. S. "> 3 



2 3 



3- J- 



rj CT r^ 



^ 



<:c^ 



3 C/) 



3 »-t fD 



fD ^. ro 



^. 3 
fV fD 



fD 



H 9- 



p: 2 fD 
OQ 



O 3 



fD O 



fi:- W 



fD < 



V) 



rD 



C/5 



^ 



er C: 

fD 



W !5- 2 2 o 



p 



> oq 



B* ^ü 



fD 



Ui 



fD 



P 



3"Ö 



Ui 



^ 3 



p 



a 



3: c: 

CT OQ ^ 

3 fD N ft) 



3. fD 1:5 <i) 



wi 



W Jd 



s- ^ 



fD •-« 

lyi a 
p: fD 



i 3 2. S- ■ * 'S a W '^. '^. CT 






N 



3 "• >— ' 



p c: S f^ 2. 



•-{ i-t» 



> 3 



>••< 



fD 



n 



rt) ^ ti: 




?i 3 »t 



^ B- => „ e s- 2. gr 3 5- -• § g 2 a 



p 



1 fDty)3w|ffe3 I >-i 



^^S'&S'B'B 



RW3 .^.CT^Ü 3 



fD 3 I 3 



< a W 






P 



3 c/] 



0, 2 3 2. 



I Ui 



Oi 3 •-< P C 
fD fD 2 f^ 3 



f1? 



p a 

t/3 



I •-<•-« 3 



3 N ^ 

a {:: i 



■ >-' /t» /Tl r.n I 1 ^ !•' 



fD <D 



CA I 



CO aoq 3 er 2 a <! 



p 
P (71 O: ►^t 



Q S > 3 °2. ^ i 



W P fD 



P 



CD 
fD 



äB-g- 



3 {« 



»— ' 3 



fD 



►^laHCTasJcrt^ p>Tjn C<^S< 

£«fD>?J^fDSD.f63.^CT.. XP^fT^^ 



3-^5"22^,£i^2J5§B' 



a*3 



c/3 

fD 



fD 



fD a 

3-8- 

p " 

IT P— •• 



^ 



o 



^-.Rt? -3 r^M <- mJ^^^fri»-. r^o33fDrt) ^f 



rt) Ä ?:i 3 2. 

►-. T O •-' •— ' 



C/) 3 
p: 




2 CT 



Q ;^ 5« 2 t3. ^ CO :;• o 



2 o^ ffi 



a 



3 3s 



fQ ^* p^ 



fD 

3 ^ 

oq 

fD 



o *-% o 



fD 



er 



g- oq 



fD 

5 ^s 



oq 



fD 



3- 2 ?:: 2 



^^cr 



CO 



3 a 3 



t-i •-« (-J 

fD 



oq 



fD 



fD 



3 rt 



'■^ fD 

a 3 
p 
•-$ 
p 
3 -i 



fD 

'S 



a 



fD 



fD N 



% 



fS ^ S q 



c ^ 



fD 
< CT 



» 



X3 

fD 



-3aS£3«^S 

!-•• 3. 3. ^ *■♦• 'A »-5 



o 

l-i t/1 



2 fD 



p 



3- . CT 



fD 



oq 



•-J a 

fD 



9-- CT ^ _ ^ :^ ^ 



3 ^ 



p. W p- 3- 



p: 
fD 



3 ^ er rt) <j 3 



o 3 ST: '^ «^ -'^ 



p fD 



fD fD 



3- CT 3 
oq 



a 



fD 



Ci 



v> 



rt) 



^ ^ ?? 



ns ^*' 



^ ^ .^ & JG "^ ^ 



fD 0? 



fT) i?. f5 /T) 



fT> 



;4. ^y. o 



CO 






w 



c/1 frt 

oq ^ 



a 

fD P 



3^2: 'S 

-^ er S 



CD ö 



fD 
fD 



^ Mi VI 

"»BS" 



a p 

P Q. 



oq 



P 



3- ^ o fD a 




p 



S- 



Q. - 



fD tu 



(D 



fD 



rt) 



fD 55 



a 

p 

CD 



fD 



N 



^2 2'3 






ci ^. a td 3 

ri 3 ft» fD i-^ 



fD fD 
• Ui 



3 cr 

Oq ft) 



3-- 



p 



p 



-- ft) 



^5 a 3- 3 ^ H: 



c/1 i-j O: 



3 2 .►^ 



3 ft) 



O ^ CT 
3 1^ O 

a 



CT CT -! 



p 



N 



3 ^ -• »O t3 < S- 



P 



a 



N 



P 3: 






oq 
P 



Ui 



p 



3 ^ c 3 



CJ O* rt) 
'/i fD 



2. rt) 



1:5 K <^ CT 2. <« 3 



t-»> cfl oq 



p 



fD 

S 3 
fD 






oq 
«-»• fD 






N d, O) 

P 3 



oq 3 cn 






w 



fD 



'D 



fD 



fD 



fD 



CD N ;:j 

fD 



fD 3 



3 3 W 3 rt) ü 
3 i^ 3 3- (D 



O CD 
N 



a 
p 
t/1 



oq 

fD 



W 



fD 



P 



ü 

p: 
<-♦■ 
fD 



2 CL 

3 p 



fD 



C4 



oq 



? 



OQ 

rt) 



2 Q. 2 



fD 



^^S- 






^ SO 





p "-s 



a t± 

fö 



a 3. 



oa S — 3 



o. o -. ^ 



rt) rt) 3 ii 




N 3 o,q 3- ,^ 3 $: n;- 

^ ^ o ^^ )i? ^ o A 



fD 



D- fD 



fD 



^'B- 



rt) •-» 
oq 



ü ^ 



fD i^ V p Ol •-» £i .^ 



p 



C/) 7> 



fD CT 



fö 



P 

a 



o o 



fD O 



p 



CT > 



3 ^3 



P C/) ui 



O 



N 



ft) 






S-a 



CO 



P 3 

CT Vi 

i-j P 

3 (D »t 



=i. 3 



P 



a 



fD O 



C/1 



Ö 3: 



p o 



C/) 



CT 2- 2= ÖT 



9-2. p^ 



o a 2- 

3 rt) 3 



fD Ä* »^ 



P cn o ^^- Ö* 



3 



8-3 "►? 



P 
I fD I 



W K 3 

V n v> 

S; CT fD 

^ ^ 3; 



p 



c/i 
oq 



fD fD 



r- fD CT p Sl 
•r • p 1-1 1^ 



•— • 3 tu 

2. o ?: 

n 3 o 




p 



fD 



fD 3 



3 w> 3; 



& ir ^- ^ s 



3* ►-. 3 3 ^• 



►-• a oq 



fD 



fD N 



fD 



p: 



3 N 
oq 



N ^ 



5^ 3 6 



3 3 rt) 
oq 3 



;?;• a 



% 



N «l/ C 

c ^ f5 

I fD i-s 



CA 

CA 



rt) 



fD *-> 



N 



5*3 ^ 



2,g 



E 2. 3 



rr. ^ 3 3 

cfl fD 



t/1 

^ 3 Vi 3 



S-S-S|S-3,g^S^3.ag 



•x/ P 

3 oq Ej 
5 rt) 



3 C 



f^ \ 2 S. "^ 



*T? 2. "^ 



O: 



rt) 3: t::» 



oq :? 



a CT 



B. 2 3 



ryi N -1 y- :^ 3 

c p (D ':• 3 



^ ^ - 



s^s- 



^ö 



fD 



E 1 



o 



a 



CO 

CO 

fD 





pÖcfDOai^fDrt) 
I a »-« 3 3 fD I 3 3 



a 
^ .. ßf- ?D 3 

I r+ CD 71 I 



3 W p 



a S2, 3 - 3: -t 



/> 73 



^^ *-• Ä 
o ►-, a 



CD 



fD fD 3* g M 



fD 



5 3 



oq 



<D 



fD 



fD 

a •-« 



3 3 



^4. O 3- 



P ;^ 



r: tt 



rt) o: o 3 2. 



jt «« 



3 " 

Ü 2 § 

<2 p 

■< o ^ 



p: 



3 -« 
fD fD fD 



a "^ 



3 j=f 



o 



a 



o 



M 



rt) t.-: 



2. W 'S. 



»^ 

-2 3 :;i 
p 



fD 



5" ^ 

3 ? 



i-|. n- 



3 O 



o 

9 ^ N 




=» ;? 



tn 



3 tf 

oq oq W "^ (D 



fD tu 



fD 



Ui Qu 



2 3 3 



W-' Ol 3 
-i < ?iOq 



ffq 



oq 



fD 

<-^ 

N 



DO 
o 



a 



"115 o :3 fS CT 



(/l 



fD 



fD 



N 2.öq 

^ ^ ^ 

«-^ 2 3 

P 3 oq 



•-J O 3 

P tu 



N 



03 ri. ' 

►^ ^ C <; 

3 2 



2. rt) 



?§ 3 W ^- 3 3 



W 



a 



a*Tlrt)2.»^2. s:-2'-^p3 



-. p 



3. 3 



o 



p 



fD 



►-i r* fD 



CA 



< N 

fO p: fD 



rt 

CT -: rt 



o 
o 



Q. fD c f 

3t 3 S ' 



3* 



P 

'>Z. Ui 



C/1 

o 2 
3 3 




S'^Ä-3 2 



I:?; fD 



ffq 
(D 



3 O 



fD *-» DJ 

CA •-» 3" M 

a 3 fD C: 

O P ^' CT 

2 oq c/1 o 



M 



oa 



►a o 



3 -T 



1-.. f^ — 



N 



Co i-s 



rt 
? 2 ö^ 2. 



fD a 

o 






a 



a 






^ C qq 

&s:sS3& 

fD *-l \^ '" Jt 

3 N t) ^ CD ^ 

_ 3 3 P: '■4- fD 



a o ^ o "^ 

fD *;< 3. '/i r/) 

M C/1 3 ►-• y. 

o 3 o 'ü 

P 3 •-$ 



ffq 



fD "Ö 



3- a ►--• tr- 
^ fD 3 O: 



tr a -1 



fD 



^ b w 



fD •-< fD 



P 



N 



er ff^ 



3t:?3 3t 



fD 



fD 



^ W a S ^ ^. ^^ 

& 3: ^ :^ ^ s- 3 

£• g- _ w 3 -" -^ 



N 3 



.1 3 - 



trt 



g" 



OQ 



P 



O 



fD 



CT fD 



fD ►-l 



^ 



fT> 



^' ^' ? 

r>. 3 
oq 



I I 



'di 



p 
c« r 



(D 3 
ffq 



fi 



a ^ 



^ 3. 

ß' ,-, 
t- --ja 

to 3: 2. "= 



O '1 



o 



fD 



Ol 



a p 3 o 
c >-j ?r CT 



M 3 
X 3 



Jl. fD 



OfD«-. fort) b'Off^TJo 

-S M M, 3- 3 3 CT. T- fD ^ 2 



I I 



? P 3.' 



0> M S a 
o <» SS. ? Sl 

a* BT 



TD 

3 

o\ 

W 



25 



n 

ff 



o 





O 



s 



C/I 



CD 



CD 



i\\Jlkl \ -t 1 


CO 


>WtAJ\J CD 


1 1 


V^ (/> 


CO 


2Jä ^ 


m 


§ v\ ^ 


■ 


0y^ z 


= 


V* mm- wmn^^M ^^ 


= 


st 5^^ ^ 


c^r 1 






3 w^ 

3 2 

p 3 

g: ^- g: 5 

fD 



CT '^ 
ft 3 



fD j!!f 3 
CA 3 3 

e» fT5 - 



»-•• tn .^ 



fD 



fD 



l 3 



'4 3 tJ 
CT fD Hj 

fD 
O 



<T> *—' 






3 

3 



O 



rt CT Ä 
S* 3t rt> 

^ctW 
^ 2g 



fD W 

3 



. ^-ctä;? 

r 3 fD O: ►r« 
::t 3 5 S- 
i« ^ '^ 

O* M CT 



g' 



n 
CT 



CA 



o 
3 



n 



fD ^ CT 
3 C P: 



^^CT 
«^ pj ►-'- 



fD 
f^ 
fD 
•-I 

»— ' 
fD 



i,?S5S^|e I 




p 

# ^ 2. 

• (D J5t 



R- 



2-0 ? 



•>» '^ m 
' 2. p 

c/j P 



^» 


B ^ 


er 


.^ CA 


a 


3: a 


f^ 


5 fD 




t/1 3 


?r 


B-" 


O: 


<-^ . . 


3 


tö 


3 
fD 


,9--- 


3 


tÜ 3 




r/)_3 a^f;; MC/)?r,^3 o. ^xii^j^c/^a 

tX"3 fD f'. t/1 r^P ^d P rToVeir^fD 



rt> „ 

•-J a 

fD 



3 CT V3 3 jj 



O o 






3 a c/2 

f5 r) 



2 3. 3 ►-s 

3 fD • f'" 



P p tu 
^3 3- 



O c/1 
3 



o g- 2 

< v: o 



P »-i >-1 fH 



3 ^ 



f/j i-j 3 



oq q 



p: 



fD 



^ CT fö 2. '-? O ^ M ^li 3 
. , ^ 3 2 •-. «5 c/) fD 



CT c 3 

rt) 3 00 



o tx> 



t^ 3 CÜ 



o -5 



fD fT> 



fD 
f; 



^r] p 



N 



o 3 i- 
»-! o crq 



f6 

n 
a 
n 

•1 



rXi 



3" 



r/i 



^ »i .- 



3 3 

fD <-^ 
3 P 
0^ 



fD 



P 



W 



O Hj 

P 3 o 



3* fD 



fD 
P 



3 trq 



CD 



fD < 



a 

»— •« 

fD 

a 



o!^^3 



ffq 



oq 



P 



fD 
CA 



^ 3 S 



tS Fi 



o o 



C/2 



w 



N 
O 



3* 



p 
•-1 3 



3 3- 



i 3 



C/l 



li o 



o 



03 



,-. •■-" ►^ CI4 



fD 



<— ^ M 3 



fD 



3 OQ 2 



1Z, 



fD 



3 fD 



3 rt) a 3 



?^- B CT 

CT :^- ^ 



a3 3 ^ 

fii r' >~> 

•1 tii 

^ 3 N 

p a 



CA m t;rf 



fD 



3 b CT 
P M m 



PJ 



oq 



p: 3 



2" o: 



'o i? 3 3 



^ p 
0^ s ^ 

N y ^' 

S oq 

p 3. S 

333 

P 3* 3 

^ £L rt> 



s 3: 

3 3 

3 S- 

31 rt) 

p «-i 

3 

q-3 • 

'-' p t— « 



3 2 



fD CT r/1 a 



fD a 

3 rt 






3 

p: 
3 

a 

fD 



3- P 3 

CD o 



^ (/i 



3 ^ 

fD »-j 



a 



p er 

a o 

fD P 

3 o 

o CT 

rn fD 



ts 



P 



ro 



O 



-5 e-H 

er p 

fD 3* 

3 -1 

fD 

TT 3 
P 



3. 3 3 



LI 



?.'crq 



o 



fD 



P 
O 

•-.' tr 

w 

c 

2. o- 

3^ fD 
•^ 3 



^ P 
5^ 3 

S "^ 

2. fD 

3 ;:;; 

fD fD 



S N ^ 

O C 

w 2- 

t/) ?r 

t/i o 

^ 3 



3 fD ^ 

a 

P ►-• >s 

3 q.?§ 

rt) S T 
J^ ^ 3 

fD ►-« 

r*oq 
- P a a 

c/) P 3r ro 

CV ^4 ««^ V 



t- fD 

3 3 

^ 3 

a rt) 

o 



rt 



3 N o 



o 

3 

►1 



a 

o 
3 



fD 



Jq 



S. 

o 
o 

3* 



P 
•1 

> fD 

N fD 






•1 

a 

e 
e 
s 



3 
•-1 

a r 

fD - o 

5 a 

3 ^ 

•-J iD 

a 

fD W 



3 
o 
3 

3 
3 

a 

3: 
er 
o 



o 



'D 

3 



fD 
CO X 




;/5 



\v 



«a^ 



fD 



?: 



o 
o 
o 



p 

t/J 



< fD 






«> 






5J 



o. o 2 3 



^ 



3 
> 










»'^m- * 







\ 



Si 

& 



O 



■b4 



M 



0^ 



M t 



■»'S 

k 

•i 





t^ T 



z: a 



c-> 



- 1 



5^ 



^ 






Q w 



s 



«o 



=) > 



OBI 



t>. 






00 



•ci a> 
n 

SS OM 



u: 



0) 



M 



MO 2 

im o 



cn (d oj 

•3:5 2 

S s ^ 



(/) 



14 a 

JS-Ö 



0^ 



» 






luin 



D CD« 



o 
5 = 



JC u 

W M 
..=1 O» 



OC o 









<4 3 

J3 0ii 



00 



^1 

■I 

H 



r. 



» 



JA 
'S 



o 



o 



Q) 



ÜO 



►J 



23 



<D 



o 



o 



o 



00 



M 



14 a 



c/) 



» 



•ö 2 9 

an 9 
5 t* 
«a g J3 



1- 'S -^ 



sä 



O 



C VJ 

c :2 



'-- :0 



^ ^ 



^5, 



n 



o 






CD 



0) 



CD 



lO 



^5 ^H 



o ,i: 



o 






Ol 
VI 



<u 



J^ Pu /a .ti 



rd 

Si. CS 



> 



0) 
N 



fs 



a 



i2 



J ?, ^ 3 ^ 



Ol 



CS 



CS 



0) 



?. ?:=5 



O) 



rö 



CU 



(0 



^-5 






(0 



O M 






(d 



-" ^ CU 



Q u 



U «) 

©'S 
OH 



(TN 



««0» 

"'S c-i 
0» o 

<flJ5 CM 

« o >..., 
ja «> :j 

CO 



fd 
(d 



2 S S =^ 

ri -Fl -iS ^ 

71 t/i 



m 


i -i 


^1 


'S s 


^^B 


s 'i 


I^^^H 


>•-■ t-i 


i^^H 


0^ "^ 


^^^1 


. c/^ 


^pH 


:3 ^H 


IG 


O ^ 


^to ■ 


*-> (X) 


^■^ 


:3 -i^ 


P^ 


< « 




^ 




• • 


H 


U-^ 4-* 


^" 


. •— * 


ED 


,^ < 


■Tt t 


o . 




. CT! 




.~i •>-• 






M^H 


(0 ra 


^B 


fl -^ 


aB 


- r> 


i^^H 


•^ (I) 


B^^H 


a) ♦^ 


Hl 


öj w 



'«-I t-i «»^ e o (-^ 

'^ - S 5 £ a 



'S 2 N 



a 



<J O <u u 



'a 






•— < «""^ ^ ^1 tn 






s a 



<« :3 CO 



^? r^-^ 



Ä.2 Cn 



ii « 



4> 0) J3 



f3 



c/5a. 



E G 



goß 



::s 



tn 



W 



N 

f3 



ü 
0) 



<U 



«0 



(d -r 

0) 



oxii 



-3 



-c^st; , ü-!=; 



«-< o "d 



B:S 



(B 



(0 



O Tj I pi^ 



N 



CT) 



CQ 



«1 — • 00 f-' 






rri 



O 



rnw^ 



0) 



0) 



(d 







<o 



a> 



(^ 



93 




0) = 



1/9 



(A 



r^ 



Ok/ 



0) 

fifi 




f I 



CT G 



-41 (u ^ B o 

? 0» CO 



22 



^ 



o -^ ^ 



5-0^-^ 



(d 



C/l ^ 



Qi 



B^ 
ü •"* 






fd 



! A U 



OJ 









Ü 



-G 






LTj 



O 






1» 



MO 



CJ 



•/) 



o 






0» 






3 Ti ♦ 



•/> 



a> 



rgT3 



a> 



«n 






:- c 



1» 



o 



-?> o > 






C2 



'/» 



- c 



3 r^ r» 









Oi 



cc» 



1» 



C7> 



4» ._ 
— (t> 









film 

xas 


• 


a> 


M-S 


a o 


•o 


!« V k. 

in "ö Kl 


c/1 » 


^ 




^. 


i^g 




35 


bis D 
tender 

ner 


dliche 
15.30 


pQ 


^' c C 


- g 


Sf 


^ S.:ö 


2f.-§ 


o 


S "S 


- 8 


jC3 


:3 S, 


C/3 


Ein g 

Drei 







< 







ä 


(4 

ja 








^ 


"^4 






«-1 




*/> 

•4 

VI 

a 


inrich 

räche 




0;^' 


a 
o 




00 

I— t 




1 


kl 


1/~1 


■ ^ 






'£» 


no 

gcrstr. 


VI 

a 


votle 

n deu 




gl 


Q 


M 


u 

CO 

tt 

c 






O 


^-«-l 








c 






.^ '^ 



vo 







W 






=^ a> 



W) :0 »- « 



OJ C CO 

:fd O) Ol 



qo: 



CU 

cy 






0) ^4 



ja to 

f 1 «T »-^ 



X 'J2 



O) 



s\" ^ 



o 



(U 






tf) 






k« 




l-l 


a> 




4j 


3 


Cj 


^ 


M 


"— 










03 






^.^ 






CO 


- 


■*- 




»—■ 


'♦j 


Ol 


li) 


fa 


2 


1> 


^ 


c-1 


— 


« 


s 


^ 


o.sa 




«■k 


a> 






'^. 


,^^ 


»• 


U4 


■*" 


Q 


C 


r- 


ii 

■w 




»■f 


g 




U 

r, 


3 


u 


E 




E 




SS 







■ (d 

3 O 



3 OJ U c^ 



! - ö ^ 



(d 



a> 



CO 



r) 



<u 



a> 















u «" 






Q o 3 

x: 1d <iJ 

^ t/) 

> 



"^ ;;; r» 



Di 



o; 



P-li 



r^ o,x «c 



ai 



fo 

CS 



CS 



o 



C3 



2i . > 



^5 0C5 



0) 



t/l — < 



•— a o) -^ ^^ :a ^ .y T! 
E^ S N ■" 



o 



3 iiQ £5 



3 Ä ^ S O 



cT - CT 

3 c a 

fd ß > 

e CT t: o 



to 



<u 



T .« 



S 



CQ 



Sctc QS^KH ct-tI 






-;; u, c --C 



^ 



3 i: 



»» 


o 




»* 


« 




w« 




CM 






N 


Q 




t 


C9 




^, 


• 


0) 


ZI 




Wl 


CK 


■o 


« 


r« 


T 


fl 




fc» 


f« 




JM 


b 


• 


fr-. 


lO 


«A 


X 


ca 






W 




«• 


a 


,rt 


w.. 




GQ 


S 


«t 


>■ 


1 


ac 


• 


' 


o 


n 




-1 


S 




< 


r> 





11 Uh 

0) 



<u 



O 



.2" « 

:q I 

i-ri c3 
ö 2 

D5 



•3 a 




OVO) 



M 



U) 0) 



s .? "^ 



-. -2 = 

o o M 

«ji (I) •»-' 

CT u« 

1(0 




.rH : Ä E ;^ jS 



-^^ .^ -.^^^^ 



ßx: 









-i<f -F- 



o o 



3 O 



3 ?Z 



(U 






-. L^, M '^.' 



ri 



O i*'^ CJ -^ T1 



i5 



-o > 



=a 1 c 

- — 1^ tri O 



•4^ 


^2 o <" .1 


<\ 


■" tr (Ü P 


\ 


io u -X "^ 


c 


.süi; - 


D 


SJ ^ c 


4—» 




x: 

u 
•1— < 


X 


s « ^ ^ 


u 


4» — j:: — < 
c r; u <« 


id 

z 


S«3» 



-•1 3J 
i/J 



fd 3 ^ 



O) o 



CJC/3 



ca 



- o 



x: ~^ 



:z CO 



ß ^ "^ "^ -2 "^"^ 



(U CQ 



lO 



O t- 



-PT^-n^ 



4) 'J f3 •-. 
« CQ 1/5 3 

oa 



(Xi 





<D 






N 



<u 

3 



o 

N 



(d 



Xi fli V) 



9} 






O) J3 



lO 



,3 CT «-H 



oT :=: 



(n 0) o 



U* OJ 



O) 



-- <u 



a 



a 



•^ 3 



CU 



rtJ OJ c 



ö ß 



X « < 



-?, CQ 



<U 0) .ü 



So 



m 






»4 



C/3 



O 



(« 



(d 



Ol 



fd 






(U 



<^ 3 x: -ö 

a-'-^g 

S 4-1 •—•■•-• (/l 

(Q <_i <D »j [g 

2 B-S S 



CU 



CT 



CT) 



3 -" 



U) 



td 



cd 



3 CU 

rd <2 



<U 3 
Xi (U 



o 



a 



rd 



to 



CU 



CU 
0) 



Q> 



<u 



•2 f^ 
f8 o 

= CT ß TJ 

tfi 3 
(/> (U 

CU 



^ öj2 



CU 



c? ^ «-> 
CT o S "ö 

<U 



t/1 



> -.^IJ 



CU fr^ 



OS^ii CT 
• (/i 
CT 3 
2 <U 



;o ü, 






0) 

CU o 



CQ 



O CQ ^ 



fd 



(U 



2:3 



J 



^ ü 



^ S o 

Q 3> 




Ü CU 

i/i 



c-J 



c/i 



CT 



(d 



x: xi 
u u 
fd '-^ 

^ CU 

3-° 
o 
:=: x; 

< ° 

o 

- CT 

£ Cd 

'i:x: 



ex. 



CD 



ci A-'-i 



3 .ii' a 



K.'* 
^ 






Z,-^;^ ß 



T3 CT-. 



O O 



, ! rd ^iS '^' > Ui 



t/l 



Wl 



VI 






fd CU r M ü 



in 



'f) 3 x: 



-4 n cn 
»- CS yj 



CTi: 
(d 



3 0) 



o x: 



XI x: '-* 
^ ex 

- O CJ 



u "O 



U [5 "^ C/3 <=3 



(d 



«. C ej -, _- 



CT 



fd u, :3 <u -3 
fr_j -• LO u, r: 



fT) »_ fd 



cJc^^ 

CO 






oa 



,X 



o t: 



(U 






1« .^ 



^ ^ 3' 

— CJ r; 
<^ fd u 



o 



CT 



• 3 Ci 
M 3 O 

5 '^ "^ 



»5 " 



C3> 



0> 



tl. 



I 







r" 



v^ 



£ c <u 
er 2i^ 



^ 



CO 
N 21 

c 



3 



:3 



c 

"a 

c 
'•■^ 

§^ Li 

s «ij j- 

»- c ^ 



•n c 









1. 



«> -S 



CO 









•1 

c 

3 

•6 


1 


'■1 






Q. 


«^ 


c 


tl 




^ 


E 


i3 

c 


g 

8 


c 


1/) 


^ 
^ 
^ 




a 
•5 








«0 

C 

35 


5,^ 




o 


3 


E 




h'O 



f 














^ 


3 


o 






a 
u 

• 




o 

»o 




T! 


u. 


u. 




U 


»>i 


<3N 


•«< 


C 
<u 
C 

•Si 

<u 

Ini 

:3 


C 


o 
k. 

*-• 

5 

c 
o 


• 

o 


& 

hl 

c 

• ».* 


CU 



CU 

c 


'—1 

E 

<U 

c 


3 

t^ 
<u 
-X 
*i 

c 
1/1 


1 " 


s 




>~l 








s: 



.- s 



(U 



in 

CD 



e_ 

CJ -.-1 
1- I-. 

(U u. 

^< 

-^ 3 

in r*. fd 

i— I '-' 

S 3 

GJ 3 

CT td 
3 
fd *j 



o 



r: o 



rO 



a 

X 

o 



x: 



3 



o 

3 
(U 



g 
U 



CJ 



CJ 

Id 



CO 

3 
O 



CJ 

CT 



(d 



o 



VI 






<U 



3 
CU 

fd 






.CO 

vi '. 

ctS:! 

I '^ 

12 




c> o 



3^ O 



3 £: •5'wä 






-71 

o .r: ~ 3 o 

-. - »3 a 

•j 5 S 









-< o 



S 

o 



G 

fr- 







I 





in 






1v 



II 



S ■*-• -tJ •>-< 



O) 



4) 





V ^ 



\ 




O 

• mm 

CA 






) 




CO 


o 




CD 


:9 


^-0 

0,0 
CD . 


CD 


o 


•SS 




■■t 


0> 9 


CD 


G 


wO 


a:> 


cr> 


fcs-« 


tri 


CD 

CO 


:a2K 



1 


• ■ 


A 'J i3 ~" 


^ 




Ü h- % ^ 


^u 




^ IT, I ü, CL 


^■»«»j 


■■ 


'ü 1- O (0 


"■«- 




D)j h O 




w ^ 


n 2 *-: ^ 


1,^ 


S 




<: 




i 


X 






-^, 


T3 




■>** 












w 


3 


<k 


••* 


^ 

s 


^ 








-* .^.^ 


x^ 


^ 


^c 


^ 




n» 


: ^ 


■**^ 


*»-t '•^ 








2« 


**• 


^ 4-1 


..^ 


-»^ 


—> 


■J 




r' 


^ 




c 


^ 




N 












h 



4,^ 









•6 

o 



Q « - 
c ^ 

ü m o 



■o 

c 

o 

c c 

•S " 

o 



c: 
o 

> 



So o 






o o o 

•)• O »-T c> 

Ö W W -H 

«Vi NN 






CO 



o 

:- • M 
£ W XJ 

p.-c 



c o 

o --^ 
a er .. 



_ 5 O c Qi-^ 

"^ m O 

O i-< CO 

r» r' p» 

Cl PI Pi 






S.2 









or 

^ .c ^ - c 

^ ;i — '- p ,- •— 

. Z ~ O n C . ■ 

X O "C LI et ~ 

o tA c r o n 

<^<^ *^ — s '^- ,' 



^ ro 



•" CD C 'S >^ ■"' »^ 
•O i; 2 i2 iH ^. •"-• 




\ 



I 






'J) •-: < ^ Z< r-. 



n 

M 



o 



£ 


J£ 


N 




c 


ir. 


er, 


■^ 


h 


S 




.^^ 






•-• 


M 


M 


n 


M 


N 



c/) 
C 



5 I« - 
3 •--' "^ 1-1 

C • ' J? C 

i/i V < ;< 

o 
c 



oB S 


5 


^^ , S 




.. ^ o 


♦J 


da; 
seil 

rtag 
der 


en zur Zei 
eldungen 


rcr hat 
literari 
r wollt 
ortrepo 
werke 


•o jc o. r' 


•* ;: 


^5 -^«^ü^ 


Ü (in 


o o o © © 

M ö M O S 


1-5 © 


•r cj 







I«* 






- .-3 C 

1^ ♦-• -— • 


^ 

m 


^■^X 


fl3 ^ 


^v 


(- ■- • 


•• 


r N 


•K 


'■^ u 






^■«» 


VI O. 


^^A. 




• ~ 


— Jt 




-', 


"^ 


N 'J 


>» 


:j D 


^ 


■n G 


«w 




•« 

w 


C 2 




läc 


'O 


tÄ > B 







•m «* in IC r» 00 



c« 

C 



*- ^ c 
" u: 

^ 6 

a,cB ^ D 

W f- S N 

o ?> 5 S 

»" »i c^ ri t 




IN MEMORIAM 



Sis. ROSE KASSEL 

(Melbourne Chapter) 



It is our sad task to pay tribute to our 
late Sister and good dear friend ROSE 
KASSEL. Born in Vienna and Coming from 
a very respected family, Rose studied 
History of Art at the Vienna University. 
In 1920 she married Poldi Fisher. They 
had one son Harold. Owing to the Nazi 
persecution, the family emigrated to Mel- 
bourne in 1939. Rose helped her husband 
in their hospital equipment business 
which after Poldi's death in 1950 Rose 
carried on. In 1953 she was married again 
to Dr. Fritz Kassel. 

Rose's interests were manifold. In 
earlier years she was very active in the 
Temple Beth Israel Women's Guild, Poldi 
and Rose were foundation members of 
the B'nai B'rith Melbourne Lodge and 
Chapter. While our Chapter was still an 
Auxiliary Rose was a President. B'nai 
B'rith was always near to her heart. 
She was delighted that Harold's wife, 
Erika, is also so actively interested in 
B.B. Her son Harold made her so proud, 
when he became B.B. President of Dist- 
rict 21. Rose also was one of the founders 
of the Emmy Monash Home for the Aged. 
She was an enthusiastic Board Member 
there for over 35 years, hardly missinq a 
meeting. You always could rely on her 
generosity for donations and help. Her 
friends were numerous and she herseif 
was a wonderfui true friend. She was a 
religious Jewess. She loved beauty, 
adored elegance and her exquisite taste 
was in evidence all around her. She 
loved music and art. I do not know what 
she would have done without her tele- 
phone. It kept her in touch with the 
World and her loved ones. 

I seldom met a woman with such 
charm and warm heartedness as Rose 
Kassel. Even in her last years — she was 
in her late 70th — she would get up, 
dance or sing, when Vieniese music was 
played. 

For many years Rose suffered from a 
heart condition. However she enjoyed life 
to the füll up to the end at the side of 
her beloved husband Fritz. Rose took 
great interest in her two grandsons Peter 
and Richard, and was very dose to her 
sister Herta. She is greatly missed by 
her family and by her many friends. 

Our deepfelt sympathy goes out to her 
husband, her son and the whole family. 
The memory of Her lives in our hearts. 

—KATE LUSTIG (Melbourne Chapter) 



PRINCESS 
ANNE WINS 

no 








ANNE . . . the face jacKIE 
fixer's favorite. 



nosed out. 



NEW YORK, Fri., AAP. — Princess 
Anne 's nose is in — the Jackie Onassis 
nose is out. 



That's the current nose 
fashion news, according 
to Viennese plastic sur- 
geon Dr Hans Brück. 

Dr Brück, who has re- 
modelled about 5000 noses 
in the past 20 years. gave 
a paper at ah interna- 
tional Conference of plas- 
tic surgeons in Miami to- 
day. 

Dr Brück said patients 
iised to come to his Office 
clutching pictures of the 
former U.S. first lady 
saying: "I want my nose 
to look like hers." 

Now they thrust photos 
of B r i t a i n 's Princess 
Anne under Dr Bruck's 
nose. 

"The.v want the nose 
from the Huusc of VVind- 
sor, like Princess Anne or 
Queen Elizabeth," he 
said. 

Dr Brück described the 
aristocratic Windsor nose 
as "rather prominent." 

But, he said, his pa- 
tients from north-west 
Europe. from Scandinavia 



and England, think the 
nose "has character." 
Dr Brück said thn 

wont 
on the 



trend probably 
have any effect 
"American nose." 
"The American 
a small, slightly 



nose is 
turned 



■>•..:, -1 



up nose. on the short 
side," he said. 

"O b V i o u s 1 y most 

American girls like it 
though this is not true 
for Europe." 

He said the differences 
in nose preference be- 
tween Americans and Eu- 
ropeans has its roots in 
their attitude to life. 

"Americans like to con- 
form much more than 
Europeans," he said. 

"In Austria, one of oui- 
very good plastic sur- 
geons practically ruined a 
practice because she had 
a Standard nose. 

"People quickly got fed 
up with it. Europeans 
don't want to lose their 
mdividuality." 

Dr Brück said there is 
an ulterior motive behind 
most requests for nose 
Operations, 

"At the time that John 
Kennedy was President, 
young girls used to come 
to see me with photo- 
graphs of Jackie Ken- 
nedy and they would say 
'could you make me a 
nose like thaf," Dr Brück 
said. 

"If you looked at 
things objectively." he 
said, "Jackie Kennedy 
was a striking woman, 
but never a beautiful one.; 
and her nose was never 
really good. 

"All those girls didn't 
want Jackie Kennedy\s 
nose at all. 

They wanted to be the 
vvife of John Kennedy." 



Hilfe für die jüdische 
Ahnenforschung 

i Inspiriert von der alifiemeinon 
I neuen Mode der AhnenÄTn^ 
• R th •''S'" Sensationserfolg de 

! slh eL ^Vl ''^^"f"- l'ündig 
Ictif, '"'i"''''^ Vierteljahrszeif- 
of Jewh'f"'" 7'"^'''"'- Journal 

'Box T^fi ffenealogy" heisst (PO 

11367 iSiu'""«' '^'^^ Yo'-I' 
n ch, nur S, ""^^'Sohcr wollen 
FaiT^ hen ^'^'"'l'^'^'^'-- jüdischer 
^amlllen, ,„ Amerika wie in 

Europa, z.isammenstellen. sondern I 

MC gehen auch Anweisungen w" 
der .ner .^ ^P .^w | 

ip kl- Tu , ■ "" welche Archive 
BiWiolhcken, Behörden. Syna.goaen 
«meinden trsw. man sich wenden 
kann und nach welchen Prinzipien 

H Stammbaum aufzubauen'«! 



^ 



I.<i 



CO 



C5 

<: 

CQ 
W 

Q 

»— t 

OQ 

r" 
t-lH 




Zum Tode von Max Brauer 



Im Alter von 85 Jahren starb i 
in Deutschland Max Brauer, ehe- 
maliger Oberbürgermeister von ' 
Hamburg, ein.st eine der hervor- ' 
ragendsten Persönlichkeiten der ! 
anti-hitlcrischen Emigration in 
Amerika und einer der "grossen 
alten. Männer" der deutschen So- 
zialdemokratie. Es war ihm be- 
schieden, sowohl vor als auch 
nach der Hitlerzeit in Deutsch- 
land eine ansehnliche politische 
Rolle zu spielen und zwischen- 
durch im Ausland als mannhaf- 
ter Sprecher der mundtot ge- 
machten freiheitlichen Minder- 
heit Deutschlands auftreten zu 
können, in jeder dieser Funktio- 
nen hat er unbeirrt und unbeirr-- 
bar seinen Mann gestanden. 

Von Hause aus Glasbläser Vwie 
sein Vater und Grossvater), hat- 
te er sich schon als Jüngling in 
seiner Heimatstadt Altona in so- 
zialdemokratischen Jugendgrup- 
pen betätigt und später der Par- 
teiorganisation gedient. Noch 
nicht di^issigj ährig wurde er. in 
den letzten Jahren des wilhelmi- 
nischen Reiches, in den Altonaer 
Stadtrat gewählt. 1924 wurde er 
Bürgermeister der Stadt, damals 
das jüngste Stadtoberhaupt ganz 
Deutschlands. Aus seiner Amts- 
stube im Altonaer Rathaus her- 
aus wurde er von den Nazis 1933 
verhaftet und in Schutzhaft ge- 
bracht. 



kommissar nach China, wo Mar- 
schall Tschiang-Kai Schek gera- 
de versuchte, maderne Kommu- 
nalverwaltungen einzurichten. 
1936, nach der Rückkehr aus 
China, liess er sich in den Ver- 
einigten Staaten nieder; die Co- 
lumbia Universität erteilte ihm 
einen Lehrauftrag für Politik 
und Volkswirtschaft, und damit 
hatte die aus Deutschland ge- 
kommene und noch kommende 
Emigrantengruppe ihren zentra- 
len Repräsentanten und wichtig- 
sten politischen Sprecher gefun- 
den. 



Nach seiner Entlassung rettete 
er sich in die Schweiz, wo ihm 
der Genfer Völkerbund zu Hilfe 
kam: als weithin anerkannte Au- 
torität auf dem Gebiet der kom- 
m u n a 1 e n , Selbstverwaltung 
schickte er ihn als Völkerbunds- 



Die amerikanische Gewerk- 
schaft AFofL schickte ihn 1946 
nach Deutschland zurück, um 
beim Wiederaufbau der deut- 
schen Gewerkschaftsorganisatio- 
nen zu halfen. Nach wenigen MO: 
naten wurde er zum Präsidenten 
des Hamburger Senats gewählt 
(der technische Titel des Ham- 
burger Stadtoberhauptes); das 
Land Hamburg hatte inzwischen 
seine Heimatstadt Altona absor- 
biert. Es war die englische Be- 
satzungsbehörde, die ihn bewog, 
seine amerikanische Staatsbür- 
gerschaft aufzugeben und wie- 
der Deutscher zu werden, — was 
er widerstrebend tat. 

Dann aber wurde seine Ham- 
burger Amtszeit, insgesamt zehn 
Jahre, eine einzigartige Erfolgs- 
chronik; er verhinderte die von 
den Engländern angeordnete De- 
montage der Hamburger Werf- 
ten, er verstaatlichte private 
Ruinengrundstücke und ersetzte 
sie durch städtische Parkanla- 
gen, und als es in Hamburg kei- 
ne Kohlen gab, schickte er die 




Ernst Kafzensfein - 75 



Banz gleich, wie lange 
Sie drüben bleiben 

DIE NIEDRIGSTEN 
JET-FLÜGPREISE 



NACH EUROPA 



aller planmässig fliegenden Linien 




FLIEGEN SIE mit den täglichen 
(celandic Airlines-Jets 
von New York nach Luxemburg 
im Herzen Westeuropas 
füröie besten Verbindungen 
nach überall hin per Luft, Bahn 
Bus, Mietwagen und Camper. 



SEHEN SIE ICELANDICS WINTER* HIN- UND RÜCKFLUG- 
PREISE FÜR EINZELREISENDE VON NEW YORK NACH LUXEM- 
BURG UND IHRE ERSPARNISSE GEGLNÜBER DLN NIEDRIG- 
STEN VERGLEICHBAREN PREISEN ALLER ANDEREN 
PLANMÄSSIG FUEGENDEN LINIEN! 



AlIHNTHAlT 40 bi<; 3f)^) T.ir.c.SII /AHl fN 

AIIIINIIIAII ?? bis 4b T.Jf'.o...SII /AMI IN 

AllfllMlIIAI r M bis 21 Tjrc . ..SIL ZAIll I N 

AHM Nl MAI I 1 bis i:i T.M'.C.SII /AMIIN 



$?90 



SIE SPARFN J178. 
SIE SPAREN % 54. 
SIE SPARFN ^135. 
SIE SPARFN $?08. 



*Giilli»; 1)1-, M.ir/ H)/.?. Zu/ii)'.li( li :j, I b in jcdci K'i< hliiiiji .iiii 
W()( hciKMide \)v\ ?? Ab Inf.r I liif.on Bei .illni I liijipU'i'.iii und 
I rr.p.Knissrn -.iiul 'AndtMiin^'i'n VDthih.iitcn. 

Nn'dtifvt'' Miip.fifoise hodcuUMi .iik h Touren /u niiHltif.rton 
P»fi'.f'f) If cLiiulic ■', "Liirdpe And C.ir" itnl iiiil)t')',f<n/l.'r Kilo 
in«'tff/.il)l '|.l\''/ pro P(M'.(jn (in l)()[)p('l/ifnni('t ) .ih New VtxK lur 
1 Wo( h(\ iü'HO lur ? Wo( Ikmi. '\>A?ü fiir 3 Wo( hcn. und .ihnlii he 
pnii.wcfle AiifM'hoie .jii liilin iouron und Ski Pcius( li.jüouren. 

ni SUCHEN SIL IMRIN Rl ISrAGENTf N! 

fo l( rl.mdK Alilinrs 

t.JO hMli Avr. (KtK Krlollrr Crntc?!) • Now Yoih. N.Y. 100?0 • (?1?) PI 7 «^d«*, 

hilli'. Tiulin '.If IHM <ln' Urosdimi« XU iihi'i mtilii»".lr l'l I luri'MiM« 
n.M li liiiop.i ;il) New Y<iik I I hnwiittiiRr lüuiriij | Auto und B.ilm loun-iiL 1 
'ohi Itiuicii I I I iucpifiM' IUI |uii|fr Irutn ( | Uru(i|irri i lucpni'.r | | 



N.imi*., 



I 

i 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

I Mein Rfi'-.r.u'.rMl Ist ^ 
I 



r.ii.r.se. 

Oll 



.sunt. 



.7tp. 



ICELANDIC ^ LOFTlEiam 



I 



Staatsoper ins Ruhrgebiet, dort 
für die -Bergleute zu gasti-eren 
und als Bezahlung einen Güter- 
zug mit Kohlen entgegenzuneh- 
men. Er war neben seinem Ber- 
liner Amtskollegen Erni5t Reuter 
der erste Sozialdemokrat, der für 
Deutschlands Beitritt zum Euro- 
parat und zur Montanunion Ein- 
trat, im Gegensatz zu der dama- 
ligen offiziellen Parteipolitik 
Kurt Schumachers. Nach dem 
Ende seiner zweiten Hamburger 
Amtsperiode Hess er sich in den 
Bonner Bundestag wählen, dem 
er bis 1965 angehörte. 

Die Hamburger nannten ihn 
liebevoll "Maxe", seine Kritiker 
nannten ihn "den letzten Renais- 
sancefürsten", und selbst für ei- 
nige seiner Parteifreunde war er 
"der unbequeme Dickschädel". 
Im letzten Jahrzehnt kam er 
noch oft nach New York, um 
seine daselbst zurückgebliebenen 
und niedergelas.senen Kinder 
und seine Enkelkinder zu besu- 
chen, und dann pflegte er den 
Schreiber dieser Zeilen aufzusu- 
chen; die Unterhaltungen mit 
diesem prachtvollen' Staats- 
mann, der sich noch als Greis 
den lodernden Enthusiasmus der 
Jugend bewahrt hatte, waren 
immer ungetrübtes Vergnügen 
und intellektuelle Bereicherung. 
Max Brauers Tod reisst eine 
schwere Lücke. H. St. 



Edwin Redslob gestorben 

Im Alter von 88 Jahren starb 
in Berlin der Kunstsammler und 
Lehrer Edwin Redslob, Mitbe- 
gründer der Westberliner Zei- 
tung "Tagesspiegel" und ge- 
schäftsführender Gründungsdi- 
rektor der Freien Universität. 
Nach dem Studium der Philolo- 
gie und der Kunstgeschichte war 
Edwin Redslob in der Weimarer 
Republik als Direktor mehrerer 
Museen tätig und bekleidete bis 
1933 das Amt des Reichskunst- 
wartes. Nach 1945 lehrte er an 
der Technischen Universität Ber- 
lin und an ^er Freien Universität 
Kunst und Kulturgeschichte. Be- 
sondere Verdienste erwarb er 
sich in der Goethe-Forschung. 
Seiner Initiative als Sammler 
wertvoller Kunstgcgen.stande ist 
auch die Gründung des Borlin- 
Muscunis zu danken, im wieder 
aufgebauton Haus des ehemali- 
gen Kamnurgerichts in (1(m- Lin- 
den.«--trasse. Rrdslob war Grün 
dinigsinitglicd üvv BiMiincr CJc- 
s(^llschart lin- chri.stlich jiidi.sche 
/.u.s;uni)U'n;nl)eit. II. K. 



A lone Jewish sentinel Stands 
watch near the RJiine. He serves 
as guardian and advocate- in Bonn 
for those who survived the cruel- 
est persecution in human liistory. 
For nearly a quarter of a Century 
Dr. Ernst Katzenstein has de- 
fended the legal interests of Nazi 
victims. His hand ha.s played a 
significant role in restitution, in. 
demnification, slave labor pay- 
ments, grants to Jewish commun- 
! ities and pensions for thcir rabbls, 
the care of abandoned Jewish 
cemeteries, and all of the related 
legislation and negotiation. On 
Feb. llth Dr. Katzenstein will 
celebrate his 75th birthday. 

When he was admitted to the 
bar in Hameln, the yöung Dr. 
Katzenstein could not foresee the 
e-vents which would drive him 
from his homeland to seek refuge 
in England and in Palestine. After 
the Hitler regime was defeated 
and the first restitution laws were 
enacted by' the Allied Powers Dr. 
Katzenstein gave up a successful 
law practice in the new State of 
Israel to help the' Jewish Restitu- 
tion Successor Organization re- 
cover heirless Jewi.sh property. 
He had intended to stay in Ger- 
many for only a brief period, but 
as the indemnification program 
began to unfold Dr. Katzenstein's 
talents elevated him to the head 
of the JRSO, and soon he also be- 
came the Director for Germany 
of the Conference on Jewi.-^h Ma- 
terial Claims against Germany. 
The Claims Conference, under 
the Presidency of Dr. Nahum 
Goldmann. Consolidated the lead. 
ing Jewish organizations outside 
of Israel and became thcir spokes- 
man. To assure close contact with 
the practical Problems of handl- 
ing individual Claims Dr. Katzen- 
stein accepted the responsibility 
of guiding the largest regional Of- 
fice of the United Restitution Or- 
ganization. 

Shuttling between hi.s home 
and Office in Frankfurt and his 
Office in Bonn, and racing to meet 
officials all over Germany, Dr. 
Katzenstein seems to derive his 
untiring energy from his sense of 



mission. Althougli he i.s an arcJent 
and vigorous Champion of the in- 
terests of the persecutces, his 
fairness and seJfless dcdication 
isso apparent and hi.s jXM'sonaJity 
so friendJy that he i.s aJways a 
welcomed visitor at the German 
Offices handling indemnification 
Problems. 

No doubt Dr. Katzenstein has 
thought of retiring with his wife 
to a more quiet life of play with 
their grandchildren in Israel. 
With increasing apathy, if not 
hostility, increasingly a]3parent 
on the German side, and with 
hundreds of thousands of pen- 
sions and other Claims still to be 
paid out. the need for a dcfender 
of the Jewish interest.s will not 
soon disappear. Ernst Katzcnstein 
knows this better than anyone 
eise. With his incurable optimisni 
and zest he is now beginning to 
cast an eye toward the improved 
relations with the- German Dcmo. 
cratic Republic as a po.'^sible 
source of compensation for the 
large numbers of Nazi victims 
who still remain deprived. 

May his hopes for furthcr Serv- 
ice be realized. It should keep him 
busy for at least the next 25 years. 
Benjamin B. Ferencz 



'Aufbau" nocli ge- 



Ehrung 

für Professor Pohoryles 

Mit der Medaille der '•Palmes 
Academiques" des französischen 
Kultusministeriums wurde Profes- 
sor Bernard M. Pohoryles ausge- 
zeichnet. Es ist die höchste Eh- 
rung, die Frankreich für Ver- 
dienste um die französische Kul- 
tur vergibt. Die Auszeichnung 
wurde Professor Pohoryles wäh- 
rend des 45. Kongresses der 
American Association of Teach- 
ers of French in New York von 
Kulturattache Jean-Herve Don- 
nard überreicht. Bernard Poho- 
ryles, der zunächst in Deutsch- 
land sich dem Jurastudium wid- 
mete und später in New York 
weiter .studierte, i.st Professor 
für Französisch und Germani- 
stik sowie französische unö drut. 
.^'che Literatur ajn New York 
Campus of Pace College. Seit vie. 
len Jaliren i.st er ein treurr 
Fmnid (.\v<^ "Aiirh;m". 



Dazu wurde 
schrieben : 

Ernst Katzenstein bekleidet, 
wie Ben Ferencz zutreffend be- 
tont, eine führende Rolle in den 
massgebenden jüdischen Organi- 
sationen, die sich mit dejn Wie- 
dergutmachungsprogramm be- 
fassen. Es darf bei dieser Gele- 
genheit indessen nicht ausser 
Acht gelassen werden, dass .seine 
vielseitige Tätigkeit ungezählten 
Opfern der NS-Verfolgung direkt 
zugute gekommen ist. Um aus der 
Fülle seiner Arbeit nur ein Bei- 
spiel hervorzuheben: Dr. Katzen- 
stein stellte vor Jahren fest. da.ss 
die Wiedergutmachungsrenten 
bei weitem nicht in dem gleichen 
Umfang erhöht worden sind wie 
die deutschen Beamtenpr-nsionen, 
obwohl erstere auf den Beamten. 
Pensionen beruhen. Durch uner. 
müdliche Verhandlungen mit den 
deutschen Behörden gelang es 
ihm schliesslich zu erreichen, dass 
eine gerechte Anpassung der Ren. 
ten erfolgte. 

Auch ich schliesse mich der 
Hoffnung an. dass es dem Jubilar 
in geistiger und körpc-rlicher 
Frische vergönnt sein möge, seine 
segensreiche Tätigkeit im Inte- 
resse der Verfolgten noch viele 
Jahre auszuüben. 

Gunter Kamm 



PINTO'SCASTMOLDSHOE 

AND REPAIR 




810 WEST 187th 



STREET, N.Y.C. 
Tel.: 928-1932 



DRUCKSACHEN ALLER ART 

ZIRKULARE • PROSPEKTE • BROSCHÜREN • KATALOGE 

ZEITUNGEN • BEHAGEN etc. 

in rnKliN<lirr, dnilM lirr und niulrri>ii Sprachen 

Schwarz-weiss und Farbdruck 

IVASCII • ZUVMIM.A.S.SU} • THMLSWI^niT 

WEST END PRINTING CORP. 

Die Druckerei des "Aufbau" 
615 WEST 13Uf ST. NEW YORK, N Y 10027 Tel. 862 7400 



America's Largest German Language ^cAsp.^per 

2121 Broadway, New York.N.Y. 10023 

Phone: (212) TR 3-7400 

Coble Address: Aufbau New York 

Hans Steinitz, Editor 

Ludwig Wronkow, Executive Editor 

John M. Harofd, Adverfising Manager 

Wa/fer (saac, Circu/ofion Manager 

Board of Directors: 

Dr. Norbert Goldciiberg, 

Preiidvril and Puhlliher 

Jerry Brunoll, C/icnitiiuri 

EUio Frank, Vice Premlrnt 

Worner A. Stein, Buthjvl Direclor 

Wrrnrr D. Wohl. Duntor 

MantrcrJ George, Ediloi 1939 1965 

ludwig Loewenstoin, President I9S2 ]96H 

Michaol Selinoittachor hcoiuivt 1934 1972 

H«'llrnulh Kohn, C /ifi.Mitofi /9A8 1972 



#' 



fiilirrd a\ iccnndcla« iiniCrr Jdnu.iry 10, 1V40 

nt N Y Post Officr Ana it ,1(1(111100.11 (m.hIiih) uttiu 

iindrr Ai i of M,ir(.li } |H/9 

Rrq Üb Hrti UM No i^/mn. 

A OiviiKin of Nf-w \A/(if((J (.liiß inr. 
CojiyiKitH 1')/» liy N«A Wdild (:i„(,, fite. 



«t/ V i r\ 



yoe VI bT »Arcil Lud »'imlirm Corp. 
• Sifrivi RÄitS uni Af'f'l H.AIIUN 



Vol. XXXIX No t; 



F«bniary9, 1073 

442 



MAXWELL'S RADIO 
& TELEVISION 

SALES SCRVICE 

R.ulio Televi%ioM Air Conditionert 

Appliiinces 



^ >' <•>,' 



V 



AAI CT 






#^ VC. 




Gürtel enger schnallen 
sehr viel enger! 



Von HANS STEINITZ 

"Die giösste Gefahr, die unse- 
rem Wohlstand droht, ist ein auf- 
geblähte^s Regierungsbudget auf 
der AiLsgabenseite", erklärte Prä- 
sident Nixon in seiner Botschaft 
an das amerikanische Volk, die 
er am 29. Januar seinem offiziel- 
len Haushaltsplan für das kom- 
mende Fiskaljahr vorausschick- 
te. Er liielt Wort; der neue Haus- 
haltsplan ist ein Budget der 
Sparsamkeit, der Ausgabendros- 
selung, des Spar-Rotstiftes; es ist 
ein frugales Haut-und-Knochen- 
Budget ohne jede Spur Fett, — 
und das Stichwort "Austerity", 
das die Engländer in Bezug auf 
ihre öffentlichen Finanzen im 
Zweiten Weltkrieg geprägt hat- 
ten, gilt nunmehr für die Ver- 
einigten Staaten, — freilich 
nicht im Krieg sondern im Nach- 
krieg. 

Geld sparen ist an sich nicht 
schlecht. Nicht die Steuern erhö- 
hen müssen (was der Präsident 
verspricht» ist bestimmt auch 
nicht schlecht. Aber vor weniger 
als zwei Jahren, als die Wäh- 
rungskrise uns zu ertränken 
drohte, hatte der Präsident eine 
revolutionäre neue Wälirungspo- 
litlk eingeschlagen und sich zu 
ihrer Rechtfertigung plötzlich 
als neu bekehrten Anhänger von 
George Maynard Keynes dekla- 
riert — und Keynes, der grosse 
Nationalökonom unseres Jahr- 
hunderts, hatte empfohlen. Geld 
auszugeben und nicht, Geld ein- 
zusparen: Geld, das der Staat 
ausgibt, zirkuliert, schafft Arbeit, 
bringt in Form von Löhnen Geld 
unter die Leute und produziert 
allgemeinen Wohlstand. Diese 
Lehre von Keynes ist jetzt wieder 
beiseite gelegt worden. 

Natürlich lässt sich zur Vertei- 
digung unseres neuen Sparbud- 
gets mancherlei sagen. Vor zwan- 
zig Jahren betrug das Budget der 
Vereinigten Staaten auf der Aus- 
gabenöeite 10 Milliarden iX)llar; 
heute beläuft es sich auf fast 
viermal so viel, 269 Milliarden. In 
seinen bisherigen vier Jahren als 
Präsident hat Richard Nixon 
Jahr für Jahr den Haushalt mit 
einem haarigen I>efizit abge- 
schlossen, und zusammenaddiert 
hat er runde hundert Milliarden 
Dollar unserer Staatsschuld hin- 
zugefügt — was vor ihm kein 
Präsident fertig gebracht hatte. 
Und wenn er uns jetzt vor- 
schlägt, den riesigen Beamten- 
apparat der Bundesregierung ein 
wenig zu trimmen, so wird man 
dem vernünftigerweise nicht wi- 
dersprechen wollen. 

Aber die Realität sieht natür- 
lich ganz anders aus. Selbst das 
Sparbudget 1973/74 wird nach 
heutigen\ Voranschlag noch mit 
einem Defizit von minde-stens 12 
Milliarden abschliessen: da^ 
ganze Sp ar-G esc hrei fülirt also 
zu nichts und ändert an unserer 
Inf lationsf ordernden Verschul- 
dung nicht das geringste. Das ist 
so. weil an unseren Militärausga- 
ben nichts eingespart wird. Piä.si- 
dent Nixon hat uns rechtzeitig 
gewarnt: Denkt ja nicht, dass 
nach einem Kriegsende in Viet- 
nam auf einmal Geld in Hülle 
und Fülle für soziale Aufgaben 
(und Hauslialtseinsparungen) da 
sein wird, weil wir dem Pentagon 
nicht mehr so viel Geld in den 
Rachen zu werfen haben: das 
stimmt nicht, das ist eine falsche 
"Hoffnung auf Friedensdividen- 
den" rhat er gesagt>. und in der 

Tat v^M 107!^ r\(^r PpnfnP^on norli 



miitiiiiiuiiiintiiitiiittiiiiiiiniitintnitiiniitiitititttiiiiin 

"VACATION 
SUGGESTIONS" 

Resort hoteis offer many ex- 
cellent vacation suggestions 



vier Milliarden Dollar mehr be- 
willigt bekommen als in den letz- 
ten Jahren, also während der 
vietnamesischen Kriegs d a u e r , 
nämlicli über 81 Milliarden Dol- 
lar im ganzen. Kein Wunder, dass 
man dann wieder mit einem De- 
fizit am Jahresende dastehen 
wird. 

Umso grimmiger wurde vom 
Präsidenten und seinen Haus- 



Quofation of fhe Week 

iitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiimiMiiiiiiiiiiiii 

How solid is the peace 
in Vietnam? 

"What is likely is a period of 
political maneuvering and Sub- 
version of established organi- 
zations by Vietcong agents, 
seeking to put in power a 
"neutralist" group that would 
be open to Communist take- 
over." 

Bernard Gwertzman 
in The New York Times 



haltstechnikern, meist Industriel- 
len und Reklameagenten aus Te- 
xas und Kalifornien, die Sparaxt 
auf den noch verbleibenden Ge- 
bieten geschwungen. Viele Innen- 
politische Ausgaben sind gesetz- 
lich festgelegt und können nicht 
reduziert werden: Zinsendienst 
für die Staatsschuld, Kriegsteil- 
nehmerpensionen, Altersrenten, 
internationale Zahlungsver- 
pflichtungen usw. Also stürzen 
wir uns heissa auf das was bleibt: 



die Sozialprogramme der Ära 
Lyndon Johnson, die dieser in 
seinem "Feldzug gegen die Ar- 
mut" und seinem Kampf für die 
"Grosse Gesellschaft" eingeleitet 
hatte. Nicht alle diese Program- 
me haben sich t>ewährt, das wird 
niemand behaupten, und bei 
manchen wurde zu viel Geld für 
falsche Zwecke ausgegeben; aber 
andere waren ausgezeichnet, wie 
die Beihilfe für die Schulen und 
den gemeinnützigen Wohnungs- 
bau und das "Headstart"-Pro- 
gramm für unterentwickelte Kin- 
der. Und will uns jemand wirk- 
lich und ernsthaft einreden, dass 
es Im Interesse der allgemeinen 
Wohlfahrt und des allgemeinen 
Wohlstandes liegt, alle diese So- 
zialprogramme radikal zu strei- 
chen und brutal und rücksichts- 
los mit dem ganzen Sozialpro- 
gramm Lyndon Johnsons Schluss 
zu machen? 

Keine Einsparungen an Militär- 
haushalt und Weltraumfor- 
schung, wenig Einsparungen an 
den Subventionen für die Land- 
wirtschaft, dafür aber radikalen 
Abbau des Wohnungsbaupro- 
gramms der öffentlichen Hand, 
der Zuschüsse zu Medicare und 
Medicaid, zum Schulunterricht, 
zur wissen schaftlichen For- 
schung, zu Schüler-Milchspeisun- 
gen, zur Restaurierung des of- 
fen tliclien Verkehrswesens: das 
ist unsere Perspektive im ersten 
Nachkriegsjahr, das ist es, was 
Fred Hechinger in der "New York 
Times" in Bezug auf das Schul- 
wesen und Head Start eine "Poli- 
tik Ixisartiger Vernachlässigung" 
nennt. 

Grewiss ist das letzte Wort noch 
nicht gesprociien; der Haushalt 



• • 



WIE WIR HÖREN 

iiiiimiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiimtiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiimiiiin 



X. 






4, 5, 6, 7, 19, 20, 21 

''Mllllllllllllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiililili 



Rabbiner Dr. Bernhard Brilling, 
Akademischer Oberrat an der 
Universität Münster i.W., seit 
Jaliresfrist offiziell im Ruhe- 
stand, setzt auf Grund freund- 
schaftlicher Vereinbarung seine 
Tätigkeit als Leiter der Abtei- 
lung für die Geschichte der Ju- 
den am Institutum Judaicum De- 
litzschianum sowie seine Vorle- 
sungen und Übungen fort. Dem- 
nächst erscheint als Band 14 der 
"Studia Delitzscliiana ' (Verlag 
W. Kohlhammer, Stuttgart) Bril- 
lings Werk über "Die jüdischen 
Gemeinden Mittels chlesien s". 

C.ff.l. 

♦ • • 

Als Frontkämpfer des Ersten 
Weltkrieges konnte der Orienta- 
list Dr. Ernst Daniel Gold- 
schmidt bis 1935 in seinem Amt 
als Bibliothekar an der Preussi- 
schen Staatsbibliothek verblei- 
ben. Dann aber wanderte er nach 
Jerusalem aus, wo er bis 1962 an 
der National- und Universitäts- 
bibliotliek in angesehener Stel- 
lung tätig war. Er hat sich na- 
mentlich auf dem Gebiet der Er- 
forschung der jüdischen Liturgie 
(Pessach-Haggadah; Selichoth; 
aschkenasischer Machsor) o^ros- 
se und bleibende Verdienste er- 
worben. Der 1895 in Königshütte, 
Oberschlesien geborene Wissen- 
schaftler ist unlängst in Jerusa- 
lem gestorben. 

* • * 

Dr.Dr. Jasef Neuberger, der 
mit Vollendung seines 70. Lebens- j 
Jahres kürzlich in den Ruhestand i 
getretene nordrhein-westfälische I 
Justizminister, ist im Dezember 
zum Vorsitzenden des Vorstan- 
des der Jüdischen Gemeinde 



FOREST HILLS $47,000 

BACKSTEIN HÄüS 

Seiteneingang, 6'j Zimmer. 

Air Condition. Bodenbelag. 

Aussjebaute.s Basoment. 

Ge.schlossene Veranda. Garage. 

Extra.s. 

lANE REALTY 

THE REAl ESTATE DEPARTMENT STORE 

11245 QUEENS BOULEVARD 
FOkcST HillS, i.. i., hi. i . 

rhone BO 8-3300 

Fxprpss 7r»lh Ave. Sudion. IND Subway 



Düsseldorf gewählt worden. Vor- 
her schon war er seit längerer 
Zeit Vorsitzender des Gemeinde- 
rats (Repräsentanz). Er hat 
auch seine anwaltliche Tätigkeit 
wieder aufgenommen. egl 

* • • 

Der schweizerische Sender Be- 
romünster erinnerte am 8. Janu- 
ar an den Kammersänger. Kom- 
ponisten und Dirigenten Richard 
Tauber, dessen Todestag sich 
zum 25. Mal jährte. In einer be- 
merkenswerten einstündigen 
Sendung wurde die vielgestaltige 
sängerische Leistung des gefeier- 
ten und verehrten Künstlers an 
vielen schönen Beispielen aus 
Oper, Operette und Konzertsaal 
ins Gedächtnis gerufen. egl 

* * * 

Prof. Hans Mayer, der Inhaber 
des Lehrstuhls für deutsche 
Sprache und Literatur an der 
Technischen Universität Hanno- 
ver hat Einladungen zu Gastvor- 
lesungen in den USA angenom- 
men. Der vorzeitig aus seinem 
Amt scheidende Wissenschaftler 
verlässt Hannover verärgert dar- 
über, dass nicht entsprechend 
seinem Vorschlag Dr. Fritz J. 
Raddatz als Professor für neuste 
Literatur nach Hannover beru- 
fen worden ist. H. E. 

* * * 

Kurz nach ihrem 100. Geburts- 
tag starb am 17. Januar 1973 
Cläre Hugo Stinnes, die Witwe 
des Konzerngründers Hugo Stin- 
nes. Sie wurde in Mülheim beige- 
setzt. Sie hatte vergeblich ver- 
sucht, nach dem Tod ihres Man- 
nes zusammen mit ihren beiden 
Söhnen die ihr verbliebenen Fir- 
men neu zu entwickeln. 



EARN 

HIGHEST 

RATES 

WITH FUNDS FEDERALLY 

INSURED TO $20.000. 

For füll detaiLs contart: 





Cd 



> 

td 
> 

> 

w 

w 

> 

CD 



CO 









*.««-T'»^w 



Don't you dare growl at mc! 



t'ourlesy Chicago Sun-Time« 



wird vom. Präsidenten vorgelegt, 
aber verabschiedet wird er vom 
Kongress. Im Kongress meldet 
sich Widerstand gegen diese dra- 
konische (und so ungleich und 
unsozial verteilte» Politik der 
Sparaxt. Senator Humphrey hat 
schon sehr trocken bemerkt, in 
Zukunft würden demokratisclie 
Kandidaten für liohe Wahlämter 
einfach sagen "Ich bin für Lyn- 
don Johnsons Sozialprogramme" 
— und sie könnten sicher sein, 
begeisterten Zuspruch von den 
Wählern zu bekommen. Selbst 
die Metliode des Präsidenten, 
Kredite, die der Kongress bewil- 
ligt hat, einfach liegen zu lassen 
und nicht auszugeben, wie er das 
im letzten Herbst schon einmal 
getan hat ( und was verfassungs- 
mässig ein sehr fragwürdiges 
Verhalten ist»: selbst diese Me- 
thode wird den Kongress nicht 
davon abhalten, ein Minimum 
von Sozialprogrammen fc>eizube- 
halten oder gar neu zu beschlies- 
sen. 

Dabei ist der Kongress weder 
leichtsinnig noch verantwor- 
tungslos. Es gibt im Kongress 
ernsthafte Volksvertreter (wie 
Mills aus Arkansas und Proxmire 
aus Wisconsin), die scharf dar- 
auf achten, dass der Kongress 
nicht munter Milliarden bewilligt 
ohne für ihre Deckung zu sorgen: 
diese Kongresvswächter verdienen 
mindestens so viel Vertrauen wie 
die anonymen Büromänner im 
Weissen Haus. Es ist zu hoffen, 
dass Mills. Proxmire und ihre 
ernsthaften und wertvollen 
Freunde im Kongres.s dafür sor- 
gen werden, dass bei aller zweck- 
mässigen und sinnvollen Sparpo- 
litik wir gewölmlichen Bürger, 
die wir keine Rüstungsindu- 
striellen und Petioleummagna- 
ten sind, doch nicht den Gürtel 



ganz so eng zu sclinallen liaben 
werden, wie der neue Haushalts- 
plan des Präsidenten uns emp- 
fiehlt. 



FINAL 

SAL 

ON 

COATS-SUITS 
DRESSES 




REDUCED 
UP TO 



50% 



Famous Makes of I 

BORGANA b.?fore up lo $125 

NOW ONLY $88 ,.,. | 

BOROAZIA before up to S155 

NOW ONLY $17 2.,; 



MISTY HARBOR 

INTERLINED COATS 



REniJCED 
VP TO 



% 



ALL SIZES AND PRTCES 

CAROLYN 

DRESS SHOP, INC. 

4231 BROADWAY 

(bet. 179th and 180th Sts.) 

Near Bus Terminal 




17q:tR0>ApVyAY,^SUlTfe 505 
N Y. "38, N Y. CO 7-01 15" 16 



^ 



WbhmGeMMan? 

Diese Frage stellen sich die Vielen die sich in Ruhe und Zufriedenhe 
in andere Länder zurückziehen wollen. Locarno? Lugano? Riviera 
England? Deutschland? Oesterreich? Spanien? Italien? Israel? Aus 
trauen? Neu Seeland? St. Croix oder St. Thomas? 

Wohin auch immer; Für die Verschiffung Ihres Haushalls, klein ode 

gross, Q'ttjt, c5 niif eine idCrmiaiii iiSoiit; iVieil locitf. 

House toHouse 
Steel Containers 

und nur eine wirklich darin erfahrene Firma: 

ENDICOTT 555 West 33 Street 

New York, N Y. 





Tel: 563*1234 



deren Inhaber. Max Langnor, (früher Berlin Gopäckfahrt 8883| seil 1928 im 
internntinn.ilm Möljeilransnorf RnP7irTli<?if>rr \%\ und Hr»r o<s e.r-n -.,,, s..t^^u^ 
gemncfit hat die Errungensctiafton dar "Containerization", PdrnlichSpär'- 
samkeit, Schn3lligkcit und Sicherheit, dorn Ver;;iehenden zugute zu bringen. 





Am 12. Dezember 1972 verschied mein innigstgeliebti V^ 
;ann, unser lieber Vater und Grossvater ■ SJ' 



Mann 



Dr. JACOB HARTMANN 



In tiefer Trauer : 



<frülier Mayen Rlild.) 

LIESELOTTE HARTMANN 

geb. Brück 

DAVID und LILLIAN HODDESON 
geh. Hartmann 

Dr. DAVID und RHODA HARTMANN 

geb. Kalit'hman 

und AMY HARTMANN 



> 

tu 

> 

d 

> 

ö 

o 
w 

w 

l>3 



t3 



Unser guter Freund 

Dr. med. JACOB HARTMAN 

hat uns für immer verlassen. 

Wir gedenken seiner in tiefer Trauer. 
Wir werden ihn nie vergessen. 

Dr. & Mrs. ALFRED GOLDBERG 

Dr. & Mrs. M ARCZEL HAAS 

IRMA LACHS 

Dr. JULIAN MAMLOCK 

SYLVIA SANDBERG 

Dr. & Mrs. RICHARD SCHINDLER 



• ;•.•; 



^^^Ä i^MFUGEE'S SAGA OF 

KrTCHENER CAMP 

Its Spirit Maintained In War Time 



•:fi;-tV 






^^i 







By DU. ALFRED WERNKK UEIMKAl H 



:??•: 



•i»?r-] 



:.l«ifr>r- 



A-Til 



>t 



:-:r;i 




:»•: 



W^ shall never forget thls Engllsh 
^^ Summer. Its marvellously sweet 
days havlng bren mied not only wlth 
useful work for ourselves but also wlth 
excellent entertainments. wlth sports 
and games and. before all. wlth more 
and more dlscoveries of thls country'« 
beauty. 

With the nlghts growlng longer, the 
days colder and wetter now, the war 
:TIlmpo8lng Its limltatlons and restilc- 
■:-::•':::■":-.- tlons upon US — apart from our being 
Jrii':^;*-?^:?!: mentally Involved In the world's bitter 
>!:^l::!::;;;:i: fate — cverythlng Is induclng us to a 

' * deeper and more serlou» pundering 

over our common lot. over the strange- 
noss of our sufroundings and over that 
mlraculous dlspensation of Pruvldence 
whlch led us out of slavery Into thls 
mother-Cüuntry of freedom. 

JuHi now fibovit torty people — victinis oi 
peace, men tn the prlme of life— In eltlioi 
pari of r hut are »Ittlng aromid the long 
: table, dlm Ilght pouring down frotn the half- 
i hiclden lanip, and blankets prevenimg iLh 
•■:::::;::?:: rays from sparkling out lato the pttch-dark 
ii'i-iiiL;-^' raniy night 

THOUGHTS OF OTHER DAYS 

flow dltlerent are these huts oi Kitchenor 
Camn In their primitive poverty. from tho-io 
dwelllngs we used lo live In oa the Contl- 
neht — and yet we never would exrhaiij^e 
them foi* any bMght palace In our nailve 
covlntrlefc thlnklng of their torture rooniö 
we esCaped In tne very last nioment 

ie$id«l| how |(reat is the differenoo 
bttween -iur Camp's present State, and 
that hSAp Of rülni. «ur nrst settlers met 
wtth in th« «afly spring! 

It rathei lor-'kexl llke the Kalg Calnp (that 
part Which, sltuated on the other aide of 
the flamegate-Deal Road. only recently was 
acqulrcti fdf our purposes by the Refu^'c«; 
Commlttee) Is looklng now. wlth Its dozeiw» 
of large and small hvits. or rather, its rudl- 
incnts of concrete walls, wlth no Windows 
»pd doora the wholö belng overtopped by 
xfie big masses of tho water-towcrs. Wo 
have to ndhnre. thbugh. the work Whkh 
then had to be done by the ferltlsh Tomnilos 
In the nrst Oreai War, Whlch ha.s reslstcd 
so much the ravaßcs of tlme. li, bplte of a 
20 years negect 

EARLY DAY8 IN KENT 

1 remenibtr quUe well that State when 
we were only a small group li(?re No roatls. 
no work-,shops. no gardeninj;. llttle educn- 
tlon and eniertalnment I 

Everybody hart to worlt «vherever 
hand« Wrere needetf A former lawyer 
tooh the chisel or the brush, and ono 
could See former teachers, and physi- 
cians and archittfcts worliing together 
wlth the skilled eraftsmen in order to 
build shelters for ourseives and for the 
comrades to oome. 
And ihey lle deeply eitiboddcd In our 
mlnd. those Eaatet^ays of thls year. whcn 
we wore breaklng the unleavened brend in 
our solcnmly oinaled dlnlng-hall. havln,? 
escapcd the modern E>?ypt only a few rlays 
, before; Grent Brltalh'a Chief Rabbi brlMgltl^ 



wl.slifs Ol onr I 



\M)!* 



US the r.MiiU 
ji:ioni.««t.«: 

Whllst in thi« hrfzInnlM« 
l)Utru \i) pnrl) rn.m ii< < niilhu» 
of tlio Camp. hMrr on tlir. „1)11 
ninn wcrc takcn Inic .• )nsi(|,.|i,t 
to devclop tliem. glvln^r brnrfli 
mimlty tlu'ifby 

Thin there wen» p^ta» 
'rom thr large kitchen wl^ 
tenance-branches, workshc 
shoemahers, tallors, bookbiif 
«raphor» whilr the easinr worl* '■. 
dono hy the unskilleH. 
Au orch -^tiH was iC)ui>rjMd. wlUcli h' 
CUllhatlli'^ rlasr-K.il »i.u- •' muI R>'i' 
entrrtalnnio.i^ Ijoth lu our fpilow«. . 
»{^ecKij oniLsiotv-,, t,j Ol), fi,tii,Mi«;li' 
and nleiuls; a rhn\\ , cinrflv :.ssist!ni? 
n'll^ri,,„s scrvlre in thr Camp syna^os 
Ja/,/, l)arKi jomlni^ our •couffrenfif rs 
artlstes nnd a(ioh:its In ^Ivhi« 
aiKl ^ayrr putpita'nmr tu to 
('Mir'«« ppi lurnian»"« tak» 
"concort lia.I - v hiM K'n 
shdwii lOr t,,,T mrmljpis 
"canij) «'luetn:»"' » 



:-:•;■.-:?•:•.•:•:•. .-:• •:«.«:r':i:JT':-.i;*Si-T--«*'' :■■ '■■.<»^<^U•:^ 



:i»-i::is. 



:j*v 



r 



:»=: 









r brl; 

(•nr Miri 

pljHc Ui our 1 

ish (l!in< 

tn nui hpHU 



DEPARTMENT 






•3' ■ - 




•stabllMhod. ^ud En|•'■!'i•''1H^^^'i^?H»^^^^>*^^^•**'?»''^^•'«*^i•^'■ 



J 





EOUCATIONAL 

l'or tearjiing ou 
drpartinciii" was « 
latj CR aurl ►^entleti 

thf nrlglilHuirliood. klndly gnve us tlu , 
sirucMon. sacrini-lug ilielV spare tlme 
our l)encfit Mor^over tliose c-f our n 
bei 8 who already had nn Idra, inorf or iV 
of the Engllsh iant^ungr i"An\oiig the blj 
Is the one-eyod a klng!") diri thclr best! 
help thclr frlends In timi Uff*!, s\ipport 
by goou tPKt boolf-s gramophones and , 
cords as well 

Lot me mentlon shortly two other tt\st 
tutlons: the Oversoa Bpitlomeut Ofll^e. helj; 
Ing our peo'Me to emlgrate to counirl<;::'-'.- 
llke b.S.A. Palestinn ^ 
the mertlca 
dental sta 
latter In 
work-arcldPiits 

So far things went on quite well. We 
had (and still have) the best relatlons 
with the people of East Kcnt, and wesk 
after week we could «reet cheerfuily 
rtiore and more newcomers, who thank'- f 
fuily stepped on this coiintry's holy 
soü. It was not a paradise, thi» . 
Kitchener Cnmp, to spcak the piain 
triith, re^arding the lack of most of 
life's oomforts, its mmatef. being rathe. 
shooked by the mud of its rotten roadn 
but it was at least an island in a 
stormy, men-devouring sea. 

WHEN WAR BROKE OUT 4 

ihen war bioke out. wllh Ps snrrows nuti 
pnluf' for PVPiybndy wiih its Bhirk OutS' 
and AH P Us N;itif)na; Sorvlcp. Its rrstric-** 
tlons and «liortM^ps We dkl not. however. 
losp our temper nor tlie bPllpf In tlils covin-r 
try's giPfltnPRS For thr wholf nf Bnptpmbpi 
you could SPP o ir ppople. going hy buses 
and rais to Dover. Min 









:>T* 


•«Ä':::f:: 










"^••.- .<-.*- 







^^z^ 



wUh faiTMprs of tlie iip'i'lilicii linod. 

fnrgp» luptitionlng our liop-pirkr? a 

But the work for our Camp had nc- 
heen neglnotert in the meantlmr 
Everybody is busy now huilding ne% 
«"eaHs beinf afraid of the heavy rain 
of the Coming wInter, and the nolse o 
the concreto. mixers is audible through 




hope 




THE UNKNOWN FUTURE 

But dtpams nf the futur^? Oh, thls futurp 
lotally unknnwn to parh of us. nnd only 
nnd tru««t can spud thPlr rays forward 
Whatpvcr mlaht hapien, we shaij b« 
piad t'> K've our brst fr)r the beriefet of 
this country which is keeolng to its 
high traditiors of chivalry and 
hone^ty. 
Thprp«''ie we lieve atrfp'ui the iiMdre-^s, 
rieivcfd m us in hwrh \ ficudjy aiid rom- 
foiilng ii.atuu^r i)y t'ie .\i< iiblslinp «if Cnn 
tpibury. >Älih ilip dcppf st irrppcl and tlip 
ulmosf rtit!vt«!in<5tn. F m- that MiPal Pi!. 
I mote sald '.xnO ms W(<r«ls will bp kept ns a 
iwoitiiy trii^t r-iy hl.^ tiir">o thuusand lis- 
teucra: 

" It woultl •'( a PK nt th i'i» 

rrfuftpps wh'j'u we h.avr h m-m 
ponip. btif. nl'o 



ir wp In iiiiiB 

ll( >f (IMp« n« 

ultid to'wf'i- 



n«; fpll'nv w irkPis In a luiii- 
mon caub«? In whlch wo cm all Joln." 



mmimtm 



mmmmmtmmmm»ma^m0»mmti4m9*m 



.»mm 



tffßmmmm 






i:.. . . 











AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 

Phorie: (212)744-6400 

Fax:(212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Data: 12/21/2009 



Sys#: 000198685 



Box: 2 



Folder: 1 



<'\I.l-ii..S 1j.hZE,1ü4iuD lit AUÜTHALIA 
BKTISH OFFICIAL TO li.VESTIGATB 

.h« L.dney ..ornin^^ Uoxalü, No. 32.124 Frld,.y, I3th Decembei, 

1^4ü 

London, Dec. 12. (Ä..i,P,) 
"™! i'°^ ^ecrlary, ,ir. Il«x-bert u^orrison. wiaounceci in th« 

S^n^^ntL-nSiS^ '^ '""^^^^^'^ *^ invesU.-ate the c"f... *f 

An officiaL 1*88 sent to Canada eaxlier this moath to inveatl- 
gata "mistakea" thore in ^he in^ermaent oi aliana. ^"^"^^- 

is nonv:j.£s.i^/iSitraa?jr**'^ "''« ^" '^"^^— 

Mr. Morriaoni Thet le our policy in principle. 

it wi!« t^^ adüiirable und Kiudl^ U- ea^>ücnt in AuaLi-alia. ia 
« H ! ^"^ encouraife them to face the pt ixla of the a^ iA 

.J". iiorrisoa t I ain sux-e thai will be p esent in the minas ar 
thoa. coacerned. I would like to expreis aj üia Jca L ^^e 
Loveraments or /.ustraxia aud Ganada. 



The Argus äo. 29490 



27« Februar 1941 



Page 3 



li^TERi^iEED ON THE IXJM1.RA 
to be compensated» 



London, Vvednesday (A.A.P.) 





Compensation for intemees who travelled to Australia in the 
Dunera and a possible court-iiartial to investigate complaints 
made of their treatment by British soldiers on the voyage were 
promised by Mr. Richard Law, Financial Secretary to the war 
Office, in the Hoyse of Commons to-day. 

Mr» J.C« Wedgwood (Lab.) said that reaction to the Dunera 
revelations was more creditable to Australia. iMumbcrs of Austra- 
lians feit very strongly Britain ought to put the matter right 
at the earliest opportunity. The V/ar Office had decideä to open 
a court of inquiry, but the court had not yet been establishea. 

Any findings must be published to show the world that ..hen such 
things happened in a British Service that direct action was 
taken to prevent them happening again and also to punish off en- 
ders and to compensate the victims, he said. Kelugees remaining 
in Australia should be provided with money pending investigation| 
of charges that soldiers took money from them. 

•^Austi-aiians are aoing their duty and caring for these refUgees 
mudi better than we have done", he added. 

Mr. Law, in reply, Said it was impossible to say anything very 
specific while the matter was sub judice, but if the allegations| 
were tioie the Government would detest them as much as ...r. ued^^- 
wood. 'ilieie were very definite disadvantages in washing dirty 
linen in public. Ene^my Propaganda would construe ewery aetail 
of the allegations as an admission of guilt - guilt not applied 
to the articular case, but to the British character an the 
British manner of waging war. 

He added that preliminary investigations showed a case for 
inquiry, and also that some, if not all, the internees in the 
Dunera sufi'ered loss. A court- mar tial would be better than a 
court of inquiry held in secret, which might take months to 
conclude.** 




EXCKfa>T FKOM «nn. BOOK I 

Pocket illstory of the World hy lUG. Well«. 

Pages 416/17. 



If hy the sumaex of 1940, the British Conxederation of 
States was at last rallying its forces to iight in eaj.-nest, 
i^ was still being extremely va^ue aiid ill-advised in its 
Propaganda activities, 

a caystexious end seud-secret body, the bwinton CoriKiiittee was 
sex up to deai with the accunailating ^iailLitude of refu^ees 
and aiiens in Gr^iJ, Britain. The head and iront oi tuis coia- 
mittee was a certain ..iV. Lloyd-ureen who had assumed the naioe 
Cunliffe-iwister in 1924 and have be^n elevated to the peera^e 
in 192b> as Lord bwinxon. He seems to haVe ^et mpout his task 
in a manner suggestive either a sadist.ic xenophobe or a i»azi 
a^ent» A cruel and violent persecution of tlie very people 
to whom Britain should have looked ior aid in her fi^^ht to 
re Store Europe to freedom ensued« They weie tx-eated with an 
irrational laalice and brutality that has done irrepax'able 
daxaage to the i iltish naiae. L.ager eneiaies of i^ai^ional Socialisc 
and Fascism were interned under quite honibxe conditions, 
sepaiated fi*om their wives and families, aeported; many were 
driven to suicide. In the gr*eat past oL Palmeiscoa, Canninti, 
i^ielbvjurne, lace to face with tlie uoly /Uliance, it hr.d been 
the Policy of creat Lrixain to bef2*iend, sheltei , ana assist 
tAe revolui^ionai^y movement s in evex-y jL::uropean counxry^ Jne had 
Si;2E£S^^%^' ^-^»X? tiTacie. It was the uoast oi? luhe i litxsh tha^ 
wnerever their flatf waved, man were free. x\iow, a shocüsd worlo 

demanaed whether l.ngland had t> rgo^x^en? Was all ^his talk of 
deiuocracy no more than a pre^ence? 




His Macoellaney, 

for tiid Unit ad Kiii^^oin 



Your üKoell^m^p 



J^o* 7 Camp 




ac ycrar re4p.0&t v/e suhiait a report desorlöiii^ c<md.itioi3ji 
preraillnt; on ii^M«5!. "Dunera" which troii^t s<»ao ^000 i^fejfa^ee» 
Intemaee froiis üäi^land to iurtralla In öeptoiaber this y)«ir»xlie 
»»lorancltön is bp.sod cm oxyer cmcos made whXch were collected and 
scrutlnlsol as to their aacrurao;:,^ hy responiilble man In. Vatts oaasp« 
Attention is drawn to the AppanCix oontainlii^ atstaacKitd voIuä- 
tarily i5iad« "by liitemeea prepared to ^iubstaixtiate their ortdmiam 
in any I^ritish Court of Justice* 

W© feel that an iiidependant invaati^H:atiaix ^11 nhow up the 
pjijiißtioe dcme to vis,th?.t it will ixkUcö anm^/ar the;?e roBpoiiBible for 
Inflictin^ tlie hiiBailiations cxporionoed^ arß th^t it nill laad to 
compsJi3atlon for tho material damji^o lucurrcKl, 



It apF^ars, Sir, that not^^ithstandiii^ the ocemrranoes on th# 
"Itoaera" oux* iiitertunant hare uii- or the preöeait circ-ar:isjkmocs is »o 
mach at "\r\ri^mce with tho atatmaunt© aade by üritish authoritiea 
induoing as to join the tranapoi^t höro» tliat we wouM re-pectfolly 
reqaeot you to taJce up tliia matter v?ith the competacit British 
authoritie3# At the moiBerit af writinij we are in tha abnoxaal poslti 
on that nobody in Australia ( i-^raxi Jjuoludin^ Official Vlsitora 
such ao thö Lord Chief Justice ) declarca himself coHipötont to 
act as an Intiarmediarj' between ua and the liritish (iotrox'rufaent.A 
clarification of our atatu£i is ao vital that we ba<i to ur^ie you 
to exttmd youx* authority to coTer the problöcia ariöiii^- oat of our 
poGition in general whioh we wisli to sutecit to you* 



Yours rei^p ectfully^ 



( a^#) Camp üpo^eonjan 



MEMOEASDUM. 



Of «STTÄ Ä ts CS «t c- Ate: £:; ssfciss c JK r a= 



SäJ 



r^. x*!"^ followln^ j^ve« a Short accoiint of the treÄtment which the 
:?62 interueu» now in ho.l Giusp, Äatero Ccßnnaiid, iUtBtraila.exyeri- 
«nciöu. aui-in^ thoir vo^'^aee tc Australia cm bo^-^rd iUM»S*»'i;aiiei-a'^^e 
füll oo^ploment of ii^temeeo arrivln^ an the «i/anera« iu aade uä 
by -üxoiie in xiO. c Cajsp to whoai all ecndxtloiis of treatEtent aa aet 
out below aj?p3^ aut<aaatloail^ . 

All pursons her© wer« Intömed beferesn May and July 1>40 In 



refu^e: 



.cally 



taiöir politloal convictioii or thetr reli^^ious jefeitfei* üearly all 
are cla3Si£ied as »G» olaaa easoa l^jr the öpoclal iJliecs Srlbunals 
»•t up tn Siiflaad, deolaring tUm ofiTiclally to be "roru^eö^ ^rom 
iiasil opprossion« and freelng them frMi laost restrictlonö* 

— — I , „„ »^ Ir tfiCToe. to -o ovor«^^, 

i5 forö tlieir trani^pox'tatian p^erseas those liitemees wäre in 
yaricua I^lisöi Csmps ^d v/era eitlier smt overseaö volwitarilär oa 
the Btroß^th of o-rteli^ promloe© me,de,op wcre oowpelled to «• 
/ ^ ^^^ .> ^ IrtemefTB eonln^ ftrom the tcsisporaw c&mo Liii#^field 

n© wjiy nropared for a lon^ Joumcy overeeas. e j *« 

T«. 'b) fhe iBtemces cos-irg froc the lEtormaeut Cara» limrton nr. 
idTnrt>ool ( Rbout XCCC on boai^ H.M.2.»i«iiera") wer» pMÄ-IsSi to 
thelr Camy Cosmandart that j»i-w.*BB» ny 

oertaji. restrictioris, and ^oeoibilitios fcr work üi ofiefa own 

if) ■öicir wlTes and chlldißri atJuld fcll<w eiiortiär 
>) axyr prospectire tranm igranta woiiM aot De ttlaced. in & 
worse yoBitloii as reüsarda thair miciration i^Umm» 

On belQg persoiifiüLl^ coxtavated, tiiL. Ofricüra in cJmr^e of tka 

•f ^* *a- of^ei Cialis announcod that bO Iba. lu^jjaee coiUd be 

S^r^«^, ^ »^^!^,°^ ^« «am»? icitba^s wer« proridcd to take nacesei- 

tp«rs rt * *^* requiaite aumbsrs for tho * 

c) She iiitemeoo froa the C^tial Caa» aEd Onohan C^o Dou^i-n 

1) iiiey were ßclng to Caiiada 

i' ^ ^ wlveo anl chlldrca: would be in the 9aae sonTov 

off Icinll? ^mot^'^^ if^^ *i:L ^^"^ Camdlaii pootal «ddreBs ILb 
oTticiclly mjioxmccA, »i'he i^arrleä. aaa £r^ thesie oamve Vülur)t«or«d 



d; Ehe iatorDoes ccöIq« firom the Jnztammt Caap Bamsey.Isle of 
Man. wero mostly msäabera ojf the fomer Kit<*iener CaÄi>,üicshborow-h 
K^t, i.e. T0tu.poet-, frora tienuaiay who iuid fouüd aaylusi iß JiHgJaitt aeis- 
^^§ ^^^' furteer tTWiamigratK». cvereoaB. &^y were aroKilSod by 
their Camii CoBrjandmitJa ' 

li t^Mt tiiay m)uld aoat probabl^/- eiO to Casttda 

2) th'\t ao raösrdß thair troßerüitiratiGaa tlieiy woiUÄ iü ixo misr b« 
plaood in a. wovoq coräitiur'. by Jotainfi tJiö ti-anspoi^w 

>} that tiie taaaomiÄraiits to xhe U.a.A. (»i^pr. 200) ooula m 
do nothiiiö better tdian to volunteer for this tranöport.esüecially 
as tiiey woald sare thsii- aea |»asgat-e money in tiiat way. * 

4) tiiat ovorseas thoy woald re^alii frecjdora of movaaaöt, 
1,, — "^ '*^-^** ?-''--'-S'''f^ *° *"*« ^*^ 1^8' l««ga«e Witt! thea and the 

It will be clearly obsorvod froa tJie above timt tiie üitemees 
had rolui^toured £or thia transpor and bM done 30 o« th \^^^S 
^«^ ^J^^:.^^^^ ÄFßlnat aazi ^eimany th?» slttie« behiad barbed 



wlre in Ehgland 



Tri .^y 



wöi-e mea with gre^t hoj^m ^md bri#s)it splrlto 



w^o^arrired at Liverpool fo;ih;jreS;^l^ti^ovTra«i^S; ISljSt. 



nrr *^ t® fara» is knovm the first transport to «rrive v'era «ibo.ii; 

?ar S^ S^? £^*°f • '^% "^f *«^* ^i^Ä an Le ÜbariluoB pfi, 
for ti.e boat to aat:e iTaat and Jiad tiiac to proeeed tnrouÄÜ a a-irro* 

f^^fi Vhf «*i"^->ct»i evor/body to ^ excop/iicoly roueir, aearoh. 
i.Terj tttiiig oamea iü nana or looae in th« -.HicKets w<is takimi a^f 

J^L^^''''''''T' ^^^«»^ vaxuabla offeots ifko SoJ^ISilÄ utöSil. 
aateöiea, piyes, eto, wero tnrown dlsorüerJLy on tho -round. Valuablaa* 
were etvuTfod inlo «uökb or disayi-eared o^^enly into the ÄeS^f S, 
«earching soldiei'o. Soon rowa of emptiöd wallet© «ra l;-iu on th«. 
floor. the conteuto of eL^ptiod attnShe oaaas wele t^^hl^^r^ 

ouinlß or all 



Kinas, ^ere taitön awey, thw^^i on the ^;to\jjm ov even 



ootttitlTeV tOÄi Ui) before tlie i^cs of their Terj o^n^ers^ 

AmmlB to the offioers staiiding V wera fiuitlets. Attanpte of ^ 



lo«rer and up 
articlea taJ 




fee 



B. The mombera of the öecond tranöLK>rt i'rom Hu ton -rr-ivini^^ « 



' > " 

««„3i-i?^*'*^v* o^orad into tb© upper Ho. 2 Uess Deck, aod on anta- 
res all at aohe caaos aad the provldüd kitbaga were takaa away.^a 

iHtarest .sie ta en out, 'iTila proocxiare was atOBued af cer a tlma rJid 

deck sjod to ffioye to the othar throo^h a row I? ^oldici-a. ilöri tha/ wL. 
iivoxytlilEt- 10036 whicn wp.3 foiuid. war. takeii «mur. o^^**>« 

oiderL"^* ""if ^""-^ ^t«**^""*" "^^ ^■^°' > ^««^^ ^'««s Deck.iLere tüay wer» 
oraeroa t^ .>a.t wO .n ana to raopty everytüing out oiT tiieir i/oeJcett, on to 

£faer8 diu. ßot appcf-r to be nny aysta« aö res&r.i. tue otäer artiolw 

:if^*.*^*.^f^?^ ^* was dedared tlwt a miBta'e )md beim Via e aS IS« 
»aoKS contaiiiirjtf articles linpouBdetl on this, the upper l»o.> aS ulSS 
•P: i ^««^ *®5« eoptied out on tiie ilour and on one of the taSeaflt 

C. me frroui' fron the littsmnent Cr.nn[» Mr.ffiold orriTod k#.x+ «Ph,«,- 

l;ook tney ;rere tre-ted similnr to th« befcre m^rtion 4 t^roup. 

?i' P-%-^f J® Of «an ^ere quartere.^ in the Ser^feanta i)ec3c on the firi»- 
port wf tne sliip. -xhc rcKialnaoi- In th« oft .art.to^-ether v;ltb non- 
refU€oe Intorneee ^nd itallans. laxer alaarSÄtSlEJ^e? 

«*+«T,iL ! Plnced In the fore^art, aU caaes, oatss, :aid other 

portable«, v/ere talcejs awn^r oa their enterine ths shit.. dnd a bodv- 
jaRrch was connaaceed, bat not corapletelj^ carried oat. while th«r wer» 
^eated et thslr m^-aatables. iäoß.e of the articlee tafcffii off th^wera 
placöd In large bov.ls and were later retuined.iSost ertlcles of 
Talue were uisainc» " 

-«♦^^^^.^''^^^ '•'°^.*''*^ ontBfche aftiiart of the sMp mre coarched wh« they 
«tered the Upper ke«r> Uocüu Kvej^thln« found In tho pocfcets was tckS 
a^ray, includlic hnndlcerchlefs, etc. All artlcleo wer© tlu«owi on the 
^T^\ e^c. pt Dost of tlio vnluables vihi«äi wcre irocketc-d Irr theeoldlers 

redietribJto* ^^ ''' about, v,üleh the Interceoa thai ooca-i.iacod. to 

All •«xese aearchea oro cairlart out wlthout any äieorlmirifition 
«ceorapanicxl by acts of vloltaioe, .-md roeultod In th7 loaa Jf S^ ' 

r^n^?^^-*^nlJ^L°**''F; '«^«"'''ie articlea. tollet naceesltlea. end 
iniportant öociaMUto wl.lciri iiave nerer booR recovered, 

As resarda tlie inoldanta appertalnln« to the «nbarkatlon of tho 



1 

intemees. referenoe Is LL"to thc accoiayanylnö statemants. 

I, E^TöÄenic coiiditiorts. 
a) "The intemees» livcVs w^rf^ T.H-f-hr>n+ r-^«^«^* 

Ijeoame aoeomodation Cor ^54 ,-nen •i'i'?- n^i,\Ä'^$- "'' ^°f ^^" raer.lt 
practioally every deic?;^ ^^"^ i>roi>orTxon -.mr, traa of 

PosBi61a..he porthole. re.. ine<? clJ^oS ^S\StiS'tinf"^"^ " "^« 



OTcrboard. ^ **^*'*^ ''^^^'^ removeu.destroye'.- or tJirown 



c of 
tal 



-^ierciae" v/h3 orclreöT"^ sentrieu ./ith baj'cnctn. On mtuiy dayB.hormyer 
as li tooic j.lacc"^'''^^''" ^^'^'■^^^ ^'^-^-^ ^'^^^'^^cs a day on auch c^^^ 

bettle broke and the li temoeT verp rtnf-o-at!^,^ I^*' i^tum..or.,'i'he 
w«re mibjecteJ tfümt tieaS«1t! "^ "" ^"^ ^^^ '^^^^ mtei^uoo 

by the .er.t.rie. with rli^e ^tt^or w^^e £^^^0^^? T'^ ''f:^''^ ^«^^ 
Ol tho aecka Lewia ^runs load.-d nnd oorinL^^ i ^'^ ^^ blown.At the ends 

-^cimeaa To ahoot.At tlmeo orrioers aau oergeant» 



- 5 • 

MMWult^ tibie vm^Blxie lutemeoB^ gfoshed tbrni hmit thmsi moA in&uXt^A 

or mfor^ at th«e nhilst hlttlng thtci. .1 öooan Gatliollö jiclÄit \m« 
as^im^ läsM»«^ j^^ualiod and ti^t<^ Ixl thXa silEnw« 

d)In tb0 lio^iJUaAiJUo It ^m^ not p0ZT«iio«ible to «mide tlMe^ 

^ ^ 5> 2fei»o VW« ooöD portlioloß at tbe IcltoNm» li) tSie viisiirooas* 

«M In th€i laux^inoa» Är«H03d all tbw^ i^rfcholi^s - inalmliri tliact? 
in liic latrlne^ ^ closelc/ ^aakasl ^x>ui#s ^^Jtnilo stand ti^ijo^i to obtala 
a little frmh alr* At 4 o'clocft: tri the aftenioiäii i^ie&a porttmlea too 
-era al^cjd, a^o alr in tixe latrrtsco.'» rraartars dofiea daeerlpfrion. 
aSi^ecialV ixi 1iio «aalira^ce; r' *a tha j?tcfua trtm the hot p?.lt f^atar 
asoi^ro följai^iad wlth t' -si^lratloia of tfee cx''OTr'?ded lacacr.*. 

6) FTPom Um timt Isii ir g in »crläi Weat Afrlcn to tfea rirst 

troplTO - «bara was fttösh t^tar onljr tawo or tJiraa^tlm^ö a ^wk^ .urli« 
*^Ä? ^*^|^ "- "^-^ Afric^i i^orta ^erc tLhe unc of nalt wnter ^b for- 
blda« oaeau»e of ttie c<?r öf cQ3Bteifc,^ion, thera rmB no ?mtor nt all 
for tue uloimiiie of cxoc^coiv» -^mshln^ or batliljuis - an^. vimt In tkia 

7) Stere waro aii- jrozlsmtely tvro derlei- scatd 1^. 14ie latx^tnas 
ror lb(K) iiiteraeaa« ia tixa conatmit ^trcmia of aalt mxter rljxslr;^ tiuM 
iR^ muöh too Tioleüt^ e Boaber of thc?r>a saata wexa coxi:.trjitly aaaarad 
witb a lölxturt? of mlX mter and es:craö^t3,r-a:a2k5 tH^ uao lru>03ßlbla 
üj xroiit Ol tl7a r«aii^ia« saats quim» 0* aaltizzig »ax woula a^^ßatible 
c^uriii^ ti^e ru:^si2 hoiu'i^, 30 that nature ha^; to öe rclieTctl iii xh-- jfull 
ylov? oiT any iL^j^atieni vdtnenaoe.. Iii acmitloi:. a lax'^e mirt of tiia 
inteia^«!! aufi'aared £nm violent Mar^looaaj- Ic otharö aeaaiöÄrneaa 
took the föm of c^irmlc Xx-i&Xcmtimi. Q^ija^ to tLz riotXon of tibia aoa 
t^a floor of toe latrin^a aaa almgra floof;ad wlt: riow-i^e* Gte Äaya. 

J f::J^2;i^S? ^^^ w^^eb» th© State 0? thc laTst-cy aoolA hsj^ly ba 
4öacrlböa*2b.cro was a oaßu;tmit aortago or lav? toiy üo^er. ttbi ra 
üiore tfcazi ^ chöots rar peraoa. C*^0r impor T;ai> not availr^jlt.,?ie^8- 
"liiere wero forbiducm. 

^4 ^ J^ isaeor^ asid fcOiairiiie utwaUs iy^ul ba« te^ca: atimy.lÄirljQ« the 
firjt flve «Ma eYery«^ «^«t abcut ^th ^^r.kaai^t baarda.flie rwatiiur 
t^Bhm ai3d itehüß war« moct palnrul^aiaae who hnd vmjimod ta reaa 

S^L'^'^i^fLf'l ^^'^^^^^ ol^aM^en, werc thraat«Rad ^ith tfarboiUcer 
a^re ^^*rlval lii Ä^o-cralla tba ©rier tm iTon to roßOTo thc baartlß 
to^lateli'^For tude ^lirposo l raroJr:?. wero dintriDutad a-ton- IhOO 

* T^ ; ) M^iaa»aata woro Tiy aticrt, tliere ^ma not erm a «iffioiant 

a M^i^ or wiiole liour toafure bcln^ lot to a doctor.üo^ beforc sawral 
watta baov olapood taie laca seriouis o^iaao were ueralttaci to alt on 
dec dvurl»^ axurclsie. a^iortl^ boforo arrlT&X iu Äu^j^ralia «a«Äi OTttr 
>4 yaara oi a^e ^mu orij^plö^j wure .jrat.tad abrot aü böur»a re.it In 
iiia fraah alr avoafy da^^* 

IC) IJaln^wltho t miy lu - a tha grtatoQt ^^art of the Izitoi-neaa 




miMoarw w«n m» 



b) wlt^ic^ut ooflib HKS teiirbfuftli 
«saxfol n or boat drlXlo mwm ww CMorrftoci out« 



H 



fltfc«& <mt at nasdoö w w^lmis^timU^ Qt ^i i/öwohö «aartorÄÄ tu 
9»rtimXar ia^Aui« JUx mmw 9B»m Vame MNorohea uj^pa^rtd iKi b# IA10 
Imiaortolnrite mo1»3 Qt i^oaifAtt» in otb^ixii tii^y ww# «rried out ta tlM 

te tä^» tapoop dtcäc® aMmii^finlad by prl'r t^s wltsh ftmad b«:/©nüt» ftca 
«l#tljr bt>s«iii to unfMitcet wrlßtswtdb#»t *-«^ ^^ w«ddJU^ i-ü^^t «»* 
oMurafe fox^ fmXnablMt forotni? llia p^rmmu affaotaA to ie««y «olot i^ 
tb« tfeurocit of Tlolctioo« S«^T<ind Uton^oa. idro bo^tw mi^ cm ther e 

:) Ott tbo fiftb a«^ of tht» TDjmno aU mt^moood «uartorod lo %o 

iios 2 ftroö^ Book w«fo oxaoroa to «0 oß «or^isof nobody wms «illovi'^uA 
to mmmiA bidow# Soamiwi^it« thon » .Mrotioä tb^ wi^ty sm^os witbout 
wltAOMoa tmü took «mur »majimliie vmliiaULoa «od o«^or artloli^, cmm 
el0To>^» ' ^*fö* oto^^;»« ooÄt 110111.0 Wort tomA t© brnv© bo«ri otrii/ od 
o»iEi|«aKi tho amrfififf of Jmokoto tojm out«öia Hn^tr rotuam fwm mmrcUm 
tbo |jutoisri#a& w«ro oomrobod ot tbo «K^treyaoo to tbolr dooiui m:xi 
do^rlv^ of irittt iTow airtloloo tb^ b«ä otlXl ultii tliocs« 

>)Xn vlo«y of tiiliii ^ioavob «Ml 400 . l^rnftimm of tbu lovor Bo#> 
Soik dooidM to oolloot all T^aaULoa am to i^troat tboä to aiä 
offioor f^^ aafo lcooi;i£^^#Ai} offloor dooliuraä blttoolf wll^l li^i; to 00 
tialiB im^i ^WTo bla word of bofioucr an au oiTflaar to loi^k aftor tbmi 
aiiul to roiujm tbaa at Um mi of tbo vaya|^o«Swo oXoa^ anuvaaa oac>a 
flXlaä wiHtk artlaloa waro thorou^'On haaä^ to blsii«^ olibM* tlia \m^u 
npT Ük^ articloo ocmtalaod th^^r^lii^ baTo orar baaa aoaci aualu* 

iäbortly aftar tba artloloo Jk d boar* tltu^; voluiatarll/ ourrofi* 
darod. a ^aarob aiilla tba Ititamaaa vaao on o:%.orolBa «ma mada m thla 
iwd tn^ tt^yor 1^0* > ]>aofct olmllar to that oti tba äuc Jüaoika»i^ tl.la 
aaaaaion artlolot llko tcotbbi^uabaat tootbj^aato^j^araonal lattt^re miü, 
i^otOB^ ülaappoa^aä alon^^alda wltb alMit fouutala y«a«valuablaa«paii-* 

allQ, oto»wara laft ovar» ^ ^ . .^ *. •. ^ / . 

▲ almllar aaanA^ aae al»o wido an tba Itollan I>a^ (Uypar 
Ho ? Sroop !)aüfe) and t*io fiaok oalow whava rafo^aoa wora q^artarod^ 
aa OAo of tha followlnf dayo# ... 

4) rai*aatia wava dapHTod of tbalr wriotaatobaa, wmiiLiJß^'lmx^^ 
aad oihßT artial&a whila on aa^^araliia on daolc«fbay wora oftaa oaarohod 

au tba;^ rotumad fro»& aaareloatOtban wara li^taraw^aa tqr 

toilaa« «ad^lS*!» TWla ralloTod jf m;y i^aroacal-^ v- 

Clatawoaa wbo i^gyc^JW^t»£^. Ät-*^ ^^ ^^ •^^ i?aUv 

daiirl^ 



HliQdi 



guK>vsf ik»«l 



lar aaikt ^^sm daprlr 




'^ 



V.V:<S>U 




.^V\>1 



aartlolaa of talua bllot 



• 7 • 
A^liiC tboir vcarik« 

Othwa mii^« »MuralitA «Ami «i >y wüat to f etofa thulr huitifc» ^ 
th^ «M0i^ digr of th« voya^tii« n^hiiai prot^uts Ktr# utt#r#d or offlaemi 

^} IMurlß« tliM# cMMuroli^fi rall^latui ii;a3miiato» imioki tvttneut« 
vnjr«]r te0lc09 blbIe&»i^lm0lM»jnMii were takwa aw^ or tQxn. Cm 

tbei»0 T00l»€aat69 lüit duxlfi^ «Mete oiT t£i« £t>llowlri|^ uis^%& tix^ wtjra 
8«ftitt Mrri«a «MUT liiy MüSMDit« wd mt mwm ««^ULii« SLiom« oi; tii«^« 

«Dd wlthlja 1dEi0ijif rl^ti^ to swseirii mt «yr tJjim» Col^^ott^ who wma 
ta iteUM of ttio ttlUtaüy an )hmuML 9bX»^ Uiformmi tho do«k; 1 ad«» 
Qt th« IntwmMNi tlmt ho hBA ywooauaiy o«4oroa tbooo ooanaaatlocm. 
aotln^ on W«ur Offloo t&atraotlonot «i^A that mXl 9iP0i,»«rtar woiUtd bo 
roolmraA to labte intosmooo» 

Whon o etotottoiat to «bat offoot um mitelttod ^r «lo e&ck: 
XooAüre» Col.Soott ha« tt rotontoA with tootroatioii» tbmt ho wouUl 
looOk: 1^0 4ook loadom into tho »falp*o prloon oM hond ttiont oroar to 
Idio jliiotvmUoii otttbj.rltloo In immi» If tho reirroo^totlTOO ©feoula 
ufidortoko to ontanit fikrtlor letter^ of thio kliul« 

1) Iho jU.tsmooo h«d boor. offlolAll/ lafona^ In tho iü^lloh 
OMu^o that thi(y «axn i^oft^l ttod to ta o c^C Iba« of lu,^;t^:;aeo ^iUk thott# 
?or ma^a^^ ii^tontoao i^o had to fl^0 from tih« iiiaeia uut of <^üxim3q/. 
ac^llajEul^ ijal^ aja^ thoao oO Iba« of lUigifa^o ooi^atltutad jaoarl^ all 

t) Osi hoardUo« Hau?«*'IXmajra«* thir IntoanuHM woro doi^rlTod oa 
tiiolr ontlro laavaffo for tho duratlo ^ of tho ?OjratfO«hopoatoüi ai^yli» 
aatlono to offloara to ratuLm to tho» at X^^at onall ha&ä lut^o^o» ov 
tofomtt thiM to^toka ao oaooar laa öut of tholr twaatait ^^^ rofuöau. 
Uro» tho Vary b a gtonln g of tho Jouraor tho tuto^aiaoe aaw thair trMfiQ 
thrcMi into oaroioaa jolloa on th# opon dooko« m@ truislca bad boor. 
forood op^m» «oot of %tkm had boom oXaohod ogm wl.4a bayor.oto. tho 
ooDt Äta rauaaokod awro partXj^ l/la« ahout a dook. nxui iJs^i^rWt 
doeuMiito» o« :«imana9i& l^aali^ration pai^oro^ uraro biowi about tha dook 
aad liito tho aoa# 7ha ooiatoRte of aany aaaao ! ' m %iy od, out 
at «WDL^ooa fmd fatli^o i;^artioo of lütomoaa had to aXoar u^ tho hoay 
ahloh had t^^mx ocKpoood to uoa »»n^ and aralxi# Slalom oporilJr 
poekotod artlolaa flron tl^at hoap» 

Xiat«r tho boloii«lii40 wora takon tnto a Xaeeasa rooa whlah 
awit hovaror» noiläiar lookod cor o. 1 1^« I^urlni^i tho o&itlro roj^m vy 
to tl'.o flrat AoatraXlaiä port isiortroatito aad yriv&tao woro a^^in and 
a^in oooiä tliöji^ onar^'O^ fruia Uio Xui^^aeo roo». locidod wlth alX 
kiiido of obJaot^«Xt aXoo attraotad attantioti th&t ^^oraoaiat» wero 
aaddio^iV writia^ wlth aanvOCi^olTe fowitaln y^möt «u^- that a lVi^oi\?rltor 
haXa^t^l^ to an li to3?n«»o waa ooaa lu tha Ordorl/ e^cmd« 




•< .0^' 



I'aS' 



>*«af 



^^1-3 v 



M>"V'ff \iffk 




^u\uvuuj<.u\ (^au:b' *^v. 



btiJioi» HI2 «VlEZiA iM£ Ki;i^:r 



MO' »n\^c^«uv 




A^- 



,^ VvV^^V 



^ 



^-rVX^S 



:^ 



'^^^^n^^ 



vv;\vvi%i 



■>\>:r^:.<A^\ 



o 



• Co 

3> ■■OlH—itn «bA aftiMl izuBttrunoDta w«r« takOB froe ^e luäfia«« 
©f ifitoSiST«? Sir« IdMy wmf9 ncli thrwA overboftjpd, oitlcinl^jr 

fvw Hl 1» «Off««*««» 2b« ly.temw» wfttÄ«* to äo ttol »vmlouo t^« 

Sek^sM» «r «tli«r «iM&aJlz^ M««rtsl »sii« it l«irM»tlTe to aoMpt 
•Ad. vlMM of «Oft» takra out of om»4MI* ,, ^^ 

^) iai«i Hm liiiMiiri ««£$ rotena«d lu ta» AuatraliaB aMiii»»lt was 

l) that thö eontects of 8M»at oaaa« haA k««a «lUniUjr JU t«JP» 
o) that HasAl^ aiaythla« «f vaäu« baA raaaiaaA && ai^ ax tu« 

tcllat utenails« wbA «iuaußtltlaa oif «biliar ifftmim wäre niiutu«; 

e) that a om t' ©raöla aanbur of tmyovtim% «bä irareylaoaaö»« 

dMOMBtS »-«M Biselt 



f) that a £wl}«r of ivunka anA aaltoa««a haA AiaaypoaMA 

tlrolüf « 

«s) tbat aam§ oaeua i^talnoil eiaxiOy «Ixadi airtiOleB la a bo; 
•tat« not Mlon€;iB€ to ttt« mmw of ttua eae«, tbe «hole of tb lir 
ori^ituO. 9oat«ito b«iB loßt« 

i'imiumliitk 



F'OK tli« utsot ouv Btatua al>oa A «b« "DiiBeva" i«a» t:L!U4oflae&* ^* 
olAisro «KuMMiaA tt« WXl«f tbat w« w«r« pasaoliutlät« oir»iB any oaa« 
■ riöeß«r« of »«r*fh« tr«atw»t A«at out «•• ••••»**««jj'^*«f^.^ 

to Hat«» tom« latomaos« rayroBautatlTo« awmt tlio «anjr mraat» 
^üc IwAlly imnltilaMBta 4<^t out iztdleorlmjumtaly ttjr i.U*0.*8 aao. eea 
«I «Toiy oooaalou.OjRier» «v ovttry kisA war« «Ivan t« tfte aooottjanlaoat 
S loISA^m«. ilth üayan«l» flxad. iüokü aaä hit» wlti rlia«-butt« 
«re a Aaftlr ooourtmoe.iuoy attwipt t& 8«ak: r«oour»o «aa xoufilOjr frusi- 
»•t«A.airalifiiit»*»% roaMB taa» eoou «ough to vrot«c« »««Jf^* «b 
th« «pot tjy 8«iityl»B altäijMit ««^ iKVostlt^tlöB er obatio« «i roArose, 
fhm «lAovir li toma««. enA ti^os« «tte fiaA i^oc« tturowAi tho aoTor« 
tvoatMOt at ttuT lunA« ol üaKi a6'«»to in u«jnfian ooneaalmtlon otuatrs 
b«f«r« th« iMiA founA roftt«« in JäüiO^Ä,»«««!»« oo 4««i»onctcat that to^ 
hia awar *«i«vor a ur^iforn eaao iato wlt^t, yartloüdartjr in yorte of 

•«•alMit th« n«ct aiMMBt aid^t brln«. «h« brutaXity of «^iannora auA 
aoHMAa £i8i>lny«A aaa mMb that taUc «f aoloiA« «<as «nnraftt« tmö. &ß Iw 
jSSmimio iJSm«« «*w« thlj^jjay out.a« «Jt^^f »t^ülü^^^iS! 

«•at. aroduoefl sn alMaaoh«»» «f f«arf^ a»ipr«aocc<ioB,int«««ifl«Ä by 
1h« MULiLg of utter h«l»]L»a(m«aa at th« aar«/ of unifomoA vwrmaa' 
tatiTMOr a «ountzy whieK haa h«n«lf siT«n th« int« ««•■ nfv€» froa 
th« vro»«outioa of Hi« ««»ia« «aA t« «tun ttietr XoyaXtjr h«A bo«B vroved 
in mir« than aa« >>ajr*liiy »rol«sta aaA« to offloon aaA a«n oa th« 



• 9 - 

Ums of att«föf teä amim fPban a tlaaa af raup iviilali bad h^mi w»api>ad 
avowuS a Qtael'-' oac^isixl lamp trumln/^ all nli^t to irrotaat tba 
al^opara from tbu ooatlnao^ui ^lara etart^d mifn^ldarixi^« It was 
«uJLcidy j^ullod üomk aod ^^atar levae »«mrad ovar It Iqr tha liiternda« 
idiia alayt l>6äaeath lt»tmt tl&a iwi«t«it &mull «itiumatal tba aatitrytia 
SBTaatli,atlor. wa^ b^^M aiää tha feuumlaa8iiaii£i of tho oaaa qul<Atly 
aatabllahad to tho aatlaflactloß of tha Conna&&ar«üairartli€iXd80|i cao 
Ictimaao naa put Into tbu ^ihlj^^a i^riöon for oao iii«^t aim aca i»raaa 
i*Ofoarts lii AaatraXia latar Qj^olca of aa attwu^t to aat flra t^ tha 
ahlp« Wo wora aoouaoA of attaavtoä matJUi/ alnoat all tkk& tiaiOt 
altitio^i^Üi IMI Offort aaa ayamril on tho iMirt of tHo Aook loadara ( l#o« 
tbe Intofttooa« MpirosaatatlYaa) to jcaidi^ pooplo oalia aud to aTQi4 
'äila^ lAdcäi tti«^t b^To l>o«zi tutorprotoä aa aa aot of provotetiokü« 



apoolal iJEt taiUMO of lll«»trorttMiat ooti bo oltod tbo 
follovliosi 

1) Surin^ tSia «xarolaoa Um liitamooa w«ro ifasllx§A bgr offloara. 
aavvaanta aod filtati^i baat«eig äxtrm, aloix0 wlth tho batts of rlfloa 
aiid otixorwi&e lll^tre! tod 

2} Dvuriair »M^MliM anA ooafiaoatloiaa of all idzs&a intomooa woro 
%fmtaa and 01:1 a«»o oooaBlona atabbad wlth baj^oi^ot«« 

>) I>ari&e JQlOi^pti^^.tion^ i^.bout ocnflaoatod Taluabloe tbo daok loa» 
ders voxn Hiroataaad wlth tho bmikar and iaroiiB 

4} Gblaf Babbl Xr« iluraatreu abo had writtmx t») tha Conaacter In 
a roll^rious s^tt«r^ waa iwmiMt by Lt» C^fiolll täiat ba vo\a<d hazi« Lim 
at t^io «aatj avrlxie' bim Iqr bis boaxd round tixo saatytbrow htm oror» 
board &nä tba llko# 

>} v^an a ao«»OQllod £^poon moaaaco bad boect fouzid» tbo interne ea 
wnra throat^od wltlx the aurtaUtt^nt of food and II^kI t,milooa tlM 
parscn raaponalbla cmifaaaad* 

6} Slmilar atai^a voro araiounaod abaa It aaa allot^aa tbat aomo 
^HnlTM ba£ Taaiabod from tbo kitobtai« 

7)2h(ro Intaxiaooa nbo bad baan fo\ma out of bouiida woro tlcid to 
m poot }xy Lt« C<£ioill ^b. waa appavantl;^ In a atato of unuaJcoiiXiasa » 
Inaultod wltb woxda aaob aa "^Gamian Jowlab ciwlno"| ^oona of iiroman 
do^**t and ono of 1fei«a aa^ boataic^ untll be blöd» bis aerocima of pala 
oould bo board tmm afSr» 

b) An Intomaa abo aaa kapt In Maapltal on aaoount of aantal 
dlaoaaa and wbo attaaiatad to loaTo tbo obip at Malboamatin aa abaurd 
diaguiooi aaa Bialtroated by aano aarig^aenta in tba aeat brutal aannor 
laailsablo and lupat^i on^onsolauo. Uis bloodstalnod obirt «aa aboan by 
Capt« Burton tc Golir Soott« "^ 



ad 1#10) j|aln^ witbout an/ To^isa^^o» üae groatoat part of tba IntatioMi 
bad to pajw tbxoud^ tho troi^loa aa followa: 



•^^^ » 



HV'lE' 



i.",«*''»! k*si 



- 10 • 



»> wlthout teoth^nuA mA -past« 



^l «^5"?^^, ««ab «Ki jhtalrteuah 



to «T«xy ^o wm. «um «r tvi«« a «Sk * ***•• *' *••» *■• i«»«ad 

4»»^« ' '?? ••*»¥! thottt tevalst latar «vazv iß ««>- - ^ 

tawal» «»■tly orlÄimtluff out of oyaoM nTSM^««« ^J^+T^?*!^ *^« 

■*•«-*> ~- »--- ^ ^?*** *** ■■••»• ■OBti? with tatharad. aalaa a& 



tix0 latrtEe;: ^ ^^ "*• ••■*«•• «»▼«*ß« 



SÄ »5 «c » « »st «m «r »■ ae » «16 «R «: «,4Bn»fc|p| 



fiaf* >/lM/X, 



°"iS» f£ ^.5*ö*^ CoaaaiaaUiiar 



Cr«&tlaa«ig 



Z He te a<äaie»la<«a Iha raealpt of your lattar of 
ma 2»A Daeamlior autelttiu« . raport and a»,«Äiaaa wgarÄl»« 
>«««litlon. »rafalllim «» iiai.f. .puBm- fiurin« th« i*aaa«a 
ftw« ita«b»d t^ äxxatnlU U Sci»t«ikar last. 

X M iMrtti taly «nmnl0oin£ tbaao &a«ua«ita to ^ 
fiaraaiaoBt fte ttelr attmtioß. 



( 



Tours Äliiifuli^, 
.) äaaffwy naaaaaM 
UJb CoibUiiaeloaax-» 



\ö^ 






^VXM« HI2 MV1E21A IHS; Kn><^ 



'11 






»•XVtlf Mll 



wt^i^vw^ ^^^^M<S^ ^^^^^ Ü\H^\\*-^'^v *>3^^vc\v\ 



\ 



\ 



^\ 



Kou ^jCt^ 



Campspolcesiaan, Camp 8. 
Eastern Command. 



V 



STATMKITT Qg EVMTS DURING PUR PASSAGE OK BQAED H.M.T.^DUHBRAJ 



^na 



We have refrained up to now from desoribing aur treatment on 
'board H.M.ll.wmmera* as we were afraid tliat these facts might "be used 
for eneiny Propaganda. We are now - J months after oxir arrival-glving 
this Statement for the use of the aathorities only and it is aur wish 
that If the authorlties should think that the treatment of these facta 
during the war might prove dctrlmental this Statement should not be 
regarded as a oomplaint "but that the matter should rest» 

fhe Intemees on board H.MtT^^Banera'' were oomposed of 2 
dlfferent oategorles^altogether approx* 2730 in number, 2288 were 
political or raci»al refugees many of whom had gone through the 
hardahips of the German concentration camps and all of them are the 
"bitteres t enemies of KaÄidom. All of us in this osunp belong to this 
mtegory^We passed the Aliens Tribunals and after careful examination 
oad l>een exempted from intemment.However^in l^lay and June 1940, the 
jolity of the Home Office towards us changed and we were Interned 
when a» a consequence of the unexpected events in Surope, a general 
rounaing up of all enemy aliens, ineluding refugees, was decided upon. 
On July 10, i.e. shortly before the poliey of the Home Offiee reversÄd 
In our fayour again, we were sent from our respective eamps OTerseaa. 



These 2288 men oame from the following British Inte 

1 • Prom Huy ton near Liverpool i 1 ^c men 

2. From Central Camp Douglas lOM. 2S0 

3. Prom Onohan Camp lOM* 3 50 

4. From Ramsay Carap lOM. 2^0 

5. From Lingfield 308 

Total 2288 



mneit oamp 



n 

IT 



men# 

The other category were 444 persons, of whom 200 were Italian 
intei-nees and 244 were German» Intemees who had already ander special 
internraent Orders been detained for some time previous to the general 
-internment order ( class »A«* enemy aliens) Of the?}e 244 Germans the 
majority were TTa^is or German sympathisers. 

In our respective camps we had been inforraed that we were 
allowed to take with us a certain amount of luggags.Therefore, most of 
US had with them suoh equipraent aS would seinre them for t?ie voyage and 
for internment overseas. LIany of those refugees who did not possess 
a permanent home and therefore no opportunity of leaving thelr proper- 
in a safe ousfcody somewhere had with them all their property they 
had saved. 



earried 



.SbLO, search of pers ona on the nl«f^ht of >Jmbarkatio n. 
This aearch eaused a severe shoolc to our minds. It was 
out in a reckless manner, valuables and other artioles bein^ 
seiJted^no lists of any kind being made nor reaeipts given.The articles 
thua taken were throvm together india er iminately.lt would have been 
impossible afterwards to identify the owners, even if an atterapt had 
eventually been made with a view to restoring these articles. Worst of 
all, this search was oarried out with brutal foroe.The refugees from 
Huyton €uid Lingfield were searched by several If.C.O's in the presenoe 
of Lt^O^Neill when they passed a small bridge to board H.M.T."I)uneraa 



- 2. - 

On this oocaBlon paroels. blanViaf« n«<>«.o.».^_ ^ , 
wer« selzed, the Peekets e^tled^^?t I- ?h!'-^t°^?* *®'' «*<»• 
sorae oases, the whole contents we^Tt^f« T^ **^L?***^*I^*=' and in 
were selzel, but also documJnta waiiS^ f^f^y-^®* ^^^ ifäLxiables 
tacles.foxm^alü pens, tSu^rSkcleJ ;«no^?,''*''''?*'?•'''^^^°«'«P«®- 
set of falae teeth. Most o? thraJtfßlprwfH It,^'''^ ^ °^^ ö^® a 
the brldge. some vere in ö,,^Lff ®L^®^® thrown ou a heap oa 

Bome w^e%ut by tirierSa^S fn^^^v *t *^'''^ ^^^ ^^ water, aM 

iB 58T?ars of age Ld wS caSw Se tJoiS^KJS Chlmeclci.H; 
ted out to the soldier conoern^ +f-r^^^ ^ n^ ^^^ ®°^ ^^ P0ln4 

Instrument sfcould be VeDt rt^-i .?^^ essentlal that the valuable 

knocked his foot wi?h the bS^ o? m^^°?^°''® °^J^^ soldiers 

Violin f-romhiffi a^fLt: O.JSll ished h2*'«S^f''*S.2?" *°^« *^« 
ecene are^Mr. Chlujaeckl's son p?«^ t ^ . alfng. Witnessen of this 

^vror hie fcot occuJerand'hiB^na'iis Sere^o?nf °^ "'' '^^°^'- *^ 



all 



Aftdecks respeetirely. The a««rnwf«*?f leading to the Pore-and 

to our persons are eaaoeSed As^S^-f^ property and the vioienoe 
öfflcer was present.S?sf ^e^«^ir^^°^.°'' *^^ Poredeek an ^"* 

The refugees fron the Isle of Man wer« «irni««+=^ +^ 

more thorough search at which no oSioirw^a^iJell^t ^h^^'Ä*^ ."^f 
oeen taken down ta -fViÄT-y» -r.^ow^^o.j ^«'»x waa preseiix ^^^nen tney had 

de«o.lbed werru3:d*aSLf Sose'Jho'Slerto «i'i^**"^'"^ ^^^^^ 
pre threatened wlth riSes or WtL, o,!o • «^qjlaln or remonetrate 

22nd. to Mr. Binford Kol7i^ »>,?«? v®"®^ ^° °^^^ lecfcer of jfoy. 
of whioh we Inclos? co?y. • ^°^ ^""^^ Particulars are given aZd 

We ^0? ^\cc'o^odStfJn ^l/siJefiJf SJ^e'^ff '^.^\* "°^ ^° ^^^- »«r- 
in qyarters wlthout lavatories wSf*not fii^L^J^^" "^^^^ aooomodatT 
use the Uvatories. As we had^IJJ wJltW p«!*^ *? ^*' !° ^««'^ *» 
Pier almost ererybody ur^entlv"np«rif? *r^ for a long tiae on tha 

our man aucoeeded iS^bSSSS ffeJ buokJ^M^ÄxJ^«^ ?? ^ *«^ o^ 
to orerflowing within a ahort^L; Lid aSlJd Se f?t^ "^ "^''^ ^^ 




^' •^Shis^'s'^thl rth^^h^"" ^^J'^^ -öeeply ^rieved. 
inis v.as the first nlf^ht on board H.M.T.-Dunera'», 



hyg:ien: 



li 



rMaT^^Duinp r^rr^ 



bad. It il therefore no Sondfr f-Snf 1?^? eonditioM were extreaely 

last period ©f the vova^P^,^ +n ^ön ^^»^^ «ui<i «lat diirlng the 
while^aany mSre »ach JaÜents L'n? ^«f^"^ ""^^^ Itocpital-patlenta 

aiere x^ere among ua mamr old änd yJS2 iL^JL niaxlmum capacity. 
men who coald nft staM^thrcSdi?Zf J^evaSfiS^f JJaM?' "'"* 

sleep on or ondSr ?aSeBra?pS?t!h;ies''f-^hi^T?**^ ^^*^^ *«» 
sed and our rooms were lit L??^,^^^ v,^ ^® ^^"^* ''®^^ ^s^* o2.o- 
artlficial light. ^ *^® ^^°^^ ^°y^« «^^ ^y 

were.of ooär/e. ine vi table ^fÄ ^^tween bhese two partlea 

so thafieXd'^lotS? ISffa%e°^?e'oftff/r "^* ^'^^«^--«^ ^o -oh 
oal and ©ther cllaatel S.ni^tlfLLr^^ 1 ''®!^ throug*. tropi- 
such as aoap, toothbrushes Soth ««.S® mos t primitive neoesaitlee 
olothcB as we werHSlly wearlS? Frin, ti«^*^!«''^*^ °^^ "^^^ 

had to walk about half-naied^J.J?| ^^^ Si^^iS^L^ffaXä^t, 
, very"bld%^Jp^isny''aniJ?; "^f*^ *^^'^ oiroumstanoes cf oo^or.« 

Who suffered especlalfy l^om lacf S ai?^ dSJ! ^'''''^^^^^"^^""^ 

Tfae condltlons of the tollet*^ ^nri 1«,^«^^ a 
tory. particularly those ol Se aftdSj S^t.^^'^..^'■e ^^^^^«^»0- 
had no toilets or lavatoriea at t^^ t^^\^ J^ aitdeok one part 
Txirter wanted tö usla fa?^toJr th^ h«f f^ interneea of thie 
on deck leading to the othl? m^^i-«^^-.^^'^ ^° ^^-^ '^ ^"^^11 t'aagway 
the total of ^fo men Ind thref^f If: SiiL^^^» '^ toileta^fof^ 
nrinal of afoat 2 -3 yards aSI ?- ^^v,^ H^*^ ''"'® """^^ °^ U8e,one 
were out of ase while tS rSi^derho^''^^f "^ ^^^''^ «everal'w««« 

laundry and dish-cleinS|. S^S |ere al^« J^h^"^ ^°'' ^^^ahingT^ 
were in use. All thls was in a reo« «/oh ° l f^o^ers.of which *Y 
morning we had to queue up fo? JbSSt fo S ^? "J® y*^^«' ^ ^^e 
eould wash or dean our aiah^a *^^.^ ?v.' l^ minutea before we 
»ddltional urinal was Latalled L^Lv^f toiieta.Later on an 
tloned Passage sltuJt«£ bj^len ?he ?Jo^Jr?^* •? ^^ abOTo-men- 
plaoe where we could ^et fresh oi^ 1^,^^ luartera i.e. at our only 



1 



- 4 - 

This opcn-air passage was during the day-tlme always overorowded 
and It wae so limited in apaee that we had togo up in toatche« 
of flfty to haTe fifteen miimtes of fresh air. 

Purlng the earlier part ©f our voyage we were not alowed at 
night to use the above mentloned gangway to the IsTatories^One of 
our fellow-intemees^iäir» P» Fl:^ess who ©ne night was suff erlüg from 
diarrhoea and endearouring to reaeh the laratcry liy meane of the 
gangway mentloned, was stabbed through the barbed wire with a bayonet 
intO hiß stomach. When the soldier trled to stabb him a second time, 
he avoided farther injury only by imnediately jumpiiig to his foet 
and escaping into the lavatory. He was taken to the hospital on a 
streteher bleeding badly. 2he Medical Offioer foiLrid that a muscle 
in the abdomen was pieroed but luci:ily the stomaeh was not hurt. 

In the coaree of the voyage the conditions were improved in bo 
_ar, as the already-mentioned air-passage was enlarged so as to 
hold abo^at 200 nen and we also received some small pieces of soap 
at rare intervals Bn& v/ere handed some towels taken from own (»es, 
A few of our fellow-internees received from the Medical Officer the 
pemissiOG to sleep on deck as they were iinable to stand the atrao- 
sphere within. jü ot^ri that and ing this permission they were on several 
ocoaoions driven below by the gaards. One of theia,]Six# S« ^iimmer^ 
56 years of age> was on such an occaslon badly beaten, pushed against 
the barbed wire and thrown downstairs. 

In conseguence of the lack of cleaning and washing facilitles 
many skln- llseases 11*^^6 impetigo^furunctilosis, etc. occured» But 
much worse were the hf^p.Yy cases of dlarrhoeas from which only a ßmall 
percentage escaped.Probably the poor ctnality of the food was respon- 
elble for It^ The qiiality ©f food which at the begirming was satls- 
factory deteriorated in the course of the Journey, Our food consisted 
mainly' ol froren meat and tin preserves« Onoe a week we got an apple« 
The bread was not suffioiently done and tho imt frequently of dubious 
guality.In consegusnee of the guality of the food and the heavy 
diarrhoea roost of us lost strikingly in weight. 

Our trertment» 

But much more thsn from the privations mentloned we suffered fron 
the harsh treatment we reveived and from the humiliatlon we had to 
go through* It was a daily occurence that some of us were insulted 
or pushed and threatened. We have to quote some inst?^nces as it 
seems so unprobable that thone things should have happened on an 
English ship, 

E.G. After some days we v/ere allowed a daily exerclse of about 
15 minutes. Buring those exercises we were pushed by some of tho mon 
shouted at and asked to run. Some of the older intemees who could 
not run threatened. After some time an order was given to the effeot 
that we oould take part in those exeroiaes only bare- footed.From 



- 5 - 

then on many of the refugees dld not take part In tJie exeroise any 
longer. We should like to mentlon here the followlng oase: The refu« 
gee ^Ifred Landauer saw while running in f ile during such an exer- 
oise, a Sergeant swing and throw an empty beer bettle in his direo- 
tion calling out "(ret on you bl...» buggers« ü!he bottle brolce on 
the floor and Landauer cut his feet and the same happened to some 



of 



the men behind hiin,who could not stop. 



Ifeny other instances of ill-treatment occured. jiaiia Xx'Qiibsrgex, 
19 year» of age, wa'^J together with aiiother boy sent to tha buniker 
because of a rxiisnmderstanding and after aj^e^ hours released. His 
hands as well as thoae of the other boy '•vere tied together Tery 
tightly their position back bo bac>,Lt. OTOeill^who came into the 
boii'Scer boxed Zronbarger into the faoe with his fist and cä.led hlm 
n^jnes. He pretended to strangle the boyg and tied a rope around 
their neoks. \Vhen the boya were released the marks of the treatment 
receivod r/ere ':jyid8nt and they made a Statement before the Medical 
Officer. ^j^ Rpbert Crotey was, on a denunoiation which proved to 
be mi!5tak€:n,t9.1cen to the cells.He was Dushed down the stairs and 
kicked by Sergeant Holliwell in the presenoe of Lt.O'Neill^who 
ßtood Ijy in the cell. Sergeant Holliwell hit him with his fist three 
times 1^.1 the face ?„nd oalled him names, also in the presence of 
Lt. G^Heill.He was kept in the bunker for some days withont his case 
belüg heard or examined in any way. - Wg'mer Heller who during a 
night ha* put a towel over the artificial light caused thereby a 
fire whicn was easily extinguished.lt was a very cold night, he was 
pulled on deck, dressed only in pants and knocked the whole way with 
rifle butts. He was called names and taken to the bunker. The next 
morning he was released.- Waldemar I'ckfeld is saffering from some 
sort *f mental disturbanoe'and since cur arrival in Australia has 
been kept in/i hörne. When the '»Bunera'* was at Melbourne, he went 
to the room of an offioer, shaved his ohin, leaving the remain^er 
of his beard urtouoherl, chane^ed his olothes for uniform and left 
the ship by a port hole. When emerging from the hole he was caught 
and brought bsok. Ee was Struck many blows in the face so that he 
sustained a fracture of his nasal bone, and swellings over his^hole 
face BTö one tooth was knocked out. He had afterwards to be taken to 
the ships» hospital. 

In none of these cases did the Commanding Officer grant us any 
protection nor were any of the responsible officers or men repriman- 
ded. Some milder form of ill- treatment and bad langaage were dayly 
occurenoes. Cur despair was great. jTakob Weiss committed suicide by 
jumplng overboard. He was particulariy depreäsed because his -oass- 
port, which oontained his Argentine Visa had been tcrn and thrown 
into the water during the searoh on the first night. 

S^Q dwa^-Q inflicted pur luir^age. 



We have given partioulars of this damagc in the letter to Mr. 
Binford Hole, to which letter we beg to refer in this connection 
again. Höre we should like to point out, that the way in which our 



• 6 • 
proper ty was treated made us feel as outlaws. As we had already losb 
the bulk of our property in aermany this was for some of us all they 
nad aaved. But more than the material loss was the anxiety and the 
alarm caused in oonnection with it» 

On the se-cond day we had to discorer that our cases were forced 
open ana looted. We could see from hehind the barhed wire that parta 
of the oontents of our csses were dispersed over the deck. Our com- 
plaint we tried to bring before the Commandant remained unanswered 
when on the 49« 10 th and resp.lith day our deckleaders were allowed 
to see hira, hls harrangue was disheartenin^. We are attachin^ the 
Contents of these two harran^-ues aocording'^to the notes of our deofe- 
leaders and we are also enolosing copiea of two letters thev have 
written to the Cominandant. 

After some days of our voyage apparently aji order was ^-iyen to %h 
the eiieot i;iiat our cacos had to be openeä and searched. "hey were 
xhen gradually taken to the störe room below deck. This störe room 
4^as accesöible through the hocpital and the hospital uatients fre- 
quently observed. that e^ome of the J^l.C.O's left the storeroom with 
paroclß^ii.hen we had heard that all our cases were beln^ opened the 
deckleaders of the Fore a}.iä Aftdeck offered the Commandant that -/e 
should be wxlling to assist at the openin^ of our cases, but we recdi- 
Ved no r^ply to this offer* 



s 



^ 



Aaotxier illconsiderea measure was the confisca-fcion from onrhs^e 
KO.& re-distrlbution araonp -as of laundi-y.r.hoes and clothirg v'Viich 
the GomEiarLdant aDparently thought iiecsösary for us for th*> jou-nev 
A conaiaürable araoimt of oig btmdles was allotted to everv deck bfit 
as we dil not waat to deprive our own comradea of thelr 4opertv we 
refused to distril)nte theae goods ainong our feliow-lnteraees. 

...fl!'"^'®? ;^l^2 . ■'■^°^. °t equlpment bbcame more and more taibearable the 

cases 80 tnat thejr ooulö take therefrom the niost necessarv utenöila 
Jut no socner had the first 23 siaitcaees been broujht oii Lcrnnd 
their reapeotive owners fetched them.Cpt. Colle stop-ed this aotion. 

As raentioned in the letter to 24r. Binford Hole several more eene 
ral ssarchea tooic place m the course of the vovaf-eTötill m5r<» 
depressinfe- were the iiidlvidual searches whi^h aevSr entirely ceaaed 
If the orpreaaxon "search" can be applied to auch acta: FroJ ??me 
to time, some of the J^.C.O's would aearch oui- pookets at daytS 
e.g.on the occasions of the daily exeroise. Also one or morV ' 
H.C.O's woala come at night Into ovj: quarters and search our pocketa 
for any valuables left. In three such cases whicd hauDenpA in i-vT» 
hospital. the Meriical Sergeant interrened^d succeederS resSin^ 
the property to the respective ovmers. A rather strikinc c»3.a«^a +^^4- 

iVWtT". ^-'^ ^r^-.^l*^« \2'^ night%f ' Ja? ^vJJagf at'^out^^' 
^Ix^ two solaiers entered the deck where he was sleeoin^. He slf.T>t 
with_hi3irlng^he solaier woke him up and asLd f of Sf rVn/ ^ 

retched on which he was v/earin« a gol3:en~ii^E?t^' 




e yomig man exiilained that he was luiable to take tlieHn<^ off hl- 
finger.'JJhereupon the soldier became angri^took him to the lavatory^ 



- 7 - 
and by UBjLng water and soap finally got the ring off the flnger.Ihiring 
this procedure he injured the finger and Roth had to report the follo- 
wing day to hospital. Wlien the Medical Officer bandaged the finger, he 
asked for an exnlanation as to the cause of this injury.Later on he 
iiifonned one of* our Doctors, Dr. Schatzki^that he had made a report 
on this matter. 

We had to he caiitioas in our representotions conoeming the tiÄt- 
iDcnt of our property ab is proved by the treatnient of Dr. K.C.Fleischer 
One of tho refageen had on the occasion of the first searoh boen de- 
privsd of a mrticularly valuable platinum watoh decorated v/ith 
preoious nt4nes. !)?• Fleischer v/ho had witnessed the scene miqfa. writ- 
ten Statement to tte Gcirir.andant and later on identif ied the Corporal 
who had been respon^ible.Thereupon the Corporal and a police serg«ant 
oame to see Lr. ^'leiBoher and threatened him with the v/orc'.c " iou will 
be in for io". Pr. Fleischer informed Cpt. Robertson v/ho promised him 
his aöBifcitance. In the aftemoon of the same day the regimental. Ser- 
gG^t Mai er, a Police bergeant and a difxerent Corpral cane to see 
"O^^ij'leiö eher. The i^.C.ö's seized hiin at the collar, dragged him from 
the meSB to the empty eramination room of the hospital and tried to 
persuade hin to direct a Charge for the robbery against this particu- 
lar Coro oral, althou^h he ^ras unknowi to Lr. Fl eis eher. Dr. FleisciaBr 
refiised^and was thereupon agaln threatened by tiie police Serej^ftBat» 
A weeS: ?.ater, Dr. Flei^ohor was called before the CoiTTnarclir.g Officer 
who deciared in the -or.»esenoe o*? his adjutant and the regimental Ser^ 
geant Ivlajor that he coulc not insti-bute proceedir:i:s a^Birst the Corpo- 
ral as he had denied the Charge ^nd it vvould otherwise amount to 
believing the vrords of an enomy allen instead of a British soldier« 
The Gorsmandtng officer enö.eö. by naying that he diu not ^'xsh xo be 
bombarded by intemee? with letters " regü^rdin^- their alle^ed property" 
and that he could not act as an amateur detective to find out which 
artioles bc=5lorged to thenn. The fcllowing day., £: Lt. infomod Dr. Flei- 
scher that he had managed to f5nd a platinur.i vvatch which was then 
miioi!^ to and identified by the ov/ner. 



VVe should like to mention that during the mcnth of August the 
hMpj tal was deciared out of bounds for the ecldiers^probably at the 
lP»vanoe of the Medical Officer, after seyeral refugees had there been 
w searched" by IM .0.0 's and axter some other hcVd of viclence had 
happendd. 



In View of the continous insecarity to v/hich oar property v/as 
exposed we were advised by Lt. Mallaney and Lt. Ti'aning of tha Fora 
and Aftdeck to hand over any valuables still in our possession to 
officers for safe custody. The intemees cf cne rooms eaoh jf the two 
deoks followed this adviae and handed over their valuables in a sack 
respectively. These valuables too have not been restored to as.nor 
any of the others. Later we leamed that Lt. Tinning had put the one 
sack Into his cabin but that a Sergeant who had seen the s^ck there 
had fetched it with a written order of the Comiiianding Officer. 

X^xStructions to oolicitor . 

By our letter of Eovember ?^?. nd. we iiistracted a solicitor to aot 
on our behalf as we are afraid that under the Public Authority Act 
the period of limitation for our Claims for darnages raight be only 
6 raonths, the more so as for many of our fellow-intemoes this Claim 



rlTÄÄ-Ä? SMrÄrÄ ^^^J^" 

a ssttlaaeat if poueltle. 

On the T th September we arrlved ^^f^S^Äe'-Sie^^ «a«, 
leaYing 1ii. deofe. ^ ^^^^ 

aua men were well-ciisposed «^^ /tjey Sre not in a poaition to help 

«r er tüey rlrhed. »•^' »^«^^^^^StBon aSo to Lt. llallaney and 
n'^^'<rfir Lt. Brooks and Cpt. Ro^«Tn°^V^w officers anä men of *h 
IJt! Stanley { R.A.^^-.C) ^^^° J^^f tJefrs^^patoles.lnd we do i* 
tf dc^not ^ow the namee ^^«^^1x0 mltrSU us dld not act 
S^:c:frlJor^i?firenx^'B?Sish Tradition. 



OBl 






; 



? ' ^ /QU/ 




/ 



/# 



*' No ordinary czcusa, sucb 3.s t'-^av. tbe re is 
3 -./^ir on and thet offioials ar-e over.'^/orkecl ^ 
i s s u f f 1 c i 'J n t t o 2 x p ]. a i n 'rr h a t h a s h a p r>e na d 
. , Ho rriDlo tragadies, un^ecx^ssary and 
ij nde s r^' e d , IIa a t '"che d o o -r o f s o '^'-d :: o d y . . . , 
Frankly, I shall not T e ;r 1 b'-^ppy, 3itbor as 
an Engli sbr^an or as a supporter of t'iis Go-- 
v-jrnr.ent, until tbis- be spat ':e r:.''^ P^ß^ of ovcr- 
b i s 1 vv h a s oe z ^^' c la a n^ ö n p a nd rew ri t te n ' ' . 

AJOR CAZALj:T, i'^ tbe Boust? of Cv'-r.ons, 

August 2? , 1940. • 



i^:i- APVx^AL FOF JUSTICE Al^D Hb 



"TT^,^ 



In tb^:;5^e days of /lav 1^^41, RIOO ?-".^fuge-^s fro^ ; 
■'%'s.'.i opni:»essio.n;, intsr^ed in G-neat Britain and tpa'-":;sferped to : 
-.ustnaiia, ,sae nat^':^'3 tic '^ll^/ pa^s tbe first a.n^ivj rsar^v of t^elr 



•i --I T ■" -y- ■'' "^ P "n ' 



Gucb a dav gives us tbe pigbt to raise our voioes 
^"d to :;:aks tban: baapd, even if tbey are bound to be f.Unt. Tbis 
occasion oy its^lf fully .iustifies our plea for Justice and 

. n ■■1 ~) n 1 ''i"^T * - 

■''bat c bärge is brougbt against us and '^bat ^nakes' 
US deserve montbs after. :r:ontbs of life .:ebind barbed ''/ire^, sap- 
aratttfr fno^ wiv3 s , cbildren, par^nts and friends, severe re- 
jt^^ictions in onr connections, >^y tbe repeated wreckage of our 
j::ist. ice and stigmatization by prolonged detention ? 

. Tb- vast maiority of us are refuge^s- of Je'^^isb 
ü r extrac t i o n , o t ^ ^e r s a re ve te ra n s i n tb e po li t ioaX..^ 



Li9. ■.■! u . 



ar-^n::'. ^ " n.e figbt against Piitlerisü:. 



T U 



t b 

e \ 






1 



c 



,^ r> 



f i 
r y 



■' e a n p e 

o n f i d ü nee 

y o u 

Z r 1 g n G 

b u ::i a n b j i 



n 1 n g 



r s 



a 1 t o 

Ol 1 

CO r s 

a n d 



n g 



:/ 





u 


w 


> 1 
1 ■•-. 


■'"1 


t 


b ö 


n 


n 





c. e 


n t 




'cc. e 


n> 


s 


.1- 





r e 


"r, 





u 


S 




S 


S 


e n 


t i 


a 




f 



OuB FF.. .DO. 



/ 



o 



o 



o o 



'•'bj-n Alien 'T'rieunals ''/ere set un in Great Britain 
just af te r th3 begin-^ing öf tbe '79 r, '■■^- bad to apne?r before tberi 



:? 



9nri .^ •■ r'3 cl-.^sified n s refuge:;S, 'viati-is of Fazi oppression". 
:^].t"'^ougb '-^e ■'/■. r: ernr^ ssive Iv exe^-^pted fron intern.'"-, nt oy tbese 
'•'rl:junals > our nvass-internme^-^t 



n^c: t^ c 



s orderjd by tbe r^rltisb Gove rn« 
i-^ tbe hectic days af te r tb j Invasion of t'>3 Low Cou^triäs, 



mc n -r 



■) 



u 



Our first reaction v^as naturally utter aewilder- 
did not faiJ to understand tnat eve:^ybody had to 

Co: ;on Cause. R^alisin.. tbat :^^is''"abes 



tF 



in .^ar ti..;:;S, and trusFirii'^ f'^at tbe poliov of 



r 1 ng s a c r I .t u c e s 10 r l. . ; ^ 

c ■• nnot jj "ivoi d : r " 

V'bols:;sal^ intcrn:::ent v^as/bound to ee rjvie^'jri at tbe earli^st 

possiblj :nome-^t^ -^'e p3-'-i;.ntly w-iit^c. for cur rehabilitation. 

■ .•;■■; a n.v b i ]. ■.; , Fr a nee coli d p b e u , t c^. o da nge r o f i nv a s i o n g re v/ _, so tbat; 

H. .Gov.jrn:?.ent, in tbis er/jrgency, deoided to arran.-.a for trans- 

ports overseas, in order to ei-ipty tb'j internrnent ca::,:.s . 



" 'a ny o f u. s vo lun t .i j r . d for t >i e t r a n s p o r t w hieb 
ntirallY jrougbt us to Australia, on tbe strength of prorisos 
:y ^' Cutborities. In so ine c-ayr.ps we ••■.^.re assnr-vjd tbat v/e 
w o u 1 d b • .; o b i p pe d t o C a na d a , in o t ", 1 e r s i t • '/■' --^ s i ' '•. d i a t. 'f d t h a i: 



,!i :^. Li Vj 



--.' .'4 
V« w 



Pa.<:^G 2 



wui,i.lii n 11(1 ßwJutKii- rif'u-ic'^u.T* "tfid o!f!ployrn'cjiit ovci-öcas. Thv'3 marrdod 
mon ^i':erc proinisod tbat thelr f^:;:ili^s would foliow thcj;- uithjp in 
thc S:v:;;e convoy,, op i;:;n:oc]iat'j"ly -■^fturvards. Tbo tpansinigpants 
WoTü told that no disadvantagd "/ould aris.; fpora the i v* ivacu? tion. 
In L'bc^ contra ry; it W3s hiiit^d, that tb^^ir ^rn.igration to USA v/ould 
"bj raallitat .;d .)y tha f ac t that. tb'jy would bj thon already on tho 
A:nü vi r. a -n c o n "'. i ncj n t . . ' 



Ho\7'.;v. p, it must bci öxrj-i'csslvely statv3d t>^at v/hon 
CUP ti'anspoi't was a.pi'ang<^d ;, the Nazi syrnpathisG ps had alj^jady 

t' h o 
d 



bean üvacuatod fpom the 
2 10 p ö' f u g ü .-j 
in B a y;, w a s c 
f p p d V e p s 
s u s p c t » . 



ca>i':ps in Bpitain. 
s ■ '^>/ h o w e p 
h s n t 
■j a s b G c •'' u 



>.T 



ij 
S 



o n e 
int 



o f 

6 p n 



(i 



VJ 



c: 



t 

h 



p a 



e 



n s 

w a 



In th'3 days of oup QVacuation tho wopld was shakon 
by thd tpoachc^i'ous activitias of thG a c t u a 1 Pifth Colu:T]n- 
istS;, thj (Ju^rlings, th-.^ Lavais and thö Plandins. These ambitious 
tpaltops, inpipüd^ paid a -d co-r-nandoü ped by Eitlep^, undopmincd 

h '- "h T>P ■xrr-' ri +: In. : t t--» ni"r n n nn v-i-f- tot a 



ano o 



^ ^ — l'J. — 

jtpaytjd thv;ip own cou'^tpi.. s 



In fopmop waps tho placrj of bipth of an individual 
was tho cpitcpion of bis loyaltv, It was thepofopc not supppising 
that in viow of the so activitios, suspicion in pegard to evopybody 
bopn in Gopir.any op Austpia. So, tho indiscpii^^inato intopninont 
was suddonly opdepod. No di stinc tion was rnado betv'^oen the vict'ras 
and tho suppopteps of the Nazi idoology, This ideology has causod 
this vrnp. It is not 9. wap of countpios, -■ s othops wope, but a wap 
of id ;als, A 'mrt of ono systo:n agalnst tho othep, Do-rocpacy 
against Die tatopship . Allios of tho dornoc p.-? tic Ideals ap.: found 
a::ong th^. nooplo bopn i^^ Kitlop^s pealiii ond oittep Gn^j:;ios can bo 
tpac.d v/ithin the ve py Dopdops of thi. Democ pacie s . Wholo countpios 
ape split up- in this stpugglo . So, fop instance, the Fv^. 
pooplo apo divido d into two carnps, Tho Ppoo Ppench stand coup-- 
ageously up to theip old tpaditions, whilst tho othops apo con^ 
niving to and conspiping with tho systo of typa-'^ny, ::any 
Amcpicans of GrOp!'::an d-scent havo only lat;;ly djclaped thpough 
the iTiouth of :;p, "öillkio that thoy havo nothing in oorn^on ^^^it 
ppe se nt Gj p:,:any . 



th 



■Vhilst w.), by st-^tul^apy laws, ape not evj^-^ anyriopo 



Gep^'^an citi.^ens, but roduood to a status of 
wo apo not ovon allowod anyr-opo tc sot foot 
wo sadly s.o that wo pofug^os who havo boen 
apo still keot Oohind bapood wipo. 



minop pights, -'hilst 
ag-^in on Grep-'-ian soil, 
depoptod to Austpalia, 






In xi^ngland oui:' loyal ty to 
officially pocognisod. Itwas publicly ad^:i 
tinu>.-d, indiscpi:ninat>. intopnr.on '• ".night only 
his ::iondacious ppopaganda. It was poalised 
and a matte p of coir. -on senso that we , who h-^. 
Nazi concentpation ca'ops, who havo oen oxpo 
whos'J ppopopty -/as confiscated, and -^ho had 
tho.countpy of theip bipth, v/ould bo Bpitain 
froodor:^ s natupal alliu s . . -< 



SOCDl 



C o r:::r.o n C au s j w a s 
ttjd that OUP con- 

h o 1 p Go .: b oo 1 s In 
that it Is only logic 
d oeon toptupad in 
lled fpon thoip bonos 
o:;on dpi von out of 
's and the caune of 



On the vepy day wbjn H. -.T. *'Düi^.Li:RA'' stapt od its 
illfamod voyage -'Ith 2100 intjpnod pjfugojs, fpo-: Llvoppool, a 
djoate took place in th. House of Co:r. ons with vQgQvö to the 
unjust and ofton hapsh policy of intopnniont. On this day, July 
10, 1940, :.:p. Foake, the (thon) Undopsecp'Otapy of State, stated 
"I should like to pay rny tpibute to t^ieso" r: fuge es in that they 
have shown the- :s-. Ive s wopthy of tho confidence 'which we placed' 
in thoiii''. In the -uany follcwinp: dobates on th1 s qnb1-.-t 



the 



(t 



hen) British inistop fop Ho 



le So c u pi ty a nd Ho r.ie Se c pö t a ry 



Sip John Andepson, adrnitted on August 23, 1940, that 



^ Page 3 



"'Fcgret-':.abl''j and djülorablo irlstako s" hau bapv>enec3 in connection 
witb our intcpnniont . On Decerroar» 3^ ].940, .'r. Herbert "lorrlson, 
Ho"CG S^icretarY, prümisod a revision of our cas^^s ^'witb gre^t 
speed^' and statcd tbat mlstakes had bean "crdo in reg-^^rd to in.^ 
t -' r n.-; 'j s s e n t t o C a n •a d a a nd k\x s t ra i i a . 



issued;, on Jul; 



ca::Tps in 



•9:1c.] 



istration, A^:* 

the oeginning 

thon inany thousand rnore 

a s f rc ^j ine n . 




s 1 nc e 



of Dcceinocr, 1940, about 8000 refugees, 

V'/ i rc all ov/ ü d "b o 1 e a v c the B r i t i s h c a mp s 



Slnce, opinion in tho United .■•••'■•: :'.'•' had insisted 
upon a change of tbj poiicy of i 'diso ni^lnate Internmon"^ of the 
frie-'dly refugees -bo had found on tbe british Isles the tra~ 
ditional asylu"::: '-'hich siüce centuries had oe^^n granted there to 
the o p pro s s e d a nd i n noc e n t ly pe r g :. c u t e d , 

The ga tes of tbe internniont carrips were flung Wide 
open in Great Britain. Thousands of our brethren joined the 
Pioneer Corps of the .British Ar.ny, and they can be found on 
overy battle fro't , '^'^'^ are receiving many letters frorn England 
saying that our f ri end s are proud to be recognised as allies, 
The i r e n t hu siasin, devotlona nd e age r ne s s i s pu d 1 i c ly ac know le d ge d 
with gi'atitude . 

Our brethrQ"'^ v/^^re also fi^^hting side by side v/ith 
tbe British Ariny and the Jewish Palestinensian Forces in Greece » 
Just now we mournfully read the sad news {''^ ^ .G'^ , Melbourne, 
•ay 15, 1941) that some thousands of these soldiers, rnembers of 
the Jewish Lab our battalions, ai-nong them ro fuge es fror^i Ger^.any, 
havc been captured there. Tbey are nov/ prison^jrs of war in a 
caT.p near Corinth and we only Pnow too well what fate awaits 
thein in the hands- of the Nazis. 



The SYDNEY .:ORNI G HERALD cit-;d on Octob^r 30, 
1940, a cablegrair. from the british Official ireless, stating 
that '^thousa^-^ds of aliens are oeing mobilised for technic^l 
Services through the International branch of the .binistry of 



Lab our 



Other frionds of ours enlistened in the A.R, 



A.F.S., and the various branches of National Service. 



^he changed poiicy towards refugees in the 
United Mngdorr: thus showed itself not only to be comrnensurate 
with Justice and humanity, but also to satisfy the dernands of 
com.ion sense . v/hilst ?s internejs we we re a bürden on H.--. Govern- 
ment, as f re : rnen we became, v^ithin our limits, a v^.luable 
asset. 



Tbera are aT.ong us highly skilled workers. 
scientists, doctors, and numerous experts. Thei r abilities , 
and Services were generally recognised. On August 20, 1940, 
-v. Cburchill stated in the bouse of Comicns: We rnay be able 
to do the enemy quite a lot of things that they have not thougbt 
of yet. Since the Oerraans drove the Jews out and lov/ered their 
toch'^ical Standards, our science is def ini tely ^ahead of theirs." 



m 



in th 

"No 



e 



hat -'r. Feake, Under-Ser retard of State, stated 



bouse of Coinrnons on /^ay 29, 1940 proved to be true 
case was known , v/here refugees had con::.:i tted hostile acts^'. 
So, 'in the case of our brethren in Gre at Britain, Justice and 
Humanity prevalled. 



\ 



- Page 4 - 



V'/hy IS th- Position of these rofugoea transfsrreö 
to Australia so dil'ferint ■ by are we Guspücted to be enjrnies 
and not recognlsod to be alli'is ? Why aro *e still - one 
after our internment ~ l^apt oehind bapbed wire ? 



year 



The fundarncntal reason and truo ansv/ep seeiTi to 
li:.^ in the agreament which was inade botv/ejn the British and 
Australian Governnont^ regax'di-^g our internrnünt. "whilst the 
Com-nonwealth Clove rnme nt apparently und.ptook to receiva prison- 
ers of war and Na^'i internees or Fascist sympathi sers for the 
duration of the hostilities whom the British ^overniront was to 
have r^turnad after the war, 2100 innocent refugees, vicfms of 
Nazi persecuticn, arrived here, 'hose mass-inte rnment was later on 
ad'-itted to be a mistake . The -'^ustralian G^ove rnine nt, well with 
her rights, as far as the responsibili ty betwejn the two Crove rn- 
jnents is concorned, insists now that the clauses of thl s unfort- 
unate agreement are strictly upheld. 



a n a 
dorn 

a 1 1 i 

m o r e 



But what does a clause 
g r e e m e n t "in a t t e r, i f the fr 
of so :,iany, innocent and' 
ed rnen, imprisoned now for 

s a t s 



1 n 



e 



n 



than 12 months.is at stak 



9 



The responsibil-' tv between the two Gover>nTOnts 
repr-esents only one side of the problern. The othe r side lies 
in the Obligation which a de-ocratlc country basically has to 
Hurnanity and Justice. ~ An Obligation which' imperatively demands 
froedom for innocent people , And thi s demand, is so strong and 
so ii.iportan-'; that it can be expected to override any clauses 
in any agreement. 

Australia^s ki nd receptio'-^ and human treatment 
of refugees frorn Nazi oppi^ession is an honour to her nanie and 
tradition. The Commonwealth is one of the countries '/ho signed 
the Evian Convention , made to elleviate the predicament of 
these unfor-'-unate people to give them an asylum, where they 
could en.ioy again the fu^^damental rights of ^ a human being.' 

j.lay we , after one year of detention and in our 
great distress, appeal to the noble spirit of this Convention 
and even venture to st^te frankly that our internment is 
contrar:\r not only to its spirit, but also to the wording of 
several of the Convention' s articles. 



This' historicai document was signed, according to 
the prjamble, by the Governments who we re :; "desirous that refu- 
gees shall be ensured the enjoym.ent of civil rights, free and 
ready access to the courts, security and stabilitv as regards 
establishment and work, facilities in the exercise of the 
professions, of industry and commerce, and in regard to the 
movement of persons, adrlssion to schools and universi ties . '' 



To this Australia, which has signed the Evian 
Convention, we direct our apneal for holp. Australia being at 
prese-t the only country which, on the one hand is in a position 
to Dring practical relief, and which on the other - as stated 
by -.r. Peake in the House of Com^ons on July 10, 1940, ~ has 
the power to r--:;ljase us , 




Our internment is regul^^ted by the Australian 
detention Orders. These Orders were issujd on the strengtb of 
the^hritish^..^£iss-.intoT-rimcnt ordjr. Ls the" latter, hcwever, has 
in the "-.öa'-itime be^n acknowleögeo to nav« involved '^deplorable 
and regrettable mistakos", the ^ustr'Uian detention Orders have 
lost their foundation. 




' I» 



'agi 






The technical difficul^ies connact'j d with th'^' trans- 
ports oat/cj-::! th'3- Ooüitinj iits ;, aad thci fact tbat among us ar^ aoout 
800 transTle-^r-ants .> .iltiniata ly dsstlnerl for the IJ,S,A.,^ rnakes our 
Situation so co:;:pl.'. :. a'ced . tbat our ;oroble"-n can only oo solvjd v/ith 
tha co^-ope pation ai:.d the good-zill of th^ Gc^rron^ealth . 



:os 



j_ 



of 



t ''n t-* <^' '■^- 



by the ^a 
to b'j gi*a 
cases th 
fcr the::: 
ortunity 
Kin'.doniv 
after si- 
f e rre d aii 
frus träte 



■'^ - ..o o s 






irii.onding ariiigran-'-s have boen surprised 
Vy m 'xreai: Ji^ritai .0^ v-hilst their 'aiting for theirvisas 
nte d . They v^vre inte med and ai^e nov-/ in Australia, In rnany 
ir ^''.^ i V e s , c h i 1 d re n a n d p a re n t s a re a nxi o us ly a 1 re a dy v/ a i t i ng 
In the U,S.A. T'-pough the i r evacuation they missed the opp- 
■/'.'hich existed in 1940, to ernigrnte directly from the United 
After a great loss of tirne ;, due to their deportation, and 
-jg a lot cf money to have their consular files trans- 



•] , 



he.lr cases cornpleted, they now sadly see all their efforts 



IC an Oonsulate 
n 



At first the ■:inister for the Arri^y informed the Arner- 
G-eneral in Sydney that the interned refugees from 



ireat Britain "^öu'J ^-"^ not be allav-iid to ernigrate directly from Austra- 
lia., but had to rectum to the United King dorn. But even after this 
regulation had ''ceen cancelled our departure to the U.o.A, still en- 
counters unsurmounta'ole' dii' "icultie s , The American Authorities wish 
to adm.it only internees '^hose uncondi tional release has been granted 
by the Home Offi.ce and whose mtcgrity is thus officially established. 
Our release he re is only granted und^^r the condition that it"tekes 
effect upon cur departure f^"om. the last Australian pcrt, This being 
not satisf ac toi-y for the Am.erican Authorities, our emiigration v/ould, 
therefore, only be possible if the Com.monv/ealth Gove rnm.e nt consents to 
cu" unconditional release, if only for a short period,and for those 
who, in all other respects, coinply v/ith the requiremtents of the 
American Im.-'lgration Laws. 3o , m.e re 'technical difficulties prevent 
the childr-^n;-] of 17 and 18 years am.ongst us to .ioin their parents 
and many m.arried m.e n to be reunited with their famllies. 



3everal weeks a^o, the Home Office sent a Liaison 

Gfficer, ilajor Jo Layton, tc Australia, Owing to his good efforts, 

about J.8G selected caseS; m.ostly m.arried m;en,had the opportunity 
tc r(^turn to England, 



In accordance. '/ith the British policy, v/hich nc^v for 
many m.cr.'-.hs regards us refugees f "D m. Nazi oppression as allies, 
:.:a'fOr Layton invited the fit men bet^vveen the age of 18 and ^0 tc 
lein the Pioneer Corps of the British Ar:'my^« In the neighbo; = rhood 
cf CGO men j'.:'llowed this call. This is, in view 01 the gi^at number 
of Ghi].dTeri_, üld and ailing m.en am:Ong us, a considerable percentage. 



'-•ov/ever,, what is to become of the rest of us,. mhose 
Status is identicaj. tc the recruits and ^7ho are also anxioUi? to "do 
their bit'' for the Gomm-^on Cause ? 



New, the Ski 11 and cambilities of the engl nee rs . 
soientists, doctors and exnerts in our m.idst, are rotting behlnc 
barbed wire. .'hau would be m.:re noble, in viem of the shortage of 
rnanpov/er, also m.cre advantageous tc the Australian war effort than 
to usefully employ our unused potentiali tie s tc the füllest extent 



in the figh,t against our oppressors ? ~ If 
icipate in the 
Problem, but be^ 



com;. :on effort . 



•'^ o me 



an asset to 



Y/e would cease 
Australia • 



w 6 ^.^.^e i'0 all ow e d t o m 1» t " 
to be a bürden and 



In this total war no ounce of e ne rgy ought tc be 
wasted aiK"^ men shculd not be judged solely according to their :^l.^.?o 
p f b^ rth . ^ :\ Y.% i'i> ' •» i-r-^ 1 ) ui i-y o i yc tiV.-iH ta i^- ti o n II .t*(^ i* ext" .i'ac>2'<il :is. vy 



measuT'Os 



i" >. ! '■ ^ j 



c 













I s i t 


n 


w 


e , a 


n 




t 


he n 9 


h 


* 

.1 


i n 




t 


h 


e B r i t 


1 S 


t 


h e 





t 


h 


er, st i 


1 1 


t 


e r n 


e 


d 




h e r e a 


s 



a 



p a r a d ü x i c a 1 
n d, a r 9 i n v 1 t e 
h 5' o 1' G e s , s. n d a 
r e c^ a r d 9 d a n d 






d 



;r 



9 n e 



y 



ö- 1 i 9 n 



sub.jected to the sa:7?e Ca^-r^p Kulae as Fpison^pü of 



ar 



s 

9 



fl 



^3. t 

i n - 
aacj ever. 



Th.es9 Ca-:;:p Kules issued oy th9 7ro)n. Cor-'anö&rit oT 
Inteminent Cam]ps, on ::arch Ist;, 1941, stat9 i.a»! 



üU T 



(la) 



Th9 Iioldlng üf political rneeting or rn99tlnes at -A/bich 
any political Propaganda is used^, op T^^azl or Fascis^- " 
principl9s recom-r.9nd9d , advanced er urgod, js strüctl'r 
forbidden. Tha Nazi and Fascist salutes -will not be " 
parrnitted, but Internees or Frlsoners of •'ar will ba 
called tc, or will stand at attantion at all tlrr.e^ 
whan baing addressed by an Gfficer or N.C.O, ^f'tha 
Australian ...alltary Forces, or whan an inspaction" 
Roll Call is baing hald. 



or 



(5) 



(15) 



The axhibition of Nazi or Fascist emblems, f?igns or 
engravings within any Compound is :c rohibi tod . " 

The victiniisation of any intarnaa or Prlsoner of War 
holdi ng anti-Nazi or anti-Fascist viaws. or for any 
othar reason, is prohibited. 



:t is daeply depressing for us rafugaes to be Surround 
ed after ono year of intern]7:ent and aftar fully baing rahablli tated 
in Crraat Britain, by such an atmosphare of distrust. 



In addition to the above ma ntioned flamt Rules ^'i^ rrmr 
Field Censorship Regulations^' are applied to us . •^hiist we de not 
believe that thi s is due to a delibarate rolitical ge sture, we are 
at a loss to understand the reason thereo'f, 

The "Arniy Field Ca nsorship Ragulations'" harrre r our 
effortö towards the Solution cf our orobleras, Cables may nct be 
despatched at all and ainr.ail letters, which constitute the only 
practical rneans of reiraining in contact with, and of advising our 
fan:ilies, only under axceptional circumstancas and with srecial ' 
permission. - In Camp No . 3, Tatura, letters written by the Gection 
Leader to the A;rerican Consulate 'General, Sydney, dealing with 
vital sub.iecvts as to cur arnigration have'baen ker^t back and v.^ere 
raturned onlv after 3 to 4 raonths. Comirunications fr>om the ^.ustpal« 
ian Jewish v/elfare Society, Sydney, did also not nass the local 
censorshir and were delivered only after a few weeks. The i-^e , letters 
were even rejected, whe n the local censcrship of Camp Nc . 3 thcught 
their ccntents nct to be apororriate or exredient. The ''/--ray Field 
Censorship Regulations" stipulate furthermcre that we ar^ 'nct 
allo-'ved to write on behalf cf other internees, Thi s also appües 
to ouestions in regard tc our release and emigrai-.jcn and n'^^tuv^lly 
Provas -Go be very di sadvantageous . Cur comrr.unic atJ ons hav^ to oa'is 
two censrships: nct only the "District Censor'' but in add ' t ' on th^ 
local censorshir. 



Is it nct astonishing that we .- in 7reai: ^-r^: tai n ^-e-- 
cognised as allies - and aftar one y9ar of inter>nment. feci h'u-niiiat9d 
and are de9pi.y depressed by the continucus r.ii sunders tandir,p- r,-' ' 
true Position ? 



our 



, , ,, ^'^'^ August 6, ].94G, Lord Cecil sali in the House of 

Lords: I feel mcst strongl;/ that the hi.tcrv cf what has "take n Place 
with regard tc thess unhopry alj.^ns,,'. c-K^^cf the. mos t di sc re/h^ ta^ie 
incldentä m the whoJe h.i.vbory- nf v;bi r ."canrrv'' ^.oA.j.e 



\ 



X 



- Page 7 - 

"■'hilst we know that fondai^entally , Australia is not 
röspcnsibls fop the dif ficulti--^^ viith re^e.Tö to onv unfoi-^tunate poe- 
j. "L-ion^ ^"-e wi sh -o be allowed to exprose the hope tbat tbe Covirr.onwealth 
will rsleass our tvue Status as allies. And as a free country - 
ipr-3spec tive cf regulations applied to ^ but not inade for uü - refrain 
irorn v/ithholdi^^g freedor. fror;i us^ victims of Nazi oppression. 

'''e have borne tbe hard fate of mistrust v/ith oalin 
dignity for cne jornplete year^ Our undesirved sufferings caused by 
the sepa'.»ation frorn our fa..llies, the repeated v.'reckage of our ex- 
istence ai^ too evident tc be stressed. 



We know that the right ,1s on our side^ and that in a 
free Com;:onwealth of Nations, fighting against barbarism. the right 
is ulti:nat-:ly bcund to be victorious. 

Cur problei^i is a British problem - a problem of Justice, 

We Gonfidently trust that ^•/e will not rernain to be 
sl>igled out from the benefit of Justice and Hur.anity, 



''/ i t h the u u ...i j. 

i n n o e n t, vv e a p p e a 1 t o 

d e p r i V e u s a n y 1 o n g e r 

p i g h t f hu in an b e i n 



confidenoe 



6 ^ • 



o f the 
you not to 
o t t h ü f i r s t 



f 



Our 



L i b e 



r t y 



^'l have no doubt whatever that the first ?tep 
towards maintaining the morale of re fuge es 
from Gerr;^any and Austria^ refugees from Nazi 
opprassion, is not to speak tc the world in 
general teriv.s about the ideals of freedorii^ 

.but to convince thern that ycr will du 
justice'; that the upholders of fpeedora, as 
we are so proud to be , the fighteps against 
evil things, brüte force, bad faith, in- 
justice. oppression, and pe rsecutiv-jn^ aro 
doi ng Justice to the men and wcir.en vvho have 
already suffered bitterly from the;:;'e things 
in «■^Terirany, and have f le j fror.: the:?. to us'' . 

BISHOP CF CHlCHaiS'-nj^R, in the House of bords^ 

August 6, 1940. 




^ ^ ^ 



^ K 




/ 



Sii 



^ 



r 



Srr: ' Aliens intarrad in Austraiia. 






has mvar^Iitod 'ustralia^o for a„ ?„glishjro.;a„^ as,^oiallya. ^Unglish M .P. who 
ow« affaLr. S tt^^r^^ 'r*° !I^^°^f^ anjrthi«^ ,.r yovr oo.irtry«8 mamg^moi^t of its 
botwo.p your Siorm^tif^'. I^^nt to dtsciiss is roally o« of a rosponsibility starod 

lor tharis a f S ^"^"^ ^''"^^^ °^ ""^ ""^^"^ F^rtrar, Jorkirs", Th, tost rouijdy 
jach doal with xts own Govormoiit, So may I summarizo thj facts? 

as Du:,ora ^.d iS^?.'/ Ju' ^"""^^ 2500 , ■ ;, wo ro land.d in Australia from th. Bri..is h 
Gn„r^„ i . IntJrmd, ThDy woro all so-oallod "o nomy a lio r^s " , and tto Australian 

iSdTLlrMr'a^Sj TJ^^'^ ^^"T' ^\ ''''' that'thoso t.o uSploatt^'t'Jdrrndi- 
uiiora;,rod\; yo^i'iSt:'"'' '"' '* ^■^^"'^ ''^^"'^^ ^'^^^^^^ -- «^ ^^ ^^ «--'^lly 

tvi don^ Rv*44<n4v, v,n "^ J^^-^^y c-... man oi oxact±y similar origin and qualitv intorhid 

v-b.p of a Faso-. ,i orgatrLsation. T.haso vroro classiflad A ar,, -.- J-^^^fi^^ns, 

n aftonmrds fovu,d to bo cor^picuous anti^j^^i or anti-Fasoiat fighl'Js rf 

^BrS; s?&::ira^r:^^:ts;5;jrtS: s'^^^s-'^'r r^'- '--•-- 

n.iT,j,«4. „_i j. 1 ^r ■'.• °-&nj.iyi.ng Timt tnjy could safjlv b^ i-rh n-i- Vrima 

subjcot only to minor rostrlotions . rath;r stiffor for tto ^<l tlnl\L\^< n, ^ ■' 
fcßst of ttom, b^ing Jowish or political r^fue^os haH^-l,- . * ^ ^f *''' ° "' ■ • 
iihur exa..i«.tionwith tho worfa '■SSi,ST^^?r.£'„Jpt:/on"? '"'°^^^' ^^''''• 

.^-^ dan^r'of Wat rniV°L'aM'::;d.?p:.1::;:1./.rr°^ cur ..vor^^^t, ,t..awit 

taking ohargo 5 so^n of [^«4 f l^Sht^" our Govormont's adaniiTistratlva bv,,rdon by 

Du«,ra»6 icad. ^M. 'nl I'!!^.^^ fr an Jh._ torp.dood_ Arandora star^ wor. inolud.d ir, tto 





rjmairl- 



n hie quallfl« 



W' "" ^'^Ji'^S? **"' P^f of tto-'throo"i;,^n;to;r;;iti7h, carx^alan. Australian. ' 
TTnt- -n^ b°i"g ^o, how ocmo8 it ttat wtoroas by tto latost ofkciarfiruvos 

n^4^4«K 1 '""'^^^ ^° "-"*' *^* ^ l^^SJ Proportion T,-oro ; j^usjd o-i- -^„^ b^n^i,,,. 

British Qmployors appUod for ttoa porsorally or through tl» s.ottL '".^/-^ . T 

hlflj, *"^^''* knov^rgttat h. would tav. to vait for Wm •:•.;., Li nonthaS 

„^4.. „ . Sacondly;, it ' ■ mxoh hard^r for a man In Australia to na:,. 
oationa.; colloot W.- ..ctimonials and so satisfy both or.ployL ahd H.a. Offio- 
^v,^^- n I^'^^ ''' "P"''^ Plaiiüy, thoso mon suff^rod muoh and ran^r 4° i- ' on 

.hat ovorora.dad .hip, wton ca.o of thoir cuatodians atanufuliraSs.d ; < r ■ -u.t 
inat is an ugly .story whioh ij- i.id thov would f&ln formt • t- f* « < -r -a.t. 

of ttom, or ttoir pa^nta for tlBn.^ for sS. ar^\Vil1**ttelr t '.T'shr'fi^/ '"" 

than t! wa-" ni. . * this an unrousonablo hop.T It s,m3 u mor. s^naiblo Solution 
Tvo aBtod^o, /r °^ "• !5F--"^-'^ 'P^~ °" bringing tton back toro i Ätt whsn ...a of i 

Lk ?Sn to varf ^v, ' ^"*f ™"f Ä "°* ^^'^ '"^^^■^^ withinAustralia.W. oannot paaslbly 
a^ nS T n ''''7,*^ arrangarunt." But not baing "Govornrunt" I rofus. to bo sl^^ncy^d 
JSoat iin hai^'.f/^"-'''^ ''i^' f' *° ^^'^»rity, if wo l„ England, v.lth tto, i' 

»tt! dSi!S T ^"" ^? ^-'^tralinT As to labovir joalottsios i t v^Ud ^rij £ Jor 
ty dn.ration . Wo ar. pladgsd to bring tton b£iok aftar ttat. Ar- " u with ,. o <> 

your young uon dolng splondid work in tto an,ud foro^Bl so righ in oraftl«- V 17/ i 
val't'l^l*, -;°:-r-^"-'"^*"-^ "-''«"••''. Tin^Ti you oannot find v/ork for a fw }undrocta?And aro 
JT^om^r i «J'^P^» e^^ring at you «oross tto s<,as that you nay «vor n^*d Juoh njn fQ' 
ft riomor Corps suoh as c«r wn, whloh has absorbod Bcr.,. th^^sards of ^^romy ali^^-J 



invaaa,w)n 
■5?— 




:l 





K...t 






^ -^yli^ .iM.bU'i c urC;rD toll no tht^t uuy^ of thoso r.ro flrst olase non, proud to bo 
itt thd British Amy arxi only longing to "bovQ u go ut Ilitlor", for t^Kjy oonsidgr OUr 
0?:iusa thD ir avn« 

As to hunanity, x/o knc/vv tli^t th:» chiof rosponsibility 5... ourc^ 'Diit hAva 
no rosponsibility tcivards thoso "viotiii.s of Vixzi Opprossion" v/ho huvj suff >rod in 
ov/n floßh, natTy of thon, th3 oruoltios \7hioh v/o ard yoii h&vo only road aboutV 

Bon't t(rll mo that th3So nor. aro wqII f':)d, safg aM l:ap^)y iri thoir oanps 
pDtiTMJd as thoy v.tj (so a roturrod nan tolls mo ) in conpounds hjlding aboixt 200 .:'jn* 
whioh oan b^ v/alI:od rouTxi in fivj minut^s . That is a lifo fit for oattlo, not for laoni 
As Honorary Socrjtary of our Parliamontary ConrTiittoo on Rafug>os, a largj all^party ^ 
body of M,P,'s, I havo visit}d nany of our avm intornnont camps • i It.yq rovor found 
th^ intarrooö groatUy oonc^rrod a bout th^ir physioal oonditions . Throo stibjjots 
absorb tYon and in this ordor: (l) Raloaso. (2) Moans of oaiununicsation with th3ir • 

fanilios . (3) Opportvinity for oiaploymont, a ftar and during intormont« In all throo 
rospoctc thoso in Australia, for tpographioal roasons, aro far v/orso off thin thoso 
ovor Yoro% So dospito tfe gocd food and tha gonorally huiuarc troatiTiont you givo ttom, 
I oan v/oll bolijvo thD Aiistralian visitor to ono of your oaiiips who wroto : 

" I spont nany hours listoning to hoartronding storios of diro nisfor-h^no 
oäoh hxving an individual pociiliarity biit all possossing foaturos v/hiohvoro oc^te' 
to oth^r intornooa» It v/as th} most doprossing oxpi^rionoo tJiat h^s ovor b3fa?.l-JBRfe^;. 
and aftor tvvo slooploss nights wondoring wh:.t rdght bo dorn, I folt lite a 11 ^r/^Sr"* 
in an angry soa, bjing graspod at by hundrods of cltitohing Itinds ♦" • 

That v/aa a y>ar ago, 3ut thoso oliitohlng Iscinds ar^ still l-old oat, for jpoßt 
of ttoir avnors aro still intormd* Won't scino of you Australians grasp thjik arjd'r^ull 
th^ra out by porsuading your Gov^rmont to lot you offor th^m oriploynont, or por 
somo of th> young oras opportun! tios for study in your TJnivorsitio's and training 
You v/ould not risk rauch, for ni)TD of ttom wculd bo lot out until h> hud first pa£ 
tho socurity lc»st - and boUovo mo, it is a stiff tost of oiir Huno Offico, vhich 
a roprosontativo. Major Layton, inAustralia, L^t th^ tvvo Govjrnaonts sottl:? it 
thom, and don't lot oith^r gjt away with that stal:^ pl;a of " mZ absont partrar, 
Jorld.r^"« 




yours faithfully. 



30*10.41. 



4;LiiIA.rOR F* RA.THBOI'j] 









^ 



litt. 



urrii 



TEI_EPH0NES : 



:SANDWICH 



{ 



258. 
259. 






pTTTTTi-rri" 



Dr. 



> c; c» ,-». 1 



37, DgI-^ Str 



1^ 






.-»j-i . • 




.> »-^^ i ^J- • .i.V.* .-,;>} <-^J_ « 



KITCHENER CAMP 

RICHBOROUGH 



(Near SANDWICH) 



KENT 



LONDON OFFICE : 2. Faul-s Bakehouse Court. Goouman Street. E.C.4. 



llarcii 2GtIi 194C. 







inf or. 



j. ' 



1 , i +•+ -i-'-» 

_i_ -/ U ü ,-. 1 



ancl tL 



' reg^uest, ^ _^i 



add'^"'^ 



^. r>. -■ 1 -; 



V> '--J J. >..!..*.-. 






r» .- ■■-, c- : ' "^ '- -*• -^ 



."0U3JS truly, 




l vi' ■ > j. , 



'^-^T^ryT -T-r-1-f-m p.yp.^-_ 




Dr. Piltz Kassel. 



37, Delf Street, 
Süfidwioh Kent, 
d@Ä 20. M'Ira lödO. 



Am das 

Kitokener C-ünp, 

Overseas Settleaeat Offioa, 

Riokbojxiugk near SandT^ich, Zeiit. 



• 



Betr.: 1^/KCR 2090, 




Iä der Allane übersemde ich Ikmem 
AÄtrag am das a!iierika»isoke Komsulat ii Lciidom auf 
BerioktigUÄg aeifies Hegistrierdatums uid bitte köfllokt 
dem ..mtrag mit eatspreokemdar Befüri7ortuEg \?eiter- 
reiokei zu wollem. 

Imdem iok mook um Bost'ltiguig auok dos 
lapf^iiges der AmLagoa bitte, zoichae ich 



mit bester Ijapfehluag 
Dr. Fritz Kassel, 



M 









4 



toerioaß Cc^taulate General, 
1 Gr*03r^rior Square, 
;,0 2!dcn, ...1. 




m 



liOMourable Go^asul 



XU,; . O.LI. ♦ j-1 - 






*«. • 






:•*-«»■ 5J' 



I ro^^d tknt th^^ B'-^^"li;:i oo ^niiL 

,';:i -lro3'lr on July 2lBt, 1030 1 uotifi^.^^ tte 
BofLin Oo-nr' / ; J .tiw^tioa fco iE^^ii^irate fe ILl. . 
n^kin^'- for füll 1 ■'fr.--/;.tio^^i I siould bo i^.: i.: .:. 



»7 



*c. ' 



^.as ': -isanG o^t thi^ 



♦ 



'>clci^': ' iAc^/*e fiiad oo^,; jT ray lefct^r c;'' July 2l3t 
1Q3B. ^^r u-ujBt 3ri. I locdv " fc:io :i;t..c:ie;' Icc^fl-t im 



I 



1 1'. 






v'-ncr sent ^:) fcho 



n^ 






U v/ 



1-. 



1 t:.red lettor ^3 to tho atat^ 



of tfe: ttur. I did Mt roooive am ,aswor* 1 rixlcGo 



-ost^l reoei'-^t. ^bt until T— -.»i :• 1^'th, liö9 m 

re^astcroü on July Tlafc, 1Ü30. 

I r©u:ii.!, ibuourablo Goiisul, 






s 



5 Bmolosures« 



X)ure r itkfull/. 



ij 



r.j!ixtz ].!.g::g1. 



# 



C p > . 



Praakenatein n July, 1938. 



p tke Geaeral Coasulato of TT.S.A. 
Berlia W 9 

Bcllevuestraße 3. 



Dear Sir: 

I kave tke inteation to immlgr^te to TT.ü.A. Bfi^i 
I beg you to ^.dve ae füll informatioßs. 



iours truly, 



gez.Dr.Fritz XdssgI. 




Abschrift . 



2iagegii 3.;.ug. 1938 
Beaat^y. 



Amerikanisohes Generalkonsulat, Berlin. 

Tiiohtige Bemerkungen über die zur Biawaaderung dienlichen Beweis- 
mittel. 

Alle .xngaben und Beweisniittel betreffs Unterhaltsaussichtefi 
und -oicherstellung in den Vereinigten Staaten w erden bei der Er- 
teilung eines -j:inBfandarungsvisums berlcksichti^t. Jedoch ist es 



nicht oache des Generci" 



uxGuz oaciae aes ueneraiKonGuic.ts dem Einwanderer eine bestimmte 
Folge von den zu erf.lllend.en Badingungaa in bezug auf Unterh Its- 
Dev^eismittel vorzusciireiben. Unter anderem kommen in Betracht 'n- 



aben über 



aaujh .-nkunft 





Y^erden, wenr. entsprechende Unterlagen als Beweismittel beir^ebraoh 
werden. Jie beigebrö^chten Beweismittel Gollen klar und d'^ufeich 
m Inhalt und ?orm sein. 




nd^r er 

llich< 



e 



n 



Verwand te, di 
zu untö 

^rliiaru _ ^ _ . „.^ 

Staaten abgeben, i;^ denen sie ihre '^ermögensvsrhältniS3e"darle<r'^en 
und ihre ^.bsicht kundtun, den i:inwand8rer zu untorstatzan. Es ist 
zwecimaüig, daB diese eidasstr.tlighen Srklärungen auBer gonc.u3n 
eingaben über .'ermögansvorhaltaisse folgende ...ngcben iber" den uc- 
steller des .Affidavits enthalten: 

Geburtsort und -aatum; ob amerikanischer B.rger; f^Jls der 
.-ussteller eingewandert ist. wo und wunn -'isom erh^-lten, ob 
verheiratet und wieviel 'linder (Ang..be des _.lters der Linder) 





n-me; "'envand^schufts^'rud des ..usstellers - ob blutsverwandt 
oder angeaeiratet, mit gen.^uGr Zrklürung der Barw^ndtscha^ts 
bezieuung und mit • ngcbc d er Kamen der "ersonen, durch die 
die ^en7^ndtsch:.ft- abgeleitet ist - in machen Pällon ist es 
r-.tsam, den ^^envandtschaftsgr^d durch Dokumente zu belegen; 
ob Aussteller in der ^^en,.ngcah^it bereits f;:r den IiinwSnd 
gesorgt nat (wenn ja, inwieweit). 



or; 



F^itls^R soll der .xu^-st^llür mit dem .Affidavit gca.ue Beweise be 
tr3ffs der daria gemachten Angaben aber seine Voimögensverhält- 
rasse boibrin^ien: u.a. könnsi: fül;:'.:^ndo llewüismittül dieidich sein, 



des 



uijjii i^uxx uc?r xiUwüuaiiür uiu aem ^xi 

der daria gemachten Angaben aber 

beibringen; u.a. können folgende B 

Im Falle, von ..rbei tnelimcrn, eidesstattliche Ilrklhruar^un 
i.iu<^xi^^Kiu^i3 :ü^r ucuc^iü, j^w^r und £)esCi.iUiienUtiit aer 
j^tellung, eidesstattliche I]rklärunc,en von vero^ntwortlichen 
Ba.ikbeamteu ''b-^r Hohe eveatueller Sankkonten und Ang.be, sei 
Wo.nn solche Aon Leu bestahaa und ob die Beträge v^ls ?au^<chal- 
suLime oder -allmählich de,>ouiert worden sind; Bankunterlagen 
oder andere Ilnt erlagen '.'her Bffektenbesitz, Investierunc-^en 



uiungea* TJnterl-<e>en aber i\ettoeiakommen durch begl-.ubigte x.b- 
schrift der Einkommens teuerer lärung oder durch^ I-iuk0i.im6•n- 



s 



arung 
^ nur XI e u bO a i naomme u a n^ b u e u , 



du 



ijruuboeinKom 



:$.iTxn/^ 



• 



men keinen ..akü^ltspurikt gibt): beiaeiskrif tij^e Tlnterlo^p^Gn 'Iber 

den i/ert von etiv^igem anüelasteteu Gruudb^sitz (wenn belastet, 
iingabe der Höke der Hypotlioken) . 

Der Aussteller des ..ffiduvits soll nickt solche TTnterlac^en 
inseaden, \17elGl1e er \7ieder sar'ickges^ndt haben i^illl, sonders 
soll von solchen Unterlagen beglaubigte .Abschriften oder ^'hoto- 
Kopien, einreichea. 

Da nicht anzunehmen ist, daß der SinVi/anderer von nickt un- 
uiit t.elbareri Veni/andten (als uriLaittelbare Verwandte gelten Ehe- 
gatten, Eltern, Groüaltern, Ilinder und Geschwister) seinen dau- 
ernden TIntarhalt ' ' ' ' * . ^. ^ 




warten hat. 




Abschrift. 



p. 



ingegy 3.\afj* 1933 

Beamte. 



Amerikanisches Generalkonsulat, Berlin. 

Wichtige Bemerkungen über die zur Biawanderung dienlichen Bev^ois - 

mit bei. 





nicht ö:iche des Generalkonsulats , dera I^inwanderer eine bostiinmte 



Folge von den zu erfällenden Bedingun<f>6n in bezug auf ÜEitürh It s- 
be\7eisiiiittel vorzuschreiben. Unter :.naerem kommen in Betracht /i^- 
gaben über ei ;ene aaah /.lakunft in dea Vereinigten 'ta.ter: zur V er 
fügung stehenden Geldmittel, v;ie ^^uch ilber dort von Verwandten zu 
leistt-.nden TTnterst'itzungeii. .lug':.ben 'Aber Geldnittel, Veiiiiör^ren, 
Eink'infte, Verdienst mm. können nur dann voll ber 'o-isichti^^^t 
werden, wenn entsprechende unterlagen ^Is Beweiciaittel beigebrach 
werden» Die beigaür%chten Bevjeisiaittel sollen klar und deutlich 
in Iah.lt und Form sein. 




ja 

St 

und ihre 

zweckmäßig, 

.mgaben Libor venuo_ 

steller des .i'fidavits enthilten: 



bsicht kundtun, den Linwanderer zu unterstiitzi: 
daß 



1 • 



TT 



diese eidesstitlicheii i-rklärungen auß^r g-:;^ 
luögoasvorhültnisse folgende . nguben aber' Ic 



3n 
h's is t 
1. ue 21 
0^1 \-us- 




Geburtsort und -aaturn; ob amerikanischer B'"rger; falls d 
.iussteller eingowi^ndert ist, wo und vjana ''■isuii orh.lten; 
verheiratet und wiex^iel llinder (Ang-be des ..Iters der Ci 
Zahl aller vom Aussteller abhängigen Pamilienmitgliedar: 
früher bereits .ifiidavits f :-r andere Zim^anderer ausgeixt 



n 



b 

die 

ratsam, 

ob ..Iussteller in der '^arg-ngenheit bereits 

gesorgt hat (wenn ja, iniieweit). 




Verw"ndtsch:: 



HO 



Ion Verv;:.ndtschaftc;.rad durck Dokumente zu 

d en 






± .L 



le 
inv7 



cob 
n^S e r )| 

b 
eilt 
rd 

n(i t 
:>f'te- 
i.^ 

t oß 
:eri, 
fider; 



PEKCR soll der Aussteller mit dem Affidavit gen ue Beryei^a be 
troffs der darir. gem-chten Angaben über seine Verjiögen^verhult- 
nisse beibrinc^^en; u.a. können folgende Beweisuittel diealic'^ sein 




■h 



suiiiiie oder allmählich de.)Oiiiört worden sind; Bankur terla-^er 
oder c.ndere Unterlc^-gen über Lffektenbasitz, Inveötiorungen 
usw.; Besciieinigum^iün von Versicherungsfiruien *lber Höhe und 
Geldwert von LcD.nrversicherun^'jßpolioen; Berichte von HandeU 
auskunfteien (z.B. Dun i Bradstreet) 'her Ge:5chä^f tsunterr?;eh- 
ßiungon: Unterlagen 'Ibor liettoeirikoaaen durch begl-.ubigte Ab- 
schrift der Ein :oi;iiaens teuerer lärung oder durchs Ei nkOhirion - 



ßtüUür 






a ki^ o v> e n I 



UM 4VX U Ulf WUX LA/^Wr- 



^'T^'-^T^ 



TTfr. 



man 
den 



keinen Aakaltspunkt gibt): bewsi .-kräftige Unterlagen Ibor 
Wert von etwai/^em unüelast^ten Grundbesi" 



eingäbe der Höke der Hypothc 



Lastet 

:ken) • 



sitz (wenn Belastet, 



Der Aussteller des xlffidavits soll nicht solche Unterlagen 
einsenden, weloke er wieder zurückgesandt kaben will, sondern 
soll von solchen TTßterlagen beglaubigte .ibaoariften cd er nioto- 
kopien einreichen. 

Da nicht anzuaehaea ist, daß der Einwaaderer von nicht un- 
mittelbaren Verwandten (als unmittelbare /enjandto gelten ßhe- 
patten. Eltern^ Großeltern, Kinder und Geschwister) Reinen dau- 
ernden TTntorhalt erwarten kann, ist es ratsam, daß solcae nicbt 
unmittelbare Verwandte in ihren Affidavits er':laren, auf welche 
Art und Weise und bis zu /«aLoh m Umfang und auf welche ^sit 
(wena diese begrenzt ist) sie fr den 2iro.vanderer zu spr.'.en ^be- 
absichtL'^en. Dies ist auch f'Ir den Einwanderer von „'ichtig-keit, 
der wissen sollte, was er von dea gutsagenden 7erw-.Qoten zu er- 
warben hat. 





UNITED STATES GF AMEPICA 



APPLICATION FOR A VISA 



c». 



City of ••'■ l^ nrjr ^ '■ -• -> 



ö 



Countv of T> -• 




To the American Ccnsul et the nearest 
place cf reridence. 




i^A^^M^ «^ J.. 



.. 1 



Id 



r-an^.^ duiy sworn, deposes and sayr •' 



That I recide at Jei.'-'r.- -- -r. . Pa 



Tliat I am an American Citizen, having been bc.-n in St - ?:.i;:. r <^ ^ 

That I am a naturalized Citizen of the Unit-J St^te. '^'^ 
certificate Nc . 



.•^ , ha ving received 



Ci'.v er 



Dat 



Hl a-.vlcw 



located 



^■^r ^^ 



:h-it 



^ '^•::^. Ti (rrof .\=^sior 



y or- 
al • 






with ci'fi 



Cf. -it 



That : 



_ _ .\ 



)': 



:i':. in th- 






located at 



v?lued at i 



: h- 1 



I r 



.''iVr ncccu' 



ir. Vl^ rcllowir 



': '' < 



Incomr- 4>. 



That 1 



in:-ured vith th^^ 






••l 
1r 




i. '■•:*c r ibe 






Other pcrtinent inrcni.r.t ion: i 



■< r> 






8 



That 1 att^^ch dcc.^^-nt- -nr-i-r;. . 



That I -r, ^-d a] • 
not at any * ine b--. -hnr,^-- 



:.'jV 



Thf-t I ar. ti.e 1:l 



re.^idin^ «it 
T'-'xp] •!.:. 

T T». •,■ 4- ,- , ( ♦- . 



v;: 



t i 



t-. 



. ,v. 



... 1 . 1- . i . 












ian-^ntoe, tlwt I will prr : p- 




^ . ^ ^"^'^^ ^ ^^ nereby ]:rcrä:'^-, arr»- and 

<..^, *., ^. ,.^ ••^'-<vT^ f,nrMriT'«r»p -i^-i- I reacn t b^i * •. . 

*J "^ ' '•* *^ Ti^at this Petition and affidnvit i - »^^-i v 

..„•iW.rWWVi- •'troadwlll Visa u.r;:«;;cn or!^^-'''^''^^^^^' ' ^ 



i nt 



^-1 



r ^n • 



1 n-7 r> 




:7^Ä 




Abschrift* 



Br.Fritz Kassel. 



Frankeast ein i/'ohl^sien, 
dem 9* Dezember 1938. 




An das 

Generalkonsulat der Veroimifrfcea ' taatea 
voü .Imerika 

^B e r 1 i m W 9 . 
Bellevueötraße 8. 

Betr.: Registeraummer der fJarteliste. 

« 

loh erlaube mir die höfliche Amfrage, unter 
Tselcher Hummer ich für die Eiareise aaok ^'^.merika auf 
^ Grund meines Sohreibeias vom 21. Juli registriert 
worden bin. 

R'ickporto erlaube ich mir beizuf'vgeii. 

Mit ergeh eESter üäapiehluag 



gez.Dr.Fritz lassei. 




'.*y\i\ '■■"J 



iBiTsrafT 



^■iiki 



xibsckrift 



Dr.Pritz Kassel. 



Fraakenstein i.Schlesien. 
den O.Dez. 1938. 





An das 

Geaeralkonoalat der Vereinigten Staaten 

von Amerika 

Berlia W9 

Bellevuestraßa 8. 
Betr.: Kegist ernumnier der Warteliste. 

Ich erlaube mir die höfliche Anfrage, unter wel 
eher lummer ich f'ir die Einreise nach Amerika auf 
Grund meines ichreibens vom El. Juli registriert 
worden bin. 

Rackporto erlaube ich mir beizufügen. 

Mit ergebenster ülmpfehlun;:' 



f;ez. Dr. Fritz Kassel. 






Abschrift. 



Dr.Fritz Kassel. 



Prankenstein i.Sohlesießi 
den :\Dez. 1938. 



Aa das 

Geüeralko-^sulut der Vereiaigtea Stautea 

von Amerika 

B e r 1 i Q ^9 



Bellevuestruße 8. 




Betr#: Regist ernuriimer der '.-arteliste* 



loh erlaube mir die höfliche Aafra/^e, uater v^el- 
oher luramer ick f*ir die liareiss Ä^ch ^imerika uvd 
Grund meines .)chreibeßs vom 21 •Juli re^;istriert 
Y;ordeß bia. 

RLIck^.ortc erlcube ich mir beizufügen. 

Mit ergebenster Smpfehlung 



f^ez^ Dr.P'ritz Kassel. 




Abschrift. 



Bitte i3orp{ful&<^ aufbeiivahrefl! 
Der Absender \i?ird {gebeten, nur den um ranJe teii Teil auszuf'ilbnl 

EIHLIEPEHUNaSGGHEIN 



Gegenstand: 6 Brief 



Nr. 613a 



Uachaalime: M Rpf 

V/ert oder 
Betrag 



Gewicht: 



Kg 



g 



m 



Epf 




Eijip= 
fäager: 

Bestiitt= 

ciaii^s= 
ort: 



Generalkonsulat der Ver/ Staaten 



Berlin W 9 



Stempel 
^erlin-Halensee 1 
.ufgabastempeIlO.12.38 - 11 



Postannalime 
Unterschrift unleserlich. 



Erklärung der Abkürzungen umseitig. 



G 62 = (1.31) 
Diu A 7 






/j/C^^^fi^a^ 





t(t/ i»^W^ ^^ ^/^ y^ 






' ^(^yt^u^ ^22? ^ ^^'^''^^ 




^ItO'M 




a^ 



/^M^^^rv^/m 4^ ^ 







^ 




0^/^U^'^(^<^ . 








^=2^^ 






./</_/ , 




'/^.f-»i 







6/ 





^4^ 45. y^ ^ ^<s{^ ^'^ '^'^. o/^m^^ 



i^^^i^f ..^.^^^ x^^ 




0' 



U( ^^i^ ^^S^ ''/V^i^^f^ ^ 



^' 




//^ //c^cf 



^^A^iiif StTf^i^ /t ^ ^&4^niM ^^/4fj 







H^7(/^' 





,f . . ^cA>1(fi,, 









W ,^<^Ui^ef/cp(t^^ 





'^H^ .-^^^ 






(h^ ^lUjj' 2/lJ/^ /<^j^ /^^e^/ a 








Test=Draft 



Dr.Pritz Kassel, 



Sandwich Ilent, December 29th,39 
3 Potter Street. 



To the ilmerican Consul.^te General 
1 Grosvenor S ^uare 
London W 1. 



• t 



« ^ 



Iinmigration Department. 
Dear Sir: 

Hoping and trusting that /ou la/ill repair a obvious 
injury I allow me to touoh you iivith the folloT?7ing affair: 

Cn the July. 21st 1938 I sent to the Merican Con- 

siilate at Berlin the following letter: 

Frankens tein SI.JuIt, 1938. 
To the General Consul'jte of U.S.A. 
Berlin Vi 9 
Bellevuestraße -8 

Dear Sir: 

I have the Intention to immigrate to U..3,A. and I beg 
you to give me füll informations, 

"ours truL', 

Dr. Fritz Kassel. 

Herein I got on the August 3rd, 1938 a printed 
circular titled:''Importants remarks re proofs neoessaries 
for the immigartion". I have 4kis here this circular. The 
long contenÄs said only that it is neoessar;/ to get a affi- 
davit. I made this and got a affidavit, dated November 28th 
1938 and sent direct to the Berlin Consulate from m;- friend 
Edith G.Rosenwald, Jenkintown, Penna. 

In a talk by telephone the consulate Said to me 
that in fdrst line the date of the inscription in the wai- 
ting list were important. Therefore I wrote on the December 
9t^, 1938 in a re<;{istareJ letter: 
"Re: Registernumber of the waiting list. 



•^W^Jl^ 



21s1 



^ 



I have not get a answer, but on the Januarr 18th, 1939 I have 

got a form Tshioh was sent to me supposl-^lleig^the affidavit. 

Pilling out this foim I noted: 

'•On the July 21 1938 I had alreadv ask for immigration, but I 
aon't knon? if I am resristered and I bes You * 



_ -,^ you to examine and to 

register me under the date of Jul- 21th. *' 

Later I have got the \?aiting number: "Berlin 59,181b". 





--suppose is transferred in the meantime to London. 
I have the mining that the Berlin Consulate has m^.de the 
mistake of mv request of the July 21st, 1938 of füll informati©: 
ons only to say that it is necessary a affidavit, altough in 
this time already the insoription in the isaiting list was ne- 
cessar;^. If the Consulate had given me the right füll informa- 
tions I had ask at onoa tot insoription in the waiting list, 
I had a mh low number and I oould immigrate at or^e. (Swing to 
the falsa and insuffioient answer I have a high number and I 
must awaite long time tili my immigration is pov^sible, 

I trust and hope, that it will be possible to examine 
andcorreot this mistake. and to give me the number of Julv 21.3 8.| 
Thanking you in advanoe, I remain, Dear Sir, 

^"ours, faithfully, 



©egen» 
Itanö : 



gJttc forgföltig ouf6eroo[)ccnl 
ftfctiDcr roirP gebeten, mit ten umtan&ctcn Ztil 

einltefetuttgöf^eitt 9 

^')^^ner ")^i 




• i'^ilärunci Der Sllifücjungen um(eiUg. 



62 (1. 31) 
in 476 



■'-b Schrift 



\ 



'^TPm'Bnsteln i. ochlesien, den 9. Dez. 3'< 



Dr. Fritz Kassel 



An das Generalkonsulat 
von Amerika 



'''ereinigten Staaten 

L^_l i _g__^9 

3e'levnestra,sse 8 



1 



* 



Betr. : Regist era-omiiier der Jartillt-ste. 

Ich erla^ ^lir die höfliche Anfrage, unter welche: 
Nummer ich S'^'ir die^'l? nreise nach Amerika auf G-rimd meines 
SchreilDens vom 21. -~li registriert worden loin. 

Rücknorto ^t-ube ich mir beizufüp:en. 

v:: ^ 



^i 




Mit Br 'ebenster Empfehlung 



■V i. 



W 



Absei :*i ■: 

: = = = = =: ZSj^^'. 

w 



•■•*•: 



18. 1. 39. 



Am 21. Juli 1938 hatte i| 
v/usste aber nicht, ob i' 
prüf-ong bzv7. Regiestrie: 

Einschreiben ! 
Eilboten! 



\ 



\ 



berlits Antrag auf Einwanderung gestellt 
•egi|triert worden bin und bitte um Nach:r| 
l: unier diesem Datum. 




» «r 



VLn^ÄöbtilLLnu. 'G£ 

KITCHENER CAMP 



Tblrphones 
SANDWICH 



f 258. 
1 259. 



VL/KGR 2090 



BT, Eritz KA^SSiSL, 

c/o Bottle , 

3, Potter Street, 

Sandwich. 



RICHBOROUGH 

(Near SANDWICH) 

KENT 



LONDON OFFICE : 2. Paul's Bakehouse Court. Gooliman Street. E.C.4. 



Januaiy 3, 1940. 



^^. 5^/^' ^^y. 




Dear Dr» Kassel, 



Encslosed please find form-letter 16 of the American 
Consulate General, London, v^hich we have just received for 
yoa. 

TouiVlißi nce/^ely , 
Overse?:!S Sattle rnent Office. 




i/oM (Jm^m 



A»yi/ 



^/^. 



39 




HfHUc 



Mt^^ 



"^f 



M 



i 



1/ryi/ 



UUh ^tltUnrH>Lla/ 



A^V'Vii/yi/ 



/^ 



// 



^ /k^ jUiy;, 



^^^^ /^ L 4fi^C^yM ^U. ik4^i Jiui^ 



SuaI 



Ai/ty * 



7 



/nh/^ 









/'(hn^ ^ /?n^W 






/t/ffl^ 



^ 



KITCHENER CAMP 



Telephones 



SANDWICH 



258. 
259. 



Overseas 
VL/KCR 2090 



RICHBOROUGH 

(Near SANDWICH) 

KENT 

LONDON OFFICE : 2. Pauu's Bakehouse Court, Godliman Street, E.C.4. 



Noveonber Ist, 1939. 




Dr. Fritz KASSEL 
c/o Bottle, 
3, Potter Street, 
Sandwich, Kent. 



Dear Dr. Kassel, 







Enclosed plense find Form-letter 15 which we h^ve just 
received for you from the Amerioen. Consulate, London. 

Will you -olepse inform the Consulate thr^t you nre no more 
a member of Kitohener Camp and give your present address, 
so that e\ll future ccjmmunioetions may be sent directly 
to you. 

YoursMLncerely, 

Overseas S^tlenienl; Office. 





V ^* 



m 




»or Xatteotond ist dor J^iÄ^i-md«. loh rlohtoto ojn 21. jull 193a A 
doo i'vonoulat foltjandon j)rief t 
21. JtiOy 1930 

to tho üaneral Gonaulato 9t ü,a,A, 
B«rlinV9 
Üollevusatruase ß, 
3>oar uirt 

loh havo tho intantlon to luralgrato to ü.a.A, and l bo« you to 
ülve 110 füll Infonmtlono. 

YAum tsruly 

-üerauf oxMelt ioli au 3. AUo^ot I93« ein sodruclctoa :ö»»4llohrol 
b«n, dtts aioh D0tiltolt.-/flohtljo Jioaorl.nmjon uob«r dio zur ;.ln. 
wandorunii dlonlloh^i ::3w^io;ilttel% j)«r Im,^ Inhalt booa.;t led: 
lieh. dao0 mm cidh ein .^JTfidavlt besor.jon soll, i h tat üioaoo 
und erhielt von a<?lnor J?i-eundln JSdlth ü. Hoeeiwald auo Jonklntm 
Ponna. oinon Brief vo- l.j)ea.l930 und auf elno apao toro .ütte 1 
Aboohrlft dOB Affldavltö, 

Auf oine tcleplionlDohe icuookfrago bolia Konsulat wuMo ulr nitfr«. 
teilt, dao« in arotor Linio dao ;)tttun dor ii.itr.-i r-xuiz In dl« Warte 
lioto in ifrtt;50 kaaoo. loh oohriob deshalb ou 9.i)o2anbor I93Ü unc 
3war "oinßfjaohrieboii": 

V 

"üotr.iKoalotomujjraor d«» Wartolioto. 

J-f«/??'?'''? "^f '^^^ 'f oi'licho Anfraa «.untrr vrolohor lluaraor iß> 
5? Tai f %«^H nf i?^ nach xxorüca auf c;r.ü*d noinoo SohLASo von 
S;i^ iPf^iiotnort vwlon bin. Jliioclcporto orlaubo loh uir bclai 

loh or'-.ielt koino Antwort, abor m l^.Jan tar 1^39 olu ntr^ijop 
fomulfir, doo vo«iutlldi auf ürund dos vj-fidavlto oii iiirii -oonn 
wurdo, 35oi dor Auofuolltni^i b«oorl:to lolij 
•.to 21. Juli 193c hatte loh boruito .^ntra« auf Klmmndorun - ro. 

to u.a ^'a.hpruofun,; bozv;/i.;',iJ?rio?;;i,f ^S Zf.Z SJ?uü?"i,i 
loh habo d:«m opaotor dio rartcaiumor "Borlln ;;9.1<;1 b' orimlLo 
Baa iionoulat hat nun U(^inoo .raohtono don '.ji.l-r g«a«cJu, auf 
n,.mo :jUto v«. 21. Jull l.;3i; auf voll« informtlon >dr Jur^aa 

Affidavit alO »irfOWlnml .^^rm^^.^^^..^ ^. n . . , 




kunft haette ich oofoJt cmtopamdhcmdon .vntrog gßmtolV^^ oln« 
nlodrl >e Wartenunraor iind Icoennte auf orund doo Affidavit i3 so- 
fort olnroisoru So aber bakara idh, du roh dio man jolhafto Auokur 
olno »hoho •Turiir.ior und 2 mos viölleicht noch Jahi^o ^nxten blo 
ioh an dlo llolho kor^iaa, 

:Duroh dlo AUHTrandorung nadi andoron ötaaton odor durdi don Toc 
•wm Inhahom von Wartamiiara#m oder dur<Äi doppolte Hoglötrlorttx 
WBrdon in olno cfum0 Uoiho von llumaeDi nioht banuotst und äcm 
Konsulat haetto durah "orlohtiimi^ do» Felilars kolnon Bohsidon. 
loh hoffo alno, daes qh üoe^sllah sein ttird^ mir dlo Wartanut^xm 



von a* JtiTi 1938 25U erhalten« 



# 




t ' 



/ 








iOer TatbelT^d ist der folgende. Ich^tete 
an das Konsulat folgenden Brief: 
^. July 1938 

to the General Consulate of U.S.A. 
Berliji F 9 



am a.Juli 1938 



Bellevuestrasse 8 



üear Sir: 



I have the i>,tentdo^ to taigtateto Ü.S.A. «, I beg jou to gi.e 



Abschrift! 
Bi. ü 




• 



• ~" • •'^ • 



me füll inf ormations. 

Yours truly 

Hierauf erhielt ich am 3. August 198B ein gedrucktes Schreiben, 
das sich betitelt:" Wichtige Bemerkungen über die zur Einwander- 
ung viienlichen Beweismittel". Der lange Intialt besagt lediglich 
dass man sich ein Affidavit beisorgen soll. Ich tat dieses und 
erhielt von meiner j?reundin Edith G. Hosenwald aus Jenkintown, 
Fenna. einen Brief von 1. Dez. 1988 und auf eine spätere Bitte 
hin Abschrift des Affidavits, wovon ich mir PhotocopiaBn beizu- 
legen erlaube. 

j^uf eine telefonische Eückfrage beim Konsulat wurde mir mitge- 
teilt, dass in erster Linie das Datum der Eintragung in die War- 
teliste in Srage käme. I6h schrieb deshalb am 9. Dezember 1988 
und zwar " eingeschrieben'* ' 

Betr. Eegist^iemiommer der Warteliste. 

Ich erlaube mir die höfliche Anfrage, unter welche Nummer 
ich für die Einreise nach Amerika aut'Grund meines* Schreibens vom 
21. Juli registriert v/orden bin. 

hückporto erlaube ich mir beizufügen. 

Mit ergebenster Empfehlung 

Ich erhlieit keine üntwort, aber am 18. Januar ein Antragsfor- 
mular, das vermutlich auf Grund des Affidavits an mich gesandt 
wurde. Bei der Ausfüllung bemerkte ich: 

" Am 21. Juli 1938 hatte ich bereits iintrag auf Einwanderung 
gestellt, weiss aber nicht, ob ich registriert worden bin. und 
bitte um Nachprüfung*, bezw. Registrierung unter diesem Datuüi**. 
Ich habe bis heut noch keine TJartenummer. 

Da[s Konsulat hat nun meines Erachtens den Fehler gemacht, auf 
meine Bitte vom 21. Juli 1988 auf volle Information mir nur das 
Affidavit als Erfordernis anzugeben, obgleich damals bereits 




üb Schrift! 



• ■" »/^ • "^ • 



Eintragung in die Warteliste nötig war. Bei richtiger voller Aus- 
kunft hätte ich sofort entsprechenden Antrag gestellt, eine nie- 
drige 'Jartenuiüiüer und könnte auf Grund des Affidavits sofort ein- 
reisen. So aber bekomme ich ciurch die mangelhafte Auskunft eine 
späte, hoKe Nummer undmuss' vielleicht noch Jahre warten. Wäre 

es nicht Ihnen, sehr geehrter Herr Geheinrat, durch Ihre Beziehung| 

en 
möglich, .mir die TJartenummer von 21« Juli 1938 zu beschaffen. 

Durch Auswanderung nach anderen Staaten oder durch Tod iston Inha- 
lt bem von %rtenummem v/erden ja eine ganze Iieihe von Nummein 

nicht benützt und das Konsulat hätte durch Berichtugung des Fehle: 
keinen Schaden. Alsohoffentiich- lässt sich hierin etwas machen. 



(FORM C. 1939) 






REGISTRATION FOR IMMIGRATION VISA 



AMERICAN CONSULATE GENERAL 

38 Grosvenor Street 
London. W.I. 




Each person desirous of proceeding to the United States for 
INDEFINITE OR PERMANENT RESIDENCE should fill out this form and 
return it to the above address by mail without delay in order that his name 

may be placed on the Hst of persons awaiting quota numbers and an appoint- 
ment for a personal interview may be made at the earHest practicable date. 
The head of a family may include in his registration the names of his wife 
and unmarried minor children, but no other relatives may be included. 



Names of Prospective Immigrants 
(la block letters) 



Dr. Fritz KASSEL 



(WIFE) 



(MINOR CHILD) 



(MINOR CHILD) 



(MINOR CHILD) 



(MINOR CHILD) 




Present Address 



Town and 
Country of Birth 



Date of Birth 



X t UhtntjrCi mh Hutn' ' - 1 in ^(tt4i ii^ 



Kiohboreujh nwr SanfLi^ich"* OenntnV 



ilSrhhk. ~ 



llJfJM?. 



1. Have you lived in England for the past year ? /?.!? If not, give^ date of arrival and 

former residence ...Zi J.A^flt /935 Lp.^nM.ll.M&.Ln .^.Sc.hl^ALU.2 Germ $hh 

(A person may not register at this Office unless he is in Great Britain.) / 

2. State whether Single, married, widowed or divorced *$/..Ä3*'C. 

3. What is your present occupation? jR..9.tt.(4j.^.?.f.^f.r.y..r What occupation do you intend 

to follow in the United States? ..cAr UM.I ^ \€.. .MnSAr..L91!}... 

4. Has employment been prearranged ? If so, with whom? /Mr.fi 



5. State the amount and nature of your total resources 

6. Have you previously registered for an inimigration visa ? If so, state at whicli American Consulate 
and the date of your registration -ßfi/T-lLtt X.>/...M./.....P. 

[OVER 



/ 



7. Have you at any time been refused a visa to proceed to the United States ? If so, give place 
and date of refusal .ß.ß. . 

8. Have you previously resided in the United States ? If so, state where and between what dates 

/7£ 

9. Have you ever been deported from the United States ? If so, give date and reason therefor 

ho 

State whom joining : ^^me...ZMtk..Ü..ÄPAmm^^ jfe.0.|l7.'!..y.tg J^..QL..n.Bi/) W Ü 1 

Nationality A.iUt.W.CÄ.n Relationship to said person Ir.h.nÄ 

Address It.rikLnh.i^M...^...Annä^^^^^^^^ ili?^/..?^i^e.ntte. 



IG. 




(NOT TO BE COMPLETED BY APPLICANT) 



DATE OF EXAMINATION : 



CLASSIFICATION : 



EVIDENCE PRESENTED 




CONSUL'S FINDINGS 



Signatur e of Examining Oßcer. 



/ 



c 



omt. 



£ 









y 



» 

j 



I Camp iTr. 







# 





ITaraeö of Proo-jectlve 

TiMLiigrant;^ 
lln_o],ocI:""let1:e r -^ ) 



.no. 



Pro3oiiG ..\cidreGo iCount 



'"' ■>-. 



j .J>:.'- U C Ol 

nrth ! In. rtl: 



~j L^StMAü^ 



(Minor Chilcl) 



(Kijor Cxiild) 



(" ^inor 






TTTIn 



or Chilcl 1 









er /;.:.e par:\; year? , 



li 



T ' n n "*- /■•' "i %r o , ■; .-i -f- /-. 



(^' 



of arrival and lorner residcnce 



jereor: 



- rs -r- VT 1- 









i.oi;ii:;-;or a-G ünia orfice unleea ne ;. ü in Gr.iiritain) 
;^. State wiictUer sincle.uarriod/.idov-c- or oAvoTc^d. . . . :$in^k 



ry -■■•■-! I 



i;j your present oocupation 
/iiat üccvi-.tt,ion do you iiitcnd to 



? ...Mill.ßmer. 



• • • • t 



4 



loilo- in ths rjnired ':.t:,tz,i md^rUltJ. .tk . S.JUn^J . 

.-E.Ü e:;.ploy-ent oeen :.re/.rran-ed?lf !Ju.T/it?i .i--.-;9^ »r >^ 



5. 3 tute aino un" 



. -f • -, 



.iia. n^-^tvira o^. yöur •^;ntai rG;:ource 






IT.-. - 



o.,iaYe_you prcvicucly ro-i:3tcred f 






or ü.r. 

l GJ'ivi 






£e.nZw....i[^.5'3,-/ß.l b 






7,Hc:'.ve you 






Goatec^?Tf ■;o,f;;ivc yÜMoo und 



-■ a. w >v> Vw VI. '■ ji-^v.. l ) ii. J. L GCi 



*< *••••#« 



:.iiy -Giue bc-cn rciU;:iod ci vx ,: j. to 

8.}la-e you previou^iy rctndod in tlic Jnited 3t,-to;;?jr cci^tr-tc "vüerc 
and betvco'- ^■•■■sr^r ■ f- < KT- 

r.:nd roc,;. i;;i tucrofcp M'o 



:o ,r^iv: -T, tc 



" •• f 1. n 



j. . '.4. «^ X >.-» 1^. (.7 



:-li-y.-AJOeW*Ö. _ to ^:.Iul ooraor 




( ■ *•■ 



■y T r . . , , r^ ■■, 



L ■ ^ . . • 



' O' 



HE.: G l.NKH ALK^'NSULAT 
BERLIN 




Datu:n des Poststempel 



s 



r;as ^ -\: '^^^'^^y^yi^fU}'-^ Inn-r. hi..rclurch mit, 
^ ^ ^y-^ ^^^ '-- ^WU\4n4^Tr^vt i^ unter den 

to Igenlen Nu.T.ro rn f^inrMra^r.^n sind: 



'^ «t ■-• 




'■'•«.. 1 1 V, r 1 1 « V ^ , 



/-"».— 



« ^ V ». . 



{ 



ut,l;::UL 



^^.v u)Qq 



Es kaiin zu 






BEPI'-' '-ITM NY 
„. ., , ■*^'--'i nicht ingogeWmyErrden, warni-^ 

b:- :T:it ei;, r Bu:-ü.-k,- 1 cht igjn^- Ih-,,r Angelegenheit rech- 
nen ko-ricn; j-doch v/i^-d Ihn ?n diesbezüglich rechtzeiti« 
eine weitere Mitteilung zug-^hen. 

^ Falls Sie -v hrer ■ Mala Ihre Nunimer bescheinigt 
er-nalt ::-. hab-r , gilt .' ^1 bstvo -3tur.il i ch nur die niedri 



Nummer. 



gste 






AMERIKANISCHES GENERALKONSULAT 



•^ 



•v£c 



.>..VH d-JLA^o <*^i)-^ (f^^cA/y, ^-<MjÜ4 ^^^ ^dU3jCajC(J 

I (j Washington lane ^^ ^^^ 



c 






Cwv. 







u 



/, 



V 



/ 



^^^ 



G 



(xH-- 



:70v<*^-^t<*<^ 



11 f 

'^-4^^ <25-w<Lu jZä,-G^ 



^ C<. f 



7 



■ / 




K .\ 



• 




-li i/VO-v^j^^ 



C<L>- ^^1 



•V-/: 



^•'-t/V, 



l 






^oicv 






^. 



/ 



''■U^ 



o. 



^<.< 



^i'Xju,, 






^^^^^"^^Ut^ 



H 






C6ux^ Ax/ vuUM (^JUc(^ 



>u ^t^ 



-i ("-^^^v ^' 



l 




■ / y 






' C-< ÜU.KX 



«•VV/ 



-/iS^^ 






•<<,• 





AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 

Phorie: (212)744-6400 

Fax:(212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Date: 12/21/2009 



Sys#: 000198685 



Box: 2 



Polder: 2 



% 






N 



r 



i ä» ' • . • -», 




■*-%mmjm 



•i^^-,,^ 



'<'t M 



.mm 



rjornp-- 



JT 



"'im 



l^lltT. 



nfirrr 



I 






^11 r 







^^a»^^^^^Bii>- '-^ix— ^ 



^^U 




.2^ 



^•^hi^ 



' ■'^^s>i*'- 



'*'!*^^^W'^ 






,rA^:^**'' 



*«htt 



4t^'^# 



ns^ 






- -:^^^^&-.f!JV 



P05T 



»•^••f^. - 












Ai i 



r 



i'/i 



•v^i^ 



■,ij 



^w^ 




(p 



■^i^Mp^*" 



HOME TOWN 

FORTHE 

HOMELESS 

ÜOR twenty years Richborough 
-*- Camp in Kent, which housed the 
nien of Kilchener's and Haig's British 
Armies up to 1918, has been enipty. 
Battered by the weather, with weeds 
growing through the floors and roofs 
coliapsing, this great group of hiits 
seemed derelict and doonied lo decay. 
But to-day the Camp is again the scene 
ol* ceaseiess aetivity, lor it is the liome 
of over 3,500 Jewish and other exiies, 
f ugitives from Nazi terror, men seeking 
sanctuary in a peacefui democratic 
State. 

Here aniong country lanes, ciose to 
Ramsgate and Sandwich, these exiies. 
Jews and Christians together, havr 
founded a Community based on the 
freedom of the land which gives them 
shelter. 

The Camp has grown from an 
emergency home for 300 refugees 
into an independent town now con- 
taining over 3,500 people. 



Ir.'-- • 









A Union Jack flies proudly overhead. Below, thousands 
■^^- of Germans and Austrians work and sleep. They are 
happy. Any one of them may sometime be found, like this 
man, looking up at the flag. There is no bitterness in 
tlieir expressions. 

There is no barbed wire, no armed sentry to be seen. 
This flag, the emblem of a nation with whom these people 
and their fathers were onee at war — and with whom their 
oppressors are again at war — now, in their hour of need, 
is recognised as the emblem of their freedom. 

Eaeh one of them, Jew or Christian, has been brande 
as a criminal: the Jew because of bis birth, the Christia 
for bis love of freedom, they have been driven from * 3 
their homes and persecuted. 

Expelled from their country by the Nazi Government, 
these law-abiding, peace-loving people have endured 
torture and privation and suf fering almost beyond human 
endurance. Deprived of their property, destitute and often 
starving, these people sought sanctuary. They found it 
in England — in a free and happy land. 



% c<»i!iplele 





1 



'Z>^' 



^.AAt'..' tSü^ 



I 







^s. 









»iHiiiiMl I 



,^ 



■ <fc , V^ r,.^»jgy>. T- .. ,«i<im. 



«Il^«*-****t •**•»' 



xAP!*** 



«•^fl 



i^^ 



A 



f 



p .,» 



t^*.^ 



4 

1^ •% 



*^,'. 



f#^- 



M 



J^ 



r 7 '- 



iw 








w 











ndSo 




1/t;:_ 






piie Reward of ihe Sdj^: 




50 huts used as sleeping quarlers in 

», in which over 3,500 men are acconi- 

in parties of seventy-two. Each hui 

who is responsible for the discipline, 

smartness of bis men. 

IIH in on English lines, in spirit as well 

ere is no place here for barbed wire 

^uards of the concentration camp. 

^mselves elect their own police, who 

) wearino red armlets. The good 

inclive discipline which the men 

^st themselves is demonstrated by 

the worst misdemeanours since 

the Camp opened, was a charge 

for overstaying their leave. 

Seen this Camp, which demonstrates 

.tive and skill of ils inhabilanis. ean 

liTwherever these men go they must. with 

aordinary will to work and constrnetive 

eate a new life for themselves — and 

-»« nrw worlv nn»l '• hr«#»'»»l"»* Ilf^ fpr flici 

ecounianl. chief registrar, chief ot ii 



m 




\ 



p^ä^fllm 



I 1 ^ pi^^ 
■>Hiiii..<P, *" M 



I i 







»ifii 



.4 



/. 



[:nen 

riling 

;er*s 

lies. 



acc( 



ne • e 



mm^- 




the administrative staff. in their officeä, 



coniplelc 



)| 



j.>*i...,i». . U-. — ^ 





TJUpJJOfs 



'^^ä^f ■" f*^ ■ ■■■'*« 



•/"/:. 






I 



f 



-■■i.\^(My[NGllSH 
.••<>:o,^'IÜING 



"^•M^ 



»•*« 



"*«*Mrf./ 



\ 



-■st^^y 



^i^ÜKs 



'j^i 







This town has ils own posl officc aiitl lelephoiie swiU'h- 

board, with a compelenl slaff for sorliiig lelter.s and 

dealing with the business of Ihe deparlmeiil. 



OUT-PATIENTS 
and 

FIRSTAID STATION 




-■9«. 



r'i 





The hospilal is conlrollcd l)y luo d(»('l(>rs, niiiiH'iit iiini 
in llioir lionieland, with a first-aid stalion for dealing 
wilh casnallies. A concerl hall, cincina, uaU'h-niaker's 
shop an<l a ph<>l(»graplii<; slore are ollier anicnities. 



4/" 



'^-, 



pr 



i'^J^- 



r*r" f 




t 




I : 'Ä», 






S '• 






/ 



Ibv. O'lliams Press Lid.. ').']. Long Acrt-. London. W.C.2. and pnlilMu'd 



'■: . ^J 







i 



( ^ 



X 



^™fc^Jv 






C^ 



I 



rhr acconnlani, chief regislrar, chief of Ihe overseas deparlnienl, h*ave officers, billel officers and work organisers complelc 
the administrative staff. In tlieir (»fficen, finaneial niatters are managed and poeket nionev paid ont. 



'"^ 



^. 



«.""^^ÜC 




ä^ 



^ 






■ i 












Early nioriiiiig briiigs ••cusloiiiers" lo Richborough's 

barber. His sbop is bis pride, but be is quile ready to 

do bis busincss in Ihe open-air for customers wbo wisb 

to make tbe iiiost of tbe sunshine. 



Many of tbe exiles, of course, prefer to sliave tbem- 
selvcs. But even tliese seem to enjoy tbe novelty of 
camp life in being able to sbave out of doors, altliougli 
tbe Autborities bave niade evcry effort to provide 

lionie comforts. 




., p'-^iwte»^'-*««*!»' 




"'^ 




^^H*'. 



r.F "^^" / 



>^v ^. 






"- y 



*:i 












*^^ 




They find Happiness in their new Work 



Every man in the Camp has a job. Tliere are representatives of 
more than 30 difTcrent trades and professions, including doctors, 
architects, enginecrs, dentists, lawyers, elec tricians, clerks, 
bricklayers. and business men. Between tbem tbey are rebuild- 
ing and maintaining the Camp and its Services. 
Their day beajins at 6,30. They take breakfast at 7, and work 
from 8 to 5.30, with a break for lunch at 12.30. After working 



hours they are free to leave the Camp at will, but must return 
at 10 p.m. for roll-call. 

Only pay they receive is sixpence a week for pocket money. 
The refugees remain at the Camp until they are fitted fcr a trade. 
After that they become emigrants to United States and British 
Empire centres. 




.^sftlA 



■— ^ 



WHERE EVERl 




MAN HAS A JOB 



W--r ' 



'1 



i \. 



PIcnty of vvork is lound for ihe buGtiiiukers in the Caiup's buot- 

rt'pairing shup. 



Others, kept busy in the gardens, supply the Camp kitchen uith 

vegetables. 




In the rebuiUling of hiits, hands tliat were once occupied with pcnsand 
surgical instruincnts, liandlc with equal skill, saws, chiscis and bricks. 



Both skillcd and unskillcd nicn are given opportunities for useful 
vvork in buihling Camp roads and draining the land. 



r 



.-3. 



-'gj'^ 




* *' ür-jf"^ 




inany uscd to town lifc are prcparing for emigration to 
agricultural areas in many par(s of the workl. 



The Stores which provide for thousands ol meals daily. 




Th 



ese 



bookbinders are learning a new trade while they do duties 
as part of the Organisation. 



The carpenters are great craftsmen in the Camp. They never do 

shoddy work. 




*■ t^im^^' 



l'oiilciy-keepers learning to take their places in agricuUural cuin- 
munities supply eggs to the Camp störe. 



Thorough agricultiiral instriKlioiis are providcd for (liose who have 

chosen (»» bccome land \v<irkcr8. 




'I, 



"»r 



* . 














>r!?s*^i 



A 



Repairing and maintaining the buiUliiig of the camp has kept 
hiindreds busy since the Camp >vas founded. 



The tailor's shop is ant)thor of llie Caiii|)*s "indiiNtrics'' in whicli idl« 
hands aie oiue again riii|)l(>\<Ml ii-.rfully. 







'flr 



,?. 



'JiUkl» 






V^ 



•C^ 



«s^v 



^^\ 

V » 

% 



*^- 



W^^. 



Hi«^. 









Wx.mryi 





/ 
















••%^ 








% 




NEW FOUND 

FREEDOM 



Faciiig tlie fiilure wilh reiiewed coiifidoiice aiid Iiope llie 
comiiiiiiiity al Richboroujjjh are rapidly absorhiiiji; llie lial)ils 
and ciisloms of tlie pt-ople wlio liave giveii IIumii saiirluary. 
After Ihe day's loil \\\v iiieii allciid classes al wliicli Kii«j;lisli 
is taught. A graiiiophoiie is iised \o lu'Ip uilh the leacliing of 
pronuiiciatioii. The camp direclor iiisisls llial everyoiie sliall 
learii to speak llie langiiage ihal will sooii beconie liis own. 



T 



r. tiiiwB. 



»• « 



^1: 



s 




J 



^■^-y: 




4^ 



-• A' 










r. 








Y 



{ 



y^}'-^' 



"•»A ,1 






'■'^ 



^^^^^., 








%L 



*••!! 



I^ 
















1 
I 






They cinswered the call to the Cookhouse Door 



Two Ihoiisand pounds of polaloes, 124 pounds of 
porridge, 180 pounds of niargarine, 200 jxiiinds 
of jam, 3 hundredweighl of sugar, 700 pounds of 
nieal, 420 pinls of milk and 1,800 pounds of bread 
are used in Ihe meals served every day in the 
dining hall of the camp. Breakfast consists of 



porridge and tea, coffee or cocoa; dinner of soup, 
mcat, potaloes, vegetables and pudding; supper 
of bread, margarine and eggs. The food bill alone 
lotals £25,000 a year. The daily cost is 8Jd. for 
each man. Part of the £10,000 spent to equip the 
camp was used for the purchase of 6,000 plates. 



3,000 mugs and the cullery necessary for com- 
pleting the table-ware. 

The food is cooked in kitchens once used by the 
Kitchener and Ilaig armies, and stoves which were 
used during the last War are still in Operation in 
the kitchens. 



The food is supplitMl froni a slore which is kepl 
with meticulous efficiency by a man who was at 
one time the buyer for a large Viennese induslrial 
Organisation (See Piclure 23 also). 



'^ 




--^. 



^j* 



i» 



^ 

'-#^, 



HELPING THE 

EXEES- 

A LTHOUGH most of the Services at 
Richborough are organised on a com- 
niiinal basis, each man has to manage many 
Ihings for himself. Laundry is a personal 
matter. The men have even learned, with 
the lielp and advice of the tailors at the 
camp, to do their own mending and 
darning. 

iMinor injuries, which in other days were 



%>: 






V' \ 



ß«H^^, 



-TO HELP 
THEMSELVES 

attended to at the family medicine ehest, 
now receive more expert attention. 

There are sixty doctors in the camp ; many 
of them were famous specialists in Vienna, 
Municli and Berlin. Only two of them 
actually practise medicine or surgery in the 
camp. None of course works for fees or 
money of any kind. The others sweep the 
floors, work in the garden and on the roads 
and give help wherever it is needed most. 










/ 



■W 



r- H- 




■*i 




» * j-'Tü^.r 



^-UTi'»* 



"f 



:>j 



it: 






•-^ 



0-.>--I\>i<V' 




7 



/> W 






^<^' 



^ \V: - 



>:>. 



ijrt "pK 



"^ 



/"t: 







S«*t£ 




^ ^*-% 



A T Richborough Camp there is peace. Free from 
tyranny and oppression, the exiles once more 
can enjoy their leisure without fear and live in con- 
tent nicnt. Here are some of tliem sunbathing near 
tlieir liuts. 







r. 




VI 









"^ 



fit 



ik 



De Liddle Fellow Wins 



W 



'"""'tltl^mäm. 
-» jnm»lllgr 




i? *??* 



i^J|i3( 






,^rs»«' 




/ ^ 



is«*i# 



1. ;i 



omNoUÜMp 



JlMMl 




/••^ 



i^/ A 



■/ 






PLAYTIME 
IN CAMP 

Apart froiii going to film-shows 
at the cinema — wliicli seals 450 
persons and is the camp's most up- 
to-datc building — tlie members 
providc their own entertainment. 
Tliere is cliess for tlie more pro- 
found and ganies for the athletic. 
There are some, of course, who are 
content willi their pipes after the 
day is done. 

A sniall man whose incredible 
activity niade up for his lack of 
inches is tlie best table-tennis 
player. 

'• De liddle fellow is de champion," 
say his supporters with whom he 
shares a hut. 

There is a canteen which serves 
cigarettes, fruit and sweets and soft 
drinks in the table-tennis hall. 
Nowhere do you see a sad or bitter 
face. 










'T^fffw. '■''9r:-f^ 



*Ä^« 







.•■V-" 




1 



;."^ 




/ 




Arlisls aiiumjj; llic iiuMiibers spciid lluir liiiie dccoratiiig 
their sleeping ciiiarlers wilh ])icliires and iiiolloes. These 
drawiiigs ahove are of Sand wich Sireet and Sandwieh loll- 
brid«'e carrietl oiil in browii and wliile oii tlie vellow walls. 










Mnsic'ians niakc nse of llieir lalenis in the eanip orclieslra. 
The U'ack'r was fornierly a nieinber of Ihe \ ienna 
Pliilharnionie Orehesira. The bar billiards table is never 
without players and speetators. 



«Hkl^l 








01^- 



K, 









fA 



" 0ßi 




^4f:^ 







»► 




G-r^** j 



"^ i 





V 



!J 



\\ 



''-s*««^ 



■jr^f^H' 






/ ./y 



VsdTV.' 



■I'. 



.U.'^ 






—^ 






* ^^* 




kl. 



■i#*** 



/ 





WHEM WORK 
IS DOME 




FK>Hrr I)(mIs aiifl lawiis arc alroady rv- 
pla('iii<<; llir wt*tMl-«j;rowii wilcleriirss round 
llio hiils as a rtvsiill of llir work soiiit* <>f llio 
refiigres liave iloiit* diiriii«; llieir Irisure 
lioiirs. Willi iiiaiiv ^ardcMiiiii' is a liobbv aiid 
rt'rrealioii. Tlie wriliii«:; roiuii is always 
croudrd willi iiicii ulio kocp coiislaiilly in 
loiic'li l)v Icllrr uilli lln'ir lra";i<'allv scaltt'n'd 

fa Uli lies. 



Fine specimens of 
iiianhood arc to he 
l'oiind «nerywhcr«' in 
Ihr Camp. Brave 
fellovvs wilh spirils 
Ihat no eruelly or 
adversily can hreak. 
Men who >vili render 
fine Service to Ihe 
( iOimlry whieh offers 
Iheni iheir chanee. 





^ 




■S "'^t^^ 



•^^^T 



'^ 



\ 



The Primate of 
All England 

vislted thls, 

The Kitchener Camp 

Richborough, Kent 

and, in the course of an address, said: 




F 



IFTY years ago I spent two summers in Gottiiigen University. 
I studied German literature, listeiied to Germaii music, and shared 
the life of a German University. I think of the kindly German 
homes in whieh I moved, of the many German friends I made — and that 
increased my desire that, when that great country is set free from its 
present rulers and is healed of the disease with whieh they have infected 
it, it may return to its rightful place among the nations of the world. 

"I am proud that this country has had the honour of being able to 
give you a place of refuge and of hope, and I hope that even now you 
are having sonie share in that freedom of faith, of conscience, and of 
life whieh is the greatest treasure of Ihe English people. 

"I hope that this country may have the help of the Service whieh you 

would all be willing to render at this time to this country's need when 

it has no other wish in this war than to rid your country and the world 

of a tyranny whieh has too long been allowed io lie upon it. It will 

be a great thing when we in this country can look upon you not only as 

refugees whom we have been glad to welcome, but also as fellow-workers 

in a common cause in whieh we can all join. That is my hope." 




AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 
Center for Jewish History 

1 5 West 1 6th Street 
NewYork.NY 10011 

Phone: (212)744-6400 

Fax:(212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Date: 12/21/2009 



Sys#: 000198685 



Box: 2 



Folder: 3 



,*.>;■ -- 1^ *; J!<.ifK.'Hi»»t^/.'f\y';: 



'Mf-i'irmm\ 



/ 



^tiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 






No. 5 



JUL 



1939 E 



V 



THE 
KITCHENER 

CAMP 
REVIEW 



* 



The Journal of the Kitchener Camp 
for Refugees, at Richborough, near 
Sandwich, written for and by them. 



* 






Copyright of all articies strictiy reserved ; and they 
can only be reprpduced by the permission of the 

Camp Director^ 

JONAS A. MAY. F.I.P.S. 



= PRINTED AND PUBLISHED MONTHLY, AT TMC KITCHENER CAMP. RICHBOROUGH # = 



niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



Ui. 



a^-zt^^ 



THE KITCHENER CAMP REVIEW. 



Ho »ö. 



Julv. 1959 



I 



1 



Editor t Phineas L. May« 
Assistant Sditor; Mrs », J» j\# Mav. 

B J I T R I A lit 

"And they shall büild Up the old wastes, they shall raise up the 
former desolations, and they shall repair the waste eitles, the 
desolation of many centuries" • 

Mrs. Lionel de Bothschild quoted the above from the 61st Chapter 
of Isaiah at the opening of the Camp Cinema, and she has summed-up 
perfectly the work achieved in what was a derelict and desolate city of 
huts which had been unoccupied for 22 years, and which, by the sweat of 
men's brow, has been made Intö a very habitable town, including the 
cinema, throUgh the genei^oslty of Mr. Oscar Deutsch and the Odeon staff • 
A cinema which would conipare ffeivourably with the best, of its size, 
anyvirhere> arid it haö riöen in only a few weeks from its "former 
desolation" 

XKXXXXXXX 

ViTe have so far tried to convey to our readers the spirit of cheer- 
fülness and happiness that pervades in this Camp in spite of the many 
personal sorrov/s and anxieties of the members who have found temporary 
shelter here. ¥e cannot be but tinged with sadness, for so many of 
those> who ha,ve done Sterling work from almost the commencement of the 
Camp, have had to say "auf wiedersehen". Priendships made in a place 
such as this are far different from those of ordinary life, comparable 
with the comradeship of the trenches, whore men facing the unknown 
futüre, fomied attachments deep and unbreakable. And so when the time 
comes , as it inevitably must, for us all to go our separate ways, there 
will be linked aoross the seven seas a new and strong chain of friend- 
ship which will last, when the buildings will have returned to their 
former desolation and docay, and the ground will once again be over- 
grown with weods • 



•oOo 



THE DIRECTOR»S MESSAGE ♦ 

In all past issues I have tried to convey to the men of the Camp 
my feelings on the spirit with which they have helped to create the 
Richborough fajnily» 

On this occasion I propose, on their behalf, to thank those who, 
whilst being in fact non-residential members of our family, have been 
responsible in various ways for the creation of our home • The list is a 
long one, and many friends must perforce be omitted, but our apprecia- 
tion is nevertheless sincere for them as well. 

Pirstly, on behalf of all members of the family, I feel it is time 
to publiclj'' express our deep sense of gratitude to Mr. Ernest Joseph, 
.O.S.E., without whose help and guidance this Camp could never have 
existed at all. 

In alphabetical order, our thanks are then due to : - Messrs. 
Bamberger and Company, who have provided the timber. The Cement Mark- 
eting Company, who have provided us with enough cement to make all our 
roads, v/hich will convert the Camp from a quagmire into a modern town. 
To Messrs. James Clark and Company, for the glass, without which our 
sleeping quarters could hardly have been proof against the Clements, 
a,nd whose assistance has enabled us to repair the ravage of hundreds of 
naughty boys • To Messrs. ITettlefolds , for the millions of nails , with- 
out which no floor could have been laid or partitions made to stand. 
The International Paint Compa.ny, who have supplied all the paint and 
distemper which has helped to beautify our homes. To The London Brick 
Company, for the thouseinds of bticks , which has mado it possible to 
build the class-rooms and to erect many necessary buildings, and to 
Mr. Watts and his band of 'merry Englishmen* , who have done so much, not 
only to help us in the preparation of the first essentials, but who have 
taught our men, in the words of our Camp song, to "work the English way'.' 

(Continued at foot of page 18) 



\ 



The Kitchener Camt) Rft vi^w • 



2. 



MIXED PICK T. Tu .q. 



HAPPY 
EVENINGS 



Our week-end evenings entertainments continue to slve 

iMesxroy. in addition to some really amazinp- actinp- cn^tm-npc, «nH 

L'nar^^uf the'^S.S?^ with Just cddj and enfs'anrfooSf aSsflrof ess- 
ir^Sr;+=^ \„ really outstanding success of the evening was that of the 

?ir? :.-..! °?s Hitler, sim^i^LiiiiMifiit tii^iify^^^^" 



BRI GUTER 
HOSPITALS 



?^^^+ ?r*"'^''*^ °^ *^® °^P ^^ö *^ö t^o hospitals and 
f irst-axd rooms , and it is only natural In so largo a 

'up-to-scratch^^r'hL*''^!.*^'''!."'^?^^^ ^" ^°"^^ ^^° ^° "°* ^^^^^^ ^Ml 
^j^lJrlZ L °^ ?^^^ alternatirely received some form of Scratch 

as prssihlf «5l"?r^'i"^ ''°^*°r ^^" ^"^^°^^ *° ^^ as bSs?iy occupJed 

Mea ol atlraSfni L\^''v "?? ^r^^!"^ °" ^righter hospitals wlth the 
iaea oi attractlng, we take it, fresh patients. 



HOW THEY 
DO IT 



itoongst the methods they now have for attracting their 
cliontele, splendid sign-boards in hright red and white 
T. ^- 4 -. ^^'^? ^°" ®y® strain even before you enter the hosüital 

comers°^lä tTalff ?f ^°i^%^' ^-PP3^ smiles'^and radio aL^^^'aS * 
Corners, and to add to these attractions, good concorts have been fflvsn 
to the patients and hospital staff . We are told, but it mav be oliv a 
rumour, that certain members of the Cajnp are seriously thinking o? 
takmg up permanent residence in the wards . i^nin^mg oi 



RADIO 
FOR ALL 



Througn some good work put in by the Radio Manufacturers 
Association, many of the leading manufacturers of radios 
have presented sets to the Camp and much additional 
enjoyment has been gained therefrom. aaai^ionax 



PHYSICAL 
TRAINING 



A number of physical training instructors have been going 
ovcrto ChathamHouse School, Ramsgate, to participate in 
^, . physical training, v/ith the obiect of learnine- fi'r,;Ti-i «>, 

;i'Sr''3anrrhas^:f L"L'\^^^^.^%-^^^ *° *-^^ ^ 'l-"'?! thf's^Se way 
^s Mr. i3anJä:s has yet to be proved, for, as has already been written in 

EnglisS! ' "'^ ^"^^^'^ ^' ^'^^^ different from ?Sat of tSe 



ROTARY 
CLUB 



The Deal and Walmer Rotary Club has given a standing invit- 
ation for two different members of the Camp to go over everv 
1 -, 1 ^ rortnlght as guosts to thcir dinnors , a privilcgG which 1=, 
much looked forward to by the lucky fer who are sclectcd to go . In 
solGctmg the men, thoso who have dono some Sterling work are rivon tho 

Rot^ry'JiuJs"' "'' ^" ^'"^ ^°°^ ^'^°^'° '^°^° ^^"° men wSo rSn\°Se 



ASH 
FELLOWSHIP 



Pivo members of the Ash Fellowship gave a littlo concert 

^"°,?3°"J"?' '"'''^°^' ^y "^ sheer simplicity, had a unique 
Deauty of its ovm, and many concorts we have had on a far 

!h?f °^r^^^° ^^^° ^^^r ^^^^ Vloe.snTO than that given by the A^S lelSw- 
f^^;,,.^^^^v^^° assured that they will always be welcome if they of?ered 
to giVG such another entertainmont . o-LJ-crca 



HEW 
ARRIVALS 



An evont which never loses its ploasurG or excitcment is tho 
mu x^f^ °^ ^ ^^°^^^ contingent from Austria or Gcrmany. 
+r,„.^ . . ^i?^* **^°y °°"'° ■'^° *^° Ca^P ^'^^^cn it is noaring completion is 
their good lortune - yet is it? It must have been a privilcgc for those 

welcoSI! ^ ^ ^''°^''''° *^'° ^^"^"^ ^°^ *^^°^^ comradSs whom ?hey now 



ROIMD 

"PTTTT 






A tour of the huts often rosults in some very pleasant 
Gurpr^öcs. If "An Jingli3hman*s nomo is his Castle", then 
X, . , *^° ^^^^ °^ 3omc of tho members of this Camp are tn thon 
their palaces. In front of some of the huts deliehtfufli^So gardens 
have been made, but it is inside tho buildings that the charactoristici 



^ 

« 



The Kitchener Camp Review: 



3. 



of the occupants of one hut differ from the other* In one hut for 
example, delightful pictures of Sandwich are painted. These pictures 
xiave oeen done in shades of brov/n and look like photographs. On other 
walls^are pictures, including those of their Llajesties, and on others, 
mscriptions such as "England expects every man to do his duty - You 
are not an Englisliman, but nevertheless do your duty here" • 

CARPEOTRY 
DE LUXE 



xhen in other huts, clever carpenters have constructed 
wardrobes with sliding doors that we should be proud to 
Show to LIessrs, Gornpaotura, Ltd. Of special merit is the 



carpentry worlc m the huts which were oocupied by the ex-Dovercourt 
boys. Their hut was a great credit to then. 



ilELIEVE IT 
OR NOT 



Yesl Believo it or notU A member of this Caiiap had the 
occasion to malce his first Visit to London one day. He 
<,, ^ ^, Y®^'^"^ ^^"^^^ "^^^ Gt .Portland Street Post Office and on the 

iloor he noticed somebody had dropped a snapahot. He stooped to pick it 
ap and was astonished to find that it was a photo of a group of his 
comrades taken in one of our huts. p u a g^oui; oi ais 



EIS MASTER» S 
VOICE 



A meniber of my staff who held a responsible Position in 
a grai-nophone factory in Austria, surprised me the other 
-v. 14. 4X1 , . 1 ^^ inviting ne to make a rocord of my voice. He had 

b.ougnt with him the necessary apparatus , and with the help of our 
electricians, set up a recording room. They told me I speak rather 
iaster than it is possible for the human ear, oven with a fluent know- 
ledge of tne ^nglish tongue, to always pick up, and I, thorefore, spoke 
?*J^!:* fffi^? ,^^^®' f very slow pace. When they took me ovor, immed- 
iately afoer I had spoken into the »mike», to hear the record played to 
me, I was horrified to find that m^ voice sounded horribly Oxford 

accent, B.B.C. the old school tie - what l _ I 

shall Gontmue to speak fast. 



SCOUT 
GROUP 



Through the enthusiasm of a numbor of the younger membors, 
a Scout Group has been formed, and those, \irho had long 
X. . X . 5*^^^ deprived of the joy of scouting can once again 
participate m the doing of good turns v/ith all the deeper moaning of 
the movement, llr. Frank Lovy, a London scoutmaster, has rendered a 
great Service to us by giving our group his help and advice. We hopo to 
be able to givc a more detailed report of our Scout Group in a future 
issue, but here is an item of exceptional interest. 



ROVERS AT 
BIGGLESWADE 



With the usual splendid spirit of the scout movement, the 
Rovers of the University of Cambridge invited six members 
^ ^, .,n ^ , ^^ ^^^ ^^^P group to spend ten days with thom in Camp at 
Soutnill Park, Biggleswade, Bedfordshiro o Writing to me from Southill 
Park, they Said - "Yfe are but only a few days here, but we cannot help 
sa3^ing that v/e have nevor soen such a nice camp as this, and never have 
we oeen so friendly welcomed as höre in this country. Our first surprise 
was uo be receivod by a Rover who spoke German f luently and made us verv 
mucn easior and quicker acquainted with our friends, as it would be 
possible if he could not speak this language" . 



CAIiP 
ViTEDnilTG 



The first wedding of a member of this Camp was solemnised 
this month in the Camp Synagogue. A wedding feast was 
^ XU V .^ prepared for the happy couple, in a hut, by the comrades 
of the bridegroom. Poems, music and ^^^n a dance by the bride and bride- 
groom marked the happy evening, and the speeches included one bv the 
Camp Director. '^ 

EiNfGLISH B0R1\T A member of the Camp, recently promotcd to the staff, 

became the proud and happy father of an English-born' 
rlis wife arrived by aeroplano only a few days before the happy event 
The Camp Director consentod to become the godfather, and the young 

English2iian has been named Jonas B l, That is all the family 

for this month. 



y.i 



on 



news 



'DO'E SSSTA 



The grandost ontortainmont it was possible for four 
musicians to give was givcn by Don Sesta and his Gaucho 
Band (by kind perirdssion of LIessrs« Bobby h Co., itd., Polke3tonc) 
recently. The teclinique, quality and perfection of this band Struck 
the mombers of our Camp orchestras ii:imodiatoly . r^j^g EDITOR 



The Kltchener Camp Review: 



4. 



DO YOU SPEAK EITGLISH? 
Bv:- Professor E. R. 

Cajnt, ^n^J'^fv^^^^^''^^ ^"^^ accoramodatibn of the first members of this 
Xf^lL °"® f- *?® foremost and urgent Problems the Direction had to 
SngILh Lssons? ^^^^^^^^^ ^" opportunity of having goof LfuseJul 

accordiL^Jn ?h^?r^ were subjected to a simple examination, and, 
foliows"? respective English knowledge, classified as 

"B" - Beginners. 

Beginners advanced (with some English knowledge) 
Medium (with a moderate knowledge) 
Medium advanced (with a fair knowledge) 
Advanced (with a good knowledge of English) 
Advanced (with an almost perfect knowledge) 



"B a" 
"M" 
"M a" 
"A" 
"A a" 



Out of the last group some comrades were chosen. and. after a 
close exammation, entrusted with giving their collc^gJes English 
lossons consistlng of one lesson daily. eagues üngxisn 

üut hi^ S^^^=^^?' ^- f" ''''°'^^ °*^°^ respect, cur Director J. A. May 
hi^ CiL! i^^^^S-^^^^^*^"^'' ^^ °^=^ disposal and demonstrated to us 
hours. sonorous vowols and his distinct "th" for some 

»r,^n„=?TJ^"'^}^.^V<=^,\"*h" Sounds in an Englishman's mouth, 
iSl^i .H^ mimitable för all the 2,000 members practising It 
actually with much cagorness and diligencel Up to now. however what 
they have succoeded in performing best is the written "th"! ' 

devise^a SSforiS^^LfH J^°/F*!?°^ development öf English lessons was to 
atic ?rainin?o? ^f? ?i°+ Instruction, and to carry through a system- 
toacher by pfofession! ' '°^°^°^«' practically nono of them being a 

has bSn S!^f ^^^^^^^"'^ ^^ "^^^ ?^^^° ^^y *o English", a method which 
SLS ,^^ It ^0^,"^^"^ y°ars. It is distinguished for its being 
teachorf fr?^ ?hf ^^^"^1° elements of language, thus enabling the 
ifS^^^^f^ ^ outsot, to talk to his students in English - if this 

?S? pauses arisiA/?n th/'^' ^'^'V.T ^^^'^^ *^^°^S^ ^^^°°* associaSon. 
ffß^tnr^rL^ +t ^ m the coursG of the convorsation are filled by 
?^^^^?^n+ J ^^Ifs enable the students to acquirc further olementary 
expedients for later convorsation with Englishmon. Mr. Mav and other 
Sfi^ft"'"''''"''^ of the staff have already%ufficient5 acqL?S?eS S 
!ii?.J +.^°°''l*^ ?^ *^^^ ^^^^'""^ language, so as to underst^d and grLt 
applications fpr Icave given to them by means of gestures. 

In the so-called "Teachors Training", the teachcrs are submitted 
to a hard and methodical training in grLiar by two of tSelr coTleaSos 
whilst two resident teachers, English undorgraduatos, are giving ' 
lessons on Conversation, Pronounciation and Literature. Six or scven 
hours -teachers Training- daily, and two lessons in the evenSg! gi?r?he 
kn^So^L^ good opportunity of deepening and enlarging their English 
knowledge. Heedloss to mention that teachers and students are on 
oxcellent terms, and that the student's diligencc to learn English 
even suppresses a natural aptitude for laziness. ^ngJ-isn 

„,, 3°^ Student received one of the four progressive text-books. 
f^^?'^^^"! to their respective knowledge, a copy-book and a peSSil'so 
di?ficuUies"." P^ö^°"töd from doing his homework by "technicll 

In a really meritorlous way, toachors and frionds of the 

+!^foh^^^^"^%S ■°'^'' 9^^ ^a^° put themselvcs at cur disposal and are 
toachlng in the evenings such an excollent English. as , stränge asit 
may sound, up to nov., none of our English teafhers of Germ^oriKn 
has succeeded m oqualling. There again, teachers and students Ire on 
tho best terms noRsiblfi oaT^n^-i = n„ ,tiv,^v, 4.t,„ o. ,._„ !r '=^^'^'^^^s aro on 

those unselfish holpers wo oxpress our vory best thanks. 



The Kit ebener Camp Review; 



5o 



In the last few days , the "Linguaphone" method has been intro- 
duced in this Camp, with a view to a further deepening of English 
lessons, to the prevention of different pronounciations, inevitable 
with forty German teachers , and thus , Standard -English for the Camp has 
been provided. 20 apparati and 3,000 text-books have been acquired and 
the teachers were instructed by an expert for a weck. Thus the basis 
for a thorough English instruction has been created, and, with two 
lessons daily, this instruction is carried through successfully . 

With a View to intensifying the usage of the English language , 
tho author of this article has made the following suggestions which 
will bo realised, 

Comrades willing and capablc of speaking English all tho day will 
bc markcd by a small badgo aftor passing a littlo examination« In 
Order to cnablo tho English mombers of tho st äff to get this badge, wo 
havG desistod from examining thomo 

The "English-speaking day", v/hen evorybody \7as only allowed to 
speak English, has already been dealt with in the last issuo of this 
"Review" • 

Pinally, wo have to forv/ard two requests to our English f riends : 
Do not educato your childrcn so well; and bo loss polite tov/ards 

US l 

Melancholically wo hear the correct English of the little childron 
and, füll of envy, wo try to Imitate thoir "th" . It scoms ridiculous 
that babies should show Performances which cvon grey-haired people 
amo ng us cannot oqual» 

Many comrades havo got English acquaintances and talk to thom more 
or less intelligiblyp We know quite well that wo do not speak your 
language unobjectionably. Howcver, at our requests to correct us , we 
alv/ays got the answor - "Oh, what marvcllous English you speakl" - 
Oh, what a woll-behaved people arc tho English l 

Please do forget your good education whon talking to us • Correct, 
rate at us for our bad English, but nover say again - "Oh, it's 
cxcellcnt l" • 

Believe us , we do want to learn your language as thoroughly as 
possibloo Help us in this, please; and we shall always be grateful 
to you, while 3^our namcs will bocome immortal, when we shall once be 
able to toll our children and grandchildron - " Look hcre, darling, I 
owe my good English to Mr, May, or whatevcr your names may bo" • 



'OOo 



EVENING 11^ RICHBOROUGH , 

Now the golden clouds of the evcning drivo, 
Silent day to grave, there is still alive 
Mui*mur of somo hopes, fancy of some hearts, 
And a droam bcgins , and a longing starts 
Plying over green lawns and towns and hills, 
Ovor lonely trees, over resting mills, 
And the night comcs ncar, and she waves her wing 
Don't despair, my soull Look ahead and singl 



you lovely land, oh you calming peace, 

When my working brain cools a baisam brceze 

And my sorrows fade with the dying day, 

Then tho cvening star sonds its sparkling ray 

Liko a messago soft to the stranger 's mind: 

God is everywhere, you will over find 

That He thinks of you, that He knows your fate» 

It is nover dark? It was never latol 



A.W.W 



The Kitchener Camp Rovicw: 




GATEWAYS! 

In our Tcachcrs Training Class, 
thosG mombcrs of thc Camp, who alrcady 
possGss a good knowlodgo of the 
English languagG, are loarning how to 
tcach thoir comrados this subjocta 

Rccontly thcy woro told to writo 
an ossay on '»Gateways", and, in an 
inspirod momont, Dr. L.o.o.y v/rota 
thc follov/ing articlo, showing how 
writcrs of difforont nationalitios 
might trcat tho subjcct. 



THE ITALIAN : Gat oway s narr at o 

tho history of our Empire. They 
reflect the glory of our nation and 
teil the World hov; we conqucred 
everything that we have over met; and 
we will conquer the world again, and 
^n 4.v,^ T j. ^, more than the World. We will conquer 

^i\i^ ^h^v^'^^i.^^f ^'^''' ^^^ ^°^^ ^"^ *^^ moonlight as well. If wo 
snouia not be able to manage it by means of our weapons, we would uso 
our moutns o-- .-. 



oeoeeooeeeooeo 



THE GERMA^; ...,.., Wo havo to divido up tho gonus "Gateways" into two 
groups. Thc first takcs tho idca in tho litoral sonso, tho socond in 
tho figurativc. As to thc first, wo will havc to divido it up into 
two groups. Tho first of thcso groups, or group IIA, to nakc thc 
sutjGct clcaror, contains all thosc gatoways tho longth of which 
surpasses thcir hoight. Tho socond group, callod IIB, includos all 
thosG gatoways which arc longcr than thcy arc high; but I will not go 
as far as to toll you thc dcop roason of thc abovc montionod divisions. 

Thc group IIB must bc dividcd up into (two-and-a-half hours 

ff''^°f •) As to thc groups IB, SA CC, wc must strictly 

distinguish tv/o 



9 0« 



THE _ RU5SIAIT ; ... In spito of thc Gateway - or better still - bccausc 

of it - ho loved her, and, thcrefore, hatcd her. He loved in her the 
personifxcd gateway and ho hatcd the doad and dreadful thing with no 
psychological strceJc in it. Just a ycar aftor having shot himself he 
iciiiod her in tho Gateway by thc Gateway because of and in spitc of it. 

THE AMERICAJT: Well, I placcd a big order of Gateways. I should 

hayo sold them some twilight as well if thcy had wanted mo to . And I 
will cat my own hat for dimes if I do not make at least 50,000 dollars. 
These jittor-bugs do not undcrstand a curse of what is real busincss. 

Jiiy turnover in Gateways has becn increasing (the rcst is 

Incomprohcnslblc because of tho ohcwing gum........) 



THE FREITCroiAtT : 
thc husband and 



.90000 

o o o o o e 



In the dark and cosy corner of thc Gatev/ay stood 
CENSORED 



999o««e.«o.e.9o..».«o.e*o. 



O0.000090OCO000O9O90.00 , «« ..........o. 



THE ENGLISrnmi! A Gateway? Well that 's just a thing v/c 

may walk through, or cven drive a car through. If you are exceptionally 
romantic you might order an claborate Gateway leading to your home. 

THE SCOTCmiAU: 
door adequatco 



9 



o Why talk about Gateways? I think a small wooden 



THE REASOHABLE IvIAli : 



. . O » 9 O 



Of v/hat usc is an ossay on Gatev/ays????? 



THE CAJ/IPLIAIT; All I knov/ about Gatowavs ia that vou nnnr^ n «no-rmif 
to go through the one at the entrancc of this Camp^. 



By Dr. P,.l L...y, 



The Kitchener Cara-p Review; 



7. 



THE WORK OF THE ELECTRIGIAUfl ; 
By;- Refupee "Uumber One" 

that the?f ??nw^ Jf^ is Seen from a distance. nobody could suppose 
; l ^^®y®, ^ *°^" ^3 growmg, coraparable, in the size of its lDnüulat■ir^n 

bown are inmense. A few figures will explain this f act . 



Of this 
lamps , a 
an Output 
ces a day 



of which IflTHiir ThVt V ^.•*^^ v^J-T-n a -coxai consumption of 55 to 

hutr 55 ?S!;« i t consumod by tho lighting ciroults in the living 
providoffnrthA ^""*<^^ ^^^^}y on polcs and partly on the huts are 
for this l?sht?L ??^ho''^J ^^S^*^"g- The total yoarly consumption 
As for the nnn^^f ? t ^""^^ f^^ ^^"'P stroets is estimatod at 22,000KW 
differen? «^^^ + °^ '^*?''^ ^"^ apparatus , thero arc 9 motors and 
nnS^^ 5 apparatus now in uso with an out put of 45KW to 50107 
S ' V^^°hinos will fall to tho cinema's sharo . Two aro 

0? nel?w lU'^^i.^^ f.^^^r^^'^ ''^ °^^^e^"e ^ batterj! w?th 
Silf ?o |5?^^tJ 30^.°'''"'^'°^ consumption for two pefforman, 

you Jo?Ld°all\ho w?L^"'*^^^°'^ T.^^'e'' *°°' ^^ "°* ^° ^° despiscd. If 
with Bo^oJ I ^ wiros, you would bo able to connoct Kitchener Camp 

line SnIrntooto/°f-*^° ^^"* °{ Installations . tho cholce was ovorS 
Arrioured eirtS ?;hTf ^"®' '*°?^ ^^^moured conduit and lead installations. 
llnos aro c?lef S i^^o/"""" "o* uscd in thcse plants o The ovorhead 
mouStnd non'^ ?hiV ^^ f^'P^^^ conductors, Generators, which are 
la??^r i^ ?^ ^ ^!f^' Pfo^"°° «äi^cct currcnt (220 rolts and tho 
latter is flowing through tho two overhead line circuits One circuit 
is supplying the cinema and lecture hall direct , ^''°'^^^^' ""° circuit 

Thn oJSL°"^°''*u^^°??'^^^ ^^ moasurcd in the switch plant at the cinema. 
the ?2f ^l^/^oad line goes from the engine-house to the last pole ?J 
the Camp, Prom seyoral polcs over the hut roofs. ovorhead lines arc 

mSto?s 2e moun??f T'"f.*^° ^"'^ Y''^ °^°°*^^° ^^^^S^' ^^ prSsen? the 
?wi?ch ilLfrnlL ^° ?r'u'' ^tatic". feut it is proposed to orect a 
switch plant for fuses, switches and motors at tho cntrance to tho Carap. 

For thrcinSn?"''?tS^'^^"^^' .*^° °^°\°° "'^^ chiefly unprotoctod wiring. 
üor -cno cinema, steol armourod conduit. 

a^tD'>r^t,.?wHth^?^"?'^' ©^"'^^ally it is not so simple to supply the 
apparatus with electric energy as othor electrical power. It is necoc,^ 

t7.,,ll "f a difforent kind of currcnt and variable tensions. ?hc arc 

inSin^ ?An J"^:^^"°°. foquiro 50 to 60 volts d.c, the remaining 

+ ho^?L ° ^\}^° ^°^^^ ^^° transformed in a resistance. Tho Sotors of 

exciter^VirS"?L^?^^'^°' '" °^^ °fi^°' ^^^ ^°"^ <i-°'. and so do ?hc 
10 vn?f f n ^l the loud Speakers. Purther, the tunc valvcs roquire 
10 volt d.c., these tensions aro producod by a tonsion Converter It 
consists of a d.c. motor, 220 volts. and two onginel. ThS no?o? drives 
iS vcfts!"" °"^''^'' " ^" ^""^^ ^^^y *° P^°^^°° 110 volts and 

By the by, tho starter of tho motor posscsses an under-voltaA-o anri 
exces-s"cS;en?!'°"'° "^'°^ ^''''"'^ *^° °°"--^- against no^vo'l?Ige"2nd 

necessarv^%rfthf^°^n^J! ^''^ '■'''^ 'P?^^°^ P^^^"*' alternating currcnt is 

?Sr?Gnt f^om 2I0 vo!tr^^^'° f ^n^r""*?? ^^ provided, which changes the 
current irom ^20 volts d.c, to 110 volts a.c. But for tho cinema 

lightmg too, variable tonsion is necessary. Only tho larls fo? the 
exits and cleaning aro connected on to 220 Jolt d.c. Tho SIps ?or 
omergcncy lighting are independent of the min lines and are joincd on 
to a 24 volt storage battery, whilo the laraps for the cinorna hall 
to 220 TltTrcT^ °^°' ^ resistance on a variable tenston'between 

,.. ^, This^arrangement has the purpose of protocting the eves of vi.,i+n.o 
uy .no suaaen cnange rrom darkness to light as is usual in the cinema'." 



The Kitchonor Cozro Roviow ! 

THIS LOVSLY ENGLAm) . 

Though our littlo 
Roviow is dotorminod to 
doal principally with 
tho lifo in our Comp, 
\70 must not fall to 
mcntion thid chai^ming 
old tovm of iSandViTich, 
noxt door to us , with 
its lovoly placos, its 
cosy cornors, its 
mosaic-liko Walls of 
timbor and lDi»icks , laid 
in manifold pattorns* 

Tho nowcomor is 
Struck by tho sight of 
tho lovoly old buildings 
which havo soon many 
conturios of European 
history* 

Whon Walking through 
tho narrow, yot choorful 
stroots, you will fool 
tho broath of tho past, 
you wonder at tho 
nodcrn peoplo just of 
our kind, rat hör 
oxpooting mon and womcn 
from Rembrandt's or 
Holbein 's paintings to 
turn round tho noxt 
Gorncr* 

Gontrasting to tho 
rod and black and white 
of tho nice cottagos, 

aro tho grecn and ycllow ■ '""' "~ ' """"^ .' '"^^ 

and bluo of tho splendid 

gardons in difforcnt parts of the town, but abovo all, green, again and 

again, of a porfection a Continontal eye novcr has bocn used to . 

Lot your oycs run for nilos on end, there is no end to lawns and 




:f4^ Prt9rirh-i*^=^t^5e 



soa puts in anothor 



, - on ena, -cnore is no 

meadows in their wonderful groon, unloss whero the 
green and bluo up to the sky, 

How differont is Ramsgate «s grcoting over there erected, as it is, 
on tho white cliffs, the harbour, resembling in a way, a Southern place, 
porhaps in Pranco or Italy, if , maybo, a littlo louder* 

I do not know, but I always think it is the landscapo that builds up 
it's creaturos. Wo are used to associate the sight of sheep flocks 
with thoughts of peace, Is it not, that whercver shoep are grazing, as 
herc, thore is a peaceful and calm atmosphere? You only need to tako a 
walk to feel tho pcaoe and calmncss in tho country around us, in the 
glance and bchaviour of our Snglish noighbours . 

Insido the Camp there is still the Continont, as for the noise, the 
oxcitomont, also the dusty roads. Still wo must go outside the gatcs to 
comc to England* But tho greens in the Camp are growing, shyly as yot, 
howover, growing, and the Camp is becoming England too . 



As a matter of fact, our nervös are too oxcited. They are oscillating 
wildly after all wo had to go through and now waiting for an unknown 
future. But, my comrades Coming from countries of another boauty, you 
who over havo beon fond of ovory fine thing, enjoy tho peace and boauty 
that surrounds you. Do open your minds to all tho culturo and nature 
offerod just herc. Once that peace has ontcrod your hearts and tho 
rcstlossnoss oscapcd, you will havo strongthonod yourselvos for whatovor 
may bo in storo for you, and for yours. 



J# S 



'ÄiT^ 



) 



H 

% 



The Kitchener Cam-p) Review: 

L I P E 



9. 



A P L A T. 



a 



II\£PHESSI01TS OP A VOYAGE TQ AUSTRAL IA, 

(Prom Uos. 6, 7, 8, who left the Camp for Australia on May, 3rd) 

SUEZ CANAL, 
on our way between Port Said and Suez«, 

Bear Mr. Editor, 

Imagine lying in comfortable deck chairs on board our liner. Above 
we see a clear blue sky, beneath, the green coloured water« On our 
right, the African desert is to be esen, and on the left, Asia« On the 
shore along the canal v/e notice a fine road with modern cars, closo to 
it, cajnel Caravans with dark brown coloured men wearing big turbans o 
Above all - a bright, hot sun is shiningo Amongst this picturesque 
landscape v/e give you our first impressions of our voyage« 

To begin with the beginning: Polkestono, goodbye Englandl Wo 
crossGd the Channel, and wont from Boulogne to Paris« Thore we changed 
trains, and it took us noarly throc hours to comc from o le Station to 
the other,- Why don»t they spoak English in Paris? ViTe caught the train 
for Genoa where wo arrivod punctually« That night we stayed in a hotel« 
Next day wo got up early in the morning to see a bit of Genoa« In the 
afternoon wo wont down to the harbour, and, after passport control and 
customs, we embarkod about 6 o»clocko 

Uow we aro going to give you a short description of our boat, the 
"Esquilino", that is her neune . Shc is a nico stoamship, not too big, 
She carrios about threc hundrcd peoplc in the third class and about 
sixty in the better one, ?;hich v/o bclong to - not forgetting the cargo 
she carrios« 

Wo thrce havo got a nice cabin of our own with running watcr, 
big cupboard, bcdsidc tables, armchairs and all dosirable comforts 
"such as we were used to in Kitchener Camp"« Thore is a protty dining- 
room where v/e take our moals« We don»t v/ant to toll you too much in 
this respoct, only this: If you v/ould try to Imitate it, nobody in the 
Camp v/ould want to do any v/ork« 

In addition to the dining saloon, there a.re othor places where wo 
can spend our Icisuro timo« Por instancc, a big drawing room v/ith a 
marvellous wiroloss sot, a writing saloon containing a big library with 
volumes in soveral languagcs , a nice music room with a piano, and last 
but not loast, one place v/o likc the best, the barl But don»t think V 
that 's all for pastimco If you want to play ping-pong, deck tennis, 
board^golf, chess and other kinds of sport, you can do it « Moreovor, 
you will find a punch-ball and somo morc of these things for gymnasticso 
Again, last but not least, a sv/imming pool. 

At night v/e have dances, entertainments , cinema and we havo 
clever recreation officer who organises horsc-races, or debates« 

Most of the people höre are omigrants o Gormans, somo Austrians, 
Czechs and a lot of Kungarians • Moreover, thore are somo Italians, a 
Prench lady and four Australians . All these people speak English. 
including the stewards - the same language we could hear in Cem-p/ 

Well, you v/ould suroly like to know something about our voyago 
itself . Let»s go back again« Av/aking tho first morning on board, v/e 
found ourselves in the harbour of Leghorn« Thore is nothing special to 
say of it« We v/cnt on to I^Iaplos « This is a vory intcresting place, 
lying amidst a bcautiful landscape, a typical Italian tov/n v/ith narrov/, 
dirty strccts, but, on the othor hand, big, modern buildings « The 
fajnous volcano, Vosuvius , is tho most attractivc spot of tho tov/n« 

Tho next stop v/as Messina, the capital of tho Island of Sicily« 
Unfortunately we stayed thore only for a fow hours« It is a marvellous 
town« When we embarkod again we know that v/o had sot foot on European 
land for the la,st timo« 



a very 



/, 



/ 



/ 



most 



It took US some days to cross the Mediterranean, and, arriving in 
Port Said, v/e entercd the Oriente Up to now, Port Said is tho 
intcresting place wo havn soon- Immodiatol'^'" after cur arrival 
Egyptian native policomon, v/earing red fezos, came aboard« 

After a short talk in English, we got the Egyptian visa« It 



y 



The Kitchonor Camp Review: 



10 • 



enables us to go ashore v/hich wc did by a big ferry boat. You cannot 
imagmc this towno Life takos place mostly in the streetso Ken, some- 
timcs covered only with rags or torn night-shirts , or poor peoplo, will 
accompajiy and Surround, or even stop the stranger, offering all kinds 
or goodsor begging. If they demand three Shillings for a thing and you 
offer them sixpenco they will agree, Even then you may be sure that 
they have a profit of fourpence« 

Another occupation is sitting just wherc they likc, and 

arlnking a cup of streng blaok coffee and finally playing cards whercver 
they are. ^ x- ^ o 

Besides all this, two rxionumcnts werc to be seono Ono for the 
constructor of the Suez Canal, Ferdinand Lesseps, the other is a war 
monument for Australian and ITcw Zealand soldierso 

Pull of impressions wc left Port Saide 

We hopo that you will like this first report of ours. Wo have 
finished with our impressions of Port Said, 

You must know the heat is terrible, which does not allow us to go 
on writing« To-day is the wärmest day we have had up tili nov/* We ai*e 
lazier than over, so we will concludo this letter. 

Only one thing we still have to teil you - though our voyagc has 
given US quite new and interesting impressions, and in spite of all the 
nice things wo have seen, wc alx^ays romcmber v/ith pleasure the time we 
spent m England, and the kindness of the English people. 

With kindest regards, v/c all remain, Yours faithfully, 

No s • 6 , 7 , 8 
oOo 



DOWHS COURT, 
S A IT D V/ I C H. 

By;- "Sonnvbov " 



urt , 



.T. V.4. t ^^ Wonderland'» or like a story from "Thousand and One 

Rights - wo werc thinking of when wo wcre allowed, by the kind pcrm- 
ission of Mro & Mrs . Pete, to Visit the bcautiful garden of Downs Cou 
Sandwich, on a sunny a^fternoon in Mayo 

If you go down the stroet from Sandwich to Sandwich Bay, you would 
nover imagme what splendour you would find behind those brick walls 
covered over with bean plants and bushos, which you pass. 

At first, v/hen you enter the garden, you go along between the 
marvellous fruit treos on the one side of the path, with brilliantly 
coloured flowers on the other side, and there"are large grass lawns 
such as you will find only in England. When you are Walking on the 
lawns, it seems to you like a Smyrna carpet, and it is astonishing that 
this grass, though peoplo are always going over it, does not lose its 
velvct softness which invites you to stay t:.erc "for over", 

After we had onjoyed this for a short time, our eyes turned to the 
, the typical fme English country seat, Then we went on to the 
other part of the garden, and the view v/as so nice, that I at first 
sight recalled one of the garden sccnes from "A Mid-Summer Night »s 
Dream"o It looked like a touch of Spring, with the newly-opened, li^ht 
rose-coloured blossomsc j ^ ^ , ^±^111. 

I believe they werc Japanese cherry bushes, cjnd, as a slight 
brought some of the tender Icaves down to tlie ground, this spot lo 
like a cloud of living Spring and wc stood thcre in füll delight, 

V/e went on and passed a meadow with a lot of fruit trees and 
i7hich fertile pasture a lar^ numbcr of shoer» wore p-rn.^.inrr i^'+v,^ 
This meadow v/as surrounded by nico dark fir trees, and in"thöse"bo 
ful surroundings we could have stayed 6.Tor^^z.l.np' for hours« Lastly 
will not forget the variety of pretty -flowers growing on the borde 



house 



other Points, forming a picturc of exquisite beauty and taste. 



breezc 
okod 

on 

auti« 

I 
rs r 



I 



The Kitchener Camp Review: 



11 



OPENiira op QUR ciiwMü . 



y..r v^J % cinema at the Richborough refugee Camp, which has iDeen provided 

SL?fiV "* ^^^^?^^J. ^^f'^ ^^ ^^^^^ Cinemas, Ltd., who has also made 
himself responsible for the running costs, was opened on Tuesday l)y 

?hf V^^^!^ de Rothschild o Sir Robert Waley Cohen, KeB.E,, Chaiman of 
n?%JnJ,?^!^^yT^^S Coimnittee, presided, and was supported by the Mayor 
of Sandwich (Lt. -Co lo W. V. L. Prescott-Westcar , D.S.Oc), Mr. Deutsch, 
and Refugee NoS' ^•^•^•' (architect), Mr. J. A. May (Camp Director) 

One of the large buildings at Richborough, which was left derelict 
alter the war, has been converted in a miraculously short space of time 
into a handsome and well-equipped cinema, which will seat 400 people. 
ine stone Walls of the building have been smoothed and dressed, while the 
corrugated iron roof , supported by red painted girders, has been reno- 

+ u\i. ^^"^"^ lights havG red shades, v/hile the doors are grey to 
match the walls, with red painted framev/ork. The front of the projecting 
room, underneath v/hich the seating is continued, has been adorned with 
caryed modeis of the familiär Walt Disney characters. There is also a 
Y^ f^^^^^^®^ foyer. The work has been carried out to the design of 
the st äff of Odeon Cinemas by mon at the Camp under the direction of 
English foremen. 

The cpening ceremony was performed by Mrs • de Rothschild. Intro- 
ducing her, Sir Robert said everyone must feel a senso of gratitude. 
They thanked Mrs,, Lionel de Rothschild for paying a Visit to the Camp. 
On behalf of the Cainp Committee he offered a special welcome to the 
Mayor of Sandwich, whom they were delighted to seo* Ee expressed to him 
and the inhabitants of Sandwich deep gratitude for all the kindness they 
had shown to the inmates of the Camp. He thanked the Chief Immigration 
Officer at Dover for the goodwill, kindness and courtesy v/hich had been 
shown to refugees on their arrival in England. He expressed the 
refugees' gratitude to the many English foremen at the Cajnp whose help- 
fulness had been one of their great ploasures. Thoir friendship had 
helped^to make tho work easy and pleasant, The staff of Odoon Cinemas 
had joined heartily in makihg the work a succoss and completing the 
cinema in a miraculously short space of time. He thanked all who had 
taken part in the work. 

Mrs« de Rothschild said she had just spent one of the most inter- 
esting days of her life. Öhe had beon glad to havo been enabled to Visit 
tho Camp and see for herseif what she had so often read about. What had 
Struck her m.ost was tho vory happy atmosphere that prevailed. It must 
bo bccauso the men had constructed something out of what was a practic- 
ally derelict Camp. 

"I have been given the great honour of opening your new cinema. 
Mr. Oscar Deutsch has given the equipment and made himself responsible 
for the running expenses. It will seat 400 people and will serve oduc- 
ational purposes during the day and rccreational needs during tho 
ovoningo It will bc an enormous help to the work and life of tho Camp 
here, and in your namc I thank Mr. Deutsch for what hc has done. It is 
v/onderful to find in this distressed v/orld people as kind as Mr. Deutsch, 
v/ho is always thinking of what ho can do for othcrs." 



Mr. Deutsch said he feit ä particular and peculiar pleasure in 
witnossing the launching of anothor place of entertainmont o His job in 
lifo v/as frequently to v/itness such launchings, but he could truthfully 
say he had never folt such pleasure as he did that evening becausc ho 
knew the cinema was going to provide something that would be uniqucc 
There v/ere in the building a number of features which were cinematic to 
the best extcnt that could bo provided in difficult circumstances , but 
there v/cre othors. Tho best seats were at the front instead of at the 
back, but that was a little "sccref- . (Laughter). He thanked the 
members öf the Odeon staff who had holped him to accomplish what he sot 
out to do, v/hon he promised Sir Robert Waley Cohen to provide cinema 
entertainmont for Riohborough Camp. His instructions in rogard to films 
were that in tho first place special rogard should bc paid to the type 
of dialoguo, although they should not nccessarily disregard entertain- 
mont value. He wantod tho kind of films that would help tho refugees 
to malco themselves thoroughly proficicnt in tho language of the grand 



The Xitchener Camp Reviews • ' • 

our suJti^wSw^ remember thc looks of astonighment on tho faces of 
our guests when they entered the lobby of our cinema wh±rh tn ?+= 

?io\^r"^4iJ^:nTo-ne^^o^?a^SSerab!;^ ^"^ ^^^ ^°- °^. ^^P- 
result^o/^he^J^iv^t °7,^^''n'^/^ ""^^"^ ^"^ outstandlng. It is thc 

^!ournaf\S°Kfr?hr?;**'"i Mr.E.W.K., a valued contributor to this 
Journal, has left the Camp to go to South Afrlca, and we would 1-iV^ +^ 
take this opportunity to thanlc him and wish him thrvery best of lSck° 

oOo 

• THEY OPENED THE CIITEMAIL 
By "One who had not been invitod^* , 



Well, now it has takcn place« The opening of our Camp cinema. It 
was splendid l ?/eelcs before, feverish preparations were madoc Iron 
rods and struts were haiimierod into the walls, and the groatest efforts 
were made to fix them in such a way as to make the projection on the 
screen an msoluhle problem oven for the most skilful Operator o Even 
artificial rain was produced only to the effect of giving the walls of 
the cinema building the best perviousness possible, 

I, for my part, got my dinner jacket out of the very bottom of my 
undermost trunk in the luggage room, in order to have it brushed up in 
our tailor-shop, and I acquired a hair restorer at Sandwich in order to 
appear with a head of curled hair before the audience at the opening. 

The tailors worked for four wecks to restore my dinner jacket, but , 
unfortunately, at the last moment, they burned quite a big hole in the 
back of my trousers, as the conducting line of the iron in our tailor 
Shop will sometimes have a little defcct. 

I had, therefore, a little discussion with the foreman of the 
tailors o Just to-day I paid him a Visit at the hospital and made it up 
with him at last. He is likely to be restored within a few days . He 
IS a nice fellow, yet, I think perhaps I acted a little too rashly in 
brealcmg both his fore-arms at once. 

But I have gone off at a tangent . What 
about is the premiere at our Camp Cinema. 



I really wanted to write 

/ 



The day of the grcat opening arrived. Some lads even washcd th 
necks and bought splendid ties for tup»pence each. Thc Camp poli^e ^ 
special Instructions, the cock omittcd pcuring wator into our jaiT'for" 
broakfast. The general nervousness conspicuously increased and the 
department for psychiatry at our Camp hospital had a greater number of 
admissions than usualc The architecö covered an old divan with red 
lacquered cloth and took it personally to the lounge. Even a real reel 
was put into the projection apparaxus . 

The hour of sdnissio n approached and an immense number of cars 
passed the gate of our Camp, which, though being slightly fragile, had 
been polished up. It was a brilliant spectaclo of society, Some' 
visitors had even used thcir lorries for Coming hero. Y/hen I arrived 
at the gate, splendidly dresned, and \7ith the odour of my hair restorer 
around me, in order to ask for admission, though I did not bolong to the 
invitod noble guests, two sturdy policemcn got nold of me and gave me 
a slight push. When I crept out of the trench in front of the entrance 
to the cinema, I carefully adjusted my tiCo 

(Concluded at foot of page 17) 



The Kitchener Camp Reviev/: 



14. 



^ 

* 



it. In it v/ere stored many of the secrets of my scientific discoveries 
with which my name had been associated« 

With the aid of the light , I scanned the long row of little 
bottles, carefully labelled, which contained the drugs that I had col- 
lected from the four corners of the earth. I tpok them out and scrut- 
inised the labeis -- did my eyes deceive me, or was I dreaming -- the 
bottles were marked -- LATIII, GREEK, FRENCH, SPAUISH, ITALIAU, RUSSIAN, 
etc., - ONE TEASPOONPUL TO BE TAKEN IN HALF A TUlffiLER OP WATER -- to be 
taken only once. This was marvellous, but then anxiety overtook me 
again, as bottle after bottle I searched for one marked ENGLISH - but I 
searched in vain, for the bottle I needed most was not there . 

Then suddenly I had another brain wave -- the fruit of years of 
scientific research now stood me in good stead - I put a tiny drop 
from the bottle of each language into a cup and thoroughly stirred the 
mixture -- assuredly the potent would be that of the English language - 
so I drank it to the very dregs . 

•. . A Strange ha^e overclouded my mind I stäggered slightly -- 

Believe it or not; from that moment I have spoken the English language 
as fluently and äö well as I was able to speak it before I took the 
drügö • 



IT E G 



S H A B B A T H. 



\. 



By;- K. Ro 

Though the last years were sad for us , they have, however, created 
somethmg good by having again aroused religious feelings in a great 
number of Jews . Unexpected events , always considered as impossible, 
broke mto our lives and thus many of us came to realize how deeply 
divine power can influence our des tiny. 

A newly inspired Jewish religious attitude was striving for ade- 
quate forms of expression. Nothing seemed to be more appropriate than 
a renaissance of the old idea of Sabbath. But in those periods of 
trouble and sorrow re had to live through, there was frequently no oppor-, 
tunity of quietly hallowing the Sabbath* Thus, following Palestinian 
ideas, one or two hours of Friday evenings (sometimes also on Saturday 
afternoons) were often chosen for true hallowing and joy of Sabbath, 
and that celebration was called "Oneg Shabbath" according to that sent- 
ence of the Mussaph Shemone Essre (additional prayer): "They that keep 
the Sa'^bath and call it a delight (oneg) shall rejoice in Thy kingdom," 
In the circles of youth and youth organisations especially, this custom 
of celebratmg Sabbath had become populär in the last years of the old 
home. Those Oneg Shabbath colebrations consisted of Kiddush being sung 
and Mauzi (Blessing over the bread) being spoken, then of that Sabbath' s 
Sidra or Haftara being explained and Jewish religious or national songs 
being sung. Proquently Jewish Problems of general intorest were also 
discussed or books (Jewish history, stories by Jewish authors) were read. 
Incidentally oake and sweets were eaten and f inally grace after meals 
was recited. 

Our English friends will understand' that we want to take with us 
on our Wanderings those manners and customs which are valuable and which 
do mean something to us . 

Vory soon after having arrived in Camp many of our comrades feit 
the nocessity of celebrating such an Oneg Shabbath höre. They have 
proved by those arrangoments how a genuine Sabbath atmosphere can be 
created with good will, though means are primi,tivo. ITow it has beccme 
a habit that every week several hut communities celobrate Priday evoning 
in this mannor* These colebrations are approvod by the Camp Rabbi / 

Whoever has attended an Oneg Shabbath celebration, roally well 
arranged, knows how important it can be for tho devolopment of commur 



— J X 



ü}JX±J.ij ±li OtUiijJ • 



i 




S&l l Kitchener Camp ^ Review : 



15. 










AC 




FJ. 



V^ J-^ 



\ 



Revlcvr: 



<i^i m -^tt 



16. 




Midnight hour l 

Deep caliiiness over the Caiiip, A l^at is fluttering silently along 
the roofs. Prightening Impression, indeedT Uo sound is to be heard 
frorn the huts - no snoringe Even' the staff-hut, which, according to 
report , sometimes does not care for night rest, is completely silent« 
Calninessl Deepest calmnessl Midnight - 

Tv/elve hollow strokes are shaking the night • Ding, • .dongc • odong» • o 
how's that? ProKi 7/here? Prom the water tower clock perhaps? Nonsense, 
it breathed out its Short life long ago » Por weeks all Canip people 
were of the belief that it was three minutes past four o^clock for ever« 
Nov/ it is away and cannot produce any mistakeo 

The mysterious strokes have died av/ay, the ghosts of Camp are 
going East« Peculiar bustle is moving, whispering becomes loud in the 
air and at the cornors and - - oh spook and magic « - even the vcry 
stoncs are ooming to lifo again» 

The water to\7cr is strotching itself and Walking somo steps along 
tho agrioulture dopartment of Ilr« G« Suddenly - a mistako seoms to be 
impossible - a horriblo procossion is approachingo They a,ro machincs-- 
machinos of tho Campe Thoy havc joincd closoly in a ghostly round 
dancc and aro waddling, limping, tripping, stamping along the torrace. 
Thoy all pass by the gonoral offico, then they climb over tho gatc, 
Gross the road and go - although that is strictly forbiddon - to tho 
lako# Thoy are standing togethor in the fadnt moonlight recovoring 
from the fatiguing day^'s work and onjoying the fino fresh air. Only 
tho forv;ard bread-slicing machinc cannct be silcnto It is tripping . , 
about norvously and sa,ys snappishly: "Of course, the arrogant pump is 
lato againl It's alv/a^^s the samc story« In the whole Camp it * s woll- 
known already that tho pump nevor does to time v/hat it has to do • And 
tho sausago machino - that conceited creature - is lato as well. I 
don^t v/ant to gossip, but this ohanco, hov/ever, is too remarkable" • 

"My doar Miss Slicing," calms the stout fish-frying machine, "I 
hope you donH want to hint that tho venorable pump and tho young inox- 
porioncod sausago ma-chino ---" 

"I'm not surol Anyhow, you may credit that coquottish and con- 
ceited creature v/ith anythingo But stop, there they are just arriving" 

The pump, elegant, gentlenanly and fragrant with odour-cer-oil, is 
bowing to everybody and sayingo 

"Excuse the delay, ladies and gentlem.en, we met each other casually 
and " 

Bread slic.er (sharply): "Casually -- hahaha -- we know thatl" 

Sausap:e machine (confoundedly) : "Well, I should say - everybody wants a 
little recreation after the hard work, don't you think so?" 

Pish-fryin^ machine (belching excited-ly): "Well, you don't overwork, 
my dear Miss« Look at me, I don' t^lament , although I do the hardest 
worko Or do you think it a trifle to produce 2,000 portions of fried • 
fish in two hours?" 

Pump (nervously): "Hem-hem, don't be excited, Sir, for with all the 
coals you devour and the quantities of oil you drink, all your work is 






««V "^ W> V 









rotations in a minute« Try onco to turn round 380 times in a minutel 
I still am feeling quite giddy* I fill the water tower with 200,000 






l 






_i-ije Kit ebener C a mp Reviov/ ! " V 



17. 




litros of water and all this^with poor 10 HoP." 

1^^^1^/^'^T^?^ - ^ (screaming hysiorically ) : "You make mo laughl You are 
^\^kl I don't wonder as ydu gargle 200,^0 litres of water daily. 
1^ ^)e you xiave the power of • ton, horsos , but I»m sure you have the 
^.ntelligence of one ass onlyo All depends on me • On me onlyl I am the 

no who gives them their daily bread, I produco 5,000 slicos of bread 

aily. What d»you say novf?" 

Wter pat (ironioally ) : "V/hat do I say? That you're ovcr-estimating 
^normouslyo Nobody would touch your bread if I did not cxisto I 
furnish the butter, I furnish 3,600 portions of butter daily, Without 
*ows, without milke Itm the most important in Campo'» 

o^tatoe-peelin g^^a^^ (laughing yehemently) : "Hahahaha - the most 
mport^ant - the butter pat l Without potatoes - now mark - no people 
ould (jxist, not even our Camp people e I am representing the populär 

food, I peel 25 sacks of potatoes a day. That means 2,500 pounds« Do 

you know "'That it means?" 

^y-^^l^^ (Ipting instructivcly the pole): "ITothing at alll Do you know 
what peopJ^ like most? Meatl And meat once morel Sxcept the kosher 
department, of coursel And what am I doing? 1 cut the meat, yes, I out 
,1t mto small pieces because not everybody is able to bite off an 
entire oXo I cut hundreds of pounds daily, 

5ausag;e machine: "Por me'o Yes, my f riends , for me onlyl It » s true, 
I»m stilJ. young and inexpcrienced but I give the people something quite 
■ special, a sausagel ^Sausage, my dear friendsl Do you knov/ somebody 
l'else who could produce 1,800 to 2,000 sausagcs daily? I don'to I'n a 
. irarity, I take meat in and furnish the sausage with all the comfort of 
^Pmodern times« Wlio can outdo me?" 

Cinema pro.-jector (cleaning superiorly its lens ) : "I can* I am, its true, 
*iho youQgest member of this society, I am, however, the favourite, 

LOjfc At, tho bright faces whon people are seeing the pictures I furnisho 

'm the best and most modern creation of all"* 

:s tetner machine (buzzing lowly); "Except me , of coursel If I should 
not be in Camp nobody could gct a hearing in this magazine, and in that 
case this story wouldn»t have been written at all, you seel I spit out - 
^now that - 5,000 sheets an hour» I am the most important of this 
3cciety " 




II 



An enormous storm of Indignation follows these wordso Shocked 
3ries are heardo. The ..potatoe-peeling machine is getting to a hyster- 
ical fit, thearv-agö' machine is fainting, the bread slicing machine is 
Ißharpe^iJMjg^ in rage, the cut t er is showing its cog-wheel, the 
Iromp iS^!^Hl!Kn^, while the fish-frvine: machine is shedding some oil- 



,or. 



i'^^^IP^i while the fish-frying machine 
. ■A;Iio olnoma.. projector erlös: 

•^Shockingl This Gestetner babyl What a journalistic braggartl" 

■ "Xt this moment the clock tower of Sandwich is striking one. The 
^.oks have disappearedo Ashamodly they steal av/ay to their working 
,nd intend to function faultlessly in future for the well-being 
"^amp e 

day the sausage machine consequently was not stopped up, the 
knife was not blunt, the potatoo peeling machine v/as not 
dly, the pump Y/as not suffering with a tremendous thirst, the 
er was not ctarving and the cinema projector had not become 
nally the Gestetner machine was functioning faultlessly to 

page o 
qOo ^.^ 

vfrom page 13) * 

^ugged my Shoulders at the treatment I had received - and 

set^backs, I was determined that by hock or by t?rook I ahould 
)olice - so turning up my nose at them, I went straight to 
- made a request for a ticket of admission - obtained it - 
L ,. ^wxj. ^x^vv «^vaixwo«^ ouiiociupu ttt/ L/iiü jjiojL±ue WHO HacL reiused me 
and sat dov/n in the comfortible plush seat in the cinema 
fing - and enjpyed the excelletit film - at The Empire, 



äjiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiisiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiii liiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiii itiiiimiiim: 



No. 6 




^ I iQ^nc^ 



AUG. 1939 



t = 






• = 



I = 



THE 
KITCHENER 

CAMP 
REVIEW 



* 



The Journal of the Kitchener Camp 
for Refugees, at Richborough, near 
Sandwich, written for and by them. 



• 



Copyright of all articies strictiy reserved ; and they 
can only be reproduced by the permission of the 

Camp Oirector, 

JONAS A. MAY. F.I.P.S. 



PRINTED AND PUBLISHED MONTHLY. AT THE KITCHENER CAMP. RICHBOROUGH = 



=niiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimii!iiiiiiiiiiin 



THE KITCHENER CAMP REVIEW 



Wo .6. 



August. 1939 



Editor: Phineas L. Kay. 
Assistant Editor: Mrs. J> A. Mav, 

EDITORIAL 

With this number wo come to the end of the first six months sinco 
the commencement of this Cajnp, and not far short of our füll quota of 
3,000 men. 

So much has happened and so muoh work has beon completed, that the 
place IS almost unrecognisable, at loast from the inside. But now we 
nave just obtained the Haig Cajnp opposite and a very large area of 
flelds for cultivation. Pacing us all the time has been the derelict 
and deserted Haig Camp, with the exception of our Concort Hall and 
Cinema, which Stands within its groundso When our skilled hands have 
made it into a habitable place, as they have made the Kitchener Camp, 
an eyesore will have been removed, but then it will not be possible for 
US to Show our visltors the contrast betweon the Camp as it was after 
22 years, and as it is now after we have workod upon it, which we can 
de at present by just showing them the condition of the buildings and 
huts of the Camp opposite ours . 



■oOo 



THE DIREC TOR ^ S MESSAGE <> 

"May God bless you all". With these words, His Late Majesty, King 
George the Pifth, ended his first Christmas broadcast to the Commonwealth 
of Nations which form the British Empire, and to the subjocts of which 
he conveyed a message as father of a great familyo 

I Start this message to you with the same words, because I wish to 
make it known to you as to the way in which you can be worthy of such a 
blessing» 

I have, on innumerable occasions, appealed to you all to consider 
yourselves as members of a groat family over v/hich I have the honour to 
preside, and there is no doubt that a spirit has arisen at the Kitchener 
Camp, of comradeship and good fellowship and of service, of which any 
father might well be proud. 

The vcry existence of this spirit throv/s upon every individual 
member of the family a great rcsponsibility, for any mistake made by an 
individual may well discrodit and bring unhappiness to all who arc here, 
and it is necessary that at all times oach of us carofully considers 
what he does and what he says, as* the careless word or action may have 
unfortunato reporcussions on our Comrades . But it is not only a qucs- 
tion of our daily conduct that is of so vital importanceo Wo have at 
this Camp, and because of this Camp, an cvon greater task to perform. 
The whole civilised world looks upon this Camp as an example of the 
greatest humanitarian work ever undertaken and upon its success may 
well depend the future life and happiness of thousands of those of your 

^ fellow countrymen, who, at present are called upon to bear bravely 

''untold misery and persecution. 

I cannot stress too strongly that the success of this Camp does not 
solely depend on good conduct but rather on our ability to prove to the 
World that the Jew, in or out of persecution, will always hold out hope 
for the future, and is a worker and not, as by populär supposition, a 
monöy grabber. In this Camp we have seen some fine examples of what can 
be done in this direction, where men, who have never previously toiled 
with their hands, have turned to such toil with a willingness which is a 
pleasure to all honest men« 

I trust you all to uphold the good name of our Camp at all times and 
in all circumstances. Soon some of you will be going to places spread 
all over the world, but where ver you may be, whether at home or in 
countries oyerseas, ypu^will still be members of my family with all the 
responsibilitv that Ihat means . It may be that times will ocour when 

rt"the'KiÄe5"8L^^ l^', ^^l'^^'tJÄt'^h ??^^ L^$^f.^.^?!!S?Pily..hFe 
how best to use God. s- greatest gifrto' m^,^thi aMli^rtrsIr^ryour 
fellow human beings, and the ability to work for the love of work alone. 
Wherever you are, ^whatever you are doing, there will be one, who now 
chooses to call himself your father, who will always pray - "Mav God 
Bless you all*" ^ ±f j a.j kj^ 



The Kltchener Camp Rev iew : 



2. 



M I X E D 



P I C K L E S 



SHAKESPEARE 
CALLING U 



Through the kindness of a very generous gentleman 
residing in Margate, 20 members of the Canip were able 
^0 see a production of "Twelfth Mght" in the beauti- 
ful gardens of Dane Park, Margate* According to one of the party, him- 
seif a professional actor, the Performance of the amateurs reached a 
very high Standard, and he assured me that they enjoyed it far more 
perhaps, than the English people who were present, if that was possible, 
as the German people are much more familiär with the works of "The Bard 
of Avon" than those of the land of his birth* 



THE D.<Sc F. 
P.S.S^A. 



Great activity ig going on amongst our sportsmen, as 
they are competing against the Dover 8c Polkestone Port 
Services Sports Association on Ist August, at the Sir 
Roger Manwood's School, Sandwich, the sports field having again been 
lent by the kindness of the Headmaster, This will be a real opport- 
unity to test the ability of the members of the Camp, and to see how 
they compare, not only in time but in style, with the English sportsmen. 



SPORTS 
ACTIVITIES 



A number of our sportsmen are engaged during the day on 
agricultural work, and they now have the opportunity to 
prepare their own sports field, as a large area of 
ground now taken over by the Camp has been handed over for development 
as a sports ground» There is sufficient space for two football pitches, 
in addition to an area for other outdoor sports • The ground is in a 
very rough state but our men are really keen and it will not be long 
before they transform it into a ground as good as any they have been 
used to. We have, by the way, booked a football match with the Maccabi, 
to take place on lOth Becember, on our own ground. Further news about 
our Sports Section will be found on another page. 



STRAUGE 
INSTRIMEITT 



Amongst the nev/ arrivals at the Camp recently, there 
havo^boen somo interesting people. One is a musician 
who is one of the 28 people in the whole world who ovms 
and is able to play a viola d»a:nore, a viola with 12 st rings, very 
beautifully. This same gentleman is an authority on Seventeenth 
Century brass band music, and has with him some fine old military 
marches from the Seventeenth to the ITineteenth Century. 



STEREOSCOPIC 
PHOTO GRAPHS 



Another has an electric apparatus for viewing stereo- 
scopic slides which he has photographed himself • He 
showed me magnificent views of Vienna by night, and it 
is not an exaggeration to say that they v/ere the most lifo-liko pictures 
I have ever seen, as were also somo views he showed me of the Austrian 
Tyrol. So life-like were they in fact, that I wished to step into tho 
machine and get into one of the little boats v/hich seemed as if they 
were ready to take me on a journey along the Blue Danube. 



Q,UACK \ 
QUACK U 



No l This does not refer to the large number of doctors 
in this Cajiip, who have the title, but are not medical 
practitioners • It refers to a duck and poultry farm 
which has been started. At the moment it is only on a very small scale, 
the eggs, though good, are quite inadequate to supply a fraction of the 
large number consumod by such a vast Community • Tho coops resemble in 
appearance the most ultra-modorn villa with ovcry modern "inconvenience", 
and we fear that if they are seen by the officials of the Boroughs of 
Rajnsgate and Sandwich they will become ratoable property and assessed 
as such» 



JEWISH The hand of friendship has been extended by the Assoc- 
EX-SERVICEIffilT iation of Jev/ish Ex-servicemen to the Ex-servicemen of 

our Camp who fought in the Great V/ar, who number more 
than 400. The Association sent gifts of cigarottes for them, and the 
Secretary of the Organisation, Mr» L» Sarna, cajne and paid them a Visit, 
and WC have now arran^ed a Smoking Concert to take place nn the .3rd 
September, when a party of 60 Ex-servicomen will pay us a visit from 
Jjondon» 



SHOWING TO-DAY The films shown at our cinema sinco its opening, in 



The Kitchoner Qaunp Review r 3 

addition to thc dolightful Silly Symphonios, and interest filjns, are ' 
'Victoria the Great'S "South Riding" , "Calling all Stars", "Radio 
Parade", "Elephant Boy" and "The Shape of Things to Como" • At the time 
Y^lting, wlth 2,250 men in Camp, the films have to be shown six timDs 
so that everybody can see them. 



OUR 
ORCHESTRAS 



The Mayors of Ramsgate and Sandwich extended an invit- 
atiön to us to play on thelr bandstands recently, and, 
, ^ as we understand the bandstand at Sandwich has not been 
usea Tor many years, we are sure that the conoert made a pleasant 
sunday ojening's change for the large number of local inhabltants of 
tnat delightful old town who caone out on this beautiful evening to 
listen to our muslclans« 



ARTISTES 



I wish It had been possible for you to hear the tremen- 
dous applause whlch was recelved by the performers in an 
entertainment given in the Cajnp Concert Hall, which was 
arranged and given by Mr. Horace Goldin, the famous Illusionist, and 
Mr. Issy Bonn, the famous Hobrew Comcdian, and by other well-known 
varlety stars who wore appearing that week at the Hippodrome and West- 
brook Pavillon, Margate. To enable as many of the Camp as possible to 
see It, they gave two consecutlve Performances - at 2-30 and 4 o»clock. 
In thanking all these good folk, one must add the nane of Mrs. Horace 
Goldin who worked, not only in helping to arrange it, but acted as 
stago manager as well. 



CLASSICAL 
CONCERT 



Another person who is deserving of our very deep 
gratltudo is Mr. Jacques Van Lier, who organised a 
* Classlcal Concert for us. The foUowing great artistes 
came from london specially to give us a really delightful Programme :- 
Madame Elena Liarosa, a li-oder slnger, Miss Jessie McLennan, Dramatic 
Lyrlc Sopräno, Miss Pattle Templeton Upton, Solo Violinist, and 
Mr. Antonio Dellnnac, Planist. 



RAMSGATE 
CARKTIVAL 



With the assistance of our Scenic Artists, and the skill 
of our carpenters, we transformed our Camp lorry into a 
very attraotive entry for the Carnival in ald of the 
Ramsgate Hospital. With Stangl lying on the upper deck of one of our 
2-tler beds, a group of brioklayers busily buildlng a wall, and some 
muslclans playing enchanting music, the entry received a very good 
receptlon from the huge crowds that lined the route of the procession. 



PROM CAMP 
TO CAMP 



12 members of our Camp have been invited to spend 10 days 
with the Jewish Lads» Brigade who will be camping dose 
, . . X ^ ^^ durlng August, and our artistes and orchestras will 
nelp to entertain the boys on different afternoons and evenings durinfi: 
the 10 days they are there. 



SUCCESS 
OVERSEAS 



Good news has been received from members of this Camp 
who have already gone overseas. They have all obtained 
, , Sood Jobs in thelr respective trades. They originally 

had some entlrely different occupation, and by diligence have mastered 
their new craft, and are now turning the training to good account. 



AU REVOIRl 
DOC TORS 



Already we have had to say farewell to three of the 
dbctors, who hold Italian degroes, and who have, there- 
fore, been able to give modical Services at this Camp. 
We have been extremely fortunate in having as our doctors men not only 
of outstanding ability, but with charming Personalities, who endeared 
themselves to all. They have all become ships» doctors, the oompanles 
are indeed fortunate to secure the Services of such physicians. Our 
best thanks go with them that thoy shall have the happy future they so 
richly deserve. 



HOLIDAY 

NUMBER 



You will find, on perusing .this number, that it contains 
articj.es of a less heavy and serious nature than usual. 

As it will be read when mcst of cur En'^li'*''^ •"•*"' -^■' 

are on holiday, or at least, in hoüdäy nwo'd7lt"was"f6irtharsomethlnff 
in the natura of a Summer Holiday Number would be most in keepina with 
the month of August. >**"» «j-«'" 

THE EDITOR. 



The Kit ebener Camp Review: 



4. 



SPIRIT F TH"^ PIOUEE Ro 



One is inclincd to associatc amongst the Wonders of the V/orld, the 
Eternal Pyramids of Egypt and the Great Wall of China, Tout there aro 
other Wonders of the World, such as the great Roman roads across 
Britain and those constructed by Napoleon over the Alps, which are 
equally v/onderful and far more useful if not so splendid to beholdo 

These thoughts came to me as I v/orked v/ith a party of volunteers 
until one o»clock in the morning to help in the complotion of a part 
of the roads boing constructed in the Camp. 

As we toiled through the night, with the aid of artificial light, 
to complete a section of the read, and as the groaning noise of the 
cement mixing machine and the shouting of Instructions by the foreman 
soundod through the night, and as section after section the concreto 
road took form, my comrades becajne imbued v/ith the spirit of the 
Pioneers v/ho have constructed great roadv/ays across vast continentso 

To those unaccustomed, as most of us v/ere, to the handling of 
heavy barrow-loads of freshly made concreto, and wheeling them peril- 
ously along the narrow gang-planks , fearing every minute that the bar- 
row would topple ovcr and upset its precious cargo, and, v/hen having 
finally reached the spot for unloading, a sense of triumph, which can 
only be known to the tight-ropo walker after each journey across the 
v/iro; and the back-aching fatigue of hammering down the levelling 
board, which givos the now road a beautiful cainber, and again, to those 
unaccustomed to it, the shovolling of sand, bailast and cement into the 
hungry monster that turns them into concreto, and hammering v/ith picks, 
v/hich after a fov/ moments , to the unskilled, seemod like trying to dig 
a hole in iron. 

Yet on this night the atmosphere was eloctric v/ith the spirit of 
achieving somothing v/hich twenty-four hours beforo, secmcd impossiblc« 

The man v/ho v/as responsible for the construction of this road was 
desirous of being able to let Mr. Ernest Joseph, the Camp Architect, 
open it v/hen ho came dov/n for the v/eek-ende This part of the road 
leads from the main gate to the Staff hut o The foreman in Charge of 
the work had asked the Staff v/hethcr some of them v/ould volunteer to 
work in the ovoning side-by-side with the Car/ip road-buildors , so as to 
encourage the men to achieve v/hat scemed in the early evening a super- 
human tasko 

When that v/eek-end Mr« Joseph cut the tape v/hich enabled his car 
to travel over the nev/ly constructed road, v/e all feit a thrill of 
pride such as must be experienced by the humblest v/orkman v/ho has part- 
icipated in the construction of some great ship v/hen it is being 
launched, and it also taught us a lesson, that even the work of appar- 
ently ordinary labourers requires the utmost skill and care, as much 
as anything produced in a laboratory or manufactured in a factory. 

, After cutting the tape across the gateway, Mr. Joseph carefully 
inspected the work and congratulated those who had part icipated in 
its construction« 



•oOo 



R A U G E 



BOX LIBRAR Y. 
Dre S*.s • 



In the early days of the Camp we v/erc very hopeful that it would 
be possible to develope a fairly good library» 

V/hen we v/ere appointed as Librarians, cur first task v/as to 
arrange it in good order; that nobody should tako from the library v/ith 
out US having some form of check. V/e wcre faced v/ith the difficulty 
that it was not possible to lock up the books as wo had open shelves, 
also the room was available for a.ll roaders and letter writers. V/e, 
therefore, divided the duty so that there v/as a librarian available' 
from 8-30 in the morning until 10-30 at nigjit • 

At first the library was very small, and the method we adopted 
for enlarging it v/as to requcst the guides to invito visitnrs to the 
Camp to como and see cur little library. V/hen visitors came, we dis- 
cussed with them the type of books we had and tried to arouse their 
interest so that they v/ould knov/ what we v/ere intcrested in rcading. 

(Continued on next page) 



Tho Kitchencr Canip RcvJGw: 



5. 



Many of them promised to send us books and gradually, by the generös ity, 
of these good friends of ours, the number of books has grown until we 
have now more than 1,000 books in Camp, in English, Prench and German. 

At the moment, owing to far more important oalls upon our carp- 
enters, it has not been possible to build the library, and we still 
use empty orange boxes and a few roughly oonstructed shelves made in 
the early days of the Camp, and there are many parcels of books we have 
yet to -open when the new library is oompleted. The number of shelves 
now required will take up a considerable amount of space, 

\'iniile we know it is the policy of the Camp to teach its members 
handwork, nevertheless , v/e know that many people will find free time 
to read "books because we were and are a book-reading people* It is 
only a question of which books they could and should read. Our first 
aim, therefore, was to persuade our fellows to read only English books« 
It is understood that we chose easy books for those who only knew a 
little English, or novels that do not require a very great deal of 
concentration. ¥e selected magazines, short stories and detective 
novels, etc», for them to read, and often, when our borrowers demanded 
German books, we asked them to take English books instead. V/e lent 
G-orman books only to those who were quite unable to read English, of 
which people there were only a few, or those who were especially 
desirous of reading a definito German book we had, 

Then if someone asked for a scientific book, or a book wo had not 
got, we made a note of his name, Camp and hut number, in ordcr that we 
should be able to inform him if the book he desired cajne to our library* 
In addition wo .«Jent to the Synagogue all prayer books sent us, and 
notified the musicians of any books we received upon that subject, and 
to the CaXiip University we sont books on tho subjocts which would'be of 
interest to its 'graduates.' 

V/e have in Camp so many specialists on all subject s such as 
agriculture, road construction and repair, work in the kitchen, in tho 
Offices, eloctricity, and so on, who needed books for iihe continuation 
of their studios, that it was a pleasure to us to be ab:le to assist 
them in this way* 

We supplicd books and magazines to the various English classes and 
we have co-oporatod with the Education Department, and we have always 
tried to be as helpful as possible to the teachers of English in the 
solection of books they required* 

We shall endeavour to make the library, when it is oonstructed, 
worthy of our Camp, so that it has books on all subjects, work and 
recreation, and on all cultural subjects« 

The number of Camp borrowers at presont number approximately 350, 
but when Y/e are able to have a proper library, and are able to display 
all our books in good ordor, we anticipate a considerable incroasc in 
the number of borrowers* 

Wg hope that any of those who read these lines who have books they 
do not want will remember the library at tho Kitchener Camp and send 
them to US • 



AGRICULTURAL ITC TE o 
Our Agriculturalists celobrated a *red 
letter» day in their career when they were 
able to provide sufficient lettuces for every- 
body in the Camp^ and they were very much en- 
joyod by all, as they woro washod and sclrvSd 
frosh from the oarth* 

Mr.G***...d, when asked by a correspondent 
what he intended to do with the new land to be 
devot ed to agriculture ,said "We will plant out 
cabbages for the Autumn, Winter and early Spring, 
and another part for early potatoes*" He 
added, "I hope to be able to supply a veget- 
able for one of the meals each weeic*" 

There are 4,000 lettuces growing at 
present, in addition to large crops of pot- 
atoes, cabbages, caulif lowers , beans, peas , 
carrots, spinnage, beetroots and tomatoes, 









Camp f lowöjr-bedß • 




OaB CAP£«^r Ac«R^cuLTueisr 



The Kitchener C axip R eview: 



K 







S A IT D ¥ I G He 

OM tov/n, ^vith weather-beaten spires and towers , 

Wlth overhanging ;:^tories, winding streets - 

Once on your shore have landed mighty fleets 

And queens and conquerors slept within your boiTers . 

Hov7 far has gone the coast, far like the hours 

Of fanie and splendour, of success and deeds« 

sleeping beautyl IMow the main-road leads 

To pa,sture-.grounds , to orchards, blooming flowerso 



But , in your outskirts dv/elling, thousand refugees, 
Ifho in a hurricane their youth ha,ve spont 
Console with fate by your antiquity* 



I, son of an old people, feel the scent 
Of history, feel lucky that my tent 
Is fa.r nov7 froni the dangers of the sea 



O o O 



ü • VV • VV 



The Kltchener Canip Review; 



7. 



GEUTLEMEN OP THE 



PRESS 



By;- "Pur Printers'* o 



"Attention pleasell Those who still want to write an article for 
the new issue of our Camp Review are requested to hand them over to the 
Editor, this evening, for consideration " 

Thus spoke the announcer in his usual Dinner-time announcements , 
whilst our Campmen listened to the 'mike' with an almost uncanny quiet. 

It's the 20th to-day - so all those who are journalistically 
gifted are asked to show their efforts to the world, and from this day 
our hard work begins . Many stories, reports and other interesting news 
are being sent in to the Editor« Censoring coimnences, cutting down, 
approving, almost liko the "Times" offico. Our artists too, rack 
their brains to find new ideas for the pictures for our "Review", the 
Camp photographors walk about the Camp trying to obtain effectivo snap- 
shotso The ohief of the reproduction department of our newspapor 
blames, of courso, the drawing papor, the Indian ink and what not for 
poor resultse It is quite liko a premiere« 

Finally the "Review" has boen approvcd and editod« 

It's the 28th. Por heavon^s sake - on tho Ist our Magazine ought 
to be issued. 

Our typist starts typing all the stencils, and vory soon they are 
faultlessly writton, even though red with 'correcting fluid'« Then 

they are printed "1,800 copies of each page," doclaros tho 

Editor • 

"Out of the question," roplies the printers p 

"But it simply has to be done." (You may imagine our printers 
speak littlo English, and our Editor is Mr. Ph...«s), and after some 
negotiations ho wins on points« 

The Job Starts, and now all those who have even remotc connections 
with printed matter, come and givo orders« "We iramediately need 



e • o o 



It is a stubborn fact that whenevor our newspapor is in print , 
every department urgontly require thousands of forms« (Needloss to say, 
including those from the same Offico as this "Review" ) - so we must 
work through the night. 

The machines work monotonously •••••o page 11 1576th copy««. 

It is 12 o'clock midnight - thore is a knock on the door. V/e opon it 
woarily - it's the Night Guard« 

"What is the light on for?" Tho Chief has come in person. V/o 
oxplain tho matter« 

"Have you got a pormit for v/orking in the night?" 

"Whyl Do wo nood a pormit for work?" 

After an hour*s hard-labour, we succoed in convincing tho polico 
why wo are thoro « Wo may continuo. 

Nov/ it is the turn of tho Chemical Photo graphic Department. 
Drawings are photographed, dovolopod and reproducod on a stoncil« Moan- 

while the Gestetner machines work indefatigably - l,000«.««o. 1,000 

and 1,000 «.« again« Tho noxt day wo notice that v/e are 'on* the last 
tubo of ink. One of us has tho bad luck to bo chosen to explain to our 
bolovod Chief Cashier, of the Accounts Department, that someono has to 
go to Ramsgato and got some moro ink« You would not beliovo v;"hat he 
has to listen toi But ho doos go to Ramsgate« 

Work goos on'« Now ovorything is done« Wo have usod nearly 30,000 
Sheets of pe.per and 7 tubos of ink. The Editor has a proud look at tho 
product of his and his printers' labours « Now a staff of Campmen start 
stitching and piling up and gotting tho Magazine roady« 

All finished - all tho same? Not in tho loastl Thoro is ono whom 
v/e call the "Sub-Editor" . He flings tho door opon - "What's up now"?, 
askthe printers woarily« 

"Anothor 200 copies of pagos , 19, 4, 7, 
Starts again« 

Hov7 this Gestetner machino has to workl 

English, v/ill thoroughly enjoy our latest Camp "Review"« 

At this moment, our Sub-Editor rushos in« "This article must not 

appear on any accountl" 

But it's too late« Tho machines have stopped running alroady. 



Come 



on'." 



And work 



But from tho Ist of the 
CpixanrnGn v/hn know n. litt In 



The Kitchener Camp Review! - 



8. 



"E IT U G H T . 



By;- P,, l L,,,y, 



ti 



tf 



„^.__ ^^ shall go on with our English lesson now" , said !• 

Will you repeat the sentence of our Linguaphone record »The grand- 
father is sitting in an easy chair' - "No, no , no II Not 'ze' 'the'c 
Do put your tongue against your upper teethl 

"What«s up now?" Dinner-time is approaching and it is getting 
dark around us all the same. Darker and still darker, Are we going 
mad? Has Doomsday arrived? And through the black night shrieks the 
gramophone »is sitting in an easy chair' . 

"STOP IT Pol" Thundered a voice behind us • We turned round, pale 
with fear« 

I faced a tall, splendid figure clad as a Roman General, He held 
a long spear in his hand, and his helmet glittered like gold« 

"Who are you?" Whispered I. "And where did you come from?" 

"MEl -- EOOLUl Don»t you know Marcus Plautus, Centurio of the 
Second Legion, the most fajnous hero the Roman Empire has ever known?" 

"I don»t believe a word you say" , said I coolly. "If you were a 
Roman you couldn't possibly speak English." 

"Souls can speak any language" , replied he tersely. 

"If you are only a spirit, why are you disturbing my English 
lesson?" 

"Because you are disturbing my sleepl" Shouted he 
wildly» "How can I find my rest if you keep on 
playing the same record for years on end. Whenever 
I go to sleep you wake me up by your horrid old 
grandfather smoking a pipe«" 

"Why donU you look for another spot to have 
your eternal rest?" Said I 

"I can't," said he briefly. "I feil just 
here in a battle, and they forgot to bury me, so 
I can never leave this place, unless I go to 
Hades, and I prefer staying here to going to 
that place." 

"How do you like the Camp?" 
I took the opportunity to ask 
him. 

"ITot at all, 
I shall never 
conceive why 
you fools are 
working so 
hard instead 
of making 
your slaves 
do the work.^ 
"There are 
no slaves left 
in Europe," I 
replied. 
"Slavery has 
been abolished 
for over a 
Century." 

"Ho slaves 
at all," he 
asked • "But 
who on earth 
fights in the 
wars if you 
have to do the 
Wö r jx c3.Uxo6 oy 
yourselves?" 
"There is 
no war in 
Europe either 




TheJvitCiiener Canrp Review: 



9. 



or Toetter still, nearly no war«" 

"If there is no war, v/liat the dickens are you living on??" 

"We live on our labour« V/e loathe war." 

"There is nothing more unpleasant than peace* ITo prey, no slaves, 
no battle, b-r-r-r-r-r« YvTiat do you understand by a cinema?" He 
asked abruptly« 

"They are a sort of moving pictures," answered I peacefully« 

"Are 3''ou trying to fool rne? Pictures can't movel He replied« 

"They do all the same," I asserted, "It is a modern invention, 
as well as cars, trains, aeroplanes, and so on." 

"I've Seen such things, awfully complicated machinery« Quite a 
Job to pull them." 

"ITobody pulls them» They are propelled by steam, oil or petrolo" 

"You can smooth your hair with oil, but not move a vehiclec If 
you don't stop trying to make a fool of me I shall kill you." And he 
poised his spear threateningly« 

"¥hy do you use a stick like that," I sneered, "Kavent you got 
a pistol?" 

"Are you going to outrage my spear which has killed 766 enemies? 
If so, you will be the 767th." And he iimnediately started his attacko 

I jumped back. "o«.«oo.Is sitting in an easy chair." What 
was that? 

In my distress I had brushed against the gramophone, and the 
rocord started revolvingo The effect was most amazing. 

"Stop this stuff " , he cried. "I can»t bear it any longer. In 
the name of human charity - stop itl" 

But I seized my Chance« Once and once again the graraophone 
chanted " Is smoking a pipe." 



"Devil," he groanedo "Better go to Hades than hear this silly 
grandf athor •" 

His spear dropped, a clash - - and Mr. Plautus vanished. 

Bright sunshine from a cloudless sky. 

"Let's go on," said I dryly to my pupils • "Will you repeat the 

sentence - ^.. The grandfather is sitting in an easy chair 

Smoking a pipe..«»» "• 

^ — oOo 



OUR DENTAL 



C L I N I C. 



By j — E . o ©h G.»*oo»on© 

The latest acquisition of our Camp is the Dental Clinic, which is 
situated near the First -aid Station. This appears to me to be a really 
good and necessary Institution, and it well deserves to be mentioned 

here. 

Though only opened a week ago , this youngest department of our 
Camp has already between 34 to 40 patients in attondance daily, whoso 
requests v/e endeavour to comply with in the best possible way, and I m^ 
add that the four Dentists and their eight assistants, who \7ork in 
turns , are fully occupied, and the Clinic is carried on in a business- 
like mannor. 

At the moment , the technical Installation is not complete, but we 

are shortly expocting a proper Dental Chair so much longed for? 

together with all the apparatus , espocially the electric drilling 
machine - then we shall be 'up-to-dato' . 

I know that many of our Oomrades will shiver when they hear of 
these things - and not be vory confident at first - but even this gains 
a groat deal of respect • Should anybody trcat us too impetuously - well 
we simply shov; him one of our esteomed »pincors» and this has magic 
powers - the victim\s spirit is brokenlll 



But we are not so bad, howevor. We are very sorry that there is 



no 



pretty female assistant to open the door at \7hich the patient timidly 
knocks* But we shall do our best to rcmedy this by displaying 
extreme kindncss. You should not be afra:!fcd of the Dentist, for we only 
wish to care for your hcaltho A littlo sharp pain is quickly forgotton, 
Iv,^ 4-v»o -hnH t.nntb will Tomain - but remember that bad tocth aro vory 
often the cause of many illncsses* 

We will not hurt 



Be encouraged 



o o e o o 



eooooeoto« 



comc to US 



O O O O Q o 



you 



ee.eooeooee 



very much II H 



The Kltchonor Cam-p Review: 

PIRST ILIPRESSIOIT QF GAjYTERBURY 



-Oc 



Living in the Kitchencr Cainp, I had 
Seen nothing of England other than Sand 
v/ich, and sorne of the Kentish watering 
places in the inimediate neighbourhood 
of the Camp« 

And now I have seen Canterbury, so 
famous in English history - Canterbury 
and its Cathedrall 

I have to confess my first sur- 
prise on visiting the oelebrated 
sanotuary was the difficulty I had 
in f inding it.* Very English 
indeed, and almost impossible in 
any Continental town - not to find, 
out the centre« 

By Chance then I passad a thor- 
oughfare by the side of sorne 
department stores, and a wondor- 
fully kept, anoient heraldic gate, 
and found myself face to face with 
the Cathedral« 

The exterior of the building 
disappointed me • There is no com- 

(Continued on next page ) 




SKETCHES 
f 

CATHEDRAL 

and 
MOlNfTOlElTT 
in grounds, 

DRAMT 

aPECIALLY EGR 
the 

"K. C. REVIEW" 
by our 
A R T I S 



1 "J 



- .^ 



m 



! ,i ', i|IVv\ 




liTi, 








V.S:: 
















W''^JiüIt' V'"" 







i, 



it 



Tho Kltohonor Gent) Roviöw; 
(ContiiiuGd from provious pago ) 

parison to thc fanious 
Gothic Churches of tho 
Continent - for instanco 
StoStcphen's Church in 
Vionnao Tho white ,v/ashed 
out stono has no lifo and 
dopth like tho black- 
grcy onos of our churchos 
the light-groy, fasting, 
platod roof boing v/ithout 
doubt by far inferior to 
the splendid, glirrjrnering 
in green and gold mosaic 
roof of St •Stephon's o 

3ut the gardon, arran- 
gementl The holy edifico 
organically grows out 
from the gardon like a 
groat plant « The building 
itself having lost all 
artificial character and 
has become part of the 
landscape • 

The intoriorl I, 

and even great writors , 
are not able to give any 
descriptiono One has to 

SOG it« 

All English history 
since the earliest 
Christian days of Britain, 
all greatness and pov/er, 
secular and spiritual, are 
reprosonted in this 
sanctuary» 

Everything in thc 
Cathedral is in a 

remarkable condition of preservation, from the tomb of the Black Prince 
to the smallest heraldic ornaments on the gables between the tops of 
the crossed columns in the lovely arcade-court o 

Returning and casting a last glanco on the torn and old tov/n walls, 
reading the inscription plates there about tho Roman history of this 
place, and its connection to Julius Caesar, I found out the differenco 
which may be betweon conservatism in England and any other conservat- 
ism. The latter meaning such a thing like living the present in the 
past, in English conservatism the past boing quite alive in the 
present • 

oOo 






Y^^ 



^'m^ 






i=4 




GATEWAY LEADIITG TO CATHEDRAL. 



TIME 



COLLECTOR 



By; - Wo <, .r W» > <> ob o 



On a sultry Summer afternoon last month, the new 'Times Shif t * 
was so arranged that in my particular work I had free time when nearly 
everybody eise in tho Camp was engaged upon some work or other, or so 
it seemed to me o As I sat contemplating my comrades moving heavy 
loads of goods, or engaged on hoavy road construction work, I becamo 
conscious of my own idleness , but as it was a vory hot day, and I was 
thus thinking, I dozod off and droamt of a Caliph' of ancient Bagde.d 
OOO 0.0 who saunterod, as usual, in the magnificent gardens of his' 
palace ••#••.••••<>» he was tho great Caliph Harun, and thoughtlessly 
he aimed pebbles at the flamingoes v;hich, howevcr, were not to be 
stirred out of their solemnity by this high-born idler« 






quoui" flöwei" uUöliOö vvhluh his 



late father, the great conqueror, oncc had transplanted from remote 
regions into the State gardens« 

New and then he yav/nod broadly, and thon, finally. he laid dovi 



The Kitchener Cainp R e vi ew : 



12. 



« 



on a marble bench exhausted with all his thlnking and dolng nothing, 
But he was awaJ^ened froin a sweet slumber by a shrill crying. 

Angrily he rubbed his eyes to see two guards dragging forth an elderly 

man, who was timidly hugging a huge linen sack bound at the upper end. 
"Your Majesty, we caught this fellow when he was going to climb 

down from the wall into the palace - he certainly wanted to steal into 

the palace." 

"Did you find burglar's Instruments on him? The young monarch 
asked wearily. 

"Nothing - except this empty sackl" 

"Why do you need this sack?" The ruler asked the evildoer, because 
no more suitable question occurred to him. 

"To gather time into it , your Majesty," was the curt answer of the 
prisoner. The soldiers burst into laughter in spite of the roval 
presence. 

"Leave me alone with him," said Harun. "Did I understand you 
clearly? You are going to gather time into your sack?" The young 
Caliph asked him in astonishment . 

"That is so, your Majesty». For many years I have been busy gather- 
ing up into sacks all the time which other people are uselessly wastine: 
or allowing to drift away." 

"You must explain that to me in more detail," Harun said, int er- 
ested . 

"From infancy I have observed," the old man told him simply, "that 
there are many, too many men who do not know what to do with the most 
precious gift Allah has granted us . They waste or sleep the best hours, 
nay, even whole years, of this life of which we are granted so Short a 
measure - whilst there are sevoral people who are making the best of 
all their time, using it up to its last moment. In spite of this, they 
cannot get enough of the precious material, though, in the end, they 
have sadly to acknowledge that they will never finish their worko There 
must be something wrong in this v/orld, I said to iTiyself , and that was 
why I decided to collect in sacks Time which is not used by other people 
which is, therefore, lying in the air." 

"A fool," that was Harun«s thought, but he could not help admitting 
that there was a grain of truth hidden in all this nonsense. "But what 
will you do with this stock?" 

"I have stored up the füll sacks in the house of my fathers and I 
shall carry new sacks füll of unused time to it again and again to my 
last houir. My grandchildren, however, at my death must distribute - 
according to my will - all this treasure ainong those people who always 
suffer from too little time, such as craftsmen, merchants, poets, 
research workers, and other diligent servants of the Lord." 

Harun became thoughtful. "But will you toll me v/hy you just have 
dared to intrude upon the Caliph »s park in spite of the strict prohib- 
ition?" 

Embarrassed, the malefactor turned to and f ro . "For this time I 
shall let mercy temper justice if you ?/ill confess the truth to me," 
Harun said somewhat haughtily. 

"To speak the truth, your Majesty, the greatest part of my treasure 
I have collected in the precincts of your palace; often and often I have, 
in spite of the danger, climbed over the walls, as I have done now, into 
your private garden. I found so much unused time stored up here, more 
than anywhere in the city of Bagdad" with all its hundrcd gates." \ 

"You are froel" The Cciliph said, and his voice sounded quite 
differently. "Go home and peacefully gather into your sacks the time 
which others have wasted, you benefactor of mankind - nobody will hinder 
you any more. But you will not be able to gather in this park. From 
to-day you v/ill - Allah is my witness - find but little wasted time 
around me" . 

This Caliph Harun appeared later on in history v;ith the nickname 
"AI Raschid", that means "The Righteous" , as the model of a ruler. 
Hg himself used to recount his little adventure v/ith pleasure to his 
friends in the fev/ minutcs his affairs of State left him, and to 



rüiiifcLiJX l 



"By the hclp of a fool alono have I loarned wisdoml" 



The Kltchener Camp Review: 



13. 



AND 



N W 



Y U 



K IT W. 



I 






i 






At school I was no good at languages and I suffered much torture 
by my inability to acquire the most elementary knowledge of any tongue 
other than that of the land of my birth. A favourite of the Mathem- 
atics and Science Masters, I was the butt of every rebuke or unkind 
Word of the tutors of the English and Prench classes at the seminary at 
which I was educated. 

Yet I was no dunce, for there was no question that with all my 
lack of linguistic ability, I had mastered all the intricacies of 
scientific and mathematical research, and for my work in this connection 
I obtained a scholarship to a University« Then in later years I 
attained eminence as a scientist, and my researches, though I say it 
myself , were the envy and amazement of all the laboratories of Europe - 
yet I knew no word other than my native tongue» 

As the years went by there gathered over my Pather land a dark 
cloud and the storm broke heaviest over the people of my faith, so that 
we were forced to find sanctuary on the shores of this great country. 
In common with so many unfortunate people, I, the proud scientist, cajne 
here completely lacking in the knowledge of the one subject most 
importaJit to me in my future existence, as I was destined to live, may 
be for years, in lands where only the English tongue is spoken, and of 
that tongue I knew no word whatever« 

Immediately on my arrival here I studied hard and regulär ly to 
master the language, but though I attended every available lesson a.id 
sought the assistance of every English teacher, my complete lack of pro- 
gress took me back to my childhood days and the language masters who 

had so harshly 
rebuked me « I 
found it impos- 
sible to master 
even the most 
elementary 
phrases, and 
the lack of 
progress wor- 
ried me by day 
and by night . 
To hear my hut 
companions read- 
ing f rem the 
exercise books , 
and committing 
to memory such 
sentences as 
"Eather Brown is 
dead and then 
there were nine" 
and similar sen- 
tences, sounded 
at that time just 
gibberish to me • 
Weeks of making no 
progress whatsoever, 
and sleepless nights. 
Night after night I 
tossed and turned in 
my bed in an endeav- 
our to think out a way 
to overcome my lack of 
ability to master the 
rudimonts of the language© 
Then one night, when des- 
pair had nearly overcome me, 




onr? H rvvi 1 TT 



*» "Vn %^ «s 4 «n 



b(» 



'^citJ-iM, vv c% V c; — 



from my bed, and by 



the light of a torch I 
to one of my t runks and 



went 
opened 



amp Review ! - , ,, ^g^^ 

0V7 creaturc, who will toll you a "woarisomo" storv of 
ko a warm interest in all the difficulties and hardshl 



meet v/ith. 



hardshlpi. 




ou may docide vmethor your "milieu" will trouble and 
treadful manncr - or you will step forward to a more 
tnat you havo to carry forth on your back your due 

l°=f w?T?''v'^''" of pains and that thus the distribution of 
.oad will becono fairer and more just than it would bc 
'La not Support the other, overyone Icnd a hand to his 

corSifv°?hof """^ Kitchcnor Carnp is already, or is going to 
svllTttr./ *J^\^°<l^^rG3 ^ron each of its mombers a sacrifice 
spare time, of pleasure, of froedon, and last,but not least, 

'ich^consiSes°Li°In^V''°''" /!,'/^ °°i^^^°' "°* ^^^ Passionatc foeling 
'olossoS on^S^ tv^.^J ''°^^ it^'^^ sontiment which niay be the fincst 
is due sen+wnl^ °^ mankind) - it is rathor the warra affcction vrhich 
S^rt to iTrlZT .ll.t7 ''°''''°'' S? °^^ Community. You necessariVwill 
d?I?ress of sfno pon-nS T7 P^°\l°^\of your own. dealing with the 
are^^Wf. L^?^^^+^^;? 1 f""^ ^l^^ *° '^^«"^ y°^ almost as hclploss as you 
?r lator tn S?i. ?^^°^^- ^°" ^^^^ ^^^^ (^^ everybody has). soJne? 
your politLa? 1U"J '-''^ P^°^l°-^^ of belief, you will have ^SJiJd 
0? Jh^worS! "' ^^ ^°"°''^^ opinions on the main Problems 

t^vn ^J°s<5 G"<^oavours to fulfil the obligations of your worVin? brsin 
^noro 13 xeft of it you mtend to use for a short walk for snno 

rfeno;°" S; Sv ITl '^'f-r: ^"*' "'^^' du?ing"Ä co°nt mplation. 
will cono anrf ^l l ^ '5^°"'^- °^ y°"^^' °^ °^°" ^ stranger to you. - 
^nslish l-.t?L +i T^°^ !■ ^^^°^^- Yo" ^^ill have to writo for him aA 

matte? WM riL?.?;^*^" °'' ^"^ ^'^^^ ^-^^ y°^^ advicc on a special 
matter which ho believes you aro an expert, or he will only stop vnn 

s?i?rinf poi??i"'i" ^^°^* '''"' P^°^^°^^ of 'common IntereSty IboJt'^some 
h^o^+ /^-iJu^^^"^-^ "°^^' °^ y°^^ comrade will merely opon to vou hi^ 

iTow somebody may put the question: Has this intruder a rieht +n 

;"usin/?rh??i"''"''^ "'"' rr'' ^^ ^^" emybody bl^e Jou fof ° 
^:, + ^^?^ *° ^°^P r""" °o^ade? Is not this hour of leisure. this scertv 
rest of the day, too precious a thing to have it v/asted by some L ^, 

cjiiol ?ate?'"' '' " ^'"^ ""^ ^*°" "°*^^"S "-^ °°— t yoJ eJcep?%our 

bindinf ?h2S lir. :;.rV°'' i-r^^"? a Ugature stronger and more 
.täte ff Sd S % nL w?°°^ " "°f^ *?° ^^'^y °^ ^ P°°* *° roalise the 
A qort n/ Wo ^ ?^? ^° ^^"^ ^''"^'^ ^'^•^^^^ 0^ cncouragement from you'' 
A sort of love, of this magic power which forma out of incohoront 
raolcculos, a vigorously living body. mconcrcnt 

+ »,. ^^®^*^ f^x,-"° o^itlet, one rcfuge now left for one's foelinffs on 
the one hand the conversation you hold with the woman vou lovS or^vith 
your dear ones, by the means of writing lettors - o^the othI?'hand n 
discourso with one or the other of your comrades may b^tho sern oJ'a 
more and more deepening friendship. which will enr?ch^d stf ongtSen 



•oOo 



HPV YOU CAH HELP. 

.„ „>,fr°''°''!„^'*^''"'^^^?^ readers of this Journal have written askin^- 
in what way they can help mombers of the Camp. wrxxten asicing 

cisarettP^ ^onnff^+f ^°"^ ' ^'° ^r*" ""^''^ Srateful to receive clo thing, 
^^^f^x!*°^' '=°"^^°*^o"°^y' Sports material, books and magazlncs f' 
fact there is nothins you could c^^nrl wini^v, w-m v,.r^-u- _°x ?:"°^* ^L^a 

- - ••*- — ** ..^—— liu o uc; ^uo 00 vor''' CS^^~" 



le Kltcherier Camp Revlev/; 

GOOD LUC Kl 






YOUNGSTERS. 



An appreclation of the ex-Dovercourt "bovs who left the Canp on 13th Jm. 



k 1 

\ 



There is a training farm near Oxford which will soon flourish. 
There is a lot of work to be done - but it will be done - for to that 
fa.rni has gone a band of tv/enty-five youths of this Camp, between tho 
ages of 15 and 19. They aro the boys v/ho came to us in i'ebruary and 
March from Dovercourt, and v;ho proved themselves, not only the most 
cheerful of youngsters, but steady and excellent workerso 

They came to the Camp when it was in a very deplorable state, and, 
as much as anybody eise, they labourcd and toiled until this sad day 
when they leave us - whcn the Camp has been nearly transformod into a 
very habitable place; and, alas , on the very day on which the Cinema - 
which they so much looked forward to visiting - v/as openedo 

The work they did for our Post Office, at our telephone switchboard, 
on the carpenter's bench and in one-hundred-and-one different v/ays , was 
all of excoptional merit, and those for whom theso boys v/orkod cannot pay 
sufficient tribute to them* They will bo missed by CYcrj-body, because ^t 
was ref reshing to go into their hut and talk with them and to sco tho 
pride they took in their temporary home, and to be in-vigoratcd by their 
high spirits and good cheer« Industrious workers, facing their nisfor- 
tune with courage and fortitude« 

It will be a long, long timo bcfore we get used to this Camp without 
those youths who were regarded with so deep an affection by almost evory 
member of this Community« 

They were given a special broakfast before they left the Camp, and 
the Director said, when bidding them "auf wiedersehen", he could not 
find Wvords to adequately express his . f eelings on this occasion because 
had looked upon them as very doar members of his large family. 

As they entored the motor coach which was to take them to Oxford, 
e,n enormous crowd gathered round it to bid farewell, and the Mayor of 
Sandv/ich entered the coach and addressed a fev/ words of encouragement to 
theiii all. He said how highly the Director had spoken of the work they 
had done in the Camp and hoped that they would always work in the same 
way, and that the future would hold for them greater happiness than the 
past , and he hoped that they will always remember the period of their 
lives spent at the Kitchener Camp« 

And as the motor coach left the Camp, many an eye was meist, and 
hearts beat faster - and in the Camp, for hours after their departure, 
their was a noticeable depressiono 



he 



•oOo 



THE STRMTG-ER IH YOUR MIDST : 
By;- Dr» Wo«.or W«oo.b» 

When does Man most violently feol the rising of Problems? When he 
is alone in a vast desert, on the summit of a mountain, in the cell of a 
monastery, or when he is one particle of a huge crowd, one molecule of 
an enormous body, sharing its plcasures and its hardships , its tro übles 
and its recreations? He who never had the opportunity of being alone 
for a long space of time will probably say, can there arise any doubt 
that he who has for comrades only the day and night, the sun and the 
other constellations, will soon be overwhclmed by thoughts, over-run by 
Problems» But no - a soft peacefulness will entei* his heart, and oven 
the lonoly prisoner will finally be lulled to sleop by a benevolent 
faintness. How different fron it is the state of mind of a man getting 
ombcddcd in a multitude of people he did not know before» Whilst the 
mountaineer or the monk are occupicd moro or less with the thoughts and 
the Problems of their own, as a member of a Community you will meet the 
Problems and thoughts, tho ambitions and f ears , tho longing and desircs 
of your fellow-men; and you certainly will have to think of them« j» 

on the history of his lifo,, on the state of his family, on hir 
idoas, and so on« \^ • 

This Information may become to you either a sourco^of lue» 
cause of troublo« It dcpends on whcthor you will feel "laolestc 




AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 

Phone: (212)744-6400 

Fax: (212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Date: 12/21/2009 



Box: 2 



Sys#: 000198685 



Folder: 4 






1 

# 



COPY 



P I TT I F 



(b) 



nent of^l™f tofurnish an Opinion as to the entitle- 
to claL^™^' T^^^^^^^of ^-^azi persecution in Gemany, 
to Claim compensation under the terms of Articl«> 4"^ nf 
the a^ended Geman Compensation LarpublisJedlS June 29 , 

fide^ ^s'^oll^wr: !^^"^^-^i- --^« available to me pro- 

The victim of persecution has a Claim against Geman 

^0+^°''^ T®^ ^*" ^^ ^^^ deprived of his liberty between 
50th of January 1933 and the 8th of May 1945. This 
Äir.'" the same way if a foreign state has de- 
pnved one victim of persecution of his liberty, dis- 
regarding the principles of international law and when 
(aj internment was made possible by the fact that 

the victim of persecution had lost German Citizen- 
ship or the protection of Gerraany or ^iiiizen 

if the Government of the foreign power was in- 

Internffl^n? h^ Hl mternraent by the German govemment. 
J-nternment by the polace or military forces. arreqt 
imprisonment, gaol, forced stay in a cSncIntrtuon ' 
dt??n^f regarded as loss of liberty. Life under con- 
aitions of arrest, enforced labour under such con- 

nnit^"nf- fl^r°^^???* in special units or reforming 
Units of the military forces are all regarded as loss 
of liberty. 

of T)er8on^^^nJ,^^L?^^%'^^^!? ""^^2^ ^ ^ concemef is that 
or persons, now naturalized Australian Citizens, who were 

f^r^"^K®'*'\^^ refugees resident in the United Kingdom at 
the outbreak of war in September 1939. Thev were interned 
in camp 8 in England and in the Isle of Man at a oeriod^ 
between May and July 1940, and werl then deperte'^lrans- 
fn'T^J" Australia in His Majesty's Transport "Dunera', 

whicW«,^«r+r*"'^v'^^'^"^PP^'^ '^ith Suns and depth charges 
o;?inL?5^?®^ through the war zone and was exposed to un- 
successful torpedo attack. 



n,Pnf «^H T ßPepifically to advise whether the intern- 

'ft^'^'l^ Tlu Pa^ticularly the circumstances of the in- 
ternment of these persons both in the camps in the United 

Äf^"/" *^^^f transportation to Australia in the ship 
Dunera" was contrary to the rules of international law. 

It is necessary to state in summary form the facts 
out of which the Claim arises. At the outbreak of war in 
September 1939, the United Kingdom required all enemy 
ui^t^^'^r■ A ^^ persons of enemy nationality within the 
United Kmgdom, to go before special tribunals which ex- 
amined them with a view to determining their seojrity 
status.The tribunals were directed to establish two broad 
classifications. Under one of these they placed aliens 
within A, B and C classes. Those in a class were individu- 
als about whose security position there was serious doubt 
and these were interned; those in B olass were not internel. 
but were restncted in their movements? and those placeC in 
C class were exempted from all restrictions other than 
those applicable to all foreigners. The other olassifici- 
cation of ^enemy aliens which to some e.^ctent cut aoross the 






o V» 



n /^T^^^j-c^ 



«>.a.ccoo4.xx-jttoxuri was mzo "reiugees ITorn j.-azi 



oppression" and non-refugees. The overahelming maj^trity of 
those who came before the tribunals were classified in C 
class, and a great majority as refugees from Tazi oppres- 



sion 



- 3 - 



Followins the German iavaiolon o^ t>e l.,:.v/ -ount--c ^.,, 



May 1940 and in the period whica inrne dvitel- f-'lic--- 









■o f- 



^Hhll^r. -^^ ^?-'^-jn refugees in England werc i-te^-n.-d -V -jy-^c 
rifn! ^^ngland or in the Isle of Man- Sonre of taose .„./f;:'-'-^ 

t^I !r% international eminente ana great disli-t-- 'v:^- 
m tue lolLOwmg tei-ms, .^^-...i... 

"Thsy are htmble harralesü folk, mosU/ Jewis>, whc-s or^v 
Wish^xs to be left :n pea-e to -cor stl tute th-ir e-a- ' 
.erea i ..v^s xn a ccuntr-/ ix-oo frorr. '.he J:,tncsi)hr-ro '.■'■■" 
Uestapo and pogrora, to h-3t,tlo dcwn f.r.d haye Inpes 
own waich will gxre ther, ua^k the/ r ind--D^-r---'^'ü 

^^of^*''^^ ° ^o? In'terrasnt cf i^iens i Pengiir Special 

«„.„ ■'•" '^"■'•y 1940, some a?''^ m;;n alrea-- in thap^ i-rpT-omf-^- 

I,^™?' T'""' n^"^;''^^ '^ ^^" ^"''^^^''^ ^^^^ tran3r;o-tation'to ■ 
Australia. Of these, 2288 were to be p-operly roKarc.ed a3 

2^fctrlZ'^/'l:^^ oppresBion, 200 were Ica-;ian internees anl 

aliens -Lf r^r^ '^^" ^^'^ ^'^^'^ detarred as CJ.a,..= A enerny 
aliens. oone of the refugees uere evibarkei o-. tha ^1.n^-^a 

Otherf i^'^nh^?^"+•'^'''' '^f^ ^^^^^ ^"'"° ■'''-^e t^-n£ferr;^ abtoad 



cj anci oelf 



■^■o». 



Others m substantial nu.nibers v-re ir.du- :d -n ^^o'^vr'^-^r ^o 
embark on promises of grea-*:er free^or-,, r-at ;A/iveF^ "Air-^afn^ ■■ 
would follow shortly, wnile others we.- told thar they-'w^r-^ 
going to Ganada and that th-ir w5v-g r-ir cl-ild-e^- v-^^^d >-'-"' 
the sa^^ convoy. The mternens vore i^i fact transport-d to 

their tamilies and Lad great difficulL^^ :.n esta^lishing cop- 
tact vith them« 



^ 



e conditijnG ur:..er 



,»1 '-^ 



There is clear evidence that th.. v^.^ 
the refugees were interred in T'lngland a',d on 
were very bad indeod^ tl^at ':he c^xr.,^-. ü:.th ^- 'j-o" 
the Isle of .:^n feil far si 






'{•n ' '-IC 



ri 



ao r t o f 



■' r^ T '"^ '. 



ne e--r:taia:j soe::.Liiec. ror 
pnsoners of war under the Ir..^-rnalion-;i -Jonve-tior ---^atl/'- 
to the Treatment of Prisoner^T cf Var si^ned at >' ne ^a 'in 'l9<:^9 
which was ratified by the :jnited ivingioiii iri j^^v;^ -9^1, ^^v..' 
relevance of the Standards presorlbed 'ov thi.3 Co-ventior will 
be considered later in doterniriirc vhe.t':^r th? nian'-'^^'r '-'-d ^on- 
^Alions of intemment of the inf -^^o.^ robscci;en'^y'''iraT?^I^Vtii 
m the Lunera violated thr rulec, nf ir ner-ation^l L'.w. ., d^- 



tailed account of the condi:icnr- in the Inter'inr-' t 
England and the Isle cf "ürn ic; f'^^roisi; lt- ' " 



^y Laf it 



"; '■»IT 

.-La .1 (.' 



s :. 



P :• 



-< +■ 



Intemment of Ali-ns, Penc^i^in Spc'jial 19^0 :- 
He gives a detailed account of c'. ndiT - cnr: li- 
near Liverpool from vhich 11'.: v- of 

and also deals quite elabora-^:ely wich th^^ Isle of Azn. Cauoc^ 
from three cf which 830 of tho :Oi-nera ir^t-cnecö w";r"i d^ü^at rlij'. 



\' . •<*. '^. >» "^ •' ' 



he ..UV ton OaiTip 



Chan 



^rld hameav'c The Mac:3 ?nterncienL 



(Gentral Gamp Louglasv )n 

of refugees and their treatmeni in tne -^arious waraps wao tVie 

subject of debate in the }]nglish patlia':^/rnt Irtcr i'^ Ij^A), 

It will suffice to refer to the sta^.e;';ert c\ Vi i-j.v.rar t 

of Chelwood in the üouse of Lo"*ds c -• .iU^-T/st ö, 1V4G, tiia 

feit ''most strc^ngjy that the h_L-toiy :>f '»'■'' 

v/ith regard to these unnrnp^' p,".,::en3 is or"'e n 

creditable incidc;nt^3 i:i th'^ wh.ole hi::!':c^y of th: 3 -^c-jn-^ry «-oc 

The grosses! injustico has bccn ::;ornmit l ?:d un J :"r th*: mriuenoe 

of an unreaeonable and urrc^soniru; ter^cr ; -^nc. ::■; the ^^poech 

of the Lord j3iiE.hop of Ghi ehester vl.zo 1.', th -^ i'-^'iZ: o .C lcr';s 



i-.;e 
..c.i. '/a;3 "lais-?*: place 
^ ^:h" >;:orjt dis - 



pnd. on the same date in which he d^. c1c':vT'.c. t 
intemment or deportation c" ref"i 



'. / '- o 



sale 



.■/ 'i 1 1 



c < *^ 



X .1. 



.h 



c 1' 



were onn^ny 



aliens is therefore an arbiträr;^' c? ot - that 
age of the law of nations, an y ' ^ j£ A'^'l^l-' 



^. «^ 4 



m t'ic 



r.nsu 



an~ 



- 3 - 



The tvnpXment of the interneos on the Tunera is well 
documented, There is abundant an so far as I ain awaro sub- 
stantially uncontroverted evidence of the appalling condi- 
tions under which these men were transported to Australia. 
Their embarkation was carried out under circiunstances atten- 
ded at times by deliberate cruelty, and othen/ise by entire 
disregard of elementarj^ Standards of human rlignity and 
decenoy« The internees wore accoraodated on board ship in 
appallingly crowded, unhygienic and insanitary conditions^ 
not e-^^en the most elementary precautions wera taken to en- 
suro^ their safety in the event of marine disaster, and 
po-rticularly of enemy attack. An enemy torpedo attack took 
place, but happily failed. The ship was grossly under- 
equipped with life saving devices. The Standards of fee^ling 
and nutrition were extremly bad, and there is well \cGuraen- 
ted evidence of brutality on the part of some of the British 
military guards towards the internees, and there is also 
clear evidence of thefts of property belonging to the inter- 
nees. The fact that the military commanding officer on 
boa.rd the Lunera was subsequently punished by court laartial 
and that comensation was paid to some internees on the 
Dunera by the British government affords evidence of offi- 
cial acknowledgment of the violations of human rights and 
dignitjr which took place on the voyage « It is to be observ 
ved that subsequent punishment of wrongdoers, and payment 
of compensation for wrongful deprivation of property does 
not retrospectively eure a breach of international law, if 
either the internment of these refugees or the manner of 
their internment or both is properly held to constitute 
such a breach. I am of opinion that the internment of the 
refugees in the camps from May 1940 and their subsequent 
transportation in the Dunera of itself constitutes a breach 
if international law; but even if this view is not held to 
be established, I am of opinion that it is beyond question 
that the manner in which the internees vrere treated and 
the conditions to which they were subjected in the camps 
and in the Dunera constituted a violation of the rules of 
international law. 

vrhile the riiles of international law with respect to 
the internment of civilian enemy aliens in time of war 
cannot bo said to be established with certainty, it cannot 
dogma-tically be stated that a belligerent has no right to 
make a general internment order irrespective of specific 
proiSf of hostile association or Intention. Before the 

first World war. there was support for the view that inter- 
national law aid not allow of such general internment. 
Thus Vestlake in 1907 wrote that ''the system cf the 
treaties may therefore be deemed to amounl to a general 
agreement, on the part of governmentd, that modern inter- 
national law forbids making prisoners the persons ... of 

en^rny subjects in the territory at the outbreak of war, 
or, savmg the right of expulsion in case of apprehended 
danger to the State, refusing them the right of con- 
tinuous residence during good behaviour'. Ir view of sub- 
sequent practice, it cannot be said, particularly in view 
ot the mcreasingly totalitarian aspect of modern wars, 
that there is any rule of custoraary international law 
which prohibits the gemeral internment of enemy aliens. 
But the discussion of the question of modern auoho-'ities 
on international law clearly assumes that such Tiivi^ian 



their national 



e 



enemy aliens are under the protection of 

fr^?^^^^T^'-^^ Oppenheim- Lauterpacht International LrZ 
(7th edition, voi 2 at p. 3L6 (195<^)) discussing th. 
question first m the eerney context of the duty of belli- 
gerent s to allow civilian enemy aliens to withdraw at the 
outbreak of war says that '-'it may safely be said that 
there IS now a customary rule of International Law accor- 

o wv. .vx*-cv^xx ..-Ao. ou'^ix ouujt-ijLö ui biiü enemy as are not 

real or potential members of his armed forces, or as are 



/ 



e 



not lilcoly ^o ^upply htm v/i*'h Information of military impor- 
tance, rrnast öe alloved a rcasonable period xor withdrawai-' o 
This is folloved by a disoussion of the right and power to 
intern gucIi p.:r3or:3r The discuüsion clearly assimeg that^'.he 
civilian enoiiiy aliens under discucsion enjoy the protection 
of their national states; the stated rule with respect to 
withdrawal makes ro sense when applied to refugees who have 
lost the protection of thcir national state? and who, moreover, 
might and in the cape of the German refugees from ITazi Germa- 
ny almoßt certainly vrould, cuffer a disastrous fate were they 

to almeet-eertainiy-voH retuiTi or be returned to the 
whose r.aticnality thry Ftill possessel de_juret 



oount^ 



y 



This ßur.gr^sts clearly eriough that the position of a 
civilian enen:y allen who is a refugee from his national s'^atc;, 
even though he still rotains its nationality de jure» calls 
for special consideration« This draws further support from 
the terms of the Convention concerning the Statu? of Refugees 
Coming from Germa-'y of Pebruaiy 10, 1938, to which the Unite< 

Kingdom was a signatorj^« 

Article 1 of that Convention provides 



(1) 



J^or the purposes of the present Convention, the term 
'refugees Coming from Germany' shall be deemed to apply 

to 

(a) Pereons possessing or having possessed German 
nationality and not possessing any other nationality 
who are proved not to enjoy, in law or in fact, the pro- 
tection of the German Government; 

(b) Stateless persons not covered by previous Conven- 
tions or Agreements who have left German territory after 
heing e^tablished therein and who are proved not oo 
enjoy, in lau- or in fact, the protection cf the German 

Govemmer '. • 



(2) 



Persons who 
8ona.l ccnve 



leave Gemiany for reasons of purely per- 
niende are not included in this definitiono 



The United Kingdom ade a rese?:--ation in respect cf this article 
in terms that ^'H.M. Government regards the def inltion^as 
applicable only to refugees Coming from Germany as denned, 
who at the date of ratificat^on no longer enjoy the protection 
of the. German Government''. 

Article 2 provides : 

Without prejudice to the power of any High Contracting 
Party to regulate the right of sojourn and residence, a re- 
fugee shall be entitled to move about freely, to sojourn or 
reside in the Territory to v/hich the present Convention 
applies, in accordance with the laws and internal regula- 
tions apply ing therein* ^^ 

The construction of Article 2 is not free from ^'coubt, 
It has been very aptly observed that 

'»It has to be admitted that the wording of the provision is 
somewhat cryptic. It certainly stipulates a rign;: to .ree 
movement on the part of the refugee, but the par^ ot tne 
sentence beginning with the words »without prejudice" and 
ending with the vjovl »residence» takes someth .ng away from 
this righ.; ard it is difficult if not impossib..e to say 
exaotly how nuch is thus taken away. It is how-ver not easy 
to imgaine that it was the Intention cf the .xign Contrac- 
ting Parties to say no more than the triviality "chat the 



- 5 - 



refugee should be «-»-i-^io^ to moYe about freely and to scjouim 
or to resiie eT:vi^c when it wap forbidden to him to do oo . 
That would mcan that Art« 2 oy che Convention had no meaning 
either in law or in fact at all. This Interpretation is all 
the less credible as Art. 2 was obviously intended to be of 
paramount iir.portance. It follows iimnediately upon the defini- 
tion of th^:! term ^Refugee' and fills the entire Chapter II of 
the Conve'xition» Even in the most cautious Interpretation it 
would appear that it must have provided at least one thing in 
favour of the refugee s that he should not be imprisoned and 
intemed solely on the ground of his being or having been a 
najrional or a resident of Germany. If this is not conceder' 
then Art. 2 would be a legal absurdity of the first crdsr. 
If it is conceded, then the present Government policy of in- 
discriminate internment of 23.000 male refugees solely on the 
ground of their present or former nationality would appear 
to be at variance with the Convention. As against this it 
cannot be argued that this would deprive a belligerent state 
of a right which on security grounds is indispensable? the 
Convention applies to genuine refugees (who are laboriously 
defined in Art. 1 of the Convention) only each of the High 
Contracting Parties can require proof in every individual « 
Gase that a person is a genuine refugee before he or she is 
treated as such. But it cannot be in accordance with the Con- 
vention that persons are intemed for an indefinite period 
Just because they are refugees from Germany. It appears that 
however uncertain it might be to what extent Art. 2 intended 
to provid» protection for refugees, it must at least have 
been intended to protect them against an internment based on 
no other Charge than that constituted by their being refugees 
from Germany." (E.J. Cohn; Legal Aspects of Internment (1941^ 
4 Modem Law Review 200 at pp. 203-4). 

The chara^Lür of the Convention, designed as it was to 
Protect German refugees, defined as persons who are proved 
not to enjoy in law or in fact the protection of the German 
government, makes it clear that it did not cease to be opera- 
tive on the outbreak of war between the United Kingdom and 
Germany. In view of the fact also that all authoritative dis- 
cussion of the position of enemy aliens clearly assumes that 
they retain the protection of their national states, it is 
submitted that there is adequate support for the general pro- 
position that it is contrary to international law to subject 
genuine refugees to general internment simply on the ground 
that they retain er'^xny nationality. If this proposition is rc 
garded as ^^^ ...x^e, it is submitted that there is a rule of 
intemau^unal law binding on signatories of the Refugee Con- 
vention of 1938 which prohibits any general and indiscriminate 
internment of genuine refugees. The facts disclose that the 
internment s of May-J"uly 1940 were indiscriminate; that the 
mass of persons then interned had been established to he 
genuine refugees by their earlier C class clpssif ication at 
the outbreak of war and that no attempt was made to reexamine 
individual cases to re-evaluate the status of individuals as 
genuine refugees or as security risks. The fact that the 
general internment took place in circumstancis of extreme 
national danger in the United Kingdom cannot effect a chan^jje 
in the rule of international law; within very few months tht. 
action with respect to the intemees was the subject of 
ßharply critical debate in the English parliament and else- 
where« 

It is submitted therefore that the internment of genTk- 
ine refugees from Germany, as defined in the Convention of 
193S, was a violation by the United Kingdom of the rules of 
international law, and that thli ^' ' ' " 



appl, 



deten- 



tion in the camps in England and the Isle of Man and to the 
subsequent detention on board the ship runera. 



< 



6 - 



\ • ■'■ 



1 . -r 

If this vievr that the internment was unlawful is not 
accepted %e it is submitted that the manner of tixe internment, 
the character of the treatment of the refugees in internment 
was a piain violation of international law. Itis stated by 
the distinguished iimerican writer on International Law, 
Charles Cheney Hyde (International Law, second revised 
edition 1951, vol» 3 at pp. 1721-2) that 



ti 



Upon the outbreak of v/ar a belligerent acquires a broad 
right to control enemy persons within its doraain for the 
accomplishment of various purposes relating to the 
conflict .... The lav; of nations doea not prescribe the 
procedure to be followed. In that adopted a belligerent 
must doubtless resp-ct those requirements of justice which 
forbid cruel, arbitrary or revengeful conduct* Women, 
children, and all persons, who, through age or infirmity, 
are incapable of rendering military service, are entitled 
generally to special consideration. Apart from the obvious 
duty to respect the dictates of humanity, a belligerent is 
believed to be free to shape its policy according to the 
exigencies of the hour. It may, for example, require the 
registration of the allen enemy^ it may regulate his 
occupation as well as his place and mode of living^ it 
may intern him^» it may expel him." 

Hyde's assertion of the right to intern enemy persons 
is made without specific consideration of the case of the 
refugee? but what is significant is the assertion of the 
existence of a duty to treat enemy aliens in accordance with 
the dictates of humanity and specifically to abstain from 
*' cruel, arbitrary or revengeful conduct-'. On ths statement 
of the rule of international law, it is clear that there is 
ample evidence of cruel, arbitrary and revengeful conduct 
on board the Dunera? and apart from such wanton and delibe- 
rate acts it is äubmitted that the treatment of refugeee 
internees both in the English Isle of Man camps and on the 
Dunera constituted a violation of the rules of international 
law within the rule stated by Hyde. 

In determining the Standards which international law 
prescribes for the treatment of such persons, it is submitte* 
that the International Convention relative to the Treatment 
of Prisoners of War signed at Geneva in 1929, and ratified 
by the United Kingdom in 19 31, is relevant. That Convention 
was exclusively concemed with prisoners of war who were 
members of the armed forces of the belligerents, ani spellei 
out in detail the conditions and Standards, subject to which 
they might be fetained. The Convention of its own force (?li 
not apply to civilian prisoners-of-war or other civilian 
interees for whom specific Provision is now made by the 
Geneva Convention of 1949 or the Protection of Civilian 
Persons in Time of '7ar which, it may be noted, in Article 
44,^provides that in applying measures of control referred 
to in the Convention, the Detaining Power shall not treat 
as enemy aliens exclusively on the basis of their nationality 
de .Iure of an enemy State, refugees who do not actually 
enjoy the protection of any govemment. This Convention 
does not of course dispose of the issues with which we are 
here concerned, and which arose before it cajne into Operation, 
but it is submitted that the Convention of 1929 which im- 
poees a conventional Standard of international law for the 
treatment of military prisoners of war must as a matter of 
customary intornationa:: law be treated as prescribing bare 
minimum Standards for the treatment of interned refugees 
from Fazi oppression who do not need to be under strict 
military discipline and a very substantial number of whom 

were not healthy enougVi uv w>:!re too old to be soidiers. In 
amplifying and particularizing Ilyde's gener'- 1 statement that 



there is an obvious duty zo respect the dictates of humanity 
in respect of the detention of enemy persons, compliance with 
the requireraents of the 1929 Convention therefore must repre- 
sent the m-i'i'i.mra o>^i •! rr^-^ton i"'pc3ed on the United lUng-lom 
governraent in x^^^icx, oi ... , intemnient of Geman refugees in 
the United Kmgdom camps and in the Dunera. 

The facts disclose that either in the camps or in the 
ship or in both there were many violations of these specific 
Standards. ¥ithout an exhaustive canvass of the facts or the 
terms of all clauses of the Convention of 19^9, the following 
proposition may be stated. Article 5 of the Convention pro- 
viding that the person of the prisoner is entitled to be res- 
pectedwas grossly violated by the procedure adopted in 
embarkmg mternees on tho D-anera and by their treatment dur- 

taien frnn"^??<,nLE-'' l^^^^^'l ^^^^^5^5 ^ requiring that moneys 
taKen t rompnsoners shoula be credited to their accounts and 

thr«S?^ ^r2" ':''''' J^^^^^e^ many times in the camps and on 
as TiS^?i;nt^^''-®/uP^°''^^^"S ^^^^ belligerents should as far 
ners old^l/rT'* bnnging together in the sajne camps priso- 
fi1l%eL?s violatef i^th^ nationalities was in all LaSiig- 
T.«f„n.I vioiate i m the camps and on the ship, when genuine 

hlläi nf r""- '"^•^"°' ^° humiliation an-l persecStion at ?he 

mtnilef /rtl.?^'^"'^? T*^ '"^^"^ ^^^^ ^«^« indisJJLinafely 
ses be Pntf^oi,^^"° "5^'"' requires that the detention premi- 
liehted wni , ^ r^ ^''°'" ^"""P ^"'^ adequately heated and 

Jrfvisions wIth r^f '? f '"^f !^^ ^^^ °^P^' ^"^ ^^« f^^ther 
Ine ierP ,HniJ+ ^^^pect to Standards of accomodation and hygi- 

that fnT^'fai J% / T^^'-"^ ^°'' ^ Standard of food equal to 

s?anSSf oTr^\' °'f^^"S' ^^-^^™°- -^^fooLS^^ 

Juiref Jere not'?vrn;sh:d1i"fh""^"'''^^"^"^ ArticlflS re- 
defective in the Dnn^^!^ ^i" ^^® campsi they were grossly 



detamed in conditions anr^ ?^ o ^nterned refugees wer 

barest^minimum BlanSa;drof 'LtSL'n:?'?'^ "'°'"*^^ ^^« 

assuraing the deten^"— 5*^°"'^1 ^'''^' ^^^^^ =■ 



no doubt, 



Vi. r ";*'^"'» assuraing the dP-^,an-^-^v^ i^ t, -^ •^'*^« rnere can be 



lt4S ?n"^^run%Sv'^P-'-^o'-3"d:??LiS ''' ^^^^^ with 
transported to ^M^+'^^?Cidon camps a^r^ ,,i; "®^ °" and after Mav 

eovernment'..£3"^.'*S^^ in thr^^^^r^ho was subsequently ''^ 

liberty, disr^n^aanJ tb: ^"'' ^icti« of perL^r^-"'^ Kingdom 

withm the meanini 0- ?^.P'"r"'^^P^«s of int|?^^f'°" °^ ^is 
Pensation t^., , '-= o- Arteile 4 -,f +v "''®^'^<itional lawn 

" ^^^ Publlshed on JuJrl^ ^PsgT"'"' ^«^='n Com- 



de i„^„ , refugees has 
7i|-JHre. lost the ^-^t 

S^!" gover-^ment ^^^ 



■e condition 
rnraent was maie 

Gemany '°" ^""^ ^°^* 



■as in '••,0+ u V°^ Lfermanv ic, oi„ "^"^^ 
■'■'' -acT,_, whatever f v,^ • also satlq- 

tfction of th.^ Crtl^L^''^'' "ationali?y 



l 



8 - 



yentions, such as the Prisoner of Var Convention of 19.^9, 
is that the national govcrnrnent still furnishes protection 

tSp'^aiÄi o%''''^^^°'':■'^^^''^ entitle-l, though it acts through 
lifftf^7, '^ neutral protecting power. It either as a 
obii^J^L f °'" ^^°^ ^^'^ national government repudiates ita 
in the cnop nf''?5°''p protection, as did the Geman government 
m the case of bhe Gerraan refugees, they are, as a practical 

n'^.!!+%l! ?^^''.''i^'^°"-* protection? there is none who will 
thP^ to^?~^o/^^r'\^^^^"?^ ^^^ detaining power which subjects 
law Th. ;o5*°'"''^ ''Tc''^ violates the rules of international 

of ^emlnv anffn. t^°+^^ *^^ withdrawal of the protection 
Ol ueraany, and lor that very reason, were placed in a posi- 

hp°"r,l^ f,""^ the conditions of their *rea%MeH% internment could 
nnt H,, determined by the United Kingdora government with- 

out due regard to the Standards of international law and with- 
out oversight by a protecting power. Moreover, it is a common- 
piace of international law that breach of its Standards and 
requirements may lead to reprisals; that failure to respect 
^r^v+% .''i*^ respect to Gerraan military prisoners of war 
might lead to reprisals against British military prisoners 
in Gerraany ccanps. The sanction of reprisal had no meaning in 
the refugee content, for the Fazi German government pro- 
fessedly afforded them no protection. It is painfully obvious 
that the treament of the German refuge-es who were interned 
in the camps and the Dunera would have gained the warm support 
01 tne Geman govern::ien' 






It is submitted aocordingly that the internees in 
termß of Article 43 of the Geman Compensation law, 

sign, Zelman Cowen 
SELMAN Cö'mJJ 

^;^:.^:^ ^^'\* (Oxford), B.Aop LLoB., LLoM. (iniversaty 
of Melbourne)« Professor of Public Law and Dean of 5he 
Faculty of Law University of Melbourne, of Gravis Inn, 
Barrister-at-Law^ of the Victorian Bar« 




AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 

Phone: (212)744-6400 

Fax:(212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Data: 12/21/2009 



Sys#: 000198685 



Box: 2 



Folder: 5 



^-MmmM. 



r\'ififefeMä^,'4El^ii'Ä;fty*S:%/s*ife^^^ 



I 



I 

k 



Rechte an Grimdstuecken 
in Schlesien 



von 



Dr. Fritz Kassel, 

IIA Hedan Street, 

BT. KILDA, S. 2. 

Australien. 



1961. 



Inhaltsverzeiclmis 



Hausgrundstueck Niederstrasse Nr. 8 
Querschnitt 
A-'bbildung 

Hausgrunds tueck Niederstrasse Fr. 7 
Bauerngut Beumgerten 

Potokopie der eidesstattlicben Versiche- 
rung des ehemaligen Buergerneisters 

Wald- und Magnesitgelaende Grochau 



Fabrik Reichenbacherstrasse Nr. 24 

Gutachten des Architelcten Zinunermenn, 
Schweidnitz 

Fotokopio der Preisbildungsbehoerde 
fuer Mieten 

Grundriss des Pabrikgelaendes 
Abbildunr-en des Pabrikgrundstueckes 

Hermann Strasse Nr. 9 
Babxxhofsallee Nr. 10 

Erbscholtisei mit Gärichtsln^etscham 
Muehlbock 

Muehlenb eckers trasse 50-52 in Schildow 
bei Berlin 

Vorkaufsrecht auf dorn Gnondstueck T^erd- 
litschke 

Hypothek Pll 10.000 Reicbenbacherstrasse 
Hypothek läl 1.500 Baumgarten 

Anhang: Potokopio der Verleibungs-Urlainde 
des Schlesischen Adlers 



1-2 

5 

5-6 
7 

8 

9 

12 



10 - 



15 - 22 

24 
25 



27 - 



26 
28 



29 - 50 
51 - 52 

55 

54 

55 

56 



nm'innniMiiiiim-inTHTiniiinirniiiiiiHrTi 



- ± - 



PmUSG.RIj7Ti)3TU:üiGK NIEDüIRS^i'RASSE 






8 



Dieses Griindstueck hat eine J?ront von 10 Metern ujid 
war* auf zwei Brandstellen der am 24. April 1858 abgebrann- 
ten Stadt Pranl^:enstein erbaut. PJs wurde et-;a in Jahre 1862 
von meinem Grossvater Julius Kassel von der 7/it¥7e Pauline 
Schneider kaeuflich erworben. Im Jab_re 1890 kaufte es mein 
Vater Jacob (Jacques) Kassel, modernisierte es durch mehrere 
Um- und ZuDauten und nach seinem am 2. August 1936 erfolgten 
iode wurde im Erbgange meine Mutter Frau Elisabeth Johanna 
Kassel, geborene Brück, Eigentuemerin. Sie verstai-b am 27. 
Maerz 19^2. 

Um eine Entziehung des Grundstüeckes duji^ch die Nazis 
zu vermeiden, hatte sie ihjren arischen Schwiegersohn Dr. Jo- 
harjies Kowal in einer letztwilligen Verfuegung als Erben 
benannt. 

Dr. Kowal hat die Mieten fuer 2 Jalire, naemlich vom 
1. April 19^1-2 bis 31. Maerz 1944, eingezogen. Diese setzten 
sica wie folgt zusammen : - 



IContny 
Rachner 

Mutter Wolinung 
Mueller, Giese 
Welz 
Kuschel 



RM 200.- 
116.67 

25.- 
35.- 
30.- 

33.50 



zusammen PJvi 440.17 per lionat 

Mit \7irkung von 1. April 19^1^1- Ynirde das Kausgrund- 
stueck meinem Schwager Dr. Kov/al durch die Nazibehoerden 
entzogen. Die Mieten vom 1. April 1944 bis 31. Mai 1945 
wurden von dem Pinanzam.t in Muensterberg fuer das Reich 
eingezogen. Mit V/irkung vom 1. Jmii 1945 uebernalimen die 
Polen das Grundstueck und zogen, sov/eit Mieter zurueck- 
blieben, die weiteren Mieten ein. 



Das Grundstueck war unbelastet. 



- 2 - 

Auf Grund des am 5, Hovenber 19^^9 erteilten Erbschei- 

o^frr ofo-^?^^^^^'^^"'^^^^ ^-'^ ^-^^^ ^^ '/estfalen ~ Aktenzeiclien 
M ni 218/49 - w^arde festgestellt, dass Dr. Fritz Kassel in 
laelbourne Alleinerbe seiner am 27. Maerz 19^^2 in nYanken- 
stein verstorbenen Mutter Frau Elisabeth Johanna Kassel 
geb. Brück ist« 



Der Anspruch ist beim Ausp-leichsaüit in Bremen unter 
Aktenzeichen LA I/K - 10 332 registriert. 



i 



4 



5 - 



1 

i 



si 




%j 




m ^^» 




V> 




Jf 




VI 


• 




C 




^ ^ 


Xf 


O 


• ^^ 


«» 




K. 




# 


c? 


s 


>? 


C5 


5 




«^ 




^ 




^ 




t^ 




^ 


• 




^ L. 






, Nef 




\> 




W 


O 


2^ 


VI 


* j 




VI 


PI 


•^ 


-^ 


£* 


c 


^ 


^ 


&- 


« 


K3 


* ^^ 







«■iiririi-Mri ■rtitnfrfir'i'ii'iiiiri'itn iimm i '^^'^ 



19 



- ^ - 




Jx^-.:^^! 



::'nS:-,&;Ji^:/ 



^ V -i'-Li. ■ r^d 



- 5 - 

HAüSGSmTDGTir^K NIED.IIR8TRAÖ8E m. 7 



Dieses Grundstueck hat eine Front von 7 Metern ijnd 
wurde im Jahre 1920 von meinem Vater Jacob (lacques) 
Kassel von den Erben des Zeugschmiedemeisters Josef Goett- 
lieh kaeuflich erwerben. Der Vertrag wu.rde von dem Rechts- 
anwalt und Notar Justizrat Gustav Bluemel in Frankenstein 
beurlrundet. 

Das Grundstueck ist eingetragen im Grundbuch von 
Frankenstein unter Nr. 553. 

Im Jahre 1925 liess mein Vater eine ?:roessere Gara^^e 
in Groesse von 7 mal 14 Meter auf dem Grundstueck errich- 
ten* 

Am 2. August 1956 verstarb mein Vater und im Erb- 
gange vTurde meine Mutter Frau Elisabeth Johanna Kassel, 
geborene Brück, Eigentuemerin. Sie verstarb am 27. Mae-r^z 
19^2. 

Um eine Entziehung des Grimdstueckes d'orch die Nazis 
zu vermeiden^ hatte sie in einer letztwilligen Verfuogung 
ihren arischen Schwiegersohn Dr. Johannes Kowal als Erben 
benannt. 

Dr. Kowal hat die Mieten fuer zwei Jahre, naemlich 
vom 1. April 19^2 bis 31. Maerz 19^, eingezogen. Diese 
setzten sich wie folgt zusammen : - 



Scbmi dt 








) 






Lindner 








^ 






Kiesewetter 








) 






Niesei 








) 


zusammen ca. 


mi 


Arlt 








] 






Mitcclike 












Goettlich - 


ll± 


od 


el 


) 







120.- per Monat 



Mit Wirlrnjig vor: 1. April ir/urde das Hausgrundstueck 
meinem Schwager Dr. Xowal durch die Nazibehoerden entzogen. 
Die Mieten vnzrden vom 1. Ai)ril 19^ bis 31. Mai 19^5 vom 
Finanzamt in Muensterberg fuer das Reich eingezogen. Mit 
Wirkung vom 1. Juni 19^5 uebernahmen die Polen das Grund- 
stueck und zogen, so\7eit Mieter zurueckblieben, von diesen 
die weiteren Mieten ein. 



^;:!'.:j^ 



■.t^iÜfjfl 



'fJ:i'::i^:^lii: 



.!'-. 



- 5 .^ 
Das Grundstueck war imbelastet . 
Auf Grund des am 5. November 19^9 erteilten Erb- 



Scheines des Amtsgerichts 



Hamm 



in Westfalen - Akten- 



. , ^ :i~ — — -.-'o^-^ -«-^^■«-'-'ö xii iicLiLiiii jLii '.ifes üiaxen — euerer- 
TC«^Sr-? T^^?^^/'^^ - mirde festgestellt, dass Dr. pStz 
Aassei m Lelbourne Alleinerbe seiner an 27. Maerz 1942 
in Frankenstein verstorbenen Mutter Frau. Elisabeth Johanna 
Kassel geb. Brück ist. 

,,^ ^®^ Anspruch ist beim Ausgleichsamt in Brenen unter- 
Aktenzexcnen Vi 1/K _ lO 532 registriert. 



I 



1 



- 7 - 

BAUIvIGAI^TEN IJR. 55, KRKLS FRANICENSTEIN IN SCHLESIEN 

. ^ ,?^?^ ^^"^ ^^^ Bauerngut mit Magnesitgrube. Groesse 
ist 14- ha 47 ar 00 qm. Grundbuchblatt Nr, 29, 

Die frueheren Besitzer waren meine Verwandten, 
die Heinrich Brück' sehen Erben. Ich erstand das Grund- 
stueck am 2^1-. Oktober 1928 bei einer Zwangsversteige- 
rung. Die gri^mdbuchliche Eintragung erfolfrte am 2^. No- 
vember 1928. 

Die Besitzung war belastet mit einer Hypothek in 
Hoehe von RM 15.000.- zu Gunsten von Herrn Dagobert 
Ehrenhaus, eines Redakteiu?s des Breslauer General-An- 
zeigers in Breslau. 

Der landwirtschaftlich genutzte Teil war verpachtet 
an den Nachbar, den Bauerngutsbesitzer August Seidel, 
der dafuer aaehrlich Elvi 750.- Facht zahlte. 

Am 7. April 1937 habe ich die Besitzung an die 
Firma Boettcher & Pfeiffer in Niesky / Lausitz ver- 
kauft, um Schwierigkeiten mit dem Erbhof gesetz zu ent- 
gehen . 

Der Vertrag vmrde bei den Rechtsanwaelten Zimmer- 
mann und Dr. Zweig in Reichenbach im Eulengebirge abge- 
schlossen. 

Die Recht säend orung im Grujidbuch erfolgte am 
3. September 1937. 

Der Verkaufspreis einschliesslich der wertvollen 
Magnesitgrube betrug RM 30.000.-. 

Die auf der naechsten Seite folgende Potokopie der 
eidesstattlichen Versicherung des ehemalif^en Buergermei- 
sters von Ea^imgarten Herrn Paul Seidel vom 20. Maerz 1957 




kaufte, die sie moeglicherweise an die ]7irma Postpischil 
in Frankenberg weiterverkauft haben duerfte. 



Der Anspruch ist beim Ausgleichsamt in Bremen unter 
Aktenzeichen LA I/K - 10 329 registriert. 



^i^T^^^L. , 



l^iSä^i2£^^'*äA> 



- 8 - 






a*f^^fi^t^i^if 



a^^^^^C' 









"f/e^/^j^o i^^i^j 'f*i^ (^:>iX)^' 



J^/i^ ßt^^^ ^ ^i^f^^i fHf/ft^/g!^:^( ^/ ^^4hA^ 












.*t!»^ ^i 



"^At*^ 




^1>*l/,<^ 



'/ 










'T 







^'Mü^f/^/', ^-**i»4 /i^^> A/Sojf/A^^^ /Uff/- 









^^e^^Xe. ^^»^Jt^. 



^^fl«^ 




Ä / ■ ''':^^<^. 







f:^ ^.iiiiifi^'ibfMst^iitii" 



GROG HAU im. 



i — ' 



KREIS 



- 9 - 

FR/iNIffii-ISTEIN IN SCHLESIEI^T. 



Dieses ist ein Magnesitgelaende mit Wald in Form 
eines Dreiecks, Groesse 57 ar 00 qm. 

Ich hatte es im August 1928 von meinen Verwandten, 
den Heinrich Brück' sehen Erben gekauft. 

Das Grundstueck v/ar urchelastet. 

Am 7. April 1937 verkaufte ich das Grundstueck zu- 
sammen mit dem Bauerngut Baumgarten Nr. 29 an die Firma 
Boettcher & Pfeiffer in Niesky / Lausitz. 

Der Vertrag wurde bei den Rechtsanwaelten Zimmer- 
mann und Dr. Zweig in Eeichenbach im Eulengebirge ab- 
geschlossen. 

Die Hechtsaenderung im Grundbuch erfolgte am 
3# September 1957* 

Der Verkaufspreis betrug RM 1.200.-. 

Der Anspruch ist beim Ausgleichsamt in Bremen unter 
Aktenzeichen LA I/K - 10 329 registriert. 



Ky '■ ü^ 



it^ 



:^'y-M''C--''-->y 



iHiiilMiiiiliiiiiii 



- 10 - 



REICIIENBAGIIERBTHASSE IIB. 24 IN FR/^NEENSTEIIT IN SCHLESIEN. 



Das Gelaende liegt im Nordwest teil von Prankenstein 
i. Sohles. Es entliaelt Fabrikgebaeude mit angrenzendem 
Wohnhaus, grossen Garten, Baugelaende, Schrehergaerten, 
Holzwohnhaus und Gleisanschluss. Gesantgroesse 2?.454 
Quadratmeter. 

Es vmrde durch drei Kaufvertraege erworben : - 

l) Im Jahre 1910 von der Stadtge?iieinde Frankenstein 
1. Sohles. 7.500 qm 

Der Kaufpreis betrug damals M 7.50O.- 
Eingetragen im Grundbuch von Franken- 
stein Band VIII, Blatt Nr. 522 



2) Acker hinter der Fabrik. 

Gekauft von der Stadtgemeinde Franken- 
stein und eingetragen im Grundbuch von 
Protzan unter Nr« 35^# 

5) Baugelaende mit Gleisanschluss und Sand- 
grube neben der Fabrik. 
Gekauft von der Stadtgemeinde Franken- 
stein im Jahre 1926 und zum Grundbuch- 
blatt Nr. 522 Bexxd VIII Frankenstein 
zugeschrieben. 



9.338 qm 



10.616 qm 



zusammen 2? #^5^ Qsi 



Eingetragener Eigentuemer war die Firma Brück 8c Kassel, 
deren Anteile zu etwa 82 % mir und 18 % meiner Schwester 
Frau Elsbeth Kowal geborene Kassel gebeerten. 

Der Gesamtbesitz war mit einer H;^Tpothek von 
M 10.000.- belastet. Hypothekenglaeubigerin war meine 
Schwester Frau Elsbeth Kowal geborene Kassel. 



'^4mi 



MMttl 



^^^^^^j^^^^l^^ 



m 



- 11 - 



a 
'' 



a) Im Jahre 1938 kaufte zum Zwecice der Arisienjj::).g mein 
Schwager Dr. Kov/al aus den Besitz das an das Fabrikgrund- 
stueck angebaute V7ohnhaus mit grossem Garten und einen 
Teil des Baugelaendes. Die Groesse der erkauften Flaeche 
betrug 9.995 Quadratmeter. Der Kaufpreis betrug nur etwa 
RM 17.000,- , von dem PJvT 10.000.- in Anrechnung auf die 
auf dem Grunds tueck eingetragene Hypothek uebernommen und 
etwa RM 7.000.- durch Verrechnung mit seinem Guthaben bei 
der Firma Brück & Kassel gezahlt vro.rdeii. Etv/a 1 Jahr spae- 
ter, naemlich am 24. Jijmi 1959, verkaufte Dr. Kowal 3.300 
qm der erkauften Flaeche an die Gasolin zim doppelten 
Preis, den er gezahlt hatte. Die Auflassung erfolgte am 
12. Maerz 194-0 bei Rechtsanwalt ujid Notar Paul Krueger 
in Frankenstein. 



b) Durch Vertrag vom 15. Maerz 1959 kaufte der Reichs- 
fislois (Heer), vertreten durch die vJehrkreisverv/altung 
Vlll Breslau, diese wiederkam vertreten durch die Heeres- 
standortvervjaltung Glatz, das Fabrikgebaeude (Flaeche 
ca. 3000 gm) mit dem an das Anschlussgleis angrenzenden 
Gelaende (Flaeche ca. 5.121 qm) . Die Eintrag-ong im Grund- 
buch erfolgte nach meiner Auswanderung am 26. Juni 1939. 



Der Kaufpreis betrug etwa RM 60. 






Der Reichsfiskus vermietete die Fabrik als Ausweich- 
betrieb an die Firm.a Stocko Metallwarenfabriken, Fupper-- 
tal-Elborfeld, ujid zwar mit Wirkung vom 15.7.19^r3 bis zu 
der im Maerz 19^5 erfolgton Raeumung zu einem j aehrlichen 
Mietsatz von lÜA 17.072.50 zuzueglich der Grmidsteuer und 
der Versicherungsbetraege. 

Nach einem Gutachten des Architekten Zimmermann in 
Schweidnitz vom 25. A-oril 19^ betrug der Sachwert im 
Jahre 1944 RLI 150.850.00. Der Sachwert am Tage des Ver- 
kaufes im Jahre 1939 ist aber un 5 Jahre Abschreibu-n^gen 
hoeher und nicht RLi 170,850,- , sondern RM 156.793.95. 

Der Kaufpreis unterlag nicht_ meiner freien Verfue_gun£, 
da mein Vermoe'-^^-en auf Grund der Sicherungssj.iordnu-ng des 
Oberfinanzpraesidenten Schlesien -• Devisenstelle - bereits 
vom 24. llovember 1950 gesichert war. Ausserdem war zur 
Sicherung meiner Reichsfluchtsteuer auf dem Gebaeude eine 

Sicher-'Jin'ßcsh-ynpo'tl^^i^ "^^""o^- ^"^^^ ^-^^ 33.000.- eingetragen. Die 
Reichsfluchtsteuer VTurde direkt Yon dem Reichsfiskus an 
das Finanzamt Muensterborg gezahlt. 






- 12 - 

Bemerkenswert ist folgende Gegenueberstelliing; 
Waelirend der Keiohsfislius fuer den Betrieb etwa 
RIvl 60,000.- gezahlt hat, hatte er in den 6 Jahren des 
Besitzes einen ITutzimgswert Yon RM 102. 455 «00. 

Auf das Gutachten von Architekt Zimmermann vom 
26. April 1944 iind die Sntscheiding der Preisbehoerde 
fuer Mieten und Pachten fuer den Kreis Frankenstein vom 
17 • Mai 1944 wird besonders verwiesen. 

c) Nach einer Mitteilung meiner Mutter vom 5» Oktober 
1941 kaufte mein Schwager Dr. Kowal das Ackerstueck mit 
Holzwohnhaus hinter der Fabrik in Groesse von 9538 '^^-* 
Die Hoehe des Kaufpreises und die Art der Zahlung sind 
mir unbekannt. Der Verkauf erfolgte zum Zv/ecke der Ari- 
sierung. Dr. Kowal gibt an, dass der Gegenwert fuer das 
Grundstueck in der von ilim uebernommenen Verpflichtujig 
bestand, Gas-, Wasser-, Abfluss- und Elektrizitaetsleitun- 
gen der Fabrik, die durch das von ilim gekaufte Grundstueck 
fuehrten, instandzuhalten. 

Der Anspruch ist beim Ausgleichsamt Bremen unter 
Aktenzeichen LA I/K - 10 329 registriert. 



.rijv--. 



'■■JLS^.i 



J 

1 



- 13 - 



Entwvierfe-Gutacliten 
Bauleioung-Schaetzungen 



Eingang 
27 ^ 44 11 



Reichskanuner der bildenden 
Kuenste A 2637 
Reichsfachschaft fuer das 
Sachverstaend.igenwesen in 
der Deutschen Hechtsfront 
Nr^^jm^ 

Deutsche Bank, Zweigstelle 

Schweidnitz 

Staedtische Sparkasse 

Schweidnitz Nr. 263 

Kreissparkasse 

Schv/eidnitz Nr. 55^ 

Postscheck-Konto 

Amt Breslau Nr. 51279 



SGIi^^IDNITZ, den 26. April 1944- 

Waldenburger Strasse 3S 
Fernruf 223^1- 



.o 



TOGKC 



1 



Gutachten. 

DurchVermittlung des Herrn Landrats in Prankenstein 
/Schlesien - Preisstclle •- wurde ich beauftragt, den 
angemessenen Mieti^/ert des Fabrikgrundstuecks 

Brück & Kassel in FrarJ^ienstei ny Keichenbacher str. 10^ 

soweit dieses von der Firma 

Stoko - Ivletall warenf abrik in WuDr)ertal 

angemietet werden ist, festzustellen. 

Ich habe das Grundstueck am 12. April 19^^ eingehend 
besichtigt i,ind stellte fest: 

Das Grundstueck liegt am Nordwestausgang der Stadt. 
Das von d^er Firma Stoko genutzte Trennstueck befindet sich 
nicht unmittelbar an der '"^eichenbacherstrasse, es ist 
vielmehr um die Laenge des nicht gemieteten Gartenlandes 
von dieser zurueckliegend und ist ueber eine Einfahrt zu 
erreichen. Die Nachbargrunds tuecke haben vorx/iegend in- 
dustriellen Charakter. Der Platz ist eben; er ist bebaut 
mit dem Westbau A und dem Cstbau B, beide enthalten ledig- 
lich Fertigungs- und Lagerraemne, sowie einige wenige 
Bueroraeume und Aborte. 



■ri^^^ 



k^^ir^zM'^x^^i 



T^RSIP 



- 14 - 



AHGHITiJKT ZIl'IIilEiÜvlAM 



Blatt 2 




Die Gebaeude befanden sieb nach Augenscbein und 
Aussage des Herrn Schubert von der Firma Stoko zur Zeit 
der Uebernabj]ie in tecbiniscli einwandfreiem Zustande; nur 
die sogen. Schoenheitsreparatijiren fehlten, auch waren 
die vorhandenen Aborte unzulaenglica und in einem der 
Gefolgschaft nicht zumutbarem Zustande, V/eiterhin leidet, 
auch heute noch, der KoHer ujiter dem Bauteil A unter 
Wasserandrang; er ist notgedrungen als einzige Luftschutz- 
raumanlage ins Auge gefasst, kann aber wegen des Wasser- 
standes j de!r z, Zt. meiner Besichtig^ong etwa 10 cm hoch 
war, weder fuer diesen Zweck, noch fuer Lagerzwecke ge-- 
nutzt werden. Das ist bedauerlich, da sonst die Keller- 
anlage gut konstruiert ist. 

Die Bemessung des Mietwertes hat nach dem Heichsleistungs- 
gesetz vom 1. 9. 1939 (RGBl. I., S. 16^5) bzw. nach den 
Hichtlinien des Reichs- und Preussischen I'inisters des 
Innern vom PO. 1. 1942 (Sonderdruck Nr. 9 aus dem Ilini- 
sterialblatt des 11. u. Pr. M.d.I. 1942 Nr. 4) zu erfol- 
gen. 

Fuer die Bearbeitung dieses Gutachtens standen mir 1 
Uebersichtsplan und eine Bauzeichn^ung des Architektur- 
bueros Gauert - Schweidnitz in den Massstaeben 1:2500 
bzw. 1:200, sowie eine Eauzeiclmung des Baumeisters V/ey- 
rauch - Frankenstein zuj? Verfuegung. Den Flaecheninhalt 
des gemieteten Teilgrundstviecks ermittelte ich aus den 
Uebersichts- und Lageplaenen beider Firmen. 

11^ Bereclinunr< des c>_d .c'cmovtes_ 

^) Gr'o nd und Boden 

Nach meinen ilhrmittlungon (ohne GeTjae-Iir) hat das 
Trennprr^urdstueck einen Flaecheninhalt von 61,2o.48,oo = 

rd. 2.940 qm. 
Da das Grujidstueck im Mittel um 90, oo m von der Strassen- 
flucht zurueckliogt, iat ein Preis von l,5o PavI/gm als an- 
gemessen anzusehen. 

Kithin 2940 . l,5o - 4.410, oo RM 
Dieser Platz wird ausschliesGlich von der 
Firma Stoko genutzt. Gemoinsaia mit dem Nutz- 
niesser des Vorderlandes (Wohjahaus mit Gar- 
ten) werden ein vorgelagerter Hof und der 
Zugangsweg genutzt. 
Der Flaecheninhalt betraegt etwa 
12,00 . 50,00+4,00 . 60,00 = 600 qm. . 

Uebertrag: 4.410, 00 PM 

- 5 - 






i 



- 15 - 



Afic HI TEET z iLffi:i;iaiAm'i 



j 



Uob ertrag: 
Hierfuor is'i: der harce Wert zu rechnen 
= 600 . 0,75 = 



Blatt 3 

^l-.^10,oo Riyi 



5.200,00 IM. 



zus. 4.860,00 KU 

Zuschlag fuer Notariats- und G-erichtsgehuearen, 
Vermessung, Versteinung 7 - ß "^^ ^^» = 

Eodenwert = 

h) bauliche Anlag;en 

Vorbemerlning: Die Bewertung erfolgt zunaechst nach dem 
Stande vom 1. 7. 1914 (Bauindox 100), sodann nach dem 
Stande vom Jahre 1936 (Einfuehrung der Preisstopverord- 
nung) mit einem Bauindex von 135, die Ermittlung des um- 
hauten Raumes nach BIN 277» die Bemessung der durch Alter 
und Abnutzung gebotenen Wertminder'ong nach der Abschreibiongs- 
tabelld des Eeichskommissars fuer die Preisbildung vom 
4.7.1942 bzw. 16. 1.1943. 

A. Fabr i k^ebaeude an der Wes tseite 

Ss ist mit rd. 46, 00 qm unterkellert und enthaelt 
im Kellergeschoss: 2 Lagerkeller mit Treppenaufgang, 



im Erdaeschoss: 



1 Vorraum, 2 Bueroraeume, 1 Sxpedi- 
tionsraum, 6 Lagerraeume, 2 Trocken- 
raeume, 1 Kessel und 1 Abstellraum, 

2 Aborte. 

Bauart: Ziegelputzbau, massive geputzte Zwischenwaende, 
Pappdach auf hoelzornen Bachstuhl; ueber Zeller Decke aus 
preussischen Kapren zwischen eisernen Traegern, im Srd- 
geschoss bildet zum groesseron Teil das ^onverputzte Bach 
die Decke, nur im suedlichen Kopf teil Balkendecke mit Robx- 
deckenputz. Pu-S.Gboeden zementiert, z. T. auch gedielt. Ein- 
fache eiserne Penster, gestrichene '-uellungstueren bzw. ge- 
stemiLte Tore. 

Alter: 50 Jahre, Zustand: gut. 



- 4 - 



^^ 



lILilJii'J. 



- 16 -- 



ARCHITiJJKT ZIMiviERIiiiiM]^! 



Blatt 4 



Bebaute Flaeclie = 61, 2o . 17>lo - 1.0^6, 5o qn. 
Um-bauter Haum = 10^6, 5o • (o,5Q+ ^'^^ ^ ^ ^ ^) . 
Zuschlag fuer Keller = 46, oo • (2,6o - o,5o) = 
Zuschlag fuer Dachaufbau = 5, oo . 7, oo . 5»oo =_^ 

zus. 4.712 cbm. 



4.552 cbra 

97 " 

63 " 



1 cbm im Mittel zu 10 ^oo M gerechnet ergibt 47.120,oo LL 

Zuschlag fuer 2 Attikaaufmauer-ujigen an den 

beiden Giebelseiten = 500, oo " 

Zuschlag fuer eine Elaergrube von 8,90 . 5A5 ^ 

Grundflaeche und 25, oo m Tonrohrleitung von 

150 mm 2.080,00 " 

1 Fabrikschornstein, ca 25 m hoch, kreisrund 

auf quadratischem Sockel, einschl. Fundament = 2.500,oo '' 

Vorlrriegsneubauwert = 52.000, oo M. 



B« Fabrikp-ebaeude an der Ostseite. 

Es ist nicht unterkellert lond enthaelt 

im Erdgeschoss: Hausflur mit Treppenaufgang, 4 Arbeits- 

raeume, 1 Lager, 2 Aborte, 

im Ober.eeschoss: desgl. 

Bauart: Ziegelputzbau, massive, geputzte Zwischenwaende; 
Decken, Unterzuege, Dach LUid Stuetzen von Eisenbeton, Dach 
mit PapT>e abp^edeckt, BVissboeden zementiert. Treppe von Be- 
ton -.^it^ schmiedeeisernem Gelaender, einfache eiserne Fen- 
ster, gestemmte hoelzerne Tueren luid Tore. An ^er Aussen- 
Seite solimiedeeiserne I?.ettungsleiter mit eisernem Austritts' 
gelaender, Dachrinnen, Abfallrohre. 



Alter: 50 Jahre, 



Zustand: gut. 



- 5 - 



MÜ 



ttittttMtfi^.: 



- 16 ^ 



ARGHIT.i::]KT ZIMIviEilli/ii'i:^! 



Blatt 4 



Bebaute Plaeclie = 61, 2o . 17, lo - 1.0^6, 5o qn. 
Umbauter Haum = 10^6, 5o . (o,5Q+ ^^^^ | ^ ' ^) ' 
Zuschlag fuer Keller = 46, oo • (2,6o - o,5o) = 
Zuschlag fuer Dachaufbau = J^oo . 7,oo . 5iOO =_^ 

zus. 4.712 cbm. 



4.552 cbm 

97 " 

53 " 



«i# 



1 cbm im Mittel zu 10, oo M gerechnet ergibt 47 »120,00 I 

Zuschlag fuer 2 Attikaaufmauerujigen an den 

beiden Giebelseiten = 500, oo '' 

Zuschlag fuer eine Ellaergrube von 8,90 . 5,15 ^ 

Grundflaeche und 25, oo m Tonrohrleitung von 

150 mm 2.080,00 " 

1 .Fabrikschornstein, ca 25 m hoch, kreisrund 

auf quadratischem Sockel, einschl. Fundament = 2.500,oo 



;t 



Vox^kriegsneubauwert = 52 . 000 , oo 



Lji . 



B. Eabrikp:eb a eude an der Ostseite. 

Es ist nicht unterkellert ijmd enthaelt 

im Erdgeschoss: Hausflur mit Treppenaufgang, 4 Arbeits- 

raeume, 1 Lager, 2 Aborte, 

im Ober^reschoss: desgl. 

Bauart: Ziegelputzbau, massive, geputzte Zwischenwaende; 
Decken, Unte3?zuege, Dach und Stuetzen von Eisenbeton, Dach 
mit Pap-ne ab^iedeckt, Fassboeden zementiert. Treppe von Be- 
ton mit^ schmiedeeisernem Gelaender, einfache eiserne Fen- 
ster, gestemmte hoelzerne Tueren und Tore. An ^er Aussen- 
Seite sor^iedeeiserne Rettujiegsleiter mit eisernem Austrit 
gelaender, Dachrinnen, Abf allrohrce. 



s- 



Alter: 50 Jahre, 






- 5 - 



-^'m^f- 



- 17 - 



ARCHITEKT ZlffiiiiiRMiLMI 



Blatt 5 



Bebaute Flaeche - 4-2, oo • 11,5c + 7,oo . 8,9o 
Umbauter Raum = 5^5 »3o . (o,5o 4,2o 5i7o 

= rd. 4.800 obm. 



= 545,30 qm. 



Im Hinblick auf die X7esentlich verteuernde Bauweise durcb 
Eisenbetonkonstruktion muss hier mit einem Preis von 
15 »00 M/qm gerechnet werden. 

Mithin 4.800 . 15, 00 = 72. 000, 00 M 

Zuschlag fuer Rettungsleiter und Podest 300, 00 " 

Vorlcriegsneubauwert = 72. 300, 00 M. 



C. Aussenanlap^en 

1. 170 m Einfriedigung aus liaschendraht- 

geflecht zu 3j5o = rd. 



600,00 y. 



2# Befestigung des Hofes und des Zugangsweges, 
teils durch Schotterung, teils durch 
Pflasterung. 

Plaeche = rd. 1.250 qm zu 4, 00 = 5. 000, 00 " 

3, Kosten der Versorgungsleitungen elektr. 
Strom, staedt. Wasser, Gas, wobei die 
Entfernung vom V'estbau bis z'jr Strasse 
in einer Laenge von ueoei* 70 m zu be- 
ruecksichtigen ist, einschl. der x^n-- 
Schlusskosten an die oeff entlichen Lei- 
tungen in der ■Roichenb achers brasse 



2.400,00 " 



4. ca. 120,00 m Abflussleit-ung von der Klaer- 
grube nach dem Vorf lutkanal, 150 mm -- 
200 mm 0, einschl. der ^-rf orderlichen 
Erdarbeiten und 'Revisionsschaochte 1.800, 00 " 



UeV;ertrag: 



9.800,00 LI 




^ 6 - 



- 18 - 



ARGHITEKO; ZIMMERMANIT 



Uebertrag: 

6, Fuer Leitrangen innerhalb des Gr^Jind- 
stuecks, jedoch, ausserlialb der Ge-" 
baeude, soweit sie nicht schon in 
den vorstehenden Positionen berueck- 
sichtigt sind, fuer Vergessenes iind 
zur Abrundung 



Blatt 6 



9^ßOCtrOo LI 



200,00 " 



zus. 10.000,00 M, 



Zusaiüirenstellunp; der BauweTte. 



Buch= Bauteil 
Stabe 



A 
B 
G 



Neuwert Alter 



Abnutzung Zeitwert 



M 



Jahre % 






M 



Westbau 52.000, oo 
Ostbau 72.300,00 
Aussenajilagen 10.000, 00 



50 
50 
30 



Werte bei Bauindex 100 

(191^) 15^^.300,00 

Zuschlag von 35 ^r "bei 
Bauindex 135 (1936) ^7. 000, 00 



20 10.^0,00 41.600,00 
18 13*000,00 51.300,00 
30 3.000,00 7.000,00 

-- 26.^^)0,00107.900,00 
9*250,00 37.750,00 



\7erte bei Bauindex 155 

(1936) 181.300,00 



,-. „ 35.650,0 145.650,00 



Wert des Grund und Bodens 



Sachvrert = 



RM 



5.200,00 
150.850,00 



- 7 - 



i\;*-. ■' ..■ ^»■ 



,f» -^ /■,, ,, s^~_ 



- 18 - 



ARGHITEKa; ZIMMERMANIT 



Blatt 6 



Uebertrag: 

6, Rier Leitungen innerhalb des Grijnd- 
stuecks, jedocli ausserhalb der Ge-' 
baeude^ soweit sie nicht schon in 
den vorstehenden Positionen berueck- 
sichtigt sind, fuor Vergessenes \ind 
zur Abrundung 



%ano^o M 



200,00 " 



zus. 10.000,00 M, 



Zusammenstellunp: der Bauwerte. 



I 



Buch= Bauteil 
Stabe 



A 
B 




Neuwert Alter 
M 



Abnutzung: Zeitwert 



Jab^re % 



^1 



M 



Westbau 52.000, oo 
Ostbau 72*300,00 
Aussenanlagen 10.000, oo 



30 20 10.400,00 41.600,00 
30 18 13.000,00 51.300,00 
30 30 3.000,00 7.000,00 



Werte bei Bauindex 100 

(1914) 154,300,00 

Zuschlag von 35 ^-^^ "bei 
Bauindex 135 (1936) 47. 000, 00 



\7erte bei Bauindex 155 

(1936) 181.300,00 — 



26. -^I-OO, 00107.900,00 
9.250,00 37.750,00 



-- 35.650,0 145.650,00 



Wert des Grund und Bodens 



5.200,00 



Sachvrert = 



EM 



150.850,00 



- 7 - 



-. 19 - 



ARCHITiilKT ZIMI/iEmiAI:IN 



Blatt 7 



I 



III^ Errec hnung; des Liieti;7ertes 

Nach den I^ichtlinien des Reichs- iind Preussischen 
Ministers des Innern steht dem leistungspflichtigen 
Eigentueiner eine laufende Verguetiing zu, die einem Miet- 
zinssatz bei einer Vermietung des in Ansioruch genommenen 
Leistungsgegenstandes entspricht* Der Berechnujig sind 
folgende Betraege zugrunde zu legen: 

a) Die Verzinsung; des Bip;enkapitals mit 5 v. H. 

Nach Abschnitt II betraegt der Sachwert 150.850,- RI^I, 
hiervon 5 v. H. = 7.5^2,5o RM 

b) Die BetraeR;e fuer AbnutzunR-en , die durch die 
Inanspruchnahme bedingt sind (verbrauchsbe- 
dingte Absclireibimgen) . Hierbei ist zu be- 
ruecksichtigen, dass durch die inzwischen 
erfolgte Vornahme von baulichen Veraende- 
rungen, den Einbau von Maschinen, die Auf- 
trennung von Fussboden fuer die Einlage von 
Kabeln, das Ziehen von Waenden, die Durch- 
brueche von Mauern einerseits iJind die 
Schliessujig von Oeffnungen anderseits, die 
Benutzung der Raeume durch ortsfremde Leute, 

Z. T. Auslaender, ferner durch die Raeumung 
zu Beginn \ind am Ende der Vermietung die 
Gebaeude leiden muessen. Hierfuer ist ein 
Satz von 2.^ v, H. des Zeitwertes der bauli- 
chen Anlagen angemessen. 

1436,50 . 2^ _ 



Mithin 



100 



5.641,25 



tr 



c) Notwendige anteilige RueckstQ llunpr;en zur 
Ausfuehrun -r^ yo n Hepar ati-iren> 

Infolge der durch den Krieg und seine ein- 
schneidenden MassnaVimen hervorgerufenen Be- 
schraenkungen koennen Reparaturen nur in 
beschraenktem Umfange ausgefuehrt werden. 
Es muss dabei beruecksichtigt werden, 
dass die Gebaoudo 



Uebertrap; 



o 



11.183,75 RM 



- 8 - 



- 20 - 



ARCHITEKT ZIKiIvISR]:iiAlTN 



Blatt 8 



Ueloertrag: 11.183,75 RM 



durch eine fremde Fertigung einom er- 
hoebten Verschleiss unterworfen Y/erden. 
Weiterhin ist zu oedenken, dass zwar 
nach Abschnitt III Ziffer 26 der 
Richtlinien des Md.I. der Leistungs- 
empf aenger verpflichtet ist, den 
frueheren Zustand wieder herzustellen, 
dass dies aber selten moeglich sein 
wird, ohne dass wertmindernde Spuren 
zurueckb leiben, Hierfuer ist ein Satz 
von 2 V. H. des Neubauwertes der bau- 
lichen Anlagen angemessen, denn Jede 
Reparatur kostet zeitgemaesse Preise. 

181300 . 2 
100 



Mithin 



3.626,00 



II 



d) Die Kosten der laufenden Unterhal tung,, 
Sie ist in Unterabteilung c) enthalten. 

e) Die auf dem Leistunp^sge^enstand ru- 
henden Steuern, Abgabe n und Ver- 
sicherun p;skosten. 

Hierunter fallen die Grundsteuer, die 
Versicherimgsbetraege fuer Erandschaden- 
versicherung und eventuell fuer Haft- 
pflichtversicaer^ong. 

Diese Bet raoge kon nten jnir_ ni cht genannt 
werden. S ie" muessen daher vom 'Lelßiuzi^j^ 
•pf lich tiH on' nachgebra cht und in voller 
Hoehe dem' von ^ nir errechneten Miot\7ert 
hinzugeschlaren werde.gj. 

^) Die sonstigen auf dem Leistunp: sge^;ens tand 
ruhend en U nkosten^ 

Sie koennen vorerst noch nicht uebersohen 
werden. Angemessen hierfuer duerfte ein 
Satz von 4- v. H. des Sachwertes sein 

^ 150 350 . o,^ ^ 75 ihl5..I 



100 



Ueb ertrag: 



15,56^,00 BM 



- Q 



- 21 - 



ASGHIT:üJKT ZIMim^IRLIAITN 



Blatt 9 






Ve'oertrag: 

g) Ein anp:eine ssener Zuschlag fuer die 
verbleiben den notwendif<;en V er wal- 
tunp!;skosten. 

Hierfuer angemessen ein Satz von 1 v.H* 

des Sachwertes = ^=^ ^ ^ q '■ "^ = 



15.53^,00 RM 



1.508,50 " 



zus. 17.072,50 RM 



IV. Ergebnis 

Die Verguetnng, die die Stoko-Metallwarenfabrik als 
J aehrlichen Mietzins an den Leist\inp^spf lichtigen zu ent- 
richten hat, setzt sich aus folprenden Einzelbetraegen 
zusammen: 



a) Verzins^ang des Eigenkapitals = 

b) Abnutz 'Ong = 

c) Reparatur-Rueckstellung = 

d) Laufende Unterhaltung = 

e) Steuern und Unkosten; 

sie mue_ssen nachpiewiesen u r.d d ieser 
Aufs tollunp; zup;eschlap,^en werden! 

f ) Sonstige Unkosten = 

g) Yerv/altungskosten = 



7.5^2,50 ma 

3.641,25 " 
5.626,00 " 



.75^,25 " 
1.508,50 ■' 



Mithin jaohrlicher Mietzins = 17.072, 5o mi 



1. B. Siebzehntausendzweiundsiebzig Reichsmark 50 Rpfg. 



- lo - 



i 



- 22 - 



ARCHITEKT ZIMIviEmiMIM 



Blatt 10 



j 



oder monatlich l*422,7o RM. 



Dieser Mietv;ert gilt unter der Voraussetzung, dass der 
unter dem Gebaeude A liegende Keller absolut wasser- 
dicht hergerichtet wird. 

Hinzu treten nach Unterabteilung e) die Grund- 
steuer und die Versicherungsbetraege, 



DRP 
Von der Deutschen 
Rechtsfront zuge- 
lassener Sachverstaen- 
diger 

101 
Mitglied der Reichs-- 
fachschaft fuer das 
Sachvers taendigenv/esen 



ARCHITEKT 

Z IMMER M A N N 

gez. Zimmermann SGHWEIDITITZ 

Vi^ALDENBIIRGER STR. 36 

PICRKRUE 2254 



Fritz Zimmermann 
Architekt 
Schweidnitz 
Von der Industrie- u. Handelskammer zu Schv/eidnitz 
oeffentl. best. u. beeid. Sachverstaendiger f. Hochbau 



Ich versichere, dieses Gutachten nach bestem Wissen und 
Gewissen gefertigt zu haben. 







mf iatnf ««r rirwt Stooko, ll«t«llwarmfa^rlk«» 1» 

▼OB (. Okt«¥«r 1943 «af F««t««tnnf d«a Ml«tBia««« flr 

tereb ii« W«hx«Mlit «k«rlss«M« PabrikcnrndaMek dar fzttha 

Pins Brmak * Kaaaal in Praakanatala, Baiahaabaekar Straaaa, vird 

TO« dar PralBbildu0«abahBrda flr Miataa «nd Paobta« ftür Wob»- aad 

Gaachtfta rittst fttr dan Landkraia PraakaBatain (flarta AAardaaac 

mbar dia WahniahKua« dar A«fcabaa und Bafo^niaaa daa Kalehaka 

fttr dla Pralablldon« ▼©■ 27. Sapta»bar 1937) »la fol«t Mtaekiadaai 

•Dar Miatslna für dla fbarlaaaimg daa Pabrikf r«ndatlaka dar 
frUbaran Plr« Bmck * Kaaaal In Frankanataln, BaiebMbaobar 
Straaa«, durcb dia Wabrmacht an dla PlrM Stocke wird hlarmit 
•uf Grund daa Torliafandan SachTtratttodlgan-Otttaehtana auf 
Jdbrllob 17 o72,5o Bl odar Bonatlicb 1 422,70 BM «aafltliek 
dar Crundatauar und der Varalcheruneabatriif a faatgaaatst. 
Diaaar Mlataart gilt untar der Voraue aetsimg, daaa dar oatar 
daa rabrlk«ebiude an -ler »eataeite lie«ande Eallar abaelat 
wnaaardiobt bergaatallt wird." 
Diaaa öitacbeidun«, die sowohl der Jlraa Stocke als auch dar 
fabrmacbt »u«aatalJt lat. berutt .uf % 2 Abaata 1 daa Oaaataaa 
aar DurohfUhrun« daa Vlerjahreaplanea »oa 29. Oitober 193^ 
(löBl.I 8.927) in Terbindung alt der Verordnung Über daa Tarba* 
»on Praiaerhöhungan vo. 26.11.1936 (BGBl.I S.955)l aia iat aad- 
fttlti«. 

Pttr dla ftitacbeidttn« wird eine Verealtungageblhr Ton 14a,- M 
faatceaatBt, dla von dar Antragatallarin su tragen iat. 

frwikanataia, deo 17. Mal 1944 
Bor landrat - /»raläbabSrda - 






- ?3 - 






- 26 - 



HEmiAlJK3T.i;iÄooJd] im. g m EPvAI\fiCnii>IoTi;ET in SCHLS'-yiEil 



i 

1 

1 



Es ist dies ein Villengnindstueck arx der Ecke 
Joliaiines Wolf f Strasse und Hermajinstrasse. Es gelioerte 
dem Maurermeister Wilhelm Helmich, der am 11. Mai 1922 
in Frankenstein verstorben ist. Durch verschiedene Erb-- 
schaftskaeufe erwarb die Firma Brück & Kassel 31/40 der 
Nachlassmasse, Der Nachlass ist noch ungeteilt. Das 
Teilungsverfahren schwebt unter Aktenzeichen 31 V 4/57 
vor dem Nachlassgericht in Bra-jJischv/eig. 

Mieter des Grundstueckes waren : - 



Cas-oer 




Rl'A 


66.20 


Pradel 






66.35 


Froegor 






31.48 


Stegmann 






6.00 


Kuschel 






4.74 


(wegen Bereini 


.gung) 






zusaTTiTT-en 


mi 


174.75 mxonatlic 



Das Grundstueck war mit einer Aufwertungshypothek 
zu Gunsten der Ivreis- vjid Stadtsparkasse in Frankenstein 
in Hoehe von FJvI 3t 750.- belastet. 

Der Einheitsv/ert des Grundstueckes betrug nach An- 
gabe von Herrn Otto Leupold vom 16. Juni 1959 
17.500.-. 



Die Villa wird jetzt engeblich als Kinderheim be- 
nutzt und unterliegt der polnischen oef fentlichen Ver- 
waltung rjid I.lietskontrolle. 

Da die Firma Brück & Kassel mit 51/40 an dem Hel- 
michschen Nachlass berechtigt ist i.md ich mit 91 % 
Eigentuemer der Firir.a bin, bin ich mit 70.525 % an dem 
Grundstueck berechtigt. 

Der Anspruch ist beim Ausgleichsamt in Bremen 
\intcr Aktenzeichen LA I/K 10 329 registriert. 



- 27 ^ 



BAMHO'^'SALLE>:) NR. lo IN I^'R^KlilNSTEIN IN BG:E£iii]ciIEN. 




Es ist dieses ein Miotsß'rundstueck in der Naebe 
des Bahnhofes, eingetragen im Grujidbuch der Stadt Pran- 
kenstein, Kreis PranVenstein in Schlesien, Band VIII, 
Blatt Nr. ^95, Kartonblatt 3, Parzelle Nr, 372/2 Groosse 
16 8 90 qiT:, Gebaeudeste-'j.ernutzim'iij'swert 2850.- Merk, 
Grundsteuerniutterrolle Art 516? Getaeudes teuerrolle 
Nr. 651. 

Es gebeerte dem Maurermeister Wilhelm Helmich, der 
am 11. Mai 1922 in Frankenstein verstorben ist. Durch ver- 
schiedene Erbschaf tskaeufe erv^arb die ITirna Brück lz Kassel 
31/'^0 der Nachlassmasse. Der Nachlass ist noch ungeteilt. 
Das Teilun^^^sverfahren schv;ebt unter Aktenzeichen 31/ V 
^/57 vor dem Nachlassgericht in Pjraunscte/eig. 

Mieter des Grundstueckes waren : - 



Holfter 
Kerker 
Heinelt 
Hanisch 
Braka 
Eichel 
Rother / I.Iudrak 



RM 45 . 73 
61.13 
55.53 
55.53 
64.37 
58 . 18 
1,00 



(Keller u. Bereinis'ung_}_ 

zusammen RM 3'^-1.^7 monatlich 



Das Grujidstueck uar mit einer Aufwertuiagshypothek 
zu Gunsten der Kreis- und Stadtsparkasse Frarkenstein in 
Hoehe von GLI 8.493.14 und einer Aufv/ertungshypothek zu 
Gunsten von Frau Gertrud Kolbe bzw. deren Rechtsnachfol- 
ger Herrn Ober-Inspoktor Fritz Sprotte, fruahoD" in Bres- 
lau, jetzt Steuerrat in Jloeln-Lindenthal, Cleveler 
Strasse 61 in Koehe von GM 2.496.58 belastet. 

Der Einheitswert des Griuidstueckes betrug nach Angabe 
von Herrn Otto Leupold vom 16. Juni 1959 HM 3^r.500.-. 



- 28 - 



Zu bemerken ist hier folgendes : - Im Januar 1923 
hatte der Maschinenfabrikbesitzer Hermann Eisner das 
Grujidstueck aus der Flelmichschen-Erbnasse mittels SchTmrz- 
kaufes ervjorben und an seinen Sohn Oskar Eisner uebertra- 



gen. Im Februar 1932 v^Tirde es in einem vor dem Oberlandes- 
gericht in Breslau abgeschlossenen Vergleich (Aktenzeichen 
8 U ^4^5/32) an die Nachlassmasse zurueckgegeben. Das 
Grundstueck steht aber noch im Grundbuch^ auf den Namen 
Oskar Eisner eingetragen. Entsprechende Berichtigung des 
Grundbuches ist also erforderlich. Herr Oskar Eisner ist 
bei der Firma Raiffeisen in Fulda an der v7erra angestellt 
und koennte als Zeuge oder zur Bev/eissichorung bezueglich 
des Eigentumes an dem Ormonds tueck herangezogen v/erden. 



Da die Firma Brück & Kassel mit 31/^0 an 



dem 



Hel- 



michschen Nachlass berechtigt ist und ich mit 91 % Eigen- 
tuemer der Firma bin, bin ich mit 70.525 % an dem Grund- 
stueck berechtigt. 

Der ilnspruch ist beim Ausgleichsamt in Bremen 
unter Aktenzeichen LA I/K 10 329 registriert. 



- 29 - 



ERBSGHOLTISEI LIT GERICHTS KRETSCHAM MUEHLBOCK 



KREIS BUITZLAU. 



Die Besitzung war etwa im Jahre 1908 von meinem 
Onkel Oskar Brück kaeuflicb erworben worden, da angeb- 
lich der Mittellandkanal durch die Besitzung oder an 
ihr vorbei gebaut werden sollte. Etwa 1912 kaufte meine 
Grossmutter, Frau Clara Brück, geborene Brück, die Be- 
sitzung von ihrem Sohn und war Eigentuemerin bis zu 
ihrem am 21. April 1932 erfolgten Tode. Durch letztwil- 
lige Verfuegung ging die Besitzung auf ihre Tochter, 
Frau Elfriede Brück, geschiedene Cohen ueber. 

A.uf Grund des Erbhofgesetzes oder aus rassischen 
Gruenden musste meine Tante die Besitzung etwa 1956 
oder 1937 verkaufen. Kaeufer war der langjaohrige Paech- 
ter Oswald Hirche. 

Soweit ich mich erinnere, lastete auf der Besitzung 
eine kleine erstst ellige Hypothek in Hoehe von RM 1.500.- 
zu Gunsten der benachbarten Siegersdorf er Werke. 

Die Hoehe des Kaufpreises ist mir unbekarmt, doch 
erinnere ich mich, dass meine Tante ueber den durch die 
damaligen Verhaeltnisse erzwungenen Verkauf und Preis 
sehr ungluecklich war. Ich glaube, dass der groesste 
Teil des Kaufpreises nicht ausgezahlt, sondern hypothe- 
karisch gestundet v/erden musste. 

Nach einer Mitteilung des stellvertretenden Orts- 
vertrauensmannes Herrn Erich Hitschke in Klein Schoep- 
penstedt bei Braunschv/eig betrug die landwirtschaftlich 
genutzte Flaeche 15 ha mit einem Hektarsatz von 7^0.- RM 
je Hektar, zu welchem noch der Wert der landwirtschaft- 
lichen Gebaeude ujid der Wert des Gewerbebetriebes (Gast- 
wirtschaft) hinzuzurechnen ist. 

Herr Oswald Hirche ist von den Russen verschleppt 
worden und in Russland verstorben. Seine Witwe, Frau 
Ella Hirche, v/ohnhaft in Honnef / Rhein, Ha-jptstrasse 
hat einen Feststellungsantrag gestellt, der vom Aus- 
gleiohsamt in SieburgA^W unter dem Az.: - -^85/5/25^7 
bearbeitet wird. 



7^, 



"9, 
i 



- 30 - 



Meine Tante ist an 17 , Novenber 19^1 von Berlin 
nach KoTOio deportiert 7;orden iind dort umgekoininen. Auf 
Grund des Beschlusses des Amtsgerichts Berlin - Mitte 
vom 29. Maerz 1951, Aktenzeichen 6 II. 602.50 ist der 
17a November 19^1 als Zeitpunkt ihres Todes erklaert 
worden. 

Erbschein, nach welchem meine Mutter, Frau Elisa- 
beth Johanna Kassel, geborene Brück zu einem Fuenftel 
Miterbin ist, ist am 12, Juni 1958 unter Aktenzeichen 
60 VT 5782/53 vom Amtsgericht Berlin-Schoeneberg erteilt. 

Ich bin auf Grujid des Erbscheines des Nachlassge- 
richts Hamm in 7/estfalen vom 5# November 19^1-9 Aktenzei- 
chen 2 VI 218/4-9 A lleinerbe meiner Mutter. 

Ferner bin ich auf Grund des Erbscheinos des Amts- 
gerichts Berlin-Schoeneberg vom 9# Dezember 1958 Akten- 
zeichen 60 VI 6717/58 zu einem Viertel Miterbe nach 
meinem Onkel Alfred Brück, der zu einem Fuenftel Erbe 
nach meiner Tante Elfriede Brück war. 

An den Nachlaessen meiner Tante Eliriede Brück und 
meines Onkels Alfred Brück war mein Vetter Max Goldstein, 
133 Boulevard Bineau in Neuilly sur Seine als Miterbe be- 
rechtigt. Durch Erklaerung vom 27. Oktober i960 hat er 
auf seine Hueckerstattungs- und EntschaedigungsansT)rueche 
bezueglich beider Nachlaesse verzichtet. Seine fechte 
sind damit den uebrigen Erben zugewachsen. 

Ich bin daher an dem Grimdstueck zu einem Drittel 
berechtigt. 

Der Anspruch ist beim Ausgleichsamt in Bremen unter 
Aktenzeichen LA I/K 10 331 registriert. 



-31 - 



IJUEHLEl^EEGKSRSTKASSE 50 UND 52, SCHILD0v7 BEI BERLIN 
5^D.^R^ [ _ ' ' 

Mein Onkel Alfred Brück "besass zv;ei Grundstuecke im 
aeusseren Norden von Berlin, die im Grundbuch des Aints- 
gerichts Pankow von Schildow, Band 7 ujiter Blatt 219 
eingetragen sind. 



Durch Vertrag vom JO. Au,^?-ust 19^0 verkaufte er das 
Grundstueck Muehlenbeckerstrasse 50 an den Bauunterneh^- 
mer Otto Semmler in Schildow und am 16. Dezember 1941 
das Grundstueck Muehlenbeckerstrasse 52 ebenfalls an 
Herrn Semnler. 

Mein Onkel wuj?de im Oktober 19^2 nach Lodz depor- 
tiert und ist verschollen. Nach einer anderen von der 
juedischen Gemeinde Berlin gemachten Mitteilung soll er 
bereits am 14-_. April 19^2 mit einem Sondertransport nach 
Twarnice bei Jjublin deportiert worden sein. Auf'Grujid 
der Entscheidung des Kreisgerichts Orajiienburg - 6 a II 
53/50 - hat das Standesamt I von GroBs-Berlin am 
12. Juli 1957 ^-inter Nr. 626/1957 eine Bescheinigung 
nach Paragraph 32 des Personenstandsgesetzes vom 
16.11.19^6 ausgestellt, in welchen als Zeitpunkt des 
Todes der 31. Dezember 1952, 2-^1 Uhr angegeben Y-nirde^ 

Nach der Deportation meines Onkels hat der Kaeufer 
einen Betrag von lUA 4.000.- am 8. Pebruar 19^5 an die 
Oberfinanzkasse Berlin- Brandenburg, in Berlin vi» 15, 
Kurfuerstendaumi 193, also Britischen Sektor von Berlin, 
uebervjiesen. 



Der Hausrat int nach Angabe des Herrn Gemiiler vom 
Finanzamt Niederbarnim (Steuer-Inspektor Kracht) ver- 
kauft worden. Der Erloes soll angeblich der Oberfinanz- 
kesse Berlin-Brandenburg in Berlin W. 15, Kurfuorsten- 
damm 193» zugeflossen sein. 



Erbschein, nach welchen ich zu einem Viertel als 
Miterbe berechtigt bin, ist am 9. Dezember 1958 unter 
Aktenzeichen 60 VI 6717/58 vom Amtsgericht Eerlin- 
Schoeneberg erteilt vTorden. 



- 52 - 



J^Ji den Nachlass meines Onkels Alfred Brück r/ar 
mein Vetter Max Goldr.tein, 183 Boulevard Bineau in 
Neuilly sur Seine als Miterbe zu einem Viertel be- 
rechtigt. Durch Srklaerung vom 2?. Oktober i960 hat 
er auf seine Rueckerstattungs- und EntschaedigijLnc:<:san- 
sprueche verzichtet. Seine Rechte sind damit den^'uebri- 
Erben zugewachsen. 



gen 



3* 

i 



m 



Ich bin daher an den Gr-ondstuecken zu einem 
Drittel berechtigt. 




- 53 - 

VOHKAüFSiUiiGIIT HlilRDLIToCTiKE : - 



Die Firma Brück & Kassel 'aatte auf dem IT&chbar5:rund- 
stueck der Herdlitscbkescaen Erben ein Vorkaufsrecht, 
das im Grundbuch von li^ankenstein, Band YIII, Blatt Nr. 
520 (?) in Abteilung II eingetragen war. 

Als Komplementaer der Firma Brück & Kassel bin ich 
an dem Vorkaufsrecht mit 91 % berecht ip:t. 



,1 



1 



•u 

i 
i 

im 
J 



^ 5^ - 



HYPOTHEK GM 10.000,- 



Meine Schwester, Frau üasbetli Kowal, geborene Kas- 
sel, besass eine Hj^othek in Hoehe -^on 10,000.- Goldciarli:, 
welche in dem Grundbuch von Stadt Prankenstein, E"reis 
Prankenstein in Schlesien, Band VTII, Blatt Nr. 522 in 
A bteilung III der Firma Brück & Kassel in Prankenstein 
in Schlesien, Reichenbacherstrasse 24 eingetragen war. 

Zum Zwecke der Arisierung kaufte ihr Ehemann, Dr. 
Kowal, das Wohnhaus an der Fabrik mit Garten und angren- 
zenden Baugelaende und uebernahm hierbei die Hypothek in 
Anreclmung auf den Kaufpreis. Er wurde damit Hypotheken- 
schuldner meiner Schwester. 



Meine Schwester verstarb am 16. November 19^1 
Krankenhaus Bethanien in Breslau. 



im 



Im Jahre 19^2 liess Dr. Kowal die Hypothek loeschen, 
um - wie er in seinem Schreiben vom 3. Februar 1951 er- 
klaert - eine etwaige erhoehte spaetere Hauszinssteuer 
zu vermeiden. 

Ich bin auf Grund der Erbscheine 2 VI 218/49 des 
Amtsgerichts Hamm in Westfalen vom 5. November 1949 als 
Miterbe \ind Erbeserbe nach meiner Schwester zur Haelfte 
an dieser Hypothek, also in Hoehe von GM 5.000.- plus 
Zinsen vom Todestage, d.i. vom 16. November 1941 an, 
berechtigt. 



Da die Hypothek im Jahre 1942 im Grundbuch geloescht 
wurde, habe ich meinen Anspruch in dem unter Aktenzeichen 
5 155/60 vor dem Landgericht in Dortm^jind schv/ebenden 
Rechtsstreit gegen Dr. Kowal im V/ege der Widerklage vor- 
sorglich geltend gemacht. 






■mnii -irri " 



- 35 - 



HYPOTHEK RM 1,500.- 



Meine Schv/estor, Frau Eisbethx Ko^ral, geborene Kas- 
sel, besass eine Plypotliek in Hoelie -^lon 1.500,- Reiclis- 
mark, welche in Grundbucri von Ba^jiinp:apton, Kreis Franken-. 
stein in Schlesien Blatt Nr« 153 in Abteilung III unter 
Nr. 2 (?) auf dem sogenannten ibVihrig-G-ut d.e3 Herrn Eber- 
hard aus Posen einrretragen war. Dieses Gut ^v^rde spaeter 
von der Firma Postpischil in Sand-Frankenberg kaeuflich 
erworben. 

Meine Schwester nachte mich in ihrem Schreiben vom 
14. Mai 1939 auf diese Hypothek aufmerksam. 

Meine Schwester verstarb am 16. November 1941 im 
Krankenhaus Bethanien in Breslau. 

'Ich bin auf Grund der Erbscheine 2 VI 218/49 des 
Amtsgerichts Hamm in 7/estfalen vom 5. NcveL.bor 1949 
als Miterbe und Erbeserbe nach meiner Schv/oster zur 
Eaelfte an dieser Hypothek berechtigt. 



- 56 - 



1 
• 




Jkm 



3efl^-3eudtti5, 

.^.<3^rr^ f?S^....^^i!...c::^fe<:<^. 

■pr^.'...?:-; '.«<T:rr-^^^^^^^ 

in am A- £y^/<f 
■'J.—. . Stuf« i>«rUef}«n ioor6«n. 







\ ^ 




^MMTOlmajor u.ft»*ur. ö«r }. ftao.-Di^Uion. 




l 



l 






5 



\ 



i 






AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 

Phone: (212)744-6400 

Fax: (212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Date: 12/21/2009 



Box: 2 



Sys#: 000198685 



Folder: 6 












Form No. 3, .,,, et 8?« 

D . W . No. o! Application ^ 5 ^lU 63 1 . 

19U2. DEATHS registered In tlie District of Bur^vood ^r Canterbury at Burv/ood , 

in the State of New South Wales, 

by Travers flenry Broo ::e , District Rogistrar 



Column. 

J Ko. in Register 



2550U. 



535. 



Description 
2 W'hen and wliere died 



3 Name and surname, rank or i^ro- 

fesrtion. 

4 Sex and a/?e . . 



21st October, 19i42, 

33 aobert Street, Strathfiela. 

Municipality of Burwooö . 



Smmeline Bradly. 



Female, 79 years. 



5 Cause of death; durßt.'.m of last" 

illnt'^s; niedical nttendaut h\\ 

whoiii cortitied; and wiiou lie last 
aaw deceafied. 



ß Christian nanie and surnanie ol 
fallier, if known, \\h\i rank 01 
professit>n. 

Christian name and maidcn surnanif' 
of inother. 



l.a. Valvulär heart diGease. 

b. /.rteriosclerosis. 

c. Hyperpiesis. 
b, 10 years. 

W.S. Brool:s, Reg'd. 
18 th Octo ber, 19^2. 

Henry '"mythe. 
Gommercial Traveller. 

Harriett Thomas. 



7 Signatnre, doscription, and resideneej -D • Baker. 



of inforniant. 



No relation. 

33 aobert ^3treet , 



-':trathfield 



3 Signature of Distri<'t Rcjffistrar. 
date, and where registered. 



T.H. Brooke. 

22nd October, 19i-2. 

Burwood. 



If burial . registered — 
9 Wben and wbere buried 



ündertaker by whom certified 
]Q Name and religion of Minister; 
names of witnesses of buriai. 



22nd October, 19U2. 

Delivered to the Crematorium at 

iiookv/ood. Frank Murphy emrjloyed 

by V/ood Coffill Limited. 

J. Paul Dryland, Church of rln^^land 

Joseph Nevin. John 0. Parkes. 



22nd October, 19U2. 

Cremated at ^iookwood Crematorium. 

T.J. Fassey, Superintendent. 

/. .T. Holland. 



J j Where born, and bow long in the 
Australian Colonies, or Statea, 
indioating wbicb. 



Dublin, Ireland. 

About 70 years in Victoria 

and N.S.W. 



If deceased was married — 

\2 Where, and at what age, and to 
whom. 



^3 Is^ue in Order of birth, their names 
and ages. 



Ist Marria^e : - 

Cxlebe Point, Sydney, N.S.V^ 

27 years. 

I»eoix?ld Bruch. <Üa^,^, 

No is^ue. 

2nd Marriaf^e ; - 

Da V li nghur s t , N . 3 . '7 . 

66 years, 

Ed.ward Penn Bradly. 

No issue. 




/ 



I, Roy V/ood V.^illia, 

do hercby certifythat the above 
kept at the Regij^trar General's Of 



l{«i;i-Trar CionoiM' 



<la.y of April, 191^1: 



a true copy of the partiVulars 
?, Sydney, New South Wale.«*, 



^ • 



A. H. Fkttjkku, Actixo (iovr. Piunter. 




TELEPHONE: B 3995 



G. M. LAURENCE & SON 
SOLICITORS 



8. T. LAURENCE 



ADDRESS ALL 

COMMUNICATIONS 

BOX 240. G. P. O. 

SYDNEY 






ori, x^_y7cz6>ey. 



z^^cC^te^^ 2lst April, 1945« 



A^.^Sjif. IJW. 




Dr* K* G« F. Kassel, 

»The Continental", 

342 Beaconsfield Parade, 

St.Kilda. 

MELBOURNE* S»2. 

VICTORIA . 

Dear Sir, 




I am in receipt of yours of the l6th 
instant, I knew the late Mr. Brück referred to in 
your letter, he was a Client of my late Father who 
acted for him for many years and also acted in his 
Estate, and it was sometime after his death I acted 
for his Widow* Any Information I have concerning 
him I will be pleased to give you, but it is a long 
time since I have seen his Widow and I have no papers 
in my Office ref erring to any of his affairs. I know 
that some considerable time after his death Messrs 
Shorter & Tobin, Solicitors, of City Mutual Buildings, 
Hunt er and Bligh Streets, Sydney, acted for Mrs. Brück* 
The Business which the late Mr* Brück owned is now 
Richard Thompson, 8 Castlereagh Street, Sydney, and it 
is possible that Mr. Garden of that Firm could also 
supply you with certain Information concerning the late 
Mr, Brück» 



Yours truly, 






^luUMyUi 



Telegraph I NEMESIS, SYDNEY. 

TELEPHONBi B OSO VG^l^S* 



st 703 




Dr* K^Ct.P. Kassel, 
"The Continental", 

342 Beaconsfield Parade, 
St^ Kllda, 3 2., 
Melbourne, 

VICTORIA. 



Police Department. 

COMMISSrONER'S OrFICE. 

BOX 45a, G P.O. 

Sydney, New South Wales. 
19th April. 1945. 

WHEN mtPLYING. PLEASE QUOBC WO N.« 2D'7.4Q/.2.Q!ZJ. • 



-W, M/h ms. 



« 




Dear Sir, 

With 
ultimo, addre 
information r 
Mrs. Emmeline 
of Police to 
now deceased» 
deaths at the 
New South Wal 



reference to your communication of the 16th 
ssed to the Strathfield Police, seeking 
egarding the whereabouts of your great-aunt 

Bradly, I am directed by the Coramissioner * 
inform you that the person inquired for is 
A copy of an extract from the record of 

Registrar General «s Department, Sydney 
es, is set out for your information:- 



T 1 ^^T^^^""® BRADLY, 79 years, born Dublin, 
Ireland, 70 years in Victoria and New South Wales, 
^^^^^!?,^^^^ October, 1942, at 33 Robert Street, 
Strathfield, from Valvulär Heart Disease, Was 
cremated on 22nd October, 1942, at the Crematorium, 
Kookwood. Deceased was married twice (Ist) Leonold 
Bruch, at the a^e of 27 j^^z ü^ä^tefu No iS 
of marriage. r2nd) Edwa?? PenMCT^V at? tfee age 
of 66 years, at Darlinghura^t. No i^^tte. :^r:^«.pilge. 



It has been ascertained th<\t the Perpetual Trustee 
Company, Hunter Street, Sydney, are Executors of the Es tat 
and any further information may be obtained from that 
Company« 

Yours faithfully. 



■4f,f 



'im^\ 



e 



// 




/ 



/ 



A, St3(cpewich^^^^^^<-^^ 
Secretary« 



• 



&■. ; ISO. 



Tyvm K» G» F» r^'Sü.sel| 
•Tho GoTitincnT...l% 

342 ij<jaconi:f leid Parade, 
l^elbour-ne - 3t ♦ Kllda^ S 2 



Melbourne, 16th April, 1945, 



Tlie Re^^ißtrsr Goneral'ü Dept«, 
SYDmjy NSW 



Dear Sirß, 



Re: Certificate ol' J^eath of Mrst EnTreline Bradly~ 

V/idow of Ludwig Herrnann Brück, 

i ^te l'Jnir.eline Henry Sidne.v C myth: 



Enclcsed pleaße find Postiil ^^ote t'ov 2/6 and I 
should be Lxuch obligsd if you would let me have Doatb-Cftrtiricate 
oi my abcve nentioned grand'aunt wbo died some tine al'ter 
November 1Ü4G« 

Tlir.nking: ;'ou in anticipation, 




Yours faithi'ullv , 
Dr» K # G>y.K£assül 



Linola P/Note. 



Dr. K. C. F. iJiL^el^ 
»The Continental», 

llelLcuixe - St. ialüa, S 2. 



Jhr. : M. 



Melbourne, 16th April, 1946 • 




S» LoUrence, Esq« , 
44 F.artln PI., 

D££r Six*, 

In hiL laßt letter v/liich Tr^^ c:rand»uncle, lir. 
Ludwig Hermann Bn.icl:, v/rcte shortly before his death he men- 
tioned your name. So I iiupposo that ;you are one of hib bebt 
Trieiiv-Lb« 

I am hii. grand-nephew and the onl^^ blo cd-relative 
who c.omo to Auütrölia. You will under stand that I im amcioub to 
knovj a^ mueh c^l poü.-ible abouc hin. I v./üuld be thctnkl'ul to you, 
indeed, 11' you \ ould bo abl. to let me know oODie detail^ about 
hirr and, if oo, I v.ould lux-niöL 2^ou v;ith tiie pai^ticulart» I cun 
especially interested in. 

Should you, hov/over, be un9.]:lt to <^o 30 I would be 
mucli jbli^rd ii' you would .rive i'^ the atldreees of people who 
niiglit be abl< to cive ine the de^sired irj^*crTr.ationt.. 



Ml 




'ihanking you in anticip-ition .1 ^jxl^ aeur :jir. 



Y our s £'d i '/hl'ully , 
Dr. Km G. X''. KASbjcJL 



Jftr. <Jl. >. o- fÄitueZ. 



ijh. Id^^. 



mX>vuMm/CV yO-dw KAuJii/yut^^ 







iHx. «Ä 



OiA^Mhpct' * 









y J>/,' t9iit/- irnry Jl.^Mii fjlfytyj^yy <k V . /irryn^ jd.h^ /^^^ / 



llU J. J^ii/nU^ruCt- 



i 



i 



fi/uMnct/ 



4 ^^^^M^jut ^ ^tlu^Jfi0 77 mtjyiv ^Att ^At^M^. 






cf57 . 



t^^n^ 



V \ 



.— j\. 



^ 






• 



1-Pf. im. 



» •■ 



/ 



f 



A^ 



H.-;'f 



> 



7. 



K.o,^ 



i 






~>^ 




Dr. R. M. THOMSON 



182 LIVERPOOL ROAD 
ASHFIELD 




■ iht. m- 



y 



Cy-^ 



^' C^^^^^^Lm^ 







J. 



^Sc-»** /j2. 



-«-«-«e-^ 




-^*. 



^ 

J^^ 



k.^ 



•<^«-^ <^^<t- 




^ O^ 



< 



^y^^ ^t^ /^^£^, 




t/St^'M-^ 






-^ 





-3*^«-^ X^ 



-^^ 





-^^J^ 





-^ y^^^^^ /C^y 



^*^vC^ 



^_^, 




^ 



^.^. fsT^ 






Dr. K*G. F.Kassel, 
»The Continental», 
342 Beaconsfield Parade, 
Melbourne St. Kilda^ S 2 



JH^, S^rJ^t. lUlF^ 



Geo. M# Laurence Esq. , 
159 Avenue Road, 

MOSMAN NSW 



Melbourne, 26 th B/larch, 1946 • 





Dear Sir, 



In his last letter which my grand'uncle, Mr. Ludwig 
Hennann Brück, wrote shortly before his death he mentioned your 
name. So I suppose that you are one of his best friends. 

I am his grand-nephew and the only blood-relative who 
came to Australia. You will under stand that I am anxious to know 
as rauch as possible about him. I would be thankl'ul to you, indeed, 
if you would be able to let me know some details about him and, if 
so, I would furnish you with the particulars I am especially inter- 
ested in. 

Should you, however, be unable to do so I would be 
much obliged if you would give me the addresses of people who might 
be able to give me the desired inf ormations. 

Thanking you in anticipation I am, dear Sir, 



Yours faithfully, 
Dr. K.G. F.Kassel 




vi . ^>'l/. >. ^- ^uUXut)^. 



^. / )^h 



Dr. K.G.P.Kassel, 

•The Continental«, 

342 Beaconsfield Parade, 

Melbourne St. Kilda. S 2^ 



Dr. R. M# Thomson, 
BANKSTGWN NSW 



« 




Melbourne, 25 th Maich, 1946 • 



Dear Sir 



Messrs. Thomson & Co. , 3 Castlere^o^h St., Sydney, 
gave me your address as the son of the late partner of my great- 
uncle Ludwig Hermann Brück. 

I am I.!r. Brück »s on3.y relative in Australia and you 
will understand that I am anxious to know as much as possible about| 
him. I would be thankl'ul to you, indeed. IT you would be able to 
let me know some details about him and, if so, I would rurnish you 
with the particulars I am especially interested in. 

Shculd you, however, be unable to <lo so I would be 
rauch obliged if you would give me the addresses o£ people who mighl 
be able to give me the desired inf ormations. 

Thanking you in anticipation I am, dear Sir, 

Yours faithTully 

Dr. K.G.F.Kas sei 



7' ^^-^^^^^^^ 



Dr. K*G.F*Kasßel, 
•The Continental % 
342 Beaconsfielci Parade, 
Melbourne 3t > Kilda^ S 2 



Geo. M. Laurence Esq«, 
169 Avenue Road, 

M0SJ.1AN NSW 



t.: m. 



^ 



Melbourne, 26 th March, 1946 • 




Dear Sir, 



In his last letter which my grand'uncle, Mr# Ludwig 
Hermann Brück, wrote shortly before his death he mentioned your 
name» So I öuppoee that you are one of hiß best friends» 

I am his grand^nephew and the only blood-relative who 
came to Australia# You will understand that I am anxiouti to know 
as much as possible about hiin« I would be thankt\il to you, indeed, 
if you would be able to let ire loiov/ some details about him and, if 
so, I would furnish you with the particulars I am ecpecially inter- 
ested in* 

Should ycu, however, be unable to do so I wculd be 
rauch obliged if you would give me the addresscö of people who might 
be able to give me the desired inf crmations» 

Thanking you in anticipation I am, deai* Sir, 



Yours faithfully, 
Dr* K#G. F.Kassel 



Jjt. ^. 5- ^- ^Jla44€J< 



THE ÖLPEST AND LARGEST SURGICAL INSTRUMENT HOUSE IN AIISTPAIt 



CABLES ONLY: 

"HYPO" 

SYDNEY 



AGENCI.ES: 

JOHN WEISS & SON LTD. 

LONDON 
OPTHALMIC INSTRUMENTS 



STERLING RUBBER CO. LTD. 

CANADA 

STETRLING OPERATINS GLOVES 




MEDCO" PRODUCTS 

MADE IN SYDNEY 

ETHER ANiCSTHETIC 

SULPHURIC ETHER 

ETHYL CHLORIDE 

ADRENALINe! CHLORIDE 



DISTRIBUTORS 

BAYERS PRODUCTS LTD. 

LONDON 

PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS 



COMMONWEALTH 

LABORATORIES 

SERUM, VACCINE8. ETC. 



BAUM 8e CO. 

NEW YORK 

BAU MANOMETERS 




EDWENIL 
MANUFACTURERS 

OF 
'TIC HOSPITAL FURNITURE 
SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 



ESTABLISHED OVER 50 YEAR8 

RICHARD THOMSON & 

SHOWROOMS & OFFICES: 
8 CASTLEREAGH STREET, SYDNEY 



TELEPHONES: 

B 6915 
B 6916 

AFTER HOURS: 

FA 2324 
XU 1606 



STERILIZERS (ELECTRIC AND GAS) 

SPLINTS 

SURGICAL BELTS. ETC. 



MEDFCAL AGENCY DEPT. 

MEDICAL PRACTICES TRAN8FERREO 

RELIABLE LOCUM TENENS 

AVAILABLE 




Phase Address All Letters 



BOX 2537 E, G.P.O. 



Sole Agents for "Sterling" Brand Operating Gloves. 

All sizes in Stock. 



Sydney Mar. igth »45 



Dr. K.O.F.Kassel, 
"The Continental« 

342 Beaconsfield Parade, St.Kilda. 
Melbourne, 



^. tJ//j. l$ifS. 



Dear Sir, 

4 4. 4. ^^ö^are obliged by your letter of the Ifth 
inst, to band and we would mention the followinc 
aaareeses:«* ^ 

Dr. R.M. Thomson, Bankstown (who ie the son of 

fl r *^® ^^*® ^^* Richard Thomson) 

Mr. »•Laurence, of Laurence & Laurence, 

Solicitors, 44 Martin Place, Sydney. 

We believe thls is the Mr. Laurence to whom you 
refer and we think that he was the late Mr. Brückte 
solicitor. 

^.x., Hoplng this information will be of some 
llttle aseistance to you, 

Your 8 faithfully. 
RICHIRD THOMSON & CO 





äi.'t 



Dr^ K.G#F»Kas£el| 
•The Continental», 
342 Leaconsfield Parade, 
St> rilda, S 2 



fc. .' /35, 



Melbourne, 16th Ilarch, 1946 • 




To the 

Police Station, 

STRATHFI>:i.D NSW 

Dear Sirs, 




Would ;you kindl;v' inl'orm me \whether iny great-aunt, 
y!rQ. EüJineline Bradly, v/ife of the late IJr. Lud^^i,^i Hermann Brück, 
who lived in l^o^ S3 Roberts Street, StratMUeld, ib still alive* 
I wrote to her twice but never received a reply from her# 

In casG of her death vvculd you be able to rurnish me 
v/ith the addi'eß;:>es of her heire, respectlvely of V.r solicitor so 
that I might contact theni« 

Truöting that I am not cuusing you too rauch incon« 
venience and tlianking you in anticipation rcr ycur kindneet I am, 
dear Sir^:^, 

Yours faithfully 



(jLMjr) 



Dr» K»G>F>Kassel 



l.'/J^ 



i)r. K.G.F. Kassel, 
'The Continental», 
342 lieaconsfield Parade, 
LTelbcmrne ^ st, Kilda, .q 



Melbourne, 16 th March, 46 




Messrs. Hichard Tliomson & Co», 
8 Castlereagh St., 

SYDräEY :MSW 

Dear Sirs, 




Thank you for your kind letter or lOth karch re- 
garding n^^ great-uncle It. Ludwig Hermann Brück. 

You are right mj' uncle died without issue# }ir. 
H. S. Brück is not related to liim. 

Hovvever, I have been able to find out following 
names of friends of hi£; v/hom he mentioned in bis last letter: 
Va-t,. and Misses Thomson, to*. Ford and I^.Laurance. 

Perhaps you could furnisb me v/ith their addresses 
and thus enable me to obtain the desiied detailt.. 

Forgive me, please, for the trcuble I am causing 
you tut I See no other alternative for contacting the persons in 
question. ( 

Thankipg you in anticipation I am, dear Sirs, 



muih^i^ 



Yourc fcithfully 
Dr. K.G.F.i^assel 



THE ÖLPEST AND LARGEST SURGICAL INSTRUMENT HOUSE TN AIISTpatta 



CABLES ONLY: 

"HYPO" 

SYDNEY 



AGENCIES: 

JOHN WEISS & SON LTD. 

LONDON 

OPTHALMIC INSTRUMENTS 



STERLING RUBBER CO. LTD. 

CANADA 

STEfRUING OPERATING CLOVES 



MEDCO" PRODUCTS 

MADE IN SYDNEY 

ETHER ANiCSTHETIC 

SULPHURIC ETHER 

ETHYL CHLORIDE 

ADRENALINE CHLORIDE 




DISTRIBUTORS 
BAYEFS PRODUCTS LTD. 

LONDON 
PHARMACEUTiCAL PREPARATIONS 



COMMONWEALTH 

LABORATORIES 

SERUM, VACCINES. ETC. 



BAUM & CO. 

NEW YORK 

BAUMANOMETERS 



EDWENIL 



MANUFACTURERS 

OF 
riC HOSPITAL FURNITURE 
IIRGICAL INSTRUMENTS 




STERILIZERS (ELECTRIC AND GAS) 

SPLINTS 

SURGICAL BELTS, ETC. 



MEDICAL AGENCY DEPT. 

MEDICAL PRACTICES TRANSFERRED 

RELIABLE LOCUM TENENS 

AVAILABLE 



ESTABLISHED OVER 50 YEARS 

RICHARD THOMSON & 

SHOWROOMS & OFFICES: 
8 CASTLEREAGH STREET, SYDNEY 



P 9 



TELEPHONES: 

B 6915 
B 6916 

AFTER HOURS: 

FA 2324 
XU 1606 




Phase Address All Letters 



BOX 2537 E. G.P.O. 



Sole Agents for "Sterling" Brand Operating Gloves. 

All sizes in Stock. 



Sydney Mar.lOth «45 







Dr. K.a.F.Kaseel 

The Continental, 

342 Beaconsfield Parade, 

St. Kllda, 

Melbourne 8.2 Vic* 



Dear Sir, 

We are obliged by your letter of the 
4th inet, to hand and much ae we would like, we 
fear we can be of no aeeietance to you whatever. 
Ab you probably know, Mr. Brück died many years 
ago, and we have not eeen his wife since and 
therefore do not know her address. Her name 
does not appear in our telephone bock. Mr. 
Richard Thomson also died a few years ago, but had 
he been alive, we fear he could not have aeeisted 
you. 

We notice in our telephone bock a Dr. 
H.S. Brück, Powell Rd. Rose Bay, Sydney, but as far 
as the writer knows, his late chief had no child- 
ren, but we just offer this adtice to you for what 
it is worth. 

Regretting our inability to be of any 
assistance to you. 

Yours faithfully, 

RICH^ THOMSC^^ CO. 

The last address we had for Mrs. Brück was ''Helicorn" 
Redmyre Rd. Strathfield. 




fLr,: isr. 



Dr. E« G. F# Kassel, 
«The Continental», 
342 Beaconcfield Pai»ade, 
Melbourne - St. Ililda^ S 2 



Melbourne, 4th Llarch, 1946 



Messrs. Richard Thomson & Son, 
8 Castlereagh St., 

SYDI]r.Y NSW 




Dear Sirs, 

I would be very much obliged if you would InTom me 
if Ilr. Richard Thomson is still in your business and, x£ not, 
where I could contact him as I want some inforroation about ny 
grand'uncle, lli*. Ludv;ig ileruiann Bi-uck, former partner of your 
firm. Should I Le unable to contact La-. Richctrd Thomson could you 
furnish ire Vvith i:cme other addresbes of people who could give me 
details of my above mentioned grand'uncle. 

There are quite a number of rather important quest- 
ions I would like to put regarding him and I would be very thank- 
ful, indeed, if you could asi^ist me in this respect. 

Eoping that this request will not unduly incon- 
venience you and trusting to have your early reply I am, dear Sirs, 




Yours faithfully, 
Dr. K. G. F. Kassel 



Form No. 1. 
R. No. of Application 1944/39490. 



1889 MARRIAGES registered in the District of Glebe 



•^ 




Parti culars in 
Columns 5,7,9,10 
obtained from 
Church Register 
No. 434. 
W.H. Young, 
Deputy Registrar 
C^eneral, Sydney, 
ölst AuOTst, 1915. 



• 



in the Colony of New South Wales, 



by Frederick William Artlett, 



District Registrar. 



(JüllllllTI 



1 Nimibcr in Register .. 2510, 



91. 



2 When and where married 



19th September, 1889, 
Glebe. 



3 Names and Surnames of 
parties. 



Ludwig Hermann 
Brück. 



Emmeline Henry 
Sidney Snyth. 



4 Condition of the parties 
(bachelor or spinster, 
widower or widow; 
divorced or divorced 
petitioner). 



Bachelor. 



Spinster. 



5 Birth-place 


Silesla, ^"^-ennany. 


Dublin, Ireland. 


5 Rank or prof ession 


Medical Fublisher. 


Lady. 


7 Ages (years) 


39. 


25. 



3 Usual place of residence 



Leichhardt Street, 
Glebe Point« 



Leichhardt Street, 
Glebe Pnlmt^ 



Parents — 

9 Father's Christian name 
and Surname. 

Mother's Christian name 
and Maiden Surname. 

IQ Father's rank or pro- 
fession. 



Hermann Brück. 



Fredericke Franken stein 



Paper Manuf acturer. 



Henry William Snyth, 



Hariette TJiianna 
Moyse Thomas. 

Goramercial traveller, 



Married at Leichhardt Street, Glebe Point. 

According to the rites of the Presbyterian Ghurch. 



This marriage was solemnized 
betwcen us — 



in the presence of us — 



Ludwig Hei*mann Brück, 
•öimneline Henry Sidney Sbiyth, 

Lionel Sbyth. 

i^arie Kathie en anyth. 



By me— Robert Snith Pater son, 

Officiating Minister «odfe^ieto^X- 




T, Roy Wood Willis, Registrar General, 

do hereby certify that the above is a true eopy of the particulars in an entry in a 
Register of Marriages kept at the Registrar Generalis Ofiiee, Sydney, New South 
Wales, and cxtraeted this 27 th day of I^ovember, 1944.. 



/r> 



..—-flAUkcrr:, 




eneral. 



39013 4.40 



/\ 






/i Q/i ni REGßTRAR GENEI|^L'S DEPARTMENT, SYDNEY, B.D.M. BCH. 



• /ie/n No ^.__ Applm S^a! 

^^ o<e. 




23 APR>$4 



"5, 



//ic following fees. 



i 



S ^ u w 



k- 



RECEIVED by fro%';'Z-^_.___ n. : L J 

W W O fc / ^ o L , 9 A 

K^ U Ui O ^^ oearch ai l o. 

H g Ü H -""^ 

H " Z -J Search (addilional perlod) at 2/6. 



'^; 



t/r /^^j- 



^^•»»fe runftUtf' 



OS 5 

CO Q^ U CO 

r: 0. u u 



Search at 6/-. 



/l 



r 



i. 



BOOK NUMBER 



'. y^M 



PLEASE PRINT 



NUMBER FROM 
UPPER LEFT CORNER 
OF THE CATALOGUE 
CARD IN THIS SPACE 



CALL SLIP 



flicA'ft^^^ Jcu^ftWÖ 



AUTHOR 



^ri^fh^ Xjh.Aui 



m 



t TITLE 



^ 






' VOL. AND YEAR 
(IF PERIODICAL) 



^y<H^>lt^/ 



/Ü1') 



7123/67 



;> 71. n 



if-l-f/. 




e 



r>^ o 






rc/l^^rz//^l/i. 



/Vir 









.vife 



]i/d^^U^ dM^^yn^S] 4/ ^' 



w^^ 








28020 



REGISTRAR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. SYDNEY, B.D.M. BCH. 

C.P. Item No Applrl^m^u ß„,, 'aa^ta^V-lM*- 



^ECEIVEDby ^ /ro,S..^..Su A 



the following fees. 



8t24S 



Cashl 



ler. 



o< 

xn- 

H Q o; , 
w w o fe 

ti^ u tu o 

^ ^ r1 f- 
CO 0^ »J cn 

r: ci< -J u 



Search at 2/6. 
SearcA (addltional period) at 2/6. 

Search at 6/-. 






Anyonc know ol 
, Uli» mnn? 

/"^AN any reader glve me any in- 
P^' formation about Sydney Smith, 
who emigrated from England and 
settled near Melbourne in the 
'fifties or 'sixties? , ^ ^ , . 

He was the son of a Cotswold 
nainter, Daniel Smith, and he went 
to Australia with his brother Wil- 
liam and his sister Ellen, wife of a 
Dr. Sweetlove. , t% ;«i 

I am doing research on Daniel 
Smith and his two painter sons, 
Alfred and Edward. 

FRANCIS JAMES DALLETT, Jr. 

Athenaeum of Philadelphia, East^ 

Washington Square, Philadelphia 
U.S.A. 



/ 




» 



JluH.Mii/ \Hxryft<ffi^ . Ci^, 



//^ L^Ua. im, 






Y^t 



/t*7H4. Jlh /U%/ 



rhuHMt^i . 



^ JJ ^^ ^i ^LIU MJ J A^ M A^Jt ,mJ^ jlm 



>ft^Mv aU iU IaJq diit aIU^UU ci^t^rtji,^^^ 



^An 



JL " Ari^iii , 



^ 



At 



JL 



h^Jyvt/i^ JLmr aM x^tL;yJu i^jj^^^o^ ^ i^l 



UJ,^^ ild /U1HA^ CAyA^ Ir JJ^ JLvkk&iCp 



f i 



^ Mf^JUdl- 



flJJi 



/V^' 



5 



^^^jifutrH. 



JU L U^ 



P 



^i<fU^ 




JU^MA/Q 



hj 



i^^^e^ . JJ^'d 



t 



M.'Vn^ /hJuMou J4 



M 



i^ A >C: 



/ 




IL /^ /h^ M /h^Jt 4MM A^-tuA ^ Al aM^I HlU 



Uc^K ^u^i (Kee JcUu{ Jn 



Ac 



H. JLiC iMeho Jti^ -^JA>1 



id k Iti (^ cr^ cli/etu^ j)U 4 JL JUL^ 4u^/ 



k jXdut fW / A ^'/d d^M^^ 



^ 




u 



X« 



/rkuA^ 



y, 



-<i*^ 



^ \ iV l. 



AtJU 



Aj^ 



Ma^ 



k/? h^ 



s^Mk 



A^'^ytß^'^ 



^ 



<K/U^A^ 



hAJicl^ 



iTW^ 



/rujluc ^ h^'C oL' U^ L,.,^y,f MLa. A- ^ 



/Ur,^äL^ L xL^ \ 



r. 



^ 't»*^ /fJjMu m/ /n4ut. ^ <*^ 



•^ 



du 



cMjL oJU^ \ f}^ 



iL 



^CiK^\ 



'r ^m ' 



3 



Jl 



^'1^ ^h4v^ W ^ 4.^/ ^'^ /i x^ JU^^U 



ft^ifrtvi ^ t^ ~ ia^ . j/p 



y^ 



♦tAtV 



/ 



OHi. 



^ ^ 



^i^^H 



ua. 



tu 



^^ptAHi A 



M*^ 



f 



a^ 'VA» 



/M^f k(uel yCfc nih ^. l — iL_häJUa. 




U iL J^ytU" d ^ oiW*, f!uMt/w L/>'M /, 



c/' 



/^ 



«*. 



J 



[^•4 JU l>\U*n^ 






/H^y« 







J 



/}/i. 



-»«» ^ Ai 



Ä^'t/ 1^ T^ ^UtM^Juu J^'-^Ax^x^ 



tyf '^^ 




JlnLrrtit ^ 



W" *fl O « C-'-w» 



1 



t 



^yyu'i^w 



^ A 



Ö<fA/9 



/ÄU-^ c^ 



y>l 



l 



i- ^ 7 



/• ^'-^i^ 



A<? 



^ ö^ U^j. L /^ ßj / 



^ A^ ßJJL JLu 



CDU- 



Jy^ ^^ u>c ^^ 



c^ 



'• i 



\M. 



/h^ /Uii^ f. 






a^^ '^ yi**^ 



/^««^ 



<r 



TA 



4/tiU. 



L 



fl^ 



/f^ 'K.^ CK-^>Jy 



/hr^ 



'(. <ui M 



t^ 



^A-nit 



*^ l^ .ü L ruti ujju ^ au 3 (h JU /^, 



H 



A/^A^ A*^ ^ /£*^ 



^ 



r^v^< 



y^»^ 



^ 




^'»^. . ^ 



• < 




/^ /A^ 



<a>->v^ 



w^ 



^«-*^ ^.-»^ 



^^ 






/>>-uC 



UUdS^ ^^ C-iOu^v^^n^' ^»..-xl^ y 



r:^-hx. ^^^^s«.-^L-»- 



^ 



*>^ 



/^»^^ /^ 



^^ 



^^ 



/ 



J 



.*=t^ 



/ 



/^^^ ^'^. 



/^ /-'^y^. 



.^ 






/>HU 











ti 



li, flffvtptJu/ . '^yy. 



J>eAA/ cSW' 



fJi' 



' PK hhos: 



ji&mM^ 



huU-ilJi 



t 



j^ 



zMikl 



XjmiJiyi^ 




^ nUAUäiU. 4 MUJ. M$^' AAmJc duJLiy. ülUM^IA.^^ Jiit^ ,f^ yli^ 

AmfUaL 4 V4t «W . tL/fat^ i.S.J^. /JyJ I88i U tm^yJLrsV dmJJu.. 



^ - ' ' • / -7- "/ 



xßWtAiiUn^ M 



tv%/ A^yt/ 



/UvtHkm^ct^ 



<L^ JkMjJif 






%ji. j. V. Jhu^M^. 



■z'-rri- 




PK 45909 

( -.^ . P-H-M-S. 

Kegisirar CeneraVs lI^YaQi^^T^ 
SydLy, \? M 

Dear Sir/Maden^:- ^■^fif^|J 



Hü 



I desire to acknowledge 
receipt of your communication dated 

5Si:...A.5:^> ^^ t 

and to inform you that it will receive 
n^-" P/r 4- ^early .attention? ^"1 recolpt of fee 

o. 2/b to waich ^eti.irri npsta-e ml- 

Yours faithfully, 



Lm. itjy. / 



oe aclded. 



it 



^1^. :..G,:-. Kassel, 

'The Jontinental" 
o42 Peaconafield 
Parade, ^ 
St.Klida, S,2, 

Vi c . 



/<". W , \j\f\L L ( S 



81739 9.41 St 2634 1 0^ i^ 



# 




ADDRESS ALL MAIL TO 

REGISTRAR OF PROBATES 

P.O. BOX NO. 2063 L. 

SYDNEY. N S. W. 



IN YOUR REPLY 

THE NAME AND NUMBER OF THE 

ESTATE SHOULD BE QUOTED. 




PROBATE 




fiee c^ me ^fy/jtrm^ e/ [vro^afe^ 



t^a/ireitie ()off;^/: (^Ü-^aie/A ^^ß^ee^. 



'!yy(/ney, ,..."u.u ^.cy^;Aiw!..ur 7.yf/ 



•4- 




J-*» V ■- 



Jir , 



U tb ü 



( t 




e üi 



i.iiiiHi^ii^f ^IIIL. i^^'^i^'^^ Gi^c^^;;Cl . 



üj^2C6j2 



• -' L 











Oi 



ou CO not pjpcar to be 

• . uii.^ule to &uppa.y you v.ith a cüi;y oT the ütatcuciit 
uüöütö M.nci lialuilitivs . 

MouTB i^Uthf Lilly, 




^^^S^^WXy 4..,^^yC,^^j^ 



i^ü;i_^:i;-:jt ra r o^' 



obates • 



" riK . ü on t i ri t.r! t £i 1 '* 

i.Li2jLriOUilIIiji, 



iw»'J .li.lllJ 



4.» • 2 • 



viüTuia... 



Sri ^ '^UciafhAh^^ 



tt. 



lUiyt^rtvm/ 13 71. 






Snmu^ ^ fl, 3. 



M/ /fihl4 Myyiy jiyu IStS x/ /huuA Mvt Atuv" MmJ- /<fi5. 



äJ 



jjtH^ jJlfjL. 



Kji. ^ \J' %jI(umJL-. 




JlOJi Q%/ . 



Jr.K.G.rKaWcl. 

TTie CoyJUneyitdbl , 



6 ^ fUrJu. isH. 



%.' 70607, ~~ 



jiitjL ' " ^ 



^ J^^^' 




fniUf J AaA k'fv^ Itrv 



A/ 



^ i 



4hl MW/yrvtvJ' 



M* /UvncrJ^ 



dAii/iJuyuy ^i 



cn^ /t^ Ai 



dWd/ti/Ctf 



HiMA ^^»^MJk 



i. JCi J JUu^. 






17 7 S 



; 



iU 



/ni 




\ 



•-% 



; 



J. fr Zff 



; 






**♦♦• 



t^ 












•^♦•^ 



1^ 




yj. JI^^U^ IUI 



i 



i 




'td^K-A-vs^ 



\ 1^ 






'* tU./fi2 



/Ox^ ^^ ^-/4 



% 







(,^ fLuJa. im 



[ 



jf(t.' If Sf/n/joss. 



JUCÜA^ 



^iCiih/ 



MtA^ 



i 



u 



tty 



(f^ivUjU 









l . 



/inlftHcyitd' 



/kvi/ 



M4l^ 



mMvu fiftAi/ AA/yxhn^ryüTv 



^^M^iAt f^ /W- ifumAHAi^tAUV- /CfUc<uä/. 



ü^ 



MiCiM^ju 



My^^rjM . 



HcuM ifiiUM^JLf, 



Ä. JlA d <üLcMiu, 







Mjm\ 




\u. ' xn <oi Hj 

l-U.'- 3 31 j 5 



^'4< fy. 





A.^„, tLc/o jitM/iU i 





Daily Telegraph Sydney vom 17, August I915 
Das £nde eines Gesohaeftsmannes 
Briefe an seinen Sozius. 

Ludwig Hermann Brück, 65 Jahr alt, geboren in Schlesien, Deutschland und Mitinhaber 
der flrma Brück & Thomson in ^dney, Importeure und Vertreter von medizinischen 
Waren wurde am SonnabeäS^S^ das Sydney Krankenhaus ueberfuehrt, wo e r kurze Zeit 
darauf verschied. Er hinterliess Briefe an seinen Sozius. 

Der erste Brief bezeichnet "Privat" lautet folgendermassen. 
"Ich kann Dir nicht sagen, wie schrecklich schmerzlich es fuer mich ist, dass ich 
- obschon unbeabsichtigt - di«xiirMih der Grund dafuer bin, dass die Blrma wegen 
Trading with the Enemy ( Handel mit dem J-eind angeklagt ist, besonders da Du 
unschuldig in der Sache bist and den einzigen Weg , den ich sehen kann aus der 
S«x dem Fall zu kommen meinem Leben ein Ende zu setzen, da man einen Toten nicht 
anklagen kann. Und das will auch Dich von Deinem in Deutsch geborenen Sozius 
befreien , welcher unter Beruecksictigung aller ümxtxaiimx gegenwaertiger Umstaende 

ist besser aus dem Wege. Um eine lange Untersuchung zu eruebrigen kannst Du dem 
Leichenbeschauer sagen, dass ich Gift genommen habe und um ganz sicher zu gehen 
habe ich I/4 Ib Chloroform auf mein Taschentuch gegossen und auf mein Gesicht 
gelegt. Wenn Du diesen Brief liest bin ich bereits 42 Stunden tot . Daher soll 

das Beerdi ungsinstitut meien Koerper uebr die Strasse hinueber zum Beerdigungs 
platz . Da ich nicht eingeaeschert werden kann, moechte ich in der Freidenker Abtei 
lung des RoQkwood Friedhofes bestattet werden, iak Meine Bestattung soll nicht 
in die Zeitung gesetzt werden , auch soll niemand meinem Sarg folgen. 
Lieger Herr Thomson ich verlasse mich darauf , wenn ich versichere , dass ich keine 
Absicht hatte gegen das Gesetz zu Verstössen und wenn ich nur die Anordnuug 
durch gmfxxmii g.lesen haben, wuerde alles in gut sein. Wie auch immer, es ist mein 
Schicksal und dem kann nicht geholfen werden. 




# 



itAdc 






Uth April, 1964# 



Donr Sir, 

We hövo plenauro in ad/lsincr thpt we can offer so le 
linös fit a special reduoed prlce, «a a • dlscontlming o« rying 
this line aod in ordar to liquidate our Stocks we ar© prepa ad 
to r oÄide tho pricea aa followöf» 

Fd« I4ck tatnlaaa stael 

SausaiT© Knlvaa Ito* 1106B # 7/6 aaoh 



Fd» Diok Claave-a 

Genaan Lanftuacre coopleta 
Smallfrooda isnufacturar» 
-^•oipa Booka 



So. 53/r § 27/6 a oh 



# 77/ eaoh 

Also ainoia^j oelluloaa caaitvra T^xdious oolour» aal 
slaae, a paroel of approidsiataly 1000 rad flbrous casia^s (90 
at auch roduoad prio^a« 

I^oking forwa-Hi to your eniulriaa. 



) 



We ara 



Xoura falthfully. 



rn^-l. n^m^K^SSl. TT, T-n. 



T»4C«irA»»w, NEÜVIESIS. SYDNeV 
rtJLtt^HOHK ,' B 030' ^ • 145 • 




^. i^J/i'. /fn. 




Dr* K* G. F, Kassel, 
"The Continental," 
342 Beaconsfield Parade, 
St. Kllda, 
I^£ELP)OURNE. S 2. 




POLfCE Department. 

€SOMMISSIONER'S OFFiCE. 

BOX ABa. G.P.O.. 

Sydney. New Sovth Wales, 

2Qth 0ctober,1944. 



WHMM mMn.nH^, ^LrAmt ouorm no. 





Dear Sir, 

V/ith referenne to your communJcatlon of the 28th 
ultimo seekinp: Information rea-arrilrp the death of tbe ]ate 
Liadwig Hermann Brnck, I arn directed by the Comrnlssloner of 
Police to set out heretinr^er a copy of the flnding at the 
Inaji.est conducted by the City Coroner, Mr. F. S. HawMns 
on the 17th August, 1915, in regard to hia death:- 

"I find that the sald Ludwig Hermann Bruok, at the Sydney 
Iloapital, in the District of Sydney, In the Stste of New 
South Wales, on the 14th day of Au"a:st ,1915, died from 
the effects of a certain poison called R-orphlne, wilfuilv 
adrairlstered by hiniself at No. 15 Castlerearrh Street, '" 
Sydney, on the sar.Ȋay." " ' 

T an directed to add that it Is renorted that the 
hT.^l^ti\T«7^.^ married and residing before his death wlth 
hls wife at "Helicon," Robort Street, P^rwood, was found in 
an unconscious condition in the Office of hls buslness preSlsea 
15 Castlereagh Street, Sydney, by his partner (l,ir. Thor.soJT and ' 
Detective Soutar of the New South 'teles Police Force, who 
conveyed hltr, to the Sydney Hospital where he died shortl? after 
his adiiaisslon on the 14th August, 1915. A conv of an extL?t 
ourthfff-^J""^ "Daily Telegraph" newspaper is attached seJung 
TeltlT. f^^i\^Tr""'^^''2 ^^^ ^^«*^^ ^'^ö contalning the text o? 

Ü/'^r^ ^* ^Z ^^-"'- ^^ *= »^^^ ^^^^■'n ^'^^'^t property was left 
by the deceased. ^ j-t-it 



Yours falthfully. 



J 




J2^ 




A. Stlcoewich, 
Seen 6. ± a r 



COPY. 



"JQATLYTbJL^rrRAPH . " 



17th. kM(-VBt,191b. 



BUSINT'ISS MA]V'»S EITD. 
Ll^lTTERS TO HIS PARTFFJR. 





i 



lAidwlg Hermann Brück (65), a natlve of Sllesla, Germanv, and a 
Partner In the firm of Brück and Thomson, of Svdney, atrents and 
Importers of medlcal goods , who was admltted to the Sydney FosTDltal 
on Saturday night and died shortly afterwards, left letters addressed 
to hls nartner. 

Tl-ie flrst letter, marked "private',' read as follows: "I carnot teil 
you how terrlMy grleved T am of beln^r the caune - though unlntentlomll 
- of the firm belng prosecuted for trading with the enemy, especlally 
as you are Innocent In the matter, and the only way T can see to cet 
out of It Is for -n- to make an end of my lif e , as they cannot 
prosecute a corpse. And It will also relleve you of your German- 
born partner, who, conslderlng all the present clroumstences , Is 
better out of the way. To save an inau'^st, you can tel] the 

nou!!^^ i?k''* r "^tr ^f"^"" Poison, and, to make' quite sure , I have 
^poured ^Ib. of Chloroform on my handkerohlef s to lay my face on 
J'^er you read tM s letter, T shall be dead about 42 hours , thor;fore 

Z°'Vb^?.^? "* V\^^^ undertakers to take my body across the road 
.to their place of Interment. As I cannot be crem.ated, T wlsh to 

?®H^'''^^ ^''.'^■'' ^^«ethlnkers ' Division of the Rookwood' Cemeterv. 
I do not want my funaral advertlsed, nor do I want anyone tn follow 
my rem.alns; also please do not close the establlshment for'a mlnute 
I ^tX'th'; T^r^ f'r. Thomson, 1 trust you will belleve me Jhen 
„„rtl: T^^ ^ no Intention of trans-ressing a-ainst the law, 
SowevL ?^^^"l3r studied the proclam.a tlon all would have been well. 
However it Is my fate and cannot be helned. Please dellver lütter 
to Mr. LaurancG and packet and letter to my wife and- T hooe thnt 
occasionally you will give your late partner a klnd thouS! anf 
If at any time I have given you pains and distress of mlmi as in 
the present case, I am slncerely sorry for it, and I know vou wm 

IZ^lr "'"•..°" '"^ ^^'"^^^ ^1^^'"^ ^^y ".^ood-bv;. for evJr to 
the Misses Thomson, -r. Porcl , our staff, and''all mv friends 

Tours un';r-r ^^"^ "^•"' ^«^^ ^^^^^ I ^^ ^ victlm^ofthe war - 
Yours untll death, L. Brück. P.S. - I leave you my -old-mounted 
Office umbrella as a keepsake of your ]ate partner! -"i';^';:?""*«^ 

L^l^r'^r ''°*! ^^''^'- "^''®™°- ^°^ ^^3^^- certificate: Ludwi- ^ermann 

rSdn^roniu:ii;r?$rf4i^^.^^^^^^^' - ^^^*-^- 36,'ia4?rre. 

Thom;on''arked'hli^''..f'"''" ^'^ T"^' °" Saturday. and at mldday Mr. 
'-NO t"„! hlm, "Are you goinp hone now?" Deceased rerlled. 

^o l»ve some buslness to do, and wll] be home at 3.30.p:rr •• 
As deceased dld not arrive home as stal-ert t^f. i-,i,o^v,^«„ «j-«!- 
wer-P ir-^o^i-^^ n„ ciixvo iiuine as stateo tüe Duslness oremlses 
were visited. Deceased was found seated np a chair in" the basement 
in an unconsclous condltlon. in front of him were fhree bottleHrd 

the letter addres^ed to '■>. ThorrTsnn Wo wc,= o+- ^ '"'■'■ ^^ uui.i,j.es 9na 

Sydney Hosnltal. mo.u.on. He was at once removed to the 



"rs 
who 



and 



1 



} 



i 



t 







il^ LM,M 13 ff. 



oJlt ' in^i/if/w^yt^ <MA/ryv^irrYV" dö^ccm^ ^ /UcIoAmI^, 




Ih)/ M\t n tAv4^/ liJS /h^ A/lMi' A^/mM^ SuJ^y CltMyv^i^um^ vluoA duoi 
J-tTtndin^ Jf lU. 9 n^ I 1013 A Mu^ JtrihA44 ^ JU JLm^ A- Jtajlf 



/t\t9iA 



i] Jm i4 Mtifdli^^ JlU 



AayUlUn4^ if- Jlc MAkk^ceKiv- A- JuJl/ Jlc IvL. 




17 (hvji^l 1315 /y^ aMo >&j Ut- Jm- .Im Mt/ dtcvuJL /finu 




^&\^ XrrvßtA' 



Smryv^ V Sl. \lliryyv€t4 Wmi^ ttJUjX JL, AJUJ^ 



VOM. 



} 



"UUUA^ 






Jt^ytrw- J/t- M^ Mc H /kiH, Mft^ - 4/uu.dt^^ 



k^^ AMJL^ 




S Jtj J. Jta 



4 6^1-. 



K 



1915 



-^ 




"# 





6t) *«/wU 



Form No. 1. 

No. of Application UU/29560* 

DEATHS registered in the District of Sydney, at the Registrar General's Office^ in 
the btate of New South Wales, 

by William Gordon Hayeö-^7illiains, Registrar General. 



Cohitiin. 

1 Xo. in Register 



Description — 
2 Wheu and wliere died 



3 Name and siimame, rank or 
l)rofession. 



Sex and ago 



5 Cniiso of Donth; duration of last 
illnoss; iiiedical attcn<lant by 
whoni rertiiied; and wlien he 
last saw deceased. 



C Christian narne and snrnaine of 
father, if known, with rank or 
profession. 

Christian nanie and niaiden surnanic 
of mother. 



7 Signatui-e, dcsoriptiun, and residente 
oi' infurmant. 



8. SiufTiaturo of DCputy Ko;;istrar 
General, datc, and wliore regiö- 
tered. 



If burial rcgistered — 
9 When and wherc buried. . 



91 7U. 



1073. 



iUth August, 1915« 

Sjydney Hospital, late of ötrathfield 

tsydney • 



Ludwig Hermann Brück. 
Surgical Instrument Iraporter, 



Male. 66 years. 



Morphine Poisoning (Buicide) 
Pinding at Inquiry. 
Hy« S. Hawkins. P.M. 
City Goroner. 
I7th .iugust, 1 91 5. 



Unknown. 

ft 
tt 



Richard Thomson» 

No relation. 

Ghalmers Road, otrathfield, Sydney* 



VV.H, Young, 

i7th August, 191 5. 

öydney. 



Undertakrr l»y whom certified . . 



l6th August, 1915« 

bt, Thomas' Gerne tery, ^-»nfield« 



Wood Goffill & Go Ltd. 



10 Name and religion of Minister; A»G. MOSley , GhUTCh Of Kngland. 



nanu's of witncsses of burial. 



J.B. Wellington. W. Stewart. 



11 whoro born, and how long in the üilesia, Cxermany. 

Austialian Colonies or States, 



indicating wliich. 



ivbout Uü years in Victoria 
and W .{3. vy . 



If deceased was married — 

12 Where, and at what ago, and to Glebe point, Sydney, N.S.W, 
wiiom. kO years. 

Emmeline smythe. 



13 lasiie in nrdor of birlh, their 
na nies and ages. 



No issue. 



1, 



Roy Wood YHlliS, . livgistrar <K>nrrul 

do her«'l»y ccrtify tbit the above ia a true coj)y of tho ptirtinilafs in an vniry in a K« gistor of 

Dcaths kept in the Registrar GcneraPs Office, Sydney, New South Wale«, and extra< tt'd this 

31 St dayof August, 1 9Ul4- 





A. II. Pfttikkii, Actim; (Jovt. l*iri\Ti.it. 







18(hS4 



REGISTRAR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT, SYDNEY, B.D.M. BCH. 

>Ä> f^ n /x 



■m 

heloli 



C.P. Item No Appln\;:/^,H 



■b 




Date. 



-^-f< 



thefollowing fees. 



lECEIVED by fror^lA^. 

H Q ö^ , 
w w o fe 
ti^ U tu o 

U D ,- r^ 

CO Qi 1-1 CO 
Ca./,rer. £ <S 



Search at 2/6. 
Searc/i (additional per'iod) at 2/6. 

Search at 6/-. 




( PFPIQ-^ GOPY) 70607/U , " 
THI3 13 T^IT^l LAST WILL AMD TTi:STAMF.CT of me LUDWIG I1:*]RI,;AMN BRÜCK of 
Burwood nesr Gydney Medical Agent AFTER payment of all my just 
aebts funeral an:3 testamentary expenses I Gl VE DEVISE AMD BE-^UEATH 
ALL ray real an3 personal estate whatsoever an.i wheresoever situate 
unto my wife EHIIELINE HENRY SYDNEY BRÜCK absolute ly AND I APPOINT 
my sai:3 wife sole Executrix of this my Will AND HE ^EBY REVOKIMG all 
other Wills and testamentary dispositions et any time hepetofore 
made by me DECLARE this to be my last Will and Testament. 
IN ;VITNESS \'H>:i^EOP I have hereunto set and subscribed my band this 
twenty fourth day of November one thousand nine hundred and four. 

LUDWIG HERMAMT BRÜCK. 
3IGNED by the Testator the said LUDWIG HEJ^vIANN BRÜCK as and for bis 
last Will and Testament in the presence of us present at the s^me 
time who at bis request in bis presence and in the presence of each 
other have hereunto subsc^-^ibed our names as witnesses. 



Geo.M.LAURENCS 3olr..& Notary Public 
Geo.H. L. HIND3 bis Clerk. 



30tb September 1915 PROBATE of the Will was granted to BT/IMELINE 
HENRY SYDNEY BRÜCK the sole Executrix named in the Will. 
Testatrix died on the li4th day of August 1915. 




u 



// , //■ 



•f 



Supreme Court, 

Probate Jurisdiction, 



N9 31709 



/ ..^^^ 



.Shillings pence, 



. Sydney ,^.ul\. — / 94 . 

RECEIVED by^---—^.. fr^ .^ .:! the sum of 

pounds. 

being fees under the Probate Act. 

Estate Nature of Documents 

_ .y * V. 




y.. 



^ 



•ihMrt^ 



^76 



«* Qashier. 

IX payment has been made by cheqne, this receipt is isaued subject only to tbo cheaue 

on account of whicb it is griven being- duly cleared. , 

761 12.41 St 5632 A. H. Pkttiki;k, Actino Govt. tkinteh. 



Ay. 



i^-h im. 



/ 



ADDRESS ALL MAIL TO 

REG ISTRAR OF PROBATES 

P.O. BOX NO. 2063 L. 

SYDNEY. N S. W. 



IN YOUR REPLY 

THE NAME AND NUMBER OF THE 

ESTATE SHOUUD BE QUOTED. 




^^'».'Sn.c-CxO^ 







'ei 



C/udney., . 



llth }^ov. 



Dear Sir, 






./^^3 



\ 



He^^state of LIJDV/IG: jiEm.AITN BRÜCK decM> 

TTq. ipGpJjL 

In repl?/ to yov.v letter o'' the 7th instant 
I h'->ve to forword^herev/ith copy of the -ill of the ahove 
named deceased as desired "by yon. 

If yoiJ deRire a Certificate o:^' Death of the above- 
nained deceased, application Bh-nld he rnade to the Regii^trar 
Ceneral Sydney for saiiie (fee 2/6) . 

Recei'-'t for li/- herewith. 




Yours fnithi^illy. 



Registrar of Prohaten 



Dr, K. G.P.Kassel 

♦'The Continental", 

V±2 Beaconcfield Parade, 
ST. KILDA.^ 

VTCT^'^RIA. 



ADDRESS ALL MAIL TO 

REGISTRAR OF PROBATES 

P.O. BOX NO. 2063 l_. 

SYDNEY. N S. W. 



IN YOUR REPLY 

TMS NAME ANO NUMBER OF THE 
E.3T\TE: S-iOULD BE QUOTEO. 




4t«t, 7///, i^fd. 




PROBATE 




^ice o^ me ^eaüfyar ol^ i7r<^^/ale^ 



^-J/ei^ireme i)oat^/, w/i^aiem ,^/^ree/. 



9fdne^, .2.5t]a. Q.Q.t..o.i)..ö.j;: /9^/ 3 



Dear Sir, 

Re es täte of Ludwig Kenn ann Brü ck decd. 

No. 70607 

Ref erring to your letter of the ^Oth instf^nt, 
I have to inform you that a copy of the V/ill of the 
aboven^uned deceased will cost four Shillings. 

If you desire the copy, Icinüly forv/ard that 
ajiiount by portal note» 

The Affiaavit of i^ea.th filed herein simply 
States that the aeceased aeparted this life at »-»yaney 
on the 14 th August i':^lb» 

Yours faithi ully , 




Registrar of Probates. 



Dr. K. G.F.Kassel 

♦•The Continental'^ 

342 Beaconsfield Parade, 
3T. KII .A. 

VIGTOI^A. 



ST 274 

ADDRESS ALU LETTERS TO 

THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE, 

Box 7a. G.P.O.. 

SYDNEY. 

telephone: b 0523. 
Office Hours: 

10 A.M. TO 4 P.M. 



^^ 



^%V.\C TRUST 



Oa 







19 O'CONNELL STREET 

SYDNEY. N.S.W. 



* Dr. K.G.F. Kassel, 
The Continentel, 
54^ Beaconsfield Parade, 
ST, KILDA. 
VICTORIA • 



IN YOUR REPLY QUOTE THE 
ESTATE AND THE INITIALS. 

CBA. MJM. __ 
19th October, »M5. 



Dear Sir: 



Re LUDWIG H, BRÜ CK, deceased. 



Receipt is acknowledged of your letter of 12th October, 1945, 
and it is desired to state that you should refer to the Registrar of Probates, 
Supreme Court, King and Elizabeth Streets, Sydney, with regard to the copy of 
the Will* 

No Suggestion can be made as to how the other infonnation 
desired by you may be obtained. 



Yours faithfully. 




TfcER, 



er, 



m 



ÜJIUI, iM 



Jifyfv' • Ji. Jm JUuhI j 9 33SS6 





üJi jr aM A^ iu M^ JU. m. j AHu ^ Lauu^j LtJLUii 

aU MtkvyM/ Ju^HJtwJ. ir iLikaUy. JU k^ JU J aJvU Mt^ AI /ii a 
/Mt, /ml Aul A^ umv i/U- A4 Xn^ AilUt^ A) >4^^ Xw Ai^y^tu^, 
M^ M^ M. /MM. JujHM^ 44U<U JU AMI. ^v.yjLj' M ^ >Jlt4U^A 



Ja«/ youif WMtw /t^M/ •) Am/ /iffühtvy Jr tj^ 



M JU J U 



^ni^Hoti- 









J 



A^hv^ 






JL^' ^^<lMik JlOUut^ Z^38i6^ M.i %a^ <ÜMHAAy f lIcchuA^^ flMluJ<Ci/. 




u 




W' 



» 







*^ ^ ^, /^y^, 






Mif 



^fhi^nJke/ 




1' J^ J Kuti^ ^ W d cLd ^^ /^ ^ JUl 

^l Ur /hCci^ JhLUuJL J ää. LJL J ^... ...J . 



j 






/HHt^ 



ktJU 



uaIL 






Aryt/chui 



f^ 



y y- itU ly ^ 4*t*^ J„r>^ l^ /UU. 44 /mH 



^ 



L^ 



M/9^ 



'^•^^ A^Je44^, 



JU 



*f^ >*Hf HiMH/ 



Mm^ 



M4 A/ 



h/UYt^At^ 



^M^ ^ThMU 



Jr 



/kiiy 



f 



^- '^ KfCüut. 



Tr«-.: JIr. Fntz Jfa;J^el, ^308^6, m.^i Ut^nU -Clän-^ , Vccbrie, , Andt^li^, 



J ke u<^eiLaiait^ <~>acLctu ar ^tuttJi^ 



Chairman: 

Dr. E. SYDNEY MORRIS, 
Dept. of Public Health, 
52 Bridge St., Sydney. 

Secretaries: 

GLADYS ARMSTRONG, 
20 Redan St., 
Mosman, N.S.W. 

DAVID W. ALLEN, 
"Merrimac," Kent St., 
Epping, N.S.W. 



ff^CeUej: C^( 



antntLiiee 



itti 



SYDNEY 




Dr. Frik Cassel, 

S 39836. 

No. 2 Internment Camp, 

VICTO:^IA. 



.2Qtia-Apr-ll-y--lj9-42-.- 

jt^, 5-,/^. ISH, 




m^ 



Dear Dr. O'^a^aql 

In reply to your letter of March 27tli — we Iiave aiade enquiries 
about the deata of your sreat-uncle >lr. Ludwig Brück - and have 
ascertained the followinc^j particulars. 

Dieiä 14t h August, 1915 

Buried St. T homas' Cemetary, 2nfield on Iota August, 1915 

Minister who p«p^"©»ffte4-^kö- conducted the burial Service 
A. C. Ivloseley. Ghurch of England. 

Ludv/ig Herman Brück, was a Surgical Instruoient Maker, and v/as 
aged 66 years when he died» He was born in Silesia, G-ermany and had 
been ii this country bout 40 years. 

He was married at about the a£,e of 40 years to Smmeline S:nyth 
at G-lebe Point, Sydney and zhere wero no children. 

II e interviev/ed the Sex':on at the Cemetery and wore told tnat, 
until about six ye-ars ago the sum of 30/- per year had been paid for 
the uokeep of the grave. Also until about the saaie tizie s frail 
little old lad^ visited to ^S^^ave regularly. The Sexton did not know 
if she w-'.^^ the wife -- nor '.f a.xc aas since died. 



We enclose .erewith, tvro photo^raphs oT tn 
that it is in ood condition. 






Me, whic.i c .ow 



Hopins these particulars will be a co.nfort to you. 



Yourc sincerely 



c. 



n-- 



d 



'litn/ 



*^?W/ / i 05^6 , 






■*kt- 




M^ n^^ im. 






p^ iV ü^ jMnf;^ /mIU A4 i i^IL^t^M^ 




J JUl 



^ Mui 



rf 



- AA^t' m 



l^JUiAf 



vQJkU^ 



^^ 



Ai^tin^ Jttf JuclnUo 



y^ ISIS, t ^ l JL JU A y Wf JUU 

Mm . •^^ . . #.. ' . . MW . I 



Am/ 4714^ jJ Jl^ jtt/h^44vU44 MiJii/, 



H4^ 



A 



44 /HK' 



^^'tn/^ 



<4<*i^ 



.^rMMimv^ . /*»»» /wi^ Ju^4 Mf, 






Ai 



7 



/Ätv A^üuto. fn^4^ m^nki Mv A/(M>'C>/ntt/ . 



yfyvuj JL^MJmJu^ 



4. <iXik fJuu^. 





c 






n- 




Juifi 



ß^. JöitJjL' ^ 



^jtiJOUiAAUr 



t 



tV 



m\. 



A4 




Amy ^H^ UiJt^ di/nt^a, ^ (iu^LMci^ /Jll ni4>o AleUfJt4 . 



/k^^Hf 



jA^ujZy, 



J aLM k mJcLI Ar liJew /kauy Ary^/ ^tu^ aJL 



AMl/' 



%^ aJUIkJJh /iuJL^ 



\Jla444/y, 



Tt»^' Jr. RÜ Ka^^l, hUmtc-^.\Zi58i6, miUn Tod Office , Jfc.;^ Jnttrru- 





Co 



n- 



AiiStralta.. 



Hut jTo.: /8 , Caw* ifo.: S , Ea?/ern CiinmarwL, 



£ju^^l u.tr. 



otv 



M fLr. 36 IZ JifO. 



M**, Ar M^ ^^ 4Wv L um/ i^U„^ AiJi 



lt/h*vHitry 



jff^ -LMlJL, 



Jt. «Ji^ «JtOO*«/, 






f 



Box 1591 B G P.O. SYDNEV 

TELEPHONE NOM24I3 

CABLE ADDRESS "ITBIS' SYDNEY. 



In ßiture coivespouriencp on 
Ulis subjerT ü/easp auote 
RefNo. 36 12/40 • 












<V.' 



25th November, 1940. 



Dr.Pritz Kassel, 

No* iü, 35028, 

Compound T, Hut 18, 

i^o. 7 Camp, Kastern Gommand, 

AUSTHALIA. 






^M 




Dear Sir, 

Heferrin£' to your letter of the 22nd Septer^ber 
last, requept-uv: to be furnished with Information concerning; 
the wher^abouts of your ^and-aunt, Mrs. Brück, nee Smith, I höve 
to inform you ^hat I am in receipt of a communication from the 
Police Departrüent intimatini; that the person referr'=»d to is now 
Mrs.IiI'ijneline 3radly. She resides at No.33 Roberts Street, 
Strathfield, New South aies, but at the present time her 
condition of h^alth is very low and her memory has failed as a 
result of a stroke. 



Yours faithfully, 




Town Clerk. 




•> 



c 



^ 



To •■ The AiminUtitLn Trc,n'Ilr.Trilz]i3i^$el,httrmc'Jf,.:E3Sm\ 

Tke CUcIi cj H^^Uni Cetncterj d ^iHef,Hd Jf^.W, Ca,»t^Jf..: J, Sofern Ö^maJ 

Sydney 









-^ Jli^ 4^ X4L/ Ar muL JutA4Ad Mud 



IJI^ Om^ A4 ^ 4L 

J Miw /IWM AviMi<ncö Ar Auui^ iU JInMAtJi' sJJjui^ 



IL. 

M4I 4t ^ JUUt XxuJL 



ii/'4^ny 



\l6Ui4l Mit, 
J Auul aUt aI mjy av kmJUty Igu >W l^ 

A<K^rH/Hi*ii^*^ Air flduAW J m^ My httuiy%y >y^H< 



Box 1591 B G P.O.SYDNEY 
TELEPHONE NOM24I3 
CABLE ADDRESS "iTBIS" SYDNEY. 






In fuliire convsponJenc^ on 
this suhjecl please auote 
RefNo. 3612/40. 





^u^/ma: N.S.W. 



Dr. Fritz Kassel, ITü. ii.35ü28, 
Jjiapound I, Hir^ ±5, 

No. 7 Jai^p, .ilöstorn Coüjnand, 



17 ^a Jotüber, 1940. 



Jjear 3ir, 

let^er gf tuH 22rid ulti/..j, reque^f - -j be furni?h6d%vlth 
informa-.ion c.;noerni:, ..- "u^t -ü:.juts of your ^ i' «nd ~8-ant 
Lr^.Bruc^:, nee 3L.xzti, :>uu iii roply to inforn. ^^ou znaz .i oipy 
of your lü^te^ iias beeu for.'aroe^ Vae CoLorniss ioner of 

Police asking- if he v/ould inntituT,^ enquii'ie? . 

I vnlll advise you at a lat.er date v:h'-ther 
sny inf^rii.ation is üb^ained ^f Lars .BraeJ-. 



V 



üur 



"iifullv. 




c 



n 



From. Dr. Tri^ Ka-ö^el , 
Kr. E 35 028. 



Co»tbOU>t<i I 



Kr. 7 Camp , Erstem Cdwwaml, 



ncL 




^btchiter -U , IdhO . 




nrt. JSrucIf nee ^mi^ at ^yci»iey. 



/f/r 



•»Ä. t^ VLoi^. 



i$/tJiAMAAL - Slui IS7 (?J . 




AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

1 5 West 1 6th Street 
New York, NY 10011 

Phorie: (212)744-6400 

Fax:(212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Data: 12/21/2009 



Sys#: 000198685 



Box: 2 



Folder: 7 



Hajc MeverJruclc 

jei. m Ttahkeiisbin. in $^ihsieri 



WO mit 



Tel ix Briccff 




Clara, ^uck jeL.IBruik, 
^eh. 8.T^3rnfif mi Hirschh&j inRiesemeLi 
3est. il. April /33t Fnrikhstßin. in^ädlesien. 






Harjartefe 



S/rlcJe Clara. 



--^. 



Ilse Gdtllehe^ 



FcrAcÜAt |30o mii 



fhcxtu 



nz 






r 



I z 



' ' /'^ j 9 /. — A — /^ 















77 



ir 



I 









3^fe^.J|®6ßrah(|t 



tarn, wofaiofc; ^i"" ~ "'''' ^" ' "''^ ' 




Yf^ScthstV: 



VSft 



^r 



r 



Kt^«^ric^> 



/ 



Alfetta GoLÄ^tsin- 




5v 



^ ^ Ml 11 ) 

ElisafceÖi. TraHcotA» GoLci[4?;rL Mariah«^ ■P»,>v.,fl„,-R m-Ak- 



Ose 



ife/IUy Ä<r Säne. q^ fc(.i».|c»(ir Mi:.;r/., ^» ^-. 



ÜIi^wL 



Y 



Ütüi^h, ^EnuZy Har^''n«^?t Ji^ndlS^rMo -P^r 



1 



»1 



a *• VI 



tiax Hey erdrück 
<{ eh. m Ttankeii^JY). in $c^sien 



3e$t Ttkußir /^JfenJt^nsfein-iTi/ScÜeÄeA^ 



WO mit 




Clara 3fi6cjc j^.3ndt, 



7 



Ilse G(äliet)e^ 



( \ l 3 '^ 

Telix Briuk tUsMk JoWua Alfrei Brück Margarete Qskar 3fH«^ 3r«)io 3rtttk H/f Icie Clara. 

_geL. mi TfaiJöSBsleirv jeb-«.Ar3 TtoJjö^.«-, ^e-bjÄTsFankfeKölöTu, 3et. /Sf J^anlfe nsfe/n- J*tf« Tr4nfenatei»t. S^^^ "•^■«?' l^a^feÄS«^ lÄ/ßlÖSVrrahtensfe^. 5^ /^^i WflJranfe 
OaJi'e ^TM^ lelotetien'jg^coh ^»tfi^lSssI i^lsr^W RiTiz Sie(fFri«i GqI^^tl i) iTdcih. Feiger, C^Zaere Is^ef MröiksmßhUjCöh&n. }<airl G^pert 

T^ , r , V. , S^rbSckliMUl^llrT ,^ , ifiml- Indium iJ^York^ ^eScJl^ri e^^"» 







Soll un. hrjfnthftk Za^en..' 
^ } 



( 




f 



JÜH 



1 Z I' I 



ik^ 



I Kini 



I 






7? 




a 



3 KiTxi 






3 



/ 




I 



ir 



A 



I 



1 



^ 



rer^ayit aou/8KmD J^J^eaeonsfidi-ja«, J)r, Jwiolf Jrt-iW/k Juliane :^ijß$fil 

^ .A _ ^ A.^ ^ 







^if>,^imMwtl: llÜjClay- 






^ 



"V 



I 



ArlelU GoI<islön. . 'ElxsMh. ^^a^^5o^6e GoWsfein. jaan^nnö Xireitb 
jÄ, KewiUy Ar ^äne, o^, 1^,1^,19^ ^iUv iur Mut. jeb 133 ireö^H', 






Liüisiv Ehuly Hart-fnsftTt, Jl«vwi3r(tnö 3^ 



1 



H 



jeb. y. 1^. mo Nd^To*-. i^i. /£»<J. uVt i^fet,/ 




3.n.n 



\ 



. frttz fUs^ 



a.n 



II.A^rtl /W8 



sei, )iel{3 0i^,/-)^e. 



.V. '<.,., /M 
AX- ■ " 



••liSiS^i^s^fe:^ 



vT " ,« 



:r;- 




1 



w 

I 



Max: Me^er3ruck verekdM 

^ n-l-1S ßest Fthtu^r 1838 Jhf^i^in in ^eä^^ 



>4»-Mita 




Clara JBrMck ^^.^ru^, 

ßest. V. April /9$t Fmnl^iisbiit ui^ks^ru 



c£ 



^ 



i 



l 3 ^ S 6 7 ^ 

irud( iMsi^tk ]oWna AljM. :hmk Magartefe Oskar 3fH«ic 3nüio 3tu^ Elfieie. Clara. IUe^(5cüIieLe. 

Hahksttcleift jeB«.A73 ]lajJj0>3|fe.n.,^elJ,"^anfeN5lein., jet. iÄf Prahlrens fei'n- J*wr 7r4)ifeMaieiA, ^et li-<5.JS!/ 3^e^sfeÄ.^^^/0,fä9'^7^a},W^^•, jefc /|pt<i Wölrantersfeti 

//• 1300 mit VfeKWi<JJ:a»jii3.i:/ß3ttt yer^ai: mit verfielt Tnii: V^fUdl mit yirä<,duU lU mn^\»r4,di^ B^iifm^Jfet^ 

tit^."^''^ (^S)&3ei >JartW Hinz %fri«i Gplcl5le.'?t ^^f^/^'^/^^örr'"'' CTlaere le^er 4r«Ka»niQi(jae/v i^t G^^rt*^ 



r 







r 



I 



WS W3erliw,W.^,JSWfl«)Jain.Aein<&£(aoc53 



r i /7 







öen^i^^ 






I 



.0 




-^ 




I 



V 



I 



1 










UZ.e 



IfeifeL 








I Küti 



i.ifl?!<ic 






I 



- ^elf CurthtMMfi 



^r 






^ 



.-Äew Yorlr, /Iven «e, ÄiwX 5^ JlwÄrJr 






^c3Ä-/>/ CV.'Im ^■o^-fl 1^, 




I 



Liüian. Exiity H3rl:'>nan)t, Jlan«L3rnnö 3|rry 



1 



i %> 



1 






J\... 



^^ 



-iW^ 



>rtif 



t 









■ i'T-» • ,*5r^'>' 



fXdLic Meyer -Brück 
<\ 'eh\ m T^ankeiisteiYu in Neuesten 

ßest Fehni^r IS38 fknifetideirt in besten. 



WO mit 



Clara 3ri6cfc jdy.^mk, 

gel). 8. Tobrn^r (351 Hirsdihet^ 



r 




I 



7 



fellx BrvJt TMsiyetk yhaina. 



TrsBiker^S^ 






Alfr«i Brück Marjaföfe Q3kar3rHc^ :Boöio3r«cIf Elflsi&Clam^ rUe Goltliefee- 

^A, W "RajJ(86stei)i. jefc.«.<J.73 TiajO^eirL, ^^.imJfsn}^>S^n.. jet. /«f PrawJfensfei'n- J*M« 7r4nJ(fenstei 
3«et:. |S3<J -??^^in• 

rn-tiielÄt 1300 mit vacnw^aja^jj.j, («ß üu yereMicWT mu VQ^faeiidJ; -mit verefretKW: nuZ meh-d-u^ /0,6 WC^Miif \wWidU: |W?fzi^«|(^^tYei^^ 

T>' 7 r ^ « V. T Wohnort: S:WI<iw Vi -Ba-Zirv 

ilmacrlos, ^ Jf Inder hijWe)i«?«irafraa3& Jö --^-i . 



r 




femfej 



I KiTli 



ji 



I Z \f \ 




_> 



_, - , . . inKIi:BerIi^w ITÖ /Ä oü, . /i„ f- ' , , - 



I 





I 



>. 




IW^T^r^frewiöJi^ flUI^Tltai*^^ W tWife^, 3^ ISöif- TfehJr^Äsiew. oet ffi«-if(vku. ßeix IH /90ft?f?ihksfehi 




6 

fh iS 1886 hranik "*' ^j%f''' |ffi Joiievs^J 3i>j^K. 



ItKsiim. p*^ • jab , 19/3 -^Bre^n 



sli 



4^ 



rinbjfam. Wohnort' 



KvrrdßT 









iW^ 



JRjjieiio^, 






4)5.M *^' 



I 






^( 



EliaafceÜT. rrat-Koi^e GaUJsiüTL xlarl^nn-e ßnsiiB 



^ 



//, 



) 



1 



ÜücJii^ ^eb. US? Ol. 

4 



\ 



T 7 ' 



T 



Frttz JUs^e 



1 ^eloj-i^fAc^e- 



:v/ 



'■^■«T. 






■>. . ^ ^ ■ • ■'•II 



*« 



■"-.<■■ 



-?^^ 



ii«!ir;r' 



■~.i4-^^ 






/ 



j eh, m rrahkenskiY). in Schlesien .^ 
S J/QSnier 



( ] I ] 

felixBrucJc Iliatetk JoWna Alfki Brück H 



Clara J5rMcJc jeJ[>.3rMck, 

3est. H.J^il PJl Fwjitewfeitt in. Plegien, 





nsfe 




7 ^ ^ \ 

Elfieie. Qam^ Ilse Gi^Kdbe. 






1 , ■V'^'|f'-***6-BruciC ^1 t- 1 i/^r-/^7 I. W6^^lö^^. Jrtosfcif /ijreiw.-vl Tul^jLfi^: 



fU( 



von. niiötamiMr. '^ y 



r 



5*' 







I 



y? 





ort'' <^7aaiftrt7»ah>iKU:Be 

3 Xlnder / l^rxi 
A 



I -j'H««, ^^vj rivwjf I »^-»w. 

•SÄ UV ^)ife(«ö». Zaiben,' 



i 















I-ÖiAcrt«' 



^^^jH^Hhi IMeS. 



r: 



J^biiUtLofi, 



I 



'1 






5 Kiruier 



I Kuii 



X XtJi<i£r KhieflöiS 



^Kijiier 



~1 



.A. 



(joa^iörv EliiateÖi. rrjwcoifie GoÜsfein. i1art4hrj.e'Brbil:lar^L. !S»tfcfer ?ela tt^-^w 



I 3mAt J] ^ ) ////.w,^t,^}^r~ 



n^ 






f^ r« 






7 



^"^'^/z. mt'^y ^ ^^^ 3^ '^'^ W; Hacil^ ^f ^ne. jet 1933 £r«3l:^>p, 



■f 






/ 41 




a,«.n 









'*'*■' "^JV "•■'^- •■■:•■ ^-' "'-•■■•■ /■ ,.■ ■■ '. •■,-;- 

.. ;■ • "■ .T**',.i ' ■' '' "*" ,;■*',"■: ;'■■ . ■ ■■♦. :■ 



-':^C.:'^^^.-^: 



m 






1 ; . jM, 



t\ax Meyer 3ruck 
j eV /8W Tranken^iYu in $diesien 



Verehdidil: 
WO mit 







( — \ 1 . . - - 
















f 



Kajpti^JCaAGwf} JTil» i&asi, 






I 

3tiia3r«ci: 



TP 



3 Kinier 






a '^^l^^'i^i^^ 




^( 








-t; 



3«t ^.5" /«<? %ahdi. 



ft 





I ^ 3 »1 I i| I 




1 



ü 




=Sixi8; £i<flani, Ipywlarwl, TC^cr^Q ft 






Y^dUrbsn^, 




]^bnittlt4^ 



I 



^K 

t 



[Yen <^e, >BötX S Jlw)&rif 



/ Ki/ii 



D^hr KW*tlo(S ^^'^- ^Kijuier 



^r 




/rletU GSji^n. . ElisaiÄ^ Traj^ciöe ^^sfcrsTi J^ari^hn.© Bmiii^r^K, 



^ 



K 



I 



aarV • 



\ 



I KinÄ: 
üeltM, ie»u)ra -^Lc<:fr , 







T 




ci^nn 



je^t. /6.//. n'^V- RirmiHj'hsin: . 






■/"•'■ 
' 1. 



. •^.-'.''M't- 












"»r t^ M? 



; 



Max Me^er3ruc'k verv^efat 

jeb, /8^ Ttanken^iYu in Schlesien. ^^^ ^ 

ßest TthtMr IS3S Jkni(enslei7linß^esm^' 




Clara 3rMcfc jefc.3ndt, 






( i I 3 



6 7 ' a \ 



'■iim)f:ivbiH.i9eitdidl 0(W ;^ 






ZN. 



ÄÄTiorl: • Berlin.- ■K'eä<iii,j,göl. ZI. ß. jÄ^ Jt^nifin^tt. ^h, JromW Jfeww fet . 



Elffiedt 



}1üfi$kti 



ISinierloS , 



( 




r 



T1-. V.>^/1ok OnlJOTtl—U-J-.x. -JjliOM ■M71-_ 



77 




Jiai W Berlin. |S07 ^}a»v Aenu» BmücSa JfoehüjsivÄ^ sju. ou /JrfenD^a». iö>en,, 

Innert! Ärlln. Kß". T«tK2w Yorjr , ioT jeScffele-Jr^** ' ^"^ 

" iri — 1 



■^ 




I 





^VCSm^i 




tmws »i^rJlfVcig i r üsnbi 



^itI?ei'cU^g.)feite, Melbourne- S^Klck^.tfolnörl'/fK(Ey WJ,n 



\ 







^ _ ^ 



iL 



I ^ 3 

au, Kü./ürt MIO? 9lcny- ^ ^^^^• 






Jern/:arl J'rw.^^^^ /f^^;'' 



w^v- asBSsa^M'Ä'lfö^kM' ' ^^"^ ' ^^riii,:,^:^^^'- 




dffüViiif vü^ 




Khierlo^ 



TÄil! ' 



Z Kader 



If i If.M^^ 




I 



Lli^do^iJ^ 



^ 



^ 



-Rl 



■^^k 



^r 



^?»e, jet I3«28 irfiÖ^tti'. 




3?«^k ^taih-^v, ^^»^ ?^i . 



^^^•^ ^; /5.rSr.v ^iXir.^^' '^^^-^^^ 



LA^K, 



/^y 



il 



I ^.'J^f. 1 1 I Mary I 







1 




a,n.n 



T^iU Kassel, rtelto/crvc^e. 









;iU9t^ce 



';> 



v ; .,r--^ • 



JfT^ü^?'^.' f ' •'^ *T ■■' '"."" 



*•"•;: 



\ 




/ 



ilax: Meyer 3ruclc 

^eh. m Tranken$biYu in $cUesien 



ßest TthtiißV f^Jfejvkensiein.fTi/ScÜeÄen' 



WO mit 



Clara 3rta:k jet.^rwcfc^ 



) 



( i 

Telix BrufJc 




<9 



\ 



tUs.WK>Wua AlfreiBrid. Mar^ar^fe Qakar^rn^ 3rU,«Jru4r H|f^ Clara. Ibe Goöiiefc. 



fU^i.. «^e^feru. c,et/Ä5^VHJ^en5fein.J4>«8JTr.„Jc^..3etMe^^e^^Jel. 



Vfl-Ael.rfJ: 1900 mit Vfe«Wi<}>ta«l^3.£|S23z.u ye^icÜTnilT \rä^,at ynit y^4f>l!di mit Ver^eli^ i^ /^Ö/W-verAelic)^^ «Wz^„)(WlütYe^ 



von, BiftftcihvÄer, -' 




(^Zaere -Ls^ 



;3e[ ÜartW Bi'nz Siöffrieci Gol^I^lein. l) ^<3üih. Feiger, 

' i)Elfrie<ieJBruck 

Koslner^l-ra^SeS, vd.Z£.B3S'^hf>^'ti. osisl:. J. /, /f55 JBerlin^' gest. B3t3ie;slsi 



iH, 



, iTTr 1 ooli T^ Awl ; ^ "L?07 B>l^7^ am^ A^miVä JB/öüC^ 1 



JuviicrLog , 



^ ](mäer 



f 




r 



KinJ^Aa 



I Z w I 

IK Kä$«I^r.KailG»y?r-ll!;lO«^ 



77 



> 



r 



?riäfc W Berlin. P">7 fi*Jain.AoiMe,£rawc53 






■ite 



5^ t2u hrjthüm&i. leheK 



7? 




l 



ir 



n 


















VferSolbefl., 



3' 






I 



__.„,_ ^.^. ,-.._, . iwjforlr, /lv«i«e,B»x-^iWWr 

-^ 1^-^ 1^ ' 



^r. 



^ 







1 







an-n 



Tritz Ka-SSeL. ^iel.{)Cll(,^)^e•, 



(i 



Ei_k 



I 



■•..^^ 









^ 



r^- V i 









Max Meyer 3ruclc Ver^dÜil: 

5 jAKnier 



Clara 3rwcJc jet.3rMcfc, 

gel). S-Tobm^f IS5I HirsdiLetj imJ?fe5ögeLi 



■ ^ ^ 



/ ] l 3 «^ ^ ^ ' 

wAelifU: 1300 mit yitM<iiami^.S.mtv. yer^nÜ: mit \erdelidit Tnii: V>er4<>lisU mit Yträvdu^ lU I907ft,ityeräi^iiäi ß(^i\inb^^ 

ßs ^ritdcjeliörehen i^cob ( SofMfi^ iSs3iä J^rtlia. Hinz S^h^ GoH^lern. !/ JSiilk ?ei$er, Claere iie,5per J^lraKawj^^ÄtLjCpljen. i^t G^pbert. 

ff . ^^—9 77==^ 5 "^ 5 \{ ^l i( I » 



"vvWmort ' Berlin- 'H'eäfJii.j^gel. II ß. )5^ J^nfeußfelt. 3eb. '^xav^asr^^mn. 5®^ • 



1 ^ 1' I 



I 



GfiWW Jbr>uk 







■J»n 



I® Jo»«Ieyö»^3iw8K.. Gloß. ßijlajul, ^t^lW. " 

^j..^^^, ^KlnJer I Kiwi I JÖJii 



34 ^,S l^ Brahdt 






ttr: 



f 



Ki.)i&tiO^< 



^ I 



^r 



n.5afc<?tk Trancocöe GdJstin Ha Kahne BnsitWK, !E>^fer 3» »y^tii. 
qel), |Ä,ii,i94ff: Nä(iKy Hw ^ve,. 9eh 1939 BrcötaH'. 



^ 





m^ lay H.rbn..>t. Jl.Kui3r... 3^^^^^^^ / 













^ 5 



Clara 3ri^fc jefc.3rwcfe, 



fei IX BrUicJc 



M 



arjare 



fe 



Qskar3rH«^ 3rMno3rucIf Elflcia Qatcu 









Vep^elKÄi mit 



vrAeLAt 1300 mit VfeKWi<il:am^3,£ /Äö z.« yei^icJi: wif V3^i<it 

ÄÄfcr>'^ r^''^^^ ^'^^"^ ^'^^ %frieci GoHsle.V !) Sülh feiger, 

( ^ ~i:^ i'^^ i ^7====^ — 5 TT — ^^ : A 



(itit 



^iJ^lWtüiYeiGUtc^ 



■BrWZcjt^.jijjt 



Cla.ere Iß^et Mvahmßü^Cöhen. &t Oobb^i 



JßsLi «er^tr^sel 




I Z 1^ I 



I 




»JL in. hl^ntl^a^ I^k.' 



^ 





ert, 



I ^ 3 



»I 

i 







A, 












Ysdtahetu. 







ttr 



^ 



^ 







7 



'^P^ivL 



^eh.U^^mo l^ö^Tdr, ieL. 10,6. \S^ l^w 




citin 






Trili Kassel i1el{,o^^>^f 



Max Meyer 3ruclc 

j eh. m Ttahken^iru in ^cÜPsieri 



verlief a/: 

\S70 mit 




lest. HAtfil /aJt Fwnfewfem vii^<Uesiei 



( i i 3 ij:^ S l 7 ^ \ 

wAelAf 1300 mit YfeftWi^aniiJülüöiu yeHWi^W" Vö^idt 7„iJ: v^^UsU mit '' '' 

von. niOKoiiniKer. ~' V 



gast. I93Ö Je^lln. 




KLn(icrIoS , 



»€ i^rtW B/nz %friec[ Gold^V ^ iTdi/fi feiger CTZaere le^er v^lnaKi^Gkn. J^t^Äif*^ 

t — Tr=^- — — — ^— 1 — 1 r^ \ — \r^ I — ^ 

C<ie» . ^ei, 1913 ^eslaii 



h Jf7n<äer 




I Z 



- . , , , . ^. , • - Hiöital, Aniiiriiiiu 

g^6.5/«6ßfah(lfc l®3o.aeyahl3iw8«.. ölte, ß.jla jui, iPnjlaU. pfeicCTf'fr.tj 






?feiWi 



J)Sfeg.;5afeS. Melbourne- 3;i^lck,tfolnor^.-/fe(ZL WAn<rt' ^lüfrChfl') T/akorl -Briwgfcm mnofl:- -ftf^ Q aiiiL 







r 



I 






. , . KInJer 

OtriHtMattritie lil. j 

__ ,A_ 



l Küii 



l JünJ. 




r 



A. 



ffeulUv Sc ^«»e. 



niafceÖi rrawotöe GoUsisiTi J^ariahn-e Bföiic 



Juliarus. J^teJiei 



v^oMw.. 







1 




c^^KYl 



Fr 






iLJhnTiy'^ 






I 



I 

/ 



8 ^y\Knier 



Clara JBrkck jefc.3rMck, 

^efo. d. T^brnfiC 1351 Hirsctiberj im Re^t^i 
ßest. il.Afyril /Sit F^nkksbiii uiMlesieru 






( i I i i; 5" 6 /" 

gast. BBO 3fhliw. J«öt iTi tl7r»h]tm;slei^i|wUtfiWAT I3%tj«dl^«i ^ 8.3,lfe,Ii^m,sUtß^S, i3>tiBerÜTi <ä«pfc<Tt/s:iU5WTiflÄ.|(SwiojB^.^.<t.ÖW'Jfönfe),Jbl^ 
w^elAt 1900 mit VfcRfrUWiJ.f|SÖiu yer^idtvät netMiit -mit V^<^ldt mit W^cliJii: lU /Ä?7W*v«r4ciai: Mzifi^Jt^wW 

6»l»ilwi^'n.. «isfc y././3353Brtin.. gest. I33t-Bi«;sbu, ^Usj, )^)^ Berlin, |5W&>Jam.A«n<ft£R»ix53 Jbenüi.Ua ^^ '^, 



KSslincT^tr^iSei. 



r 




r 








nitÄ/av iabe^u' 






77 



r 



I 



7? 






-A 



^roa^rttJC 



t / ( i~ X 3 

WiviNfilÜlliQSBlotbsirwJir. Ruft. ^ 



"^ 




I 



ir 



I 




1 



lul^a,. Ä, 7&"aÄa JJrlwlS^^ l^^.^n,^ ^U y.^^ 






^rriWi 






Y^rdcrhsth, 



fh 6.S I9S6 Brandt 






läajoxJleVötiBjKfflH.. GUß. ßijlawl, ^igland, 

■,-A- , > — A 



I 



^ 



nu^tii■^^^■ 



,3atX3ilw^ 



^ Kl>»ier 



I 



1 



Y 



1 



«4 



tUilif Sur ^sÄe- ^ 



EliaafceÖi Ifawo^ GoUs!««. Jlari*ftn.e BreiTt 



HJv 







\ 



t1a3C Me^er3rucTc Ver^dM: 



Clara 3r^6clc jefc.3rMdt, 

Sest, y. April /35t FnanteÄ;sfeiR iri^lesieru 



r 



Use GMlehe^ 



i l 3 "^ ^ 6 ' 

TelixBrucJc lUatetk JoWna Alf^i Brut^ Magarefe Qskar^fn«^ 3rU)io3ruck ElflcieClara^ 

gast, toö 3^^lin J^t 2r3.4lTr»n]<^;siei^Wi»tökfeb-l3^haUcJ^^ ^. 8,3.mlMUiimTis^tS^S:S, i3>tiSedin <kprbfft/S:i/J5Wii3Ä}('owoj8st^.l^.BW7r*WM«tela, 

Ottilie ÄiiABl»i«ta -Jacob Si^&sä >fertU Binz Sie>rfri«I GolJsfaV l) Eäcld. Felser, Claere Ie»ef- ArahUitodGJien.ificftGSa<!rl: 



W(*7.ort ■ Berlin.- }vfeäd[(i,j^3«l>. -^i. fö. |Äli Jfenfensfeli. 3et. JrohtWJrociM. fei . 
, ^ - ^ JShsyua 



mticri-oö. 



Z Kincier 





I nitjl 



I Z I' I 



r 






3 Xlwier / ^»o- 



•S»tt. uu Äjedönio». /.dEienJ 



I 



I 



77 



y^ 



n 




I 



ir 



A 



I 



1 



^rt».Sr«tk: 



Cfi^W 3r'<^ ifeJCj<iipn<i'^KUli«iseiottß3ridr, Ruft. M.BrwÄ- t>5uUfö)ri3na,Mt^ Arwune Gi^ert, 






mdi«ll<U30u/8Kl9a>-3^^'^BeseQns^ieW-jaa, Jr, Ji/iolf JrnW/l. Juliane Jöiiiel^ Jtjlfob Ii*ni^Ar^,^ 



Juliane. 5fei^, >lrob J^rfin^r.,mi jÄWaiJc;^ 



^tft 6"5* /<5S6 Bra^th. 






ir 



^ 







ELsatsÖi rra>KoiÄe Gol<i3leiTi Harlan© Bnsiilarhk, %>^^ j«b 153? öi. 






ifeilUy SwT 5«ne. ^, |^.ll^l9^ Heifiüy M ^vc. ^et 13^ Br«siW. 



Anjtlertijt an I', A^rti. /'*Ö 

Fritz ifassel^ üell3oicrn.&, 



ilax: Me^er3rucTc ver^elidil: 

^el, m TrankensbsiYu in $cÜesien ^^^ ^ 

^esh Fdbfk^r IS3S Jkni(ensieL7iin^esief>^ 



Clara 3r«c?c jefe.3rMcfc, 



r 






I l 3 f ^ ^ '^ 

gest. toO Jfe^Iin jest 273- *l7?»»vT«ni6lein.d««rtwtCWifcr 13'Ä,T.aiIJi«sl:. IS'.li.lsjS'Bic^^ait ^ ^•3- Uß'XwttMi.nsfeitaeptvCÄ', iS^lBsrÜn. d^pMertl^.il, mus^Kmoja^.iO. II mTfsnk»^\n. 
wAeüAt 1900 mit yta^'Mtam.^S.im tu Yer^idÜ: mit' ve«Wiclt Tnii: Vw^dWIi nui Ver^düK lU I907nut>/enheliä<t fW2)^ra«J>^ji]^ye,d«Iicit (WbJ^ /jjj^it. . 




VoJmort •■ Berlin.- 'KWili.jget. -«. ß. JSiSi JfiüiJitfusfeit 3615. Jrwnfej^Jron'xx 5«^ , 

Ko3l.»er5tra^se3. ^ei-^S-ßj^lfeiJs^a, asßt s.l,ISi8:s^i^ gest. B3tJie;sfeM. ^jialW ierli«. '""■|Sw&.Jain.Äw«a£«»c53 Joenütei^ÄS 

Äort-- Stfiiliv M-Äflitv ^ , 'WainortiierUn. fe mYoti-.M: Jf^e^eiT^ 



Iüw<IcrtoS, 



^ Xfn^ 








SÄl in. f^ntl^eu leheK 



I 



1 



I ^ 3 , 




21c Reich a1^)fete,WdU<PJe-SI;KlIk,\fo^nort.^^fet(ZL WAno-t* 'Tköfl') T^Uorl ■^irintfgfaw.fflaioft- IQ^Q^ i itj et. (^efr^SlU.Warort- |l£9Clay- 



als Xwi KenioiEw., 



.? KlnJer 



I Kiai 



I JÜJK^ 



KihieflAS ^•^•^- ^KlruJer 



DrJA9iine^fti.^J5»«I, "VÜötiai^vairaJiai 5wr Reifte-, 

3«i» (.S /«?6 Brahih^ I® 3B»JeVe»^ BijwaH. 

Zfi»<feke^. ^ _ A A 

r n — ^: ir"i ^i » 

ArlelU Gdd^lßjn. . HiiafceÖi. Traf^oiöe Gd^isifiTi >larianTie BnsiiWK, ÜbJifer jelx l^ jju 






^ 



■^ 



> 



iMayi ItSj HarbnanTt. Jl«viÄ3rnnö 3ar 



T 



jÄ. NekiUy ä<r 5a»e, ^, i^.ltöj^ NaftßV M Uvc. ^et 1333 Br^ö^JV, 



üfjjla'vi. 



7 



H 



^eb.t(.IM3»-0 |?d?To1f. jet. /ß«. I^H New 




a.n,n 



.fii; 






8 jA^nier 



r 



Clara ^rwcfc jefe^n^fc, 



M, 






cJ» 



-> 



\ 



Q3kar ^fHcJc 3riüio 3ruclf H/flc(ie Clam. Ike GolfKefce. 



Tellx Bru<^ IUäWL JoWna Alfrei BrwcJc 
jcet. toö 3?rllrt J^t »:i %l7?Än]«rii6felhVcicp^^^ C.li.lelS-Bfcsiau, 3^« 8.3.mLieiztm,^7iS^tße^SS, miBerUru d^p:f^l^l^'V3^iiß^Kmojd.^. limited 



^Ai, m Ttehkstt^fcei^v, J€fc.«.<5.r3 ?Ws^e(7t, ^dbjÄTyFanfewsfern., jet. /«f PfanJcen^fefTu J*M^ Tr^wJc^ytöiein, ^efe i/^.tö!' TratTket)^^^ 



'D 



OäiL'e ^rkdc geborenen l^cob 
von- BittlfoihxHi^r, --^ 



^«rAelicU: 1300 mit 7fercWic?J:ami3.5:(«3z.u YerejWidJ: Trat vö^iJid^ TmJ: 

l^Sfii rferLhcu Ifinz Sie?Frieti Gol 

von- IiittlfoihxHi^r, -^ V > / J I 

KXßUner^tro^^ä Qe5t.Z«.ft^/fTib.U4/'ii «o^, ^^ims^i^' gest. »XJie^slau. 



Ver^eltc/tt nui 






ii*. 



V( 



'; 



Jundcrl-os, 



^ Jfi7i<3er 



r 







/'*'*' 



Kih <fe r^o3 

1 ^/^ 






^M^ W^ Berlin. |507Äb]^aw,A«iwe.£ß«x&3 >jrd)eniosLÄS 



ij^^hi^. 



I 









^ 



1 








Vsre^elkrU a0p/S5'.)92D 



ijfieW-:pi«, 






•.al$ fllffi Vtraiirlev. 



.. jSur öelnej ' Jän^ ueerjj/fcodt; pfeifet Höital, A m i m Tf nmr IH*^ t tmhart: 1567 Jjy^am / 



g*b ^.5" i^ Bcahdt 






/ }CU 



I J&nJ. 



A, 



^ 



lWe.tlo(5 



v;s.A. 



^ Kirwier 



I 



) 



"v 









jel), IO16. \9kf bfew 

V^n.ve/eriJjt an II, Ahl 

Yi'.U Kassel^ MelUrKi,' 



1 



1f^ 



\ 



5 i 



V 



( 



\ 



•^' ■■' •^-Tf'^ •■■-■' 




Max Meyer 3ruclc ^.^ ru.!- 

J*fe. m Traike,istsir> in ^Uesien. ^^^^'^ 

- . S y\Knder 



Clara, ^w=k jd>.3rufk, 



Iliatetk JoWna AlfkA Brück 



<9 

Ilse GohÜiefce' 



"^ 



I 

X^^^lein^l7^£^- f^^^ft ^^^'"'^ . Q3kar3rHc^ JBnou> Stuck Elfrici^ Chr^ ilse ^.^e. 

^^''•^^t£i:r^>-^ ?^^&^ i^rtW B..Z %^«lM^.V^^^...Pe.e. eifere 2... mJ^Lm^ 







ZUrJer 





I ZI''! 







I 



<.i 






I 




:Efna3r«cic öiaferdr^-lr J^vU.ptwacmRali^iotlß^rMii' 




etl 







.^ 




J 



/ \ / ^ MI 



1 



> 




*«<n 



•^ jeb.i/. ii.j^o ^wT(^lr. J^' /ötf. I7f^ )k\^ 

Fritz ffSlsSel^ rteltoir-^' 



n 



y^ 



-!^ 




/ 



' •• \ /'"— »"-r 



•^•■■■■Ar;;-" ^'^ '■-'''■ 



^^lii^BliHHI 



<5 Z\Knier 



Clara 3rkc?c jefc.3rMcfe, 
5esh ^JlpfcL /33t Fr^ntetisbin üiMlesieru 



a 



yer^kW: mit ver^i<it TniJ: V^reJelKÜ ml Ver^dWii: \U 1907 U vei^alijU Ä4.<fe«5%wWveieWat (Mbt^ 



'^ I l 3 f i" 6 '^ 

TelixBruxJc lUaletK JoWTia Alfki Bncfc Magat^fe Oskar^rn«^ 3rMno3ru£Jf • ElflcieClam^ 

*. IS7I TMfiSwW jeb.«.A73 Thajjj0^(ife(n., 3e"b,/«7Fl?3nfew5lei7i., jeK /«f IfanJcensfe/Tu j*tf8J 7r4nJ(e^steirt, ^et ll-d-ISSI TraJk&^3^ 

WeheliÄl: 1300 mit y^aM^arn^S. 

JTösli ner jhrasseJ o»)"^ä iQjx-Tli.t--.A- i- «. i ,,«« I7<3?«^- -^j. i»,« t» i 5*arfwt /.5^/9W<n«cfij?»le^WA)iorfi c^yaoofa ermahn W 

/^ I 77^^ : 3 y /v . / ' *: \ I j j 



Clsiore Is^et Mr^mßüi)G}itn. Kitt öSpenf 




]sinierloS. 



Z Kinäer 



( 









7? 





yL_ 







^<3 



ite 



■^ 





t>e6t.Jl.i. mj 




^pn<i:;^IÖiliQSsloitis3rtdr, I^jcÖl H Brück- U-5ul^^ 
l9CÄji«J(feMl«n5el^3|,|o/9lifTflanT(^ ^ ^ ^ 

Dr, Ji^iolf JfnW/i Iwltan^ Äl, J^?ob'S.S^,^fJl Äw32ocJc ^I^aobKsfein.aJp {f„i v^^,^ 



jKati 



3^t ^J |®6 Brah(lt laä 3^y^r^ 31^,^3«./ Gltö. J 

^ KJruier / J^iTii 

^ 






Jfe|iital, .Aniiiii) rinn i |Ti^t^faihort'i507 jfm / ' " '^ ' "■ 



Vfe(3icri)9v. 



'(Äho^^•' /507 Brfam A«<ue . tfsvfcxk S^ 



I JÜjiJ. 



tiUt^-^-^- z Kinier 






^r 




.^ 



^ 






n ' 









"] 



( 



L 







\ 



ff t t n. 

i ^ i f - . -■ 1 






1J, 






/ ii'^i 



r. 







sfm^v% \ 




^'U^ii/vt^ ' »U 



7 



?44^ 









^lA^-vl, 




./, 



^ "1 /_ 



H 



4 



^ '^^ U"^ 



-^-. 



t 



Ä^ /CIä^v^,^ 




^ev tii^UK} dlücjc 



«t>v 









T^U^ 



H^ci^nfwoiO 



^T^( 



i<^. 






(Urr^/UA: 



Tvip-U 






/ 



1 



/Ua . 



/ 



«-»-<? Iv^ *lPf^ 



/ 






I 



tjuk 



^-^ 















/r 



<<!) /«Ka^ -lo3A^i(r 



lv.j 



äA^Jr/f/RL. 






ItAXtC 



^ 



/ 



,•• 



.^ 



,^' 




V^*<^ fo^K-<M^ 




OLi>-CM>( -^(J.^, 






An^^uyLA^^dLj 



y^ 












.■■ ;»iv;.;^.-i_,'. 









n 



Max: Mever3ruclc 

ßeh, m Trarikeiisl^jn' in $cU(?Sien 



Verfiel £kt 
WO mit 







S ^/\ ^nier 



TelixBruJc lUaletL JoWTia Alfrei Britek Har^arefe Qskar^rn«^ 3r«)io3rMclf i:[/riaie CHara. Ike Gcitliel>e. 

5el), 1571 7iaiJ<e»islaft _geB.«.Ä73 ffeTufe^e/^, 3et,;«7yJ?a7J(few5lei7x., jeB, /5Sr FraHifensfe/n- j*«a 7r4nfe»iaieirt, ^eib. M. ISSI ÜfatkehMs^ ^'OM^ ?rah>ensfeft, j^fc i^it ia5ö Ira«Iradci/| 

'''"Äfc^>^^ ^^i^^ ^ri}i^ B.nz Si^Jnei Goli^K ^)Sdiih Feiger. C^ere h^er M^ijüi^ae^ J^.t^!^ti^ 



JM-Ytierlos , 




r 







7? 



y^ 



~i 




ir 



I 



1 



ß/ii V5r^3iü!ife■^; 



I ^ 3 

me^ayvt3aU8^.mD-3^^e3«^f.eW-^, J)r. R^iolf JfnWf^ Jwlta«*. jÄ, jÄ^-S^flZl :Dr,EW3lc?^ '!'^^^'^^*^^'^'^^ «5 

^icRe,cU^^j^fes,mboMme-aKikk,mW.'lk<ilv WAno-t' l^e^yfl^ TÄfchorl •Är»i«jfc,wmn.»f^ IdSjWact. f^..^.mu mmb |IOf Clav- * ^"^ '^'^^'^' 



fh (.5 \SS() Brah(ii. 



ttr 



r 



1 



^r 



Arlel-ta GoÜßiein. . Hi5afc<?tK rri»i5oi6e ^«istin J^ariÄnne BroäWK., J>Afer j^ IG? öu 



/ • n 



1 




^-M^n 






H. ."■ 



•.i^ tt <r<^^aifc^"iy.-^i 






4^ 







• * 5* 

1^ /*' 



^ Ta-^U f4»i, Ku^ pjuU 












•Z iCvilw 



\ 



jK^ Zmj ^ff7 






.^.■;l/^l^■■r.> , f 



iS^F«^-?; -'(/»sT'TJ'*.'^^ 



/ 







^ JU, 






f 









.•^ 






^ 



(f 



r 



«i-^ 
^^^o.^«^ 






^«^ VUd /*.. V^ 







j^ it's ^ Dir 



IHM i^r^ 







Uli' f9¥i 



Uli ' fjij 



//7y - ^¥j 







itrk^ 



iril - ff fr 










\ 







J^ti^nm. UL.hUK t4.iuU- i^^t^La^XjV^ 



/fii 






Ä^^ tu 









/f/j- /fyr 



''K-*'r^^.|>.V.>'?Vj:t^V 






,■ i:"»^ ■; ^:.> 






,V -•, ,•!'■■--'?,•'■•=;'■" 



■•^#i|T?;»'-' 



■■•'■«^': 






■■- ;^-r ■; 'j»')^5^.,i^'w-^^':oj 




AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

15 West 16th Street 
NewYork.NY 10011 

Phone: (212)744-6400 

Fax:(212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Data: 12/21/2009 



Sys#: 000198685 



Box: 2 



Folder: 8 






I . Xtf4^. 



i 



' 


1— 

> 
i' 


■ 


i 




1 1 


■ 


1 1 ^'^ Schi chic. 


■ 


1 '^'^ '' 


■ 


1 1 lirtn^ [Druck 4^ l\^^icL.L. \ 


i 

1 


1 Cx hn.h. li 


■ 


1 






■ 




^ 


C / \ / 


J 


1 




L i 



%\ 




<V/yJLxlllA/Wl€vch^n^ö , 



aUucntl inhi <JiMfU 



I 

l 

3 

10 

II 



VinvJr M4 3ioiii^MHvUiiilfni4 Hiim^/tM- If 






. JtV iiiViijt'l' 'Ji'iitA/ 
J»^ $m' ff. XX VMtJt 4hhI jLitM ■JUittl 30 



IS 
IS 
W 

17 
13 



Ju-tJc At0 Jtny fliJftllfm' 

3j h JULm^'^^uMmI 



hl 

hl 

50 
51 

57 

n 

86 

SZ 
SH 

6$ 

S8 

S9 
30 
103 

106 








106 
109 

III 

1(1- 

us- 
us 

MS 

in 

113 
115- 
116 
US 

m 

138 

m 

m 

m 
ISO 



aid^ 



l 










m 

131 

m 

ISS 

m 

«7 

m 

100 

ioit 




'^Jm 




-/- 




Abt Jm tvnt Awi/nt qJA-cuU- (u'tuMuiiiJj . 



M^ %jJirJi^€huiAt^ /dl tili ii'iivkviU n^ithyv' l>Hi, ikiULm/UlfiA- 






du 



f 






'■l^l 



■iUkiV A/rruL /}'M^dt 



yi 



m-»^ 



^inapyyvf' 






lyyi/ . dci/i JvULP Soidr dvi jtumin^' 



S- fuilh AllKÖl 'LkkuyM' 




mw i^v l . du Jüh m 



A}V 






J 



Ui/ 



vi Anni/ 
Jt K 



\ 



il^lnv If/iJ^ .C>it)lnlLukvy Wn4ciihr'^ Juli' ily^t QUhiyQA' 
\ l^m^.^JixM v^/ ^tiiryUhxk Auk Myvl /d^4A /iH^n lOOO 
i <vtflhv\ Ji'i AldtUiy" ,iyyki Anl^miü/}^ jt^mihji^ Att^ 



Z Ih 



^ / r 



^ ß 



X^ci;, \yy^Xiyy\ 



KfLCU^fU . 



it MMn- 






1 



l- 



jiidkdvU^ ^tUiciiiA/ m\.' ^Itihiim' fnJoU^ /f^tntn^ m^ 

<ihyv' üiAii^ !l3D 4w^ /W M^Uv^vyyyit luü^^4<ll 




7 -^ ,1- --'7ri, 




/.i^y 









^ MP '{avUi /h'Wl 

lUuUuyy^ mliw .^^^^ 'JftMy^ Aii^ MnV /huiU .JL 
/.^^/ (i.Ht^r.J- /jiii^triiri/ di4ui^lJi4t :n^^^o^t.vV /3^:: . 






4^1 



- J - 






A 



M 



'/ft4^./ 



/f/Z- 



^ /i 

y "ff 



nd 'uAnki'y f /)fVtlvyv /^ /Viyi'' Miivt^'V "^-^-nivV (jUMrlLt-l^ 



^AU/yH/ At/umvnr mimt- j /hfUn.dk' AUi äu^y \.AihjLik'ff>u}^]i- 
,kmi^ l^ /inid VfUim /^irni^ lyf{vyvo.m niaai i/jfxiUy\ }if^ 



Avd ^'yy^tiiV <iM^f Mfii n^A^ ^'jn dl\ JUclr Asit^htny :d , Sil 



'li. Am LHft)/ 'Vfry Ik J^UAiyy^. U /h\v\ai £yJ- 



i'l/ 



hwiMnd dn /Jkih JtL Ki\J:il ietlil Jü4d 

I 
iOiÄv^CK^vn" /lyyv^ W^U^ AiOniv lllihvi^ ^H't/j/' , dii . '^y^ 

/Oii^cyu /i/i'^i lU^Jt'jnvrn^tV Mniih^yy ä^hOv .nie^iy /dtry' ^,4(1" 



(jii^diU Sj^hi ^Xcvlil' 



ij 



-k' 



Aiükl. ^L[.i-ut dnkl' i Xj/sI^ kLlt^ dt n^huiJic 



V. 



i\m/ 



My im/ ^jkn^/kiJk^ da mlfe^ l^^^indcxh .d.t vnl- 



Uvn' iklLtl mPi^il U,-l^dnlk^ ^M n-id^Ly Mdv- 
ML/- A^A Jdll Mnd AHa^xC^ AiiUn luxt jth>PU 

W 1*.'^.' . Mirl^^f- m v Jm- Z^:vl( ^if- ISI5' A*J. Idd 

et- JA iJ ( 



'J-ii 



üMaIIi 






/]n:\du/i^ 4nv ; iah II lK\di/ .f>^lyY<kMkyy'' l^d 






-5- 






Ui/l^nA. 



%inhv^ mo 4ln fi/^e iSlh ^'m^hI JhUI <S^dtl 



/ITyi^ 



ClMyy Hi'fXi'14'V MM Alyiioft jtoivuJiV /HIHh^ du 









Ali da liidtwOjyH^ AtU^vi4/ aOiit^^u>ydjJiui 4'nHmti^ 

J^yrvU. ^hih^' id iOi^ yUiyyddtufl ^TV dui V^iMK di-^ 



xidiAilXH^dUi^yi Ifflith cm- Aipd^ d]4/]^ didvJv<Kvidu^: 

MiiA^V AiM Ah4H^ Äf^kuw; 



Am^ /iil /JiHyy liLUt^i^^/ll ,nvd d^l j^ihrwid^CllH'iV 

LI ' I 



y 



d^t duyvCl^thji f vV, IP- /Ln^^rM\ 13 3S /h^U Andy 

^üvt/ldwi detirtl' \j\(kj^€p dioj- /ÖIImi ^i>it Jifdiv Ajadi'V' 



t7/ 



t^4##^. J'-it ^MiviuUn^ %^Hvy4 






\ 



1! 



Q.'Uuin v.'.(^ ^<^t< fei 



lUi 



i 



^- 



mÄi JlikMi^ ^ M't /:m\' /^V iinV '^^uJicill^ ,fx^ 'i^f; 
\^M /(/jj i^Oikv-\r *Ja<ifU- , Ml //^^aAi'^^ i'^^^ifik^ ^.Ji^ 






J - ^' 



A^t-L^ Jmh^ ^UUi/ S'iM.L >: uLh^y'^ d!J ;>:-t 
I (f 



yy ^l 



ßM^fkrf^ 



^y JllJ ^iHr^^n mJi,^, .<V .>,JfU '{n.UnJJ^'^<'''^ 



ft% <J >h:jik .AÜi^nW ^tKO,„wt^y Atdn A^t^' And W-if- 
.kalt (.:,< SC^...^ k ^U,:k .y Sju^.. hJi^ 



vv^ 




n 



-7- 

Aniyf MMuLuHii^i/ ^d Aki-.M^dvi/y\'' 'C'f^-h'^W /'^j^PilkiV /hwil-tHf " 

Ai4^4^v ^lUuJpi^ AnoLfUt ^moiAV Jü hMv/ Ji^nk' und 

l i i 

^h4iA IjCau^ /mdii' ^ /Ht my^^ dem/ lUh dvi' ^^UiinKlH^ 

^t^ama <>^tdiV AitkoiiM ovhhdi-, ^(Zk ii u!a^!il ^ dti m^v 

M/yiöHlM Z\\ ^O-MvV '' ,, mV Ai.f^l dt IIa i dilM.^ ^Hhl diiiV^ 

Mt^M ^^^yjtJiiLi. ^>r dii4^ ^A^' , W da it^i, dCt 

.kn^hi ^Oil.n'tiuvAiii!^ And dtwy Jkho^yyydtAv ^(wiiivi^'itfy Jn - 
.fi^dii^ ;r^ dti^ ffli)lid^yyvM du /dxyr^Ju^n^ <\tdmz>Cix^d(U . 






V? 




'v^ 



Vi / / ^ 

i 



/yhiAHCrv 



-8- 



i 



" 



-3 - 



.dun/ /jgy/ifH .viPifuHi^tiii^lUik^y nyni . i^ Mc\A/ dvi-j Ali 

y\vni ilu vAjii/ii/'^ LH tili Uu /VVnJi ^llAoi^^''Al,yi .■V^/f;;;,^ 
<ie^m4i,i . x.^^ tut li'thU'iHV ifiimynt^ ^^Ui^iSmJ- m,i^. 

itt li^.ihvi^ ^riay /T/icm ^ih/ (^hfl./imtixf/ '>v> .<^i/ 










ivi/^ 







ünf M^ CU^Akiiik^, lyU .ifyVJA^y" /yyiAn LUm-u /^^i^, 



k:ky.w /hvO^ /iAn^^i^ AlJii^ dojo ^.^) 'i^CffLtJi '^y^ 

/UiJ. Uli Ii^iM 



I 



^t A-H-' ielhu'H'^ Vi 



>;/ Myn/ AlfillJyl^ 




y 'VAA-ii .(k4 A^^di^kkn- S.J^. ^%l^^. ^M,Jl 



1^^?/ ^MyhV 



^•^^ AAw 






Ri'^^Jtii/v 



\AUri U VV AhM'^ 1 1^^^ 



/ / f) ff öl ^^'^^'^'^^^^f*^y ^^» I 

Ami m\hidt^ ^ ivA^ikv.^ ,Ui .^ J^^, Jf^ii^t 4^U Mit 

H4 ^ ilOi^Hif '^Ha^ftl Jtn^A.y /)Jlkn/ Su^ji ffli^ÄJi ^hiJi 



Mmi^ (JJny ^n- -W ^Hu{Ia^ jtnrmyniyy Aynd /lii^^^ fJk- 
.ti^k^iMuyyi^Mi MvlI ^ftdil lifikH /HmA^ ^t^^i <^Utf /Phtd^ 

Av^ Mi^- AynPl A^ /^MM ^h-ni /}H:HÄt' ^iHy^ai^ktll /htrit' 









'Vjpv 



mk^ Aiimk 



A\' MOi 



<il <iSh^vHi,yu<3U 



Ayh4r fhA'iti' u^mM t^v jfiH^ydu]/^, 



^yyy AmV A\yyV 4i>.''v /i^^ 



'\^ Jit^ 



i 






i 



WKCH^nk* 



-10- "11 - 







yfi^uliA /h^-yyy <iJ4/MHHldil fiiHku^ <^4t^ik 






I ' 



't) 



OiJJ di c 






Jta h^tUn- 






I 

AHid- i'tifvilitU ^Mt- ^ A<{uJt Vuh-yyv^ Ai^uV. 4m>/ /nM 

I 






^jt^Mn/A fHi^n 



,1 



VlOt^-Ju^/li/ 



yyy ["il 



'y/ C 



't^lj/rl/iOi^f' 



I 



Ann JMa^,v^/>z^V JUilUoJl 4ni ^^^04: J^' /).a<li/ 
t^ kiiüwv' dUluv^ yO^Mtk M.J[ /^yyy,' /j^iiM^^y^ 



/fli\\>^ 'Celf /y*y ^ih^JiUyviUn). 



^lidA/vy, 












n 



C 









Mf ^Un^ M. '^Itii " 



sA^JaaV yJkik -dciitV .IWiUi^ 4U /UiL '^n^ll .//^. «J-V 



$f^ 



AnJ-H^ .iJA4^yy ^JfplV 3C0O Jujjy^j^it, JWt/l/ /%// /^ Jt'c 

I J 

'^Ini Jmiu^ Mißv ^1 fikK ^^'^ ütui M^fiOuit^uA Ji^m 



'JldJiiihiU/ /U^yM/iy' M int /Uni 



1 



/f 



iyyy 



'J/h 



M 



Oyyyi*^ 4hA^ ^iiu i» ^ ^-Ml IT^Pta^ljo . Jon jf 



Ut^ j^iHtyy^ 4ucf3^^ /ht 



f 



Uli' 



MiiAH Mik , Ai^f!ii\h Mii' ^tvn Uiu I^S5 duiA 



/i'uU^y 









li^iy 



AAvyyl^yrv mKiy\Ult/y Aviv AUiiHiiUivi/' ^iil MuyJA lUi 



v 



lyy "Lttl MyyilA 'l/'^lhWjfHi, 



/. 



i 



II 



<>*i/ «-ItÄ^vi /tTTH" ^Ui^kinmm^. 



t 



(•k'lAln^ .ti-' '^(^v ntiJj^lthydHi pMiyv" /jtitil-H44^ ili^iit/i 



Aümlw, vf^^nifityl^ M(KrA\kn'' 4it ^J.Hin'' Ahy^ Jii 

Mü:!)U ,(JfyrTvkil XileUifyfi ^'kihrJtOL^ /h.ll ^Hiv Ali 

' ' f 

^(^^kikk JuULi^ dliiJtJ^^ , ^ Au^ ^4^% Hlif^ z?-^«-^^ W 




I / ^ I ' i- 



4i'/vii^ '^ 



^ //; 



i<^i 



Mi k ,Lyu i^dllm.Hi^l %iHf^uJ^ Urlklltn ^ 



1 /T ----- ,,,.,.- 



/M^<Un^ 




'iyy' ?W^ ^^wMhXirv^ Jlvu fU{ /fW W 



Mr^Y 



W 



-13- 

Muli/ /yyy^ 4l^^ ^4^,i^yV. okdiUi^^i/ M^r dtyy^ 9.jlv>yMuV ^n^ 
.fUV Q.Kyyi MyU' MivW '^]l'i^'tJloIyi.ciy 4t?ywy dtViv Mnv '/i^^ 
^fHn^Myyy^ ^'l(M4tl Miiyy^ ^^ y\yyYyt hm/tiV J^nfUmyy^y/' QPt fttvyd- 
]w^ MvUw «^'WmmW^ J^'C i^ipLHyy/ ^Uivt^v .'hv Mh /i-yy^ dtA^ 



C . ( 



Ayyy 



^My iy^.yyydtV M yJi' AHlUt- HirtltV WiHji^y /htU 4ih iJuiy 

mm Mi\ M4- JhJiMniJ n^J/ iU^^t>^ %4>t4iyy Jmd ^U 

At^ /j^y,U<l dld- And jhl ^"^^^^ /VtU^fUyy^. HiUmi /h^^^yy' .^v1^ 
Aim /l^hdi ^fH^4t^,MMyy7)^f AdPitii/ ^idHyyy^ dui4/ ii'l fliUAiintl 



Mu ^HHiiifloityyJri^ .u^kUt^ MUHyV Mnd^ mt 'U(mty^ Ai 



^m^yy". Alt' 



-/^- 



AA/ An4 itlAMry/ A 



fV[ 



M^ //m^ tJ^(tM/ 4iAjr Mn miOt^m^ dil /\}t^MJlk^ 
M^ 4yiy Jm Mi AÖ^ MyyV /fl^W /myy' VM'^.^p<Ah^ /lir^l 

^'Vvi Ävt/ iHii MU^yy^yy m^t^l^UkUl^V -«*</ M^ iiUJll*JHi>U ^ 



-IS- 







l-l.l 



: AcAi^ miM d^ik ^'■^^'Ht Auhfi- IKdeu^f/iH Miiiy ( 4if4lui(u^^it 

/ i // / 



timi^LVi.tUJl9,i'iryy lli'^xvtn/ hiAtry". U Ä%^ 



Ait4l ^HK*fw7*f Alf A^)yJti^ "H^CtH /t*^i/ ^>^t^ ßl^-h^U ^."^ 



f 










hntJ- .1 '^o^^f.„MinU tM' tu ^myyv ^Uj, f^. ^«^ Xjtl ^J Mn^ _ 'HU^U 



J Ak mvn' Aduvy' AV^ Ji Um4^ Jk 'Wk^ MM>ry ^1 %L 



/HZ^' ^'U l/lfH , 



^4/1 



iti^ 



d.y:i ^. 



s\ 



lUniJi AuU ^K mU^ 1f%il i^lUi ^^ne^S44,^ 



t 



moftittfjiry . Kjlmklt 






I 



vi*vyJn^i(^ 4iit\. riJfi^ /(uU ^m 4uU JLilk,»^ 'IMi^. fi^ ^^^^^^^ /j^^ £v^ ^^^^X 



mI Jut vl^ 



'^hy<^ 




JImU 



J ^ 



^7 



■fyy' 



JlnüAlirr 



' i^iin^ 



II 



diMO.Ö' ^-jiaUi'i/' 



\\ 



i 






'hHiy 



I 



UuX^Jtii^ JM/ ÄU' li^^yn-yyyUH yy'. \/i^}^ \'>/.u/h V M- /h^'l M^y 



'. /V' I' ( ■' (/ '' , / 



P i ---.'. - ^ (I l 






-v^ l/Ut^n^ Jü(PC AcUyv dt/u A/fVU dnv^ cw^^ Aiit 
*mmyyi4i/)Hl^ Mail J^uiii^kyyv- /m Alt ofeJt^^^JU' i 



/ 



yy 



-tthii/. \ßu' yU-ült 



UWv4/ ^% 'Ol'Vf m' ÄPyyvCtgry "IaA^ Yf 



7<lA^ <ki4l^n^H>^ ^tA^ /llfUln''. ^' 



AikfiilrJd /Oim mm AÜkn ^itli^y^- ^i^.irVi^p.d /^^^^,M^n^. K^^Mj^t^^ 

n I ^ i 



Jfii 



J 



1 f- V j } 

^ 



V'^lyyv wlli'l . A; 'l^{lLM4A't^hi^4o^i'lnJt^y^ H^-^Mt /i «/ix 



f^k U^*jiJ<Ui/t^ Mo 



n 



.k 







yyyy 



ihi^i^i^fyy' Alt'} /(//>y xn^ tlrh/' 



^^ 



vhfW 



? 



i-h^yv <i jiAtifyyv^i^^ ^M^t M^^L^ynl W^V 'hymt \ liKJ c^^'^ 



/fw 






Aiii^. Sfi 



V vyy 





V. 



dim 'iu'^lvdi/ . '^y /jcrJ- Ai'<^ ^ lio^ikh^ 

( 



X^nct ^ 



Um 



Xiit 



1 



Im/ Mn&i^^tyyMn ff^hvyiJ^ A^" 4 ^i^^ Mdtvv 






r 



JKM anW im/ vi^vtw j^uvJi '\niivv4,lt 44ki y^fiß^ /%ii4lK 



i ihctiU i^ihtih Anxüit 



ilmV Maift ' », .4^ ,f^^ Jyyyvahr]/ /%^nj/ yjuyyu nt^J-tV 4^^^ '- ^M^ /^iw^iL l^y my/ dcin^i.mMyi' .^^' mUiyyy Ail/y k- 



n 



( 



Mint^, 



, 'l/inJ/t'iJt^^i,^ A4 '^'MN 



vfyy Cfv 



Uv ik^rn^ . 



^ 



viJo 



/yr%/ 






'^tM' 



-13- 



M-^ d<^' ^^fklAjXrtk Inryy jfiJui^ ^JtUh^tJ 



Oi^M^ I A ;t/4^ 4\/ 






/W 



k 



JfyyyJ.UM^ 



4H^tn:t^y fj>- U o^Ut /hJ jiLw y^Tt^f fi^A^. , Siid ixJkyy. t ^(viu. 4hn '^^m y^mUuM^ %i,>Jit^ 






Ji 



i^. 







^^^^L ^aJ^. ^%lc ^ Uw ^h.^, Jmm hi^iJU ^V 48^, , :UA ^yrs^lkw It aMv '{mry Mi 






h/yyyyu l/'fMlIViyvdtit /hMVy 






Avv^ 4ktl miyV A<<in^!iA,iUy^ 






fhr 



Wl^yy^ (inl'yy 



im 






/ 



4^ /»i />n 









^ f^^ ^y Ud^^J LmL *^^i<^^ A^A,^ I j. a.,, J,^ ^^, J^^4*^u^ Mtt^ Mt4U 




iJ^JxyJuUMu« 4< i^ie^o jtj CfjJtyr "»«jf/ / / 

^uA Ai ^HyHn/ ioi^Y^ Sui.fl'fift ^(Uh{ ,;,^ d^ 




x.w Ai^i^ Ai^ ^^if^ ^ n^n, ^^^ j^^ ^ ^. yj^Jj^ X.M Au:l X- 






'-^ ^^ ^ß^h^ hy 






M4 h^c^ ^ iXii/»i 



-^c- 






MÜt 



^t ^A n^yni^y i ' ..(Uvf ihr. Vu 






-11' 



M- 









^h 













; 






Crf 4^ ^Ann^ 



' ^ r j 



t 



'-nC 5 



Ufkn^ m ''ikMi^. ,m -uh^mj ,W ,tlil/ jt-yyy^kr^ ^HtL- 



irttuTMM''- liMi^ /ftn<; 'iJiAäJm, 



AiL Äti dii 'i^xücfih-tlin KJUiyetH A\JuM. k m<iit Au 

/r>i#KV ^W^x^rvU^vy ./i^/S^K AJ^Htl^ . fiüf /h-hiUMiy Am! AH^ 
(/ J (;' 

Ami miui^ JJ} 4u m^^'\ii^ -Ccii AuMUfJvt AfikiM 









Mii^^ iyyri', Al^J Uul/'Uf ^ dy^ iiJ^ ^ A^ ^üji^ 4Hi^ ^V /UUr^ Avnfl .%Uy>Jv ^:U ^%Jt üytWikU Ulk ^ 

<iApiknrH4H. Ma ih^H^.vlLy. V^ 4^ iUnv' aI^ Wifi^L ■ W^ Jk^d ^ M\^ M^ Auf Üh^Jv MnA4 ^\,^-<Lu ^Ar 

^m /UhU tiil /Ul(d- /\rd- mv uh}^4i^i/^ ru'c/i\ulft\y: 



r,' i ' ' 



UJc 



,v^t Äv U e. ht^JimlUt- irUi^U>A W 









ilf 



mM'' <i>UHm ürv jtt^ll'. 



II 



t« 



t 



.<idt^< 



-n- 



-^3- 






nm^v 






/fW^ /Ma^v ^^aJi/w ini4/^ Ah^ijy Mwf\in*K 

tvyyyiU* uim/ Ü4i/i mlS4i KJltUiA^ m^i^ hld /hdl- 
/Hl/ Mvy £i4'ri/ M^t /yJi/w ivAyi^Oiii^M ^UnJ. iIm i^ - 



4m 4^^^ MiMjhH Uii'A^AJi, J^i \%iJU(ilJl- 



IL 



/H-A^ -/i %H/yi^ 



/ 







V 









^f^^ i^Lil^ri^ A^ ^^' " 



^Mvyy ^Mj^ JH^U ^ JktMisLy^ ItUt i^J^ 1 



^ lul ini jjkiUl ^^*y^ f*^^ fuAivTPt^ i^^ 



f.k 



Z^ ml aI^ yj^toj.ni^ du^€n^ <«^W ^\U mIhUpv Jt'tnv 



Mi, L 



A4^ tlcii^l ^^^iTrt/ Mhy ^^w /hnn ^ll^' 
/iiUAAY ^jIaUqa^' JkUfe^yi^yy iXuin^JUtltl- i^v .'hcU^iM^ ^ xyyd 

^ U.i I" 



Jii4MHl, l/^w^^yUvnn 2m/ MliiiW , IxAimp htlty 4ni CenJM 



UJ^i ^ii 



^n fiMi^ lOöO /kU 4iyi€yn' ^^u^/khyy>uLli dm Ul^-M /f'/*« ' 



/w> ic 



/*Wt/'/WxT' 



A>v 



/.. 



wrnyynt^y^ 



vS^M^ dm duM% uLhfAin< d^A 'imn^ 

/^ dßh^ mI /;;V Ai^Cufy^ lAAfirti^idUcy da^ dm- 

! # i / / / ^. ,, , j C iJ, 



MAyyt^ i' 



Idni m/^1 Jf^ M^^fe^i^tJii^ mUk ^f^^h/ rMn^ iMtly 



il 






I I 



Ath^ 



'4-*f\/ti<;A^;/i'^ ^l^ K.^Vy]Ji*ao i^iyTi'l/fci y^lAoUnh^ iAyuO^l'H^a^ 



/CM ^holfi/t^ AhnAnl (kfiöli^^ di\ M^ ^^ni^'yihn^Ji^x^ 






--IS- 

jLm ^ /m^ i4 AvniiA/ AUJl/ <AW%/ lUtLt^ J}Ad4^ J^hLJvi^ 

M^ 'Um^ 44^ JkmJ^mJuLy' h/i, StLXyy^cLA/ ^^ ^ßMh/. 

MJr i'VH4/l/ lt4d-iAlryMUt^ yytAit leUvUj, AJ^AA^-l ^^U^uu^ JuuhI^ 
44^^'yi^W IvMkUp^ inVhrtk^uäUh/ iU^lvi^ <vW^ xMml ^OtM4 uJiity^ 

dlJUkl' ifVyiA yjijmJy M^MJU aI^h^ . ^^ 4X' Avy' U^ Jul- 

Amt/' w }if\VYvc A^ djuv vltU^mti^itMV JLX' du ^^W-mJL 

Arne UufDuVtU d^ JUt'idiVulu JuifyC /hre^U^ wiH^huA^^ 



^InAyi^ 



I 




i 



\l/nfU)l/yl/ii^ 



M^yiM/. 



yyyy 



''VH^ 






\J^^yvt4 xJLa^I^ /fi^M^ /fppyyy Ac^iTW 3D IfJv^ Air M' JuA'iUl^JLHryf /f'yv d^kdfii44 <iU^*i^, 







^l^oJ^tMAkM/i^u ^hrvu^ in/ 






I 



i> 



I 



4^ M U^y^ Ur^ ^piU jtMc rllSkoi^iAih^^ ,LA p. 






-11- 

kMamI hm/nl A^ ^U /Wvtk Ji44^ 4^ ^Uw.AUäl'. 

iU/ /w- /-jWw AMph^ %\lltki^ iJfJi Mh,<uU Ja4 ^^e^ 
A^uM AktA- Ja^nH J&4hI MiU A%p(t ^ihiL ^C iiiXuL! 



4hy^y" 4W <fi^ 



^u4C 



IjUtAn/ /w AiL jJM 



^/wlhi%^H^/^^ \ A^ 



(i 

















yJx tKÜyyyi^ /udi> Muytlv^ 



^tUmd Xt flU;i X 



VAt 



^tnvx V 






ih'ytr}/ 



^"^^hC JlihH A^ iyn/ JviiVi^ mui^rm M^ /cUtr 'ftUy^/ #?W<^ 

Myt^ iMyyU^ AttiLn^^l ^^f^h^ .ikrj., Jhu>^kuUyU^ 



V Uk , iik^- /i$iiL ^^ /Äife^ -^^Wli^A-^ 




, /»^' MkJc ^TiH* üküH 

>W /W \ßiuti M^ytUfl' hiuUc ^Aro^ iu VCi^Jio Jiiuj,. 
"^ 13 i^¥vy JllJUL mUu^ 4U iim^v ^^ Slffd /IhHl 
^^^^^n^^yv^U^ ^ /Wt^yvY^j/iiuli A^ aI^ Ai^L n^ jiA^fitc JUiUt. 

^ ^^ ih Plu an ^ tu \uiAJ w S^Jitu^ii^ 




-is- 






/h*J Ahn h. 4 y '/ / 



K/lj-ifHiMH 



MH 



'^ 



^ Jl U. ,5. -U..- L. .ü^:L.:L ...J.:\ 



hfiihU/tyfil/ 




mMi-fv^ 






"dm ihn vhMiV U^ i/^htd^' 




Jfn^7/M# 










y^^ £mI , A ui^ J^ w f^^ _ ii4U»L^ tt«4^/;^ ^A^i^i^tuulr^ A^ fL.*^.t. just^ 



7 



l'. 



m. KmU'ihUi^i M^ 







>uW 



ypdKHJi 



m 



iJuUa. /f'i/yuilJt' /d^ <eU miA/ 



ii^kyyä^^yy 



iA 



A^ /pyy\ \ 



hrtjMuJ 



4^iy 



AuAi/ A^J- duyy- J4 



S^i- 



I 



^ yKnytirrvCL^ 






/MJc Ui'kI i^Pnv^ ^tUyry J^^ ^H^^ 



^iM—Zjk^^M dki UiUc ^,v Jt^ 



^^^^^ i 



/ti»v' xlt'ht'rn'Hi 



7 






k 




hU^uL f ^ ^ 4^/ 01^ Ji^ itfcw rUJe^. 

tqhv ^. vHa^ ISJt y>niU sL^ JtUi^ Im J^niUlin^ 



/^ J*ik /Hvfeii.J OtwJity. 



"t 



^f^fWidt^ 



IPTTtH-i 



fiA4/ .<k*UkyiiA^ ji^-^i 1^1 Jj^ J^^ tyi^U W "--^Wi^W dir jAyyJu^-- i^i,,l ^ tUf^tnl >^il mAI Lidkl. 






(/ / / 









Mi'SiJLw 



-30- 



Jff( /my m4t tMu/ch. MnJL 






\i% /t/h. (x Jtim >j*f^ tptr- Jim irny ^ vt/l^» ^t- 



UHU-^t^nr^ Ay*vi, Ali Jiij^^ltHittH^J /hAhm 



^pnrh^ 



r 



f}i^JLf^ /O^J lu^ 4Ühr^dl^ ii^k^fl^fld^ iHAwtHi^ M^yulM ^^ 

(. / 

U^ Xuml Uk 4iH^ aJv aJ^^v Mry Mk ^^^ 



-3/- 







I 



fklu 



I 






j^. Jt^w 4/ 






Mn^ ViU^ . 'UL' /l^r,(iilnf M'intA- ml>K AvyyJi Ali^n^ 



^(U ^Oui^. 









iMuh4>i 



■>Ch^ 



ynm'i/' AiLii4 (k.ifJLw. J^ m^tufi4 /^ fai>U' 

'^^ it^jeudi/tl Sil iiiiLy rnrvjii Jpd uImU l't .t 



Lhd^ei'^^f ^iii^^ 



etyf^yj 



'-*^mv .ku' n^J^H Jit JhUw Ait/^<1 <ifiij^M^ilc^ AiU^f 



Tiiifmf 



Il 






AinJ i^^ ^^'"^ «^^^ -^^^^ 



-33 - 






QMik*fM^^yr'^ 'i(^ y^'^^}^^ ,T^'^{^f. vf'^ir^ ^n'Mnftyy,, 



/t^Kt /idrui ""fftpfi cAif. /H^^iJ , Äi Ml 



I 



j 'Au-ii:. 



t^iii /knu/ 7v 






Cti 'Uiy Mi Mn hL^Ui/^.einM-. /J^//, ß^^ \hJühryrUi, 

r (' ' ' ' 

t f f 1 j ^1 .11 






ÜK />*ttv 



m\ 4M /iw Mi^l X^!y ^^, hU'^\iHi 






ini. 



^' ^ 'Uf^i^mi 



^{ l^/Up. ^IL, 



I 



1 ' 

ym '^i ^tUi lliM /TM^ 4ly^tw ^^lt^€in4cn Jjiv^ 11/ 

il 



kioAtMlii , d-'i ^v-oi A,i Mit iiaMiv,/ ^ w aoLia 







/^^JyytUyy- /iyrv If^^Mi/y Aö^ Ui'c ^i(kU ^yvrj ^f^f ^'*'' ^^' M? 



yy' 



M/h^r^^ytMyy i^yrV n>^yM^ aHX^ l^ri' /fiAlf ^vri/ ^^^ 



:*v 



/ 



tlf^. vVe .K^/Ukr /luH ,^,H^Av .^1 



n . M 



'tiU^m m muil^ 



j 



du 



H^Mllht. 



mUATA^/ AniA/Q 




hllflinv^ 



r 



mi^y 



I » • 



v^ 



n^inyk hi^ K^rjiu4 <LiOi^M: Aiidi .h.r{ u.nt 

d^diW ^i^% p,iJ^ ^^U ddJd %tU !>^ Jidi M^dc^^i 






AWynf^Ji^^ jli-nyt^^ *Jl,^vdl.y^ /Oll'. 



i I I 



y 



7 



ß*diiU*i^i 



lU' ^mui dt(Kvy^w ^(iLIi^ U d^iyv KUftty^^ di'i Itidlry^ ^ Sind j.^. l^. 












(1 I l' 



M 



K.l/l.J4/i dy^/ufU^ 



^>n^ ZiiWi. i^ um /^^ XyJi dt^ iti d Myrrtn^ ^^y^' 



^W»' xmjjl/y, f^y^^ ^iM^l. diK i%^7lty^<Lyy^^(h,rd^l^ylU^^l- 
M> ^^nyyyyyyy Myrtidh/ /f-A)^ , Jk^Jcyi^, fynf. A\fy^K ^Uh^hltf- 



Mmnd Mm^ 



M. 



i^yy^ /kyyi 



l 



(J. 



'iiyy QlCin 



Mi 



m 



i 



\y ^mi S'Vnin/ 



diu .fyyyf KmnnyfiMyti' 






-JV- 



' > « • ^ • ■' 



v.'7((/>» dt^rt^ »i^ 



l^OUi/yrU^Yl/ 



k^n <V»tv JÜa^ A^lUfiJt ^MyiA JUiU^ dluu^l /^^ 









t 

Jyy Aliit <lkHn4i. llibt^ ^dLr-~ X» , K. ^Ljtrjl'l 



fcv 




itiAUA^y^uv' aUrndtHri^ /ifmC oUm/ ifiW^ 






-Ji"- 



w^ ifW' voutifi , di/t /ht^^ /Hi€ih 53 "UL .cM- /^/ 

all I fl I A I . . . ü . /^♦•••h^^ 






/UyuUw^ Mmt' mi/ VUml mvh^ lu'Juy im.u^ Uu m^ 






/y>y duhv dtA/ JdAi^ UM.(K xlo^tuk Atint-nAiW ilhnti - ^v^^rvijULik U.^ 

h4 ^^ dn^ 






I 






J/it Whi^^^ 



Y^kl Vlt^th/ Warn-. 






•I 



f. 



4*^/(/ 



t1 



/VW 









/Hl 



liv 



/ ' l 

'yyt,\*th)fAiJMdMum KJie^fMiny myy^ /hrwiJt d^^M^u du ^tuUnfiA^- 



\C ^'^ 



dwiM- .dtMpAilr ^Min-yr^^h 






Aiyyy' XUu\ 



OHif 



./^;^ If^di 



n 






mhiUli^nyf dt^ "jiufUtlJl liii- Y^t 









4^ fJnJvyy^ X Ld^ A^ ^'^yy 4^ ^ J^^ 4vi^ 













f^ -^M AST'^UitA^ Sfnl^L^t 




hy 






• \ » » * > % 



'^ ih^hhr^ 



7 



-«^ /MUh' % 



-Hfta.mhxA^ 



P^kJÜL 



uyid Um- ,nviA/ 



lU ISöl Itl^^aU jtiM ifUutn. JHUi . iit u 



J ^.^riß^M^ w / 

mmnd da- ^tv^ dvt^titm ^jKh^J^^ Sxynnd %ui^ mtiJt 

/h9*dv V^PiMmry ^ißA^if-y Amd dM H^h 4iu4*ft. AiIhI> " 

A^^W Zilhi^ IS51ß ^cA<jh:L /iitmlt Al^n^d lUk^Jc^h'^Hti^ 

Imv UMJlUtL j^d "W iiyhfUuk 4idf, «-^^W /wVi ilfAyyyyr>y 






i 



A/v*V 



Myt^ßm-Mi^AnM . lud /Cn^ /iUyt1^,iU^*W JiiUt- /Wmi A\ 



dl 



h-i^dvi^' dfnui 



fry' ^nkifXm/' 



V§^»(t]i',Jt 



JMM^ /numUrv f SiaJm /ili dm hß'^^ IJauv n^^^ 
wi dik iM^iiw dt>i/ ^Uii 4.i>d ^ud 4w^ du Jf^iAffi-p 



yih^ - 



'4-t'*i' 



JAfyt^vuw i%yj<\. Xnmt/ %y€\. ^h^Jl Uimmnrh^. ' r IM. 






'»•f 





\v r^Ait' ,0\^ ^ /%iudi ^v^vi^' fU<{{iäl .V 4lin§^pj/' 



7 



V 



11 



JimiM miuA 



^^yyvt-n . 






/ 






Mh^>^ 



JiUr/' dt\ 



h^yy ^Ur/' dl^^ 



'•^ "^ / (f " (JJ 

,im/ AritfioA^ini^ jUlvn^ fllt^ WUtJi inM'^vfyi /Midi/, 
yyyr, pJku ' iSDI AvIi^/tviV^V ^HyiV f^M^ ^Pil<fi/. 'U M- du^4i 

Aim^t^tiUrl y^/i\, \J^ /^fiil\i 1833 AÜhiM ffl^ iJQ/htJl 







kW 



.im 



nkf^n^ 'f^'M 



■>r»<v 



"^5- 



\j'mk. 



M44 



ZW/W; 










Antti 



H ' K4 



ISU .4^ ÜID Ul. iHw .^U A^ aJIL^ 

joll MOl^Jt Ill*/f0 Unit VTK^i^ MAhA/ BjhiA Aii4 üIimA- 

j (j ' \: ' 







J4lir-. Uvja PjK\Ut'A 



yyyi 



; 






xMpyryil/KJ^^^ ^■' f^^' 



Alt i 

A*Ikv. Xy 'iXi/ ISH Mc^Hi Pk'tk ^%pJt '^^^ ^^"^ 



3j ^ ^mm^rVf dfi Mi iSlm l^Ha^ nHiU^v. Jo^mlt 
iMnmCUy dr. aW 'Mt^y 4iimAiA^ dlU^At ^^/iuul ff^h^ 

/iäi4 JUidß Alvvi^ Jtlry fn^ Mml /iJJl Ull /Wit M- 
ihnv fil^ yjU-nJuw /i/li .i'llAÜJh~^AH aIIuIi VtnUtJi^ ntJcL 



4>W 



\% /373 >JAr^^y^ x^iiL^ ßyiMi/vhdil MaI (}Mm^ 



r$L^ 










I 



% 



m 



miiin/ imiAtk. 



f 



oH' K Vut^^i^i IIm4- . 



i'i 



1: 



\\ 1 1 



-HO- 






<ulou^Hi/ i.rnlik/iv^^ ^hrtmri/'v /inryi/ 4l^y /^AA^h- ^hi/hjLvny 



rti'dtn^ 4yypM'i4^ if^H/viiv /^m/iih^-yj \ //tfU^ d^H^yy/tiV mt- m/i 



i 






Mrji Aiü. Itidiyy" ^hmlr\/ MuW^U^ q^UltUi^ 









^mmhyvV /ihU^iä ^ .mI At ^l^ 
^m^xv Mkil ^</o^<v ; m I iiiüiili. 



ytv 



'f 



Ak ^AiV Mf^nJiik .Jv^T^lKif^ ic^UiJ^ ihJJ ^ 



%jX§vy>/fltWJ^-n 



-ki- 



y^v Ml 



y)rf:it4/iipy^ MvJjf^^X^i^tU /hWliUy Ui^ 










- I i 



vAe\ iß^if /Hm 



Jvy Am^ /}4c' 






f 



<A 



ftm^Ji^ I ikUuift , 






iw 



mh 



dtn/. 



i 



m ' 



A$ui^ m j^^AJ^unn n^JtiJuiAi d :yKi Aufm. JtJii- 

Uywi^vv m JuMi Man vlU^fk ^v ^JlhÄi/i'^ %. 3 



oivyrUl^ Au/I Jt-nv wMoMiV. 



\ -hl- 

.h-MAy" m4 ^mffvo /frir^^f Jii/n/cC W' /QUm44 /tie^ ^ejii^ 

/Ami- A/vi /tmn/ y^f^/yxMmk SiiH^ tMpfiiii mIi^aIuV /knWi^ 
U MOtAYUr^-v ^yM^s^W ^iMtAV ^T^vH^\4AAH/w' AIv^ AuJ{/ 



u 



iWtfiaJt -^ diMi^ "CiU W #|1/ €uU*y ^p /Hiui JLi^liM^ Jm4uot 
/Vm^ u^mLyMM^dlu^ ^yUiak, Mi ^l ßmv JL^ J^Iüt44^^jL^ 
^yjLv 4'J)k . mMlk^^k U^ii{nj^^ JcmUMa^ Je^ ,f(/ü- 
nnn'tMrr'äii (fU^Mcü /Tyy lMtU^ . Jm^m< ^A'}^ Hfml /h/XÄ^^ 



. i r j I 

/ht9A4/yV S^ sfjiilil /hJ m/Vi htdi^y Jnvnt(y ^ rLJi- 



3Ll^ diC4i ^Mh, UiJhy^ ^ /ui /Wt^JL Jln^^y f PI'kJc JxfiJi Ati^^. *" 
nt A ! V 

it^^^Lki^ <JUJ Urtutn j Arwmn AihlMu dJf du, tL^U Mvi^- 
AifMfv (fChJz4' 4iH4 — ^ nlu^J A w 'Uh^ Jddi^/4a^ Mnd^nft/i^hvyv04u/yyy^ 
it^ Vtm^W ^IHifAn^ nidu^iy /f^rd M<v^>if ditnhh^ dd X(M^ 

/Wif tJ*\v%^w)f nZmtArJk n^^km^tdi- /^ MfU ^ di- mi ^JImhI 




Ki^MixdJuh^ d 



w Zfitry 



viii-- d^it^M 



.^i waIL^ 



ÄiHiU n<nJlLyy^ Jfj{ ß^i dud dij4^ ,mii>^yy,4^- XvwX 






n 



StTn wf .'/^ 



diiA , i 



Um 



O^nxAW^P M^ihny i^UyUyi/ Arrk^ f>A 4Uf riMii^,^^ 

Wi^. ^hk^tv <JU^ ful Ividu A^ ^d M't '^AiH JjLi^ 

^ (' *■ i' ( 







( 

j ^ jU f f e f 



uukiikif^ it^ ihwiHi^JUkinhM 4r~ 



-iHftfl ,/kvi 



U 5m 4hl*^h*J/k 



T' 






-HS- 



/^to'Miyi/' Ä^fU , 






oMit Mir/- ti;^,1kUi'HyT/&J^m^ 



A/S 44 /fV /IfytAH^iM^ 







'^^OiA^yyyidihuiV ^tJ A^ JUli 



/'/ä^ AhWHJV Aöi^vm^ iimt^m^n/ . 4hC 



lA^puyy/ .^mt^n/ . /li^ti (ivJ- 4i 



sj/4t<n^ C*t^ 



>^4^>y^ 



MyhMrj/' Airvp-hH^ dui ^itj/i/ Ait/I Auy ^ __„ ^, 



^HV' 






yl/hJtU 



Cl^ d<fi lÜn iliM^ /Uh />♦*«/ OiA^i de. 



l 



vt /i/)^ 



.4m^ 



1 



t'}4}n^ M'H'S'ii/ i, 



hiy. 



'/T 



// 









^5*W^ ^\^ ^^^ hMh< /Ifyu^^ /d/hiJl^ n^fl ddj (y^i^ ,^ 



Ui^^v J3a.h<4-. 




^ %.yitu<U.fit^ Sin^ {ßAfiJif ii^Jk /hn^f^viJit'ry^ 

driu>il nAjUt^ 4n' Mlyy/ oUftl Utfn^ iJiA^Ji'nnA^^^n^ ^ 

MrnAi. /ff^ /«^/ ^i*»^ KJ^Mci^ (^ij^i^Ät^^ AeJLiU Mit. 

r ii fi/ 4f r 

Cl0yn^U^ 4^ V4fn^ UMA^ d/ivHn S^rw ^yn^ JU. i /}fv v[4h^' 

t / J ^ t ^ 

ifkc A/vyii AvJJk 4lJtU Uui^ M<Vi M^ ^<^ ^^ 
i4 Ai/ An^ jiti^ \Xw^JaJ/ ^ /hk /mäk /h^Ji K4uA*r. 



lU' 



4lVr*4^ 






-kl- 






/U^^ 



A^lk Iwhy ^4i^ju4l ji^ynH ^M^ei /hPtiJ ^Ja^^!^ JthJt^f^H^. 



UifU^^Mh MfU 



'M 



i/yythv" 



^viM^^j'' 




JtMt W ^Itit 4rh^ lOD.OöO If/UfJt^ 

/Mtkt^AA4/tlyY . «r <Lhy du^i/iv JU^^J^ >'7AMiy £1 jk^^nyfUU 4mt^ 

^f^nJAAV miiß*^Jph^, 'J^ ^iMiUrMl mJatU /oJLr /h\^ -^^ 
^^^ l'^^ ^tAillaJuJlayy^ ^^ U>HA^ H/liJo /[nr^ il.^i^iJ,0ßO 

75 <iv\h, \JAcKivU vU4^ Ai^ii JU. KnlUtU^ 100 000 %Ji 

"^iAMU ^HAiL dt^yn^ (At^^ytinJ^W m>^ diidy JdaÄ /htJiA/ it" 



Jii CMM^i/ ^M^. 



1909 /\^n(l 1910 Mt^iUt^ Jkiit IhM' 4mmtiU^ y/MW- 



■»r> 



-i^t nt^/i^ 



y^^ dh^HHry llJ'M^V Am% ^\ UtU liMxMyJi , LU Ata. 



\\n Ia 






I ä / 

W MhUitLyi/' diMrUidi iti(f{/uu^ /vnv dii^ KJitinMuJl^ 
^innrnUtv* a (hriifJj. ud^ 4^A// ^>^ M^H, liidv 

dtir^y df^ nAV iV Myyy dui/ J-f^Mi 






\eyH44v' /ft^*^ 



r 



iWi 



7 



^v** 



hiril^l 



dufJy die diiiiU du 'iMUu^ my*dLt^ im^oi^^^iJU diu^ 

Mm. iiU^ cBW- , ^ dj A^^ tdlUyJli^ i*Ji UX. - 
WiJSiW /ut mmuiUtm^ ^^^ Srly^Ui^ d^i^ 4k€y ^vJi dct 



^jAijlfJAi'U, 



UniUi 



fyV. 



Aou^UA^n^i/ /h^ Mfe^-t 



fr7 1 



*mUu/ 



*W»r^. 



dirU- 



^ 



n/- 4t\Uur^ ^dvyilsw-^ Jei Ik^ %W dn4t}u v^/ ^Udi. 



nm-y 



M^ ^My^iul aÄ Xwm^-JiX^ /**tw/ mJ^ Uutty tHUftUiV, 

Uk d^A W dv^^im^ ^mH JlUfi^ ikdJi^l II AniM^r^^tJc- 
^"»^ A^ /y\A^ dit iOf£4^clJn'idm^ J dtit- Aw Mi*t/ th^tiUh^ 



4iMfn^ ,ilUn\fW liyyM^^ /VM^ 4U M^ /Tkw^ IMh^ 



/d4 



L iUr^lk 



{Mi 



n,iM,\'n4ry \lt^ t%%4^. 



ii! 



lil I 



l 



yaiyy- 



-SV- 
^^j ^ih^: jU d iik f Ji^ f^ 










j^L^M^y^ 



iti^h^ 



/Krrfi /h^ 



iJU lyyyftt^ At^yr iJCilvUl /tn AHA/ ^^Lki^ '^mUl M>i/ 



4 



-!r/- 




iH^y, Vi 



■jtfyu^M^ 






tn\*jt^ni^AUw MA «/<4^Xi«;/^ 4^ ^fpH /Uji 









Aui^/h/ AmknJüiit/i SWi lyJ jLpy- inw aU^w {t1Lr^ A^yy^- 






►ij ytU^J^/i , Uh^M . dJli/ J^tU\ />i/M4l A^jJSh^ 



W^ ' -"■ 



Üht^UJic /ktlvH (n^rdft-n^H. Xi^ht^AA^ly^. m^Aji, 



^ ^tti^ nnuttn AtUlh^ Aoi mU jd ^Iry 4tfhJ jUapU 



'VMHl/L^ 



7— T 



I' 



1 



J,^tr4j^ •««• fJiu 



\t II f 



-«- 



^^^^hH 



/ä»-. h\Aw . Vn %A^W di^ K <^^J i^yA >M^ ßUyy^ 

^Hn dl^U K.hi'^ m A»/ Af^ {jMlrr Uy^fi^ ^^^^14,1, fi 
'ff' I ' ^ / ' ' / / ' / . / / 



*itJ^ 



«n^ 4»i^)|«'t>* 



»^ i</l Äi4^ Cliif^ n^ M'^\i\ \^*Uliymir f'^ltU I '^JSÖEi / 






^'^mi «I A\yr4^yyt^ .T ^kA*^^ lliuA f>n ^iA^inJt 



J 



f 



U- 



I %' 






I • / 



/ 



(*\'a: U.s *vt-. "U/iiti ■' t »,. ' 4<\.A^ Ü^' ^ ^i^ 



• 1 ^ 









•#VH|r 



•?#»'^ 



^- ,f/*#/l^ 



«•^ 



•i^^ 



•4.i» ..? 






' -■ •-/// ,' / § J ^ 

^ ^ M. Aldi di^ JJr Attit^U /*m/ Ünmi jL^,^ 




^^ mm - 4^^;^ /U^ /H). fSuuivil ^ [^IpHuJai^ - 4^^ 

J ^ 








\l 






^ " ^^fftv LliJ;y',4i KAä.lud 



^U 



L 



xJ-Uwv mäkv^. Jiikt y y " /Äw/ AAy 4L/ /f^f^Hi^ 






^* ♦^^ 






A-^^ 






-«^v 



•^•1 






<^4 *. %.• r- 



4 Ti 



ä.4 LL* 4 



L^ üir^^ 



u!^ 






HfffuA^ 






^^ y^ftJUUh^ m^U'^fltHi*^^ 



"■^Jr*"^ X V 









J 



^^^ynUM A>fw nhnnMUm.'» (4 AtiLX' 



/lYV 



d4\ KjUUh^UJI /hp^^ 



1 



(, l,l 



It 



1/ • 



f 

_ t 

9 



^ 



JU\ 









-55- 



'-v- 



/VJIV , >4/i/t«^ 



/ 



i ^ 

Arr>t%v j'*M^v ly^^U^il . C4 MrJJk /Utk /^*rh^ Invi SUl- 

U L. JIK(h.^ lUfL ^.XUis duN^ ^J ^:' ^^' 

( 
klt ^ ^4^ UIuhJ. tlJlJLAtL U, J^/H W .^^' ^' 






/^'H'hi^ ^"^ 



^hUl^kfiutUv AHnt /^miiicvi/. tXv >iM^ ^]Ack^''^yt4h^ 



! 



A^^^^ ^ih^Mw ^inJJa^ jiSaiJ yi^d vUt Uu /ui^t%- 







jHvptj^ 



hfM- //'^v hPU 



' !f ^Hf'y 



1 



/iryyv 



^>j^ 



/ 






Ahihi^tn»! A\'vyArry'it^uw Jiryytdt 



Adß'^nnM^ ^ At^UiJLf^ry ^pjl^äJi^ m^iutldU, 

^^MW Ahiwui/ Uni^ fJinJu^' ^ dAn^<JLy ^tld- aIu^ Iph/ 



I "^ 



- I^MttvuJßi/ 



' xui 4h4 m^v mrUhi 



A/VrA 



^M-yyu^i 



* w 



1 



~^- 









4^ (WH 






^iu4il M KjliJhU^ /hm\iA^' fllAnl xUikiiteU • h 



^ "Ui 









^U{At4UJyfy^ fl^ 






'"'»«^ vLiX/h^4u\i/ dvt /n-H^>>f^At/wA^ xj^<U^iii , iMI>*h 



i^M ^ 



t!l il 






- 57- 



/^ vV ArJ^ 



dlA WKtiTky -Vmi 






—Ufimr 










ivy^ 



/hiMy' .%jft4tl MTit yUh^- 



iUKMk .hlSii^y 




^had (fuhi^ m 



/ 



A»*', 



j^M 

h^ M- 



Afl^ttny /Vm/ynf^ /Hii,JM(^\ 

^HcmMk^, Jfifyy 4i^H^ Ja;^ pfim ^hf^^ m^ Äiw^^ 



•mwrr^rwirr -jf/y ^^y^ w / 









h 



ri^&UBäCB^SSi 



-yf- 






(YiU M^^ /Ut luj' k(Xi^^ Xj Ü.yy4^ vki^t /^y^^ 

Jyfy jUjk$Mfi/ y^ffi M^i /um^ i m JliMm/ 

myy ffAIHy /JnM^^ dd /%U^n^ ^MM- /Hui fiMn/ 







Mhr ^^ ^ Am^ ^ HU ^V9W A Idim ^ 






I 



M jh^^ mtw^ /)n^4l' iily%Uii/ Mili^ ii'TtfLiJl Mr4 



/ 






'/■ 



/^ 44 mU MUd^ JkLn^ W SJitfAd A 



'itUtJtm^ /^Ä jiL'Siil 4lm 4ryU i4 ^ (in- 

W mU **Amä^/ mw 4(114 MJ^ ^ AJtriäiJ'Mrj^-' 

m Ahm ^ 4ti4U' Jhii Jt^ Slü'Hhi^ /MW' Mvft Vw*^ 

/HüLy 4*h Ck*- /mhnh t i it ihi ^ mI m4- 'm * ^ m ^" 

"^l^jIMpimk ruLUt Au« Ayy 'Ihfffn^ Itu f^f^. 



i*n> 






X ^fev 



i 



i 



-^0' 



Min - ^ , ^1mU ^^^ Ad M^ ^Md- 

/Mtj4 Ö^W^^fyry jl^iulU , ^Mtv Ahn IM^ /iU^ vinfü 

ädhnt^ (hnmlml. lUmy Auf 4^^ni^ %mUI^ ^^/i^ 







i/yy^t 




'^^ 



4^W Sn^tyhyimA< /k^ ^H iM(\. ^ .(d^ /m ^IJhi/ 

vmlj^^ JJf 4^ Uiin Jmfpy ^U^ Mi M4^^i4ej. 







f V /^ / C 










4aa W tht^ /IftM^. ffUJh A4,ff9 




V Wk '^w. '»♦^ 



^Ek^wy 



-6/- 



^ ivOiih^M^ /iif. olOf/yi/O^ /Ouyyy 



.aiü^Xl^ 444-. 4iKnn^OuyyV Ml^rrJ dü /utrm JxLJt^i^ 






MJ- M^ll /yhiky AuyyJ^ M^ jlwi, ^fuJi^ciiLiJLyi/ J^ö 



.W^ Mnl 4Hd^^^lML-JJ4^^ 



(ff^M^vt^ 



. ß nm\/, twUyi/ iUudijt] 

JiV vlrjU /hoJv /iLnt/ Mm/^vUndtiv ^Uhv<JU ^M ^M- 
^i^ln^ , ViA^ J^f /yii,^ .^^y ^^^j i-^^fj^v i/fh/oAiAHyv di'i^ 



l 



w 



7 

M 








'■hyy , 4ü A' Uli^*k ^ u^ :i>i pA i^f(. 



-*W^ ^kUi}>iiu^y^ ^t*iOtvi/u% Jii WimUn/. d^ mi- 



^y/ 












«B^BHHI 



1 



I 



4 



\ 



■: 



pi 



k 






-i5- 



t 






I ^ 



4vnL 






\m.' c 





(Mvi^t^yV, 4t$U ii 



ifl^hMjLH^ yMMf^ d\t JlCiyvtAV .<Ki/^ /UW (^vO^i 

/hml /WyiUo ^/lilo^^tU MM /^ /M(H- A^ ^i ßfd 
4^. vW him jfijk /Utfi ihtd^ ^tUiiJil ^/ 4ni^^^ 
^^md, ß^(W Ayy Ayy. ^infM ^4^ /IMIa 4n^^JJ^}. 

^Wi/ W %u% m^L mU Jt^yWsJiiM'W, ^fOi/W^ LnfA^ 

mmh/ /nvÄ/vi/ /fmw m'^ Aaxu ULL \h^k m m/y^)^ 



I 

f 






/i^fy 



l 




/lui AvU 



I (hnM^ 



L ^ X'im/ k/ mAj ßdc, Jk Umtr L 

h^^^k nGialdJi Mnl Mime Ivi lur^£JU kl A^^n4^rt^ 

Mi/y)/ SlhMti%unv4Mi/ iuhAA /hUH^i/ /Utk jiX dU 

f^uh/^Ji/j jOiXu/t^/, i4 /h^U M^ Avtif^ /h^ U^Mi^ 







if TM 








Auyy/ / 










i 







MüJ^ 




^y/" 






y^lmu 



^^^ M^l Ate 






Muy \jl^h>i/d A^n^ AoM, 



M^a r/iMk An^Ut^ /ti^f^^ A^n)t^ 



"^"^n^fh/Me J^vJL. 







7 



'/fW ^T' 












yui .h.^' 






M 




'}^^m, Stv 4'/^;^^^ [j^r^yC kvdi'^ii 4i^ ' , ^ W /hii4l /tA 
^4kha / A^ij^ n^ulin^ /}ri(\}v VCnlyi4nd[/ /viW^ iM 4^4 f 









A^hr 




vd /ht^ m^ M4f ^^^w^^f^n/^^ /h^d hfU 



^ 



/ 



^Mh. v^^4u^iu y^^ciU m /li /hv J^M^J /kM, 
/V^ Am /m^^fW /^ Kirkin^ Makw, Jim v/Kw/ 

kl AMi' Ji't UjmJc'^^, lim mH A^r.uyyf fn^^dn^ 



f-.^^n.^v 



i 



II 



I 



(Jöin^n^ vHudl< 



<i 



1^7]/ 



/Hf~ 






f4i 



/ /^ ^^^f^ 






iil 



\t4 %4AyyOi^*^^fi/J di 



ii'ttJ^hrA^i 



■1^ 

'^V'IK'VtW IIP 












m /Un ^ii^kw Mt iUdti 



-i7- 



/ 



'^A^yyyyvil .A4^, 



l 



^inwT t' 



^ivi^^iVi^yrvrJmii^n^ 



\ 3^(mw M^¥h/' mMLv^ JerhJt/. J^t^^ui^ <dfü^ /Ucji^ Ai 

4Ä4I Arnjllvyidh^ l^lM^Jcn^ ^ht^Li^^ UHtnv >44*>t^ 
AiMt^zMvy- 4/urU Wyn ^UiU^7>ui9M, #2^ ^l^ 4U ^jjUim Vk- 

^l^ AnAA/i^ di^ymM^^^f Am/ J^mtihuvyyi/yryt/i^ 'iuyA M .4M^4/i^ 
^ /Of^4^ jim/ AIKW /^yyd ßiS /hdi^jfynil d^ cliAW it^nuh^ 



^ {JcA^t^yr %MuJt /Uvht^ AJUi^i/vJt/{u/ w^^l L% Mo ^m- 

V' "^^^i^vU^ryy (llttr>i/ /^vy <jla/Hil .iHijJm . Milflc /^ Ud 



Jh i. 




V- ^hhyyyi^ , 



l^Vryyy/ mW MIa 



f 



^i 



/'/4fv ^My/ /Und dd ^4m^i^ Jfh^nOÜi^ 
^ ^jMuvvLy /hrmyu'. Jiiiii^ jiJa^M^ ßJ, aJL^ W/ ,^^ 



-69- 






wnUH 



/iMt AJm ^ mAh/ A^ JIM M^yfyy/ dJi^fi/ AMüfiAl- 

m ^it Auk At iMU%iitrt/^^ miviifL-i \fhuMi/n-L jt'f^Jt- 



aLr^ % ^^U Jm ,W m..^ il^^ '4^jdcn^ I X*.;, ^ u^ 'LoLn^ iA\dC /^ L<i^h^ ^eU, 



Uk. v"/l; <f4^ Ai^tf, ni4\^ /hHÜm^KfC/ l^r^ J'Mvo^d&AAy^ 



I 



^it iA/yM/Myvn^r A^nd^ 




V 



9) 



4^y]i/} 






r 






JmAmy^ lAn^ 4i^yvOivi4, j4Pi hfiUi^ m Cl^Viii ^J^yChHik/^ 



I 



Mit A.lM/i /L jutldL ^ptdiJo /^^ .4t^ ^kw 4UI 






'^ A/m/ JiAUr /w^ Mit Ji<j tCAuhimiJ. JudiX 



IA4^ '%ih4c4- 



<J<v ^^Ixk^kk, 




/ 



«i^ 



I 






I 



-10- 



^MÄtjJtAlf^^^)^ /im ^Mii/yv^ lUyr.^tW li^Mi^ .W'^Ci/. Ml 
MiiU^l Ci^ye A/} Auk . d»M JlrA^L ^e^^ ^^ kUjAi^hf^- 



1 



#. 



>itiXi- Auch inM m^k44ciht< tjl.4^,Jyy 



J^ 












^^ /um jiUoA(X/}nC^i<^tUry' AUiA^nv A^yy^n JtL/i^ U^ i'nJUm 
tJr W 4^^, UirH^ ^iiiU 4Uti iuiMyyy.4^ jUni^' JUyult' 

UulU /ho4cA^MMyy4^ ^hrült ^ M ^c^ diki^ JLrri ml Jh(- 

\JiktLM\ Awd OvfU Auufh /^ Jl^UuU jO(^^ du Jiint/ 




^ ^yt^mtJi M^ %ttlßt^JU d/t^ 






\ 







A^ AdMt /}vtdi{^ 



/yn 



W \icryvtdjiiAvn iW dMynfyyyy' 
^ Uijhn^ Jfid M^ynA/nnV- Iryy ^ jH^s^ ^Atl ^d/^ i 




V't ^J^i ^'*0^ 



) 



1 



-n- 

(L-mvlt iiiimidr ^y>m Or<idt^ im^ dud m ^^hi4^7iid 



Cr, . ^ ij 



JMmi. M MJiJcuLJL^^ A^/^ AftddU^, 



i^KUo 4mu 1.9t H^ik Mj^r UviakdiJU Jcitk, ^ ^*/ 



^JtA;f 4^ i^^HimyyriA} 



yy>i4o/yn^ 



^'di'mM 




w- Im/ ^r^UnkfiJ fliM ^ d J^ ^ 



*^h^ 



-73- 



Inv 



ihlMoi^^ 



iuly/ ^h^^' vwi dij Am /K'rUvit^ iOUi^4J mv 4m, 'v^ M 

hvh^Jff/v\' ^YmJc A^yJ, /iffffL JiLy^ /h(uL Jlt^/ /hj^.t^L^/ A^ 



f)lfl 



mvw^i/yy 




JlUhy / 




'» i^MiiÄ^hliJ^ MiUvv^s 



'iCW nl^/l^HV^ 4l3 ■yin/ti^/litMfe'tp/7 ifMjMlUtitt 



-yMKu^ 






Mh^'M/v^ui/', 



/haX /wtu-ke' 



"f^l^ Al^ Ä,lV 



Cl^AAÜUlPucM^ 



■• 114 4^ . 



t 



/yhii^Ji^- JmI 4i-^ /l[\4iv AiTOhiXi^icnL xßf'UiA^ ' ^ii^ yvy^^V 

^)^k^. Jvt^i), ^Qf^yy^ ^^l SwiAtwjle^ inj ^ikL 

^^Mi^yvv a-iU Uuli^ dii^ ikhh4Jiid JklxuUh/ /f^n^lhi/ />m. 







y /'du.- 



,<JiJeJ It4Jf^ 4JmJ die jUrMiUc J4/1 i)oi^:. 



I 




o-j^w^ 



^ AuUJui ^ ij J^ cT^;^Y JaU^A JUk^u^u 

^ t" / »'/ '^ 'JU^d mJLlUt cTl/cM^y xH. MihyfyyiA^ 



miiJxw 




M^xtL 5/ Au \JloyiJJ, \j\iiijLulu ^o^Aml iW>^ 







Arrmi 






yJ'vrk^ du liiuilyyy>^ 



I 



Ju^JiAM 



Ai^vyyAUl yiynd ^^MiVlHA^liUtl J4I /Ji^g^J^/f^Ll J'JS 







-15- 






/(mw JM- 



/Ulfnf0t^AK4^ikflt LÄlllc7HAl/yy>Jtr^ (V^e^yyryrufh4/i^, JiC 

I // j J il V 

\3iU>i^4.U7hli^M' JHi/jim, /hMAAi 4f)tij ^aJiK- ^Jifl' ^vyU Mt\ 



^ , /hM>l 




/ye^A^ 



jmJii4^yi/, J444t vJdhi^vv iMk 



.-.W 



nt'' /U^^yy^, 



W^HÄÄ^ /äL,/ S*l^ V4^^ ^_. . ^^„^^ „^, ^^n^ y ^,, 

^vtUtdk ; A^nnv yuii d(/y^ vnLhJf Aci MlnJu)/ A^nJiA^viALu/ 

4#w M m u w' ^iMvrdtiM du iki{lii\^ Uv Mi^u-v^' 4oi} clm I-m^i 

,1 . 

I 'W Am^ iduds^ d^ JUd Au^ /lL\ ^tirJ jutituijtd a^I 



~u- 



■ 



ll 



m/ y^ ^ ^^^ '>^^^^4«4Äs- aUL /hrk' /^ JS^ 
io^ (fnAMMlninV^*lHnn< ^/hltUtt- /mv vnrv /VUJut p^'-hU^ 



!• 



yyy\4^ 






I 



JyJJtAjlAhlt^y^ 





'i'\A/^A^yyr/ 






^wHh -mi 



-77- 



mmJi^ 



(f^^4^. /hfftA/ luLryyy 



/V^^^tt^ 










^Mk. A^U \j4Afp4jiauA Jik^vJu^/ aIa ^ 



•&'<'^A/n^V>yyfn^. 



J I 



i 



liM 



-75- 



-60- 



J 



' -..,.. -rr^r^^ t 



^ AuAA- tOAn^ A4m4Ui^ /h^^^di/, 

6 ' t I 



^*^fet 



4<i^- 






S^iLi^H^s^yijtiiiJt, CUUk^ik/ 4^ ^it^Mf4 






i 



^ /hHi4iW>/ Jtyfvl^'^ U^iüHyyyx^ UlijL/ 



t 



dti 







r 




^w /4^«^ 



a/mi^ 



^ 4n 



\ 7 



/nr*/ 1/ 



'iAif^yntl 



M lA^^ 



2^ ^ JU<Ci^i^hJiM^^ 






lom*)/. 



I'f 






ll 



-Sl' 



U/uM MJMlUy^, l/J MCuJäk^ Auh ^v^ jUnt a4LL 



W 



/fiHpy 



iIvM. tW AM Äf4^ dhfi^ ^ijtjU/hJ^ KaU ^ UhJitcL' 







-BZ- 




% 



^J 

■iM 



-^ Wi' '^■yyyt^xiijl 



I 



^ Witt^^v/ ^ vtw Mh^ ^I^^mmI-vU^^'^^ 






4i'>y(Ui^ iPt4 Mihi iUf^ mtUUrUj ^iU^U^i A^ <i*^i^ 



rt^ 3(m>n4^yyty 



\Avh^^ 



W<i 



4r>i' 4n 



Mm^v li^htujol' Im/ /tvUht/^ 



7 



l.%:U' 




/li^y^ Htl^U M^Sji^ %^'Jf*ltiyA AniÜ^nü-'tJt. /-wiwU^ 









" IIäAu^ ^M^ Wti- AmJi^ ihn^H^ 



^, 



VU'hx/ 






^w»^ /J" /m$l /J 



/m 



77 




^A-H^rf/i 



<U{AAÄ/k,yMlAt/ . 



M^ W if^ 9!w tfL/4 htk a4 



/fl ^ihfy^ 



J **»^ ' ' 



i 



t 



I 



'■l 






I 











U^Uä^MU^ luji iy^'yy, Jl4t4*U>r ^AhA^\ 



irr^ äM >^V 



ßh^ 






</?'»♦ c', 



/«♦V 



k^ 




J^ (fff 0, 









- ^^ vM * -^U r^JL^. flli^ U ^wM Ju..i Li '^^ ;jir- --^^ ^- ^' 






/ 



--JLjf.^. i^s, /-., 



hi[u%>s ik u JL %L^ li%JJf9* *^Lt^ 






aU Ui 






4>« 4^^^ 



ßll ^^-^-"^►w^ ' ^ . ^d»ff %-^ffi 

A m9L liAy k^^/ i^A '//k^/i*#.x7 *..4»^ ^^^A JL\ 



*>i/ -^Ä*.^ '^^//i 



r 



/... 



ßA A^UA ^t. ,^»^ ^0. '- ^ "„^-^ 



T 



"/«, / ^-A^t^ 



I 



*^>y^ r^J^'., v*-...j^ A..^ ,'— ,«^-^ 






A^^m^ ^'tv 



-*•(# 



«1» "^^jW ' ^««.>, A**». 4««/ .**^ 



• ■*/•>•-• ^ ■• «*^y^ 



r 



«AA am4 



te' ^ u ^-^^^ -^ 



/ 



./ 



r 






I 



l!H,' 



I 



I 



-(f^- 



M(^äi^i jfclfJi^ ^hnfviiw /Wiy /hdUi, /y^wh^ /^^ Jl^^ 

e^fcvnU^ /< ^'.<A >r m i Aiy ^. jk/ ^if ifpU 4^ ^L^/^^tMii^^ 
1/) AaI i'h^ 4^ iuUi^ ^n>^ Jit JJ/h^iu^i/ .^ ^. 
liU^, i^ hJ /h*^ sJm ^UuU ^ /iiThiu^}/ ziMlfH hV 



-H- 



> 





Hrti/f/ Ai^h^^M^ \UMr 



/W*Aj /Mit dh^ ^l/yMU ViiJi'. aa^I ^Mtdc dn ^^i^y 



l4i,i,w ^\nrh> tV. ^ nl^ di/i 4^c A^4diA% /tji/ ^ 








tl 



/ihiujt- t/^W^ M^tl $iiA^ fye4t^y 






^Jj,^ ^ dj" da. yiLur^ ^r^*^w 

^ii^>ymd AvuM /m^ ^d d'tU MJdt^ M'i ^ ^ 





AmA» 






^i4^ M(V jtl4idi /kvJ dpu WOui/it^^y ßUÄ^ VaAiJi jU^ 4dweU^ 
CiWi. SPtTfdd/ mdhA/, ßA^ JnsMt^ dht^ aU UnfddUiy^ 

/i^ify ßdt^ Jf4^ SiMfdd /K^/Jjd /ViiMh/. U /wJLu^ /J^i^i 
^fclu4r M^^dd dk AiA/i dß^l^ /l*M^ W AVMm' /kmltt^. 

jliiUvkf \jlAnU A^l dh^ Jid^OuC iUuA ^ KMAffd ^./hJ.^, 



* 



r 15 



-si- 



/*H^ 



Mt4^ 4U ^ue. 4U S'i 



^Jh^iO 



1^ MCJJtr)/. 

jlt^Vtin^^ ül^mnrviyiy rHMr dt^ ^ ,ij^ jj^ Ji 
i)^U>fH^ ^.^X/ ^niJy ArU f^,^ ^ 4^,^ ^^„^^ 



AtjhAlt^hnu^ Mnd Ä^ 



'^iM/ i^Jl^>**^ 



)U^^UO 




^if^ 



■J44 ^Ut %U tiu . ^IJU-,^^ Ja. tfh^ Ali-' 



/»•^*H*K. 



( 






<A\/ 



A/kMA^ /hvi^* 






i i mth^ f fhp — €9*^^ M 



* % % 



/ut^pUUit^. 



• 



r.i^ ^ .PA A^/y,. 1^ JU / I 




J^i^Tf cÄ . .'yätU 



Mv(J^ /hiUh/ 




/hw 



Avh4/ 



tll du^ JL I:^^ JILJ . -/ . //// 







ALUh^/aM ^ h^M^^ tX'^A4i. 4ni4lJ^JU. ^ Jßmr /Ml^ 



Illi 



I 



I 



11 

II 



"• 








I(U}UmUW \.A4mJ*U^ /WkAllc tLilu^ Si^.fiji f^CrPU /jj^j^ 
Unvk^y^ /hUt^V A*mI/ M^yJuM^vJ/\^AH^ 

/^W AwiAfvd /iUyyyynK lutuuiJ dtM^J(^(d ^^yy^/ H 

i JLiL^ t, ^^ ^j^j j^^^.. ,j^ Uk- 






/ 



I- 



ImfAV 4I4/1/ 3m4ji/Ukrynr nnrv/' J^^lJtA^m^JtUtJ^ /hAify^lhi/ 



4AV 



_ /dm 



#^ 






l ^ n^ 





mt 



4 41^ 



/H^m^iM . m^nl OiTA/i^ ^ fi 



I 






M^hn/h/\ 



htm 









fA,hHyOC 



i/iP^ 






I 



'91- 

^ U V 









;#o«^dW 



-m^ 



MiukuMi 



äm%/ 














-n- 



w 



Tl^¥^ 



yi* A i»^ * ^ / ^r '^'^^^T*^ 



«Ä^<4i^ JU$ ^^fM/> JL ^*^^ ^*^ 











4U ^M duLnMMn/ , A^ JLi ^^i^,y^ , '^ 






iLa Mi' /\mJI ßitti. 



M^ 



HiliLnitä ihn: 



^Ki^K^UJlM 



/^ 









I 



dkfX 






IUI 






II 



t 



I 



_3/_ 






"M^ 



lM^*iA4 w M^ Id^UitMi , i^^n/ XhC 4^*r^ /4h/ >4k' 







-5^ 



Mm, Alt ydLs^HiiM/ vU^d" AtAlULt^ I Ml 



d^ dl^ 



4<M/ 



JutUki^, fl*tujlluk< 







^ 1 8 

V^Undt^i/- ^/^^ AjUiy /W^. U^n' Mwff^ 





ot^ioh^ — U^ 






/UM^ diu AtJ Mü /V'UiMi/(4ii/ Jif^t^* 







M^ 



i<Hli^i*ä Sin: 



m4^*tM4iM^ 



A^ 



^Mh^ die m 



M4A4^ 



t ^Pnt^ 



If JifmJLndt'yi^ ^ di^ du jjt 

dmdr At^iJfyn4h^Un^ ^MtAMrtiV Arn 
ditiiUitfintnJtV AlhiltA^ "uM- 

i Su tHuiL^ JtdL dw 



jL ^4 



UIU h*^ 



jhtik/H4<»t^ 



I 



dßfS^ 



aU 



Vi nli'ilrUBa 



^ 



|it| 






flu L M.^ T^ *^ '^'^ '^ li^fci 

iUU iXU:,i 4L ilUclMn '^ y^U 4,^ M- 

jiL'ij. uu lau: u( ^/ u w .j. 

*^ '»«^ i^*#» . 

i?.././ / *. j i I Jt 



-9^- 



Ia Jjav dit J(Kw mti^ M^HfihiiymiiiHl d^ ^jn^du /th^fftM^Mt^ 



/ifmuv 



I 



4f)Vi^ 




Mi 



Ouofli,^hi/* 



f. 



'. •Ju/ W ^thfv 



irn^n^ 



^4^. 











AtfcUt/Hi'' 




Ut 









-' J 









lli/ 



. ^ 



«' < 



•>'•' 




t 



i« 



/♦n»^ 



iU*J(4M, W iMaI JttnJJl /ku/Jt. 

***■ J«4 WJwn' Mit' U^v^aHny 

JU- aU' 4i^^ LLtU M^/>tnU 4u SUd Ai^' 

m Mmc tfW V<h»»v »^ ^l!UJi 'ff^i^ J*lni- Sfln 

' " < 



-96' 




i^^i^fH^Mh^/ smt4 />^^ ^dJti- AH^Ul^MulJu^ /Hpd 



I^U^fHiiLy /Ufd jLl ^ 






M% 



AaI 




M^^UU hLdn Um ^ A 4iU 4^ ^ 
^ ^ AMf j4. I4J, OfäiU' jU %ffJ^ 



\0t^ /kU^LlfU /ud< ^i vUjUt^ 2iM mw A^ 

InnJM AU M/hfUti AU jLM^y*^ %U4^^ 
v^ 4*M«#' Jtal /^ Im n^ JjM- -^ 

nt^ Ami AUt444 'CUt A/VH/ MulihUtLrU' J^ ÜAM^ 
^tM- . . iupU ^<^iu %' muW Myi/ dii^ ID JiUi' ^ WioJMt - 




fiir'iV^finri 



•1f 



1 



l 



-31- 






■iPfh^ 







9u 44fmt $ttt%t' , 



J&/ 



; 



A^iH' 



mnA /dtt 



i^O\nn^ Ai^>,W JWfe/ //I^ yfk^ ^lupJfyJu aJU^ Ju^ 

milü H/ JMU - jJU ¥11414^ aU^ Jiikti^ id AifU /mui 

4k4 'KiriKf Uih^M^%4^ A4f. 








-58' 






AiU^Jul ^ /hf(A4if/ UiJU Mü^ AutA ^(nn^ jU^ ^Uh- 



? 



Ut^^ 



4^/^ 



^ii^fmUv - li/hMAty 



Avr AvV 



Avtjiw 



UMh/' 



AH ii^ 'äW iS^ 4rW Mmj4^ /hfuljU^ ^^ ^»ilUtULyy' JlM*A^ 

AtJok (r5 Chv Lik Ji4^ y^UiU^ JUjti^ ^iff^^m^yJi^ mMi^, 







jidi du 4^t Mm i^Mo ^ dtA/ liCnAt^ 4U dUuo 

/Ä^/UW. f 4^ /W^M«t/ d\A4^ Juli, ""jftffltMi ^»»^ <Zi#f,Wf^ 




I I 







-39- 



rLOOr 



l|-f 









*■« 














Jj^n^ ^ ÄUMf. M 



I 



Ai^i^imJU M Auikd flUt^ >Mf /h4^ti/ Jm Ayh4i^ 
nMAfJlMU^ ßiy^vUV M^$^ t/Al|4/44i - t>Hi^^ J^l%i^H(i%f< ^"^ 

AinU/ 3hJL /L /U^nl\$tU -W|/ M^ ^-fPi^ duiUci, 

fj^ %iluli^UmJ^^ %mUUm^ , di4r aa*9 Aif4y^ dJ- 

dit Jk^i/tu idi^JL^ Aui M^ '^ y^ Mi /h^ dhy^ 




•cWun^ 



I 



i^ 




SviU^JhV Ayy^eA>ynii^:J^i4 /jA^mi^ /kOM- /^Lh^fy ^ 

iifk AnÄL^KViA/ JLUtilUC Ih t i t iih* '. >m Juui 

fflf4^ mI W Ata4^ ^i^/Xn/ /kl^^ ^U /*»*^ ^f^ 






!w»iiU»tt4#i^ Ary^ jMiJU^ffihmi^ 



Mi 



"Ui ^ Ad A^ JU -bil ItP^ Jh^ 



i 



Ai^,^ <üA/i4M4/ l^tA^ <^ ^y»^ ^UmW aULpV /^^HJlJ^, Ml- 

ij f^ Ju^ 4K4iH/ yiäUj^K /ht^Jl/n^ /^dtuAL Jt*ffiU M- 

g t * f * ' « I ■ 1 1 > i ■ f — • M 

tJW^ S JG^ lult Ui JiA/ /tH^/ AA' Müu^M^ Slm^L^ 



diur %U^ /Linp^j ILtL (ß^ /ujf^ vMLi^ mi Mi i; 



-/03- 



m 



I 



I n IUI 



# 



« 



(H 



Alli\M JAnJlpy' Mh^ Aii4fMy' JUkJU- ^t^^^^^ft^ <*hjj4i»Mt. 

tj %iv mM /»i Mt i W a^\Mäc <3kMutf /rrM^ jdCt 

vU^m^ My^ i§L^ A^'UiA^ SihUtt Mfpheff' /f^'Unn^MtJl 

A^LU- 0t u t J i l Ut l 4Anl iUuL /IM4V Xt/ j[iuä> jkmuJU 
MtU ^hMhdl^ 4^**^ ^ MiU^ tMe^^ /If Vh^i fPfym^rU^^j Am^ 






Äi^» UdLutd ^ du ^mIo^ - JLt^^t^ mMtlmMl' 4m 

WMMAI' ^ hl, du ddU4H<-2kUu^ /hi^lduLl L^ X^iM^ 
JdhjM-'^eJU ikJidaMt/ du /UpJi du /kUjithLL ^(n^ itlUJLyy' 

mi3^ ^IdJtdi/ nrr^ id(w tMi/*^ iH^ocudidtr. JfW ww 

d^ 4U dii^ d^Ul44i^'^3c€M4^' Ja* 

/Uy^ a^Um^ Mmd /ht Adhn4tf^ wiM^y" M^f^ ^MA 

Äk^ jiA^ *iAL^ ly^ du %^ fi*Ui JtyrJiJi^ 

c f^ ^ ^ % ^^ ^^ I t/ i ' 




tm^ ^^HthJU^ A 




tfi»^ft^'/k/Ju*»>HU 



itTr/tTTf*. 




iMA^MtiiA JIM/O^^' 



% 






AaaI A^Ui^44iJht/ MuiAMftUMppy üii^4(M<^ . Ji^ fB^oMimmf 

jh^Jti4AuJhtf ><<iv nn^y" iUyi/ dmidy/ d^JLf^ , AaJL 4it 



-106 - 

iJn'/tPtd (hJU/kJl^ AMu^. (HI'UApJIuC ^ÄOfMWn/ Ä^ JhpdJUHt^ 
mM^ piu^iuvy^ 4Ua<v UaH' f^ /H^Ji Jihr^/ ^iiUyuL^^ 

/kn^uJLy dcJLM- ^^4*^ vUtvJi^in^ df>4^jdl^ 4€e#^#n<^ ÄU#^^i<w/ 




Vfvv^ 



du^ (Jihn^ 



AiliuM- 



. Ji4^^ UikU' fUw^ 



r 



lull- tnr jkffiJufMy- \WL^AV»fYI^I^ aIUL AÜ mIM^U 



Ufni^ 



f l4 



I vidi, ^Jt!i^JiA^^>nMi4H/ M^ A4tJi^ t$^i#^MM.^^^K^ 

A4^ JhdikfnUii^^ MaA/ At^ M^ Mif^ Mii$C l^hJut 
/uJIm/^^ %^wj^ Mß^ßfHi/ AtfX iU«/ A 

^uiJuJh^ /h% flUmJgchm^. Mr^eJiJUJi^ ißi^wtMiM/. 

SiJi/ Jii^ ^^ti/nalniJU aLU4^ jMiktt AifiJky A^i^ ^^ 
JjJJu^ aJL AliM. JUJUUJJut JLiU iiJI'JuX jk 
/iU4/ Atiil/ xMA^mO^ /uHMn^, JiK ^Um4 ^ JiUHi^ 



-lOi- 




UkMn^ M % m ti < M t jk i tdr Ju ^ ^4^MiUrv^ mJt^ IolMv^ 
JMfPit^^, Jm. ^ifwK/ vÄn-m. ^ XM/MU Min^^ nt^i^ it^^^^'^ 



\ 






hd>/ Aicchr j^ Mu ^/iJh^ iiwiA/ ^^HaMMu m^M4Mfp^. 04 

^^fty^ /^vyX A^^ht^ Jmi^^^iliniia^ - ^Jim/tt\^U<U^u^ Oa^uJ^cM^ 
A/^ IhMq iry >AÄ^n«^M^ wJLvvvt/vv^ ijtmiiw JUh^hMr. U 
VUM/ aJL AitA/' I dAp mi/ iJ64iuii/vvhm*^^ *mv^ Al^ /*^' 
idLuA^yy^ MhMn^ Ju^kA^ JUUjl AyAlid^yi/ /h/\^fdt^M 
Mir^ /ht/wyyt^yW^^ fUu^ AnAHUl. ^UiyMu lUM^ dU 





p 



f^ 



-, 



il 



'Ü 



oU(U'H^^Mn 



fW. 




m 



T^ll 



4 nvW Mi4 



fy}4^^ CuJ /Wtvvi^th/ MM/ AvwrJf/ 



Uvyi/, 



A^^ 



^ytprih> du U>ruMU/ 



Xtlku4 lii/ 




Hnmif /^^m^ /^tii^ 



'ind/O 



a ^ J f 




h'A^yK. I/Afw %'.^udo /yyuiA d^mi. MliulUip Audv^ 

^IMAUV MtrH4^^ nM^nUtMü^i Mh^^tAHAUW JtiSutit^ A$^H/Ü^y}^ 
/il^-^z/. (Uy\Aw Mo(/yy^ MV ^hm^ dit UMI /t^r^A^y^M Ja^C^ 

MoiJk^ ^'-m/ dc^m ^Imt\/w(WiP /^md Avyi/ 4^-^ /i4iU\4f9m \ 

ntifWkJ . ^i»^ dvi^ (hiMhoIlmy^ dÜ44i/ fllOi^ümit/yy' d£kA< 4in/ i 



-110- 



AilrYvMu^di/ 



/hy /yni^ 



\(lwO ' 



J^di^^hJiii 4i^ht/24t^4tMtyy'> iJ ihf^ dws Ait^ a^kq^^^l^ ^ 
wUdvtiU AA/yd VAmH^ /^^WiA Auh/ OimM Mti^ M4^ndt4 



Ma/ 



Myv iLM'fSiWUlPiAry' MHjPTkUf. Htnv d(A/ ^^MvMiüvvyvy IviMhV 



vvcm/ di^^ uMivk Am<uM- 



01 4ifi/yyi/ 



lUvnifLud ^Mth/ Mvyyvvmi/ diVidv<\e^^Vr. O^t i'J^Jhw' A<f A; 



Pn*]fyy 



ivyyt 



.. .... ... ...... ^..,. ^ , 



Jukul-^M^rvfiUU^, 



rU 



H 




I 



m 



-III- 



/H^VH/Jtv^H^i ii^i 




-lli- 

tj/wJiU' fiidt^vJiLAy' Ju/l]A^r /Irrw ^ Aflhj/ W*t/ U 



A^V 



A/*^niA/V*'^^n-*Mtn>y^ . 



4yv im^ 4e* lif^hiH^Mea^ /h^Mt d^uw Mi^ ■ 









JUn^ /}MAtA/ ml M^ AH/t\Jl ^jfm^Oii^/uM/W^ Juiw^t/. 

ll^uvi %rdJll ktJU 4^ /HvJ /Uci^i yCUl JU JtiMrm^ 



Artyl 



l 







M^Mii. 



iu\44- 



A/yV 



di^iMh. -itif 



M/vyd du- iidtiimtm'i^^ da v^u^r^ xMiu.^^ i Jli4^ Ut^ 




ip/hru^ ß^Unuf \J]A/y>U ^M >m*>»^ w^hÄh^^^iUi, d^/ •udiiJU'^MtfPi 



/^ rlifU^ /ifrd\ 



ilidi^ l^^UhV JiMyir>xU-hdA/ /di,i \J(Moi 







fi/\ftdiM/ 



lulOi^iMMMht 







A/n^ 



V/rdiM A/JyiATil 
m^tt^ ktmn/' A^IMfl^y^ mli dü^ i\fÜAnMrt)Müi^ ^JtA/ lUU4 

4^M. iM^iiJL^ I LI 



I 







i^t ^ M i^ 



AtiM< 




\}h^vf^li4Cy 



d(K Jlti/pLy/ Ae^dlf^ /iHidi^-^j 4r /TI^A^ diA^ JiJut d\M'- 
AelLlfd /*»^ '•^ ^ 4vUhi< Mt /inj Arh4^fi/ MoMAtty- 






i! 



I 



f 



■'■1 



:V 



wm 



-113- 

Atityr^ J^U MiH^J^ I MHlU^^e^ 



-nt- 






\ery^. 



tMt^4Uih^. 






-/n4jJh^ /^>-)a<«/ ImAvU Tr\n/ ihil'^iyytn^t^yy^, 



(M'iAyt/ j 4Mif \my)Y 4(4 \ «jU^ IvyUo^ UjeL^ /h/^ai^ dd mt ^t>mk- \^^-M>tyy^ 



} 



AVfAtAMV 






om^ /hM (HM/\/tkdf A<n^dAVyy^ Mt/h^^Jk^ /^»M^ ä^^ 







dtHw ^Ui^hV AtA/ i^^^^ ifl^ 



fimyt/ 



t M . i M 1^ LI . hlyUL»tmt.*ty»t^ . wf m 



^ltV\t%yHiM^ ^iifh midi^ /hpuh/H^^ ^ /^ dd aIw d^ Jeml 

^iUA4n/ Amd' /vmhJ- MvehA^ i/i^h^ ^im/n/ 

KiiLfMW \moKu , '^^^^^ diJt A^ &vX4ii 4/yru Ml h^ v/^^c^w^ 
/ji^tn/HU^ XhvMyy mdUw, UmAf/yd/ mw Avyy*/' /ht /M^^UiaU 'SM, 

' ii ' 

4HAV t(h/hdtU/ dlin/i4i^JcUh^ mwJtA'u^vi/. Hld l^^AiiMnti^iM/ <dliMt'- 
Acil ^AAt liA^vv VirvL m ^u^)^ki^J(^r^ -/^i^/ miiuvi/i mA/ 




f 



dlrv' ^Lyyr^^t^^ - i^^^d/' 



riT""! 






Mit- Amid /^eJUhil /fvMc^yi/ Ä4/yyyy^ . Jnlhd 



nwivmyyd/. 



Udjiwy]/yyd/il^o^y/i nk/. 



- IIS - 



' ^^If 



li 



/ 



>i^'. 




M^hJMyinV. 






%d^ 









i%AJU/ - Sjiltyi4/ JUüU Uv mk^L,^ iiMUyy Mrvl ^]üJtJtLLn/ Ai^UhI^ V^Lf^ ^lo^ ^ 








iL jL^HO SJUyy 



jÄaMMu^ d/kfum^, Jtw W 



/Wti^ /«rv*; AfM/ AU^ doi/ mtAi' 



m^ 1^0 /lud Ici^rUhtiJ-- 
/fMM VU^ . AtUi/}V /yyituy^ AfC- 



A/YiUoJlhy' 



I 



/ 



TT 



QjimoM' lUU, Ju^ AKiiLthhV 







f^>9^ 



OlM.VUihi4hfllH44: 



uhU Jfeue^ ^M^ I Alf- äA d^ dn^ 

/MtiOu^ Im/ j ^lAyyV /^w^^^ Mt M^ynOi^ <cJJ/ 4hMt /Hi^ 



1 



'i 
i 





Am. 4m4^ umU MOV fltt^Miu^. /y^ 



J ^ ,/* at J 

Aj duw^ VtHrnyi i^icfU dlfTM^ Aw lm9l^ , 

/Co^yKUJi/ QX(Cfr4lftr l/^^n^^cLn/ /t^ry^ vU-MAtpyi^MoA^ M^ 
/ItCiU^, i^¥fi- ^i mW m'Uh^^^h^li'y^i^ ^^MhrirAuyi/ 4A^yy^ 
^IUa^X^t^^ /hUU iMt dtM ^ W ^ ^lyM^^^ 



i 



m 



\ 



'^Vm/ oJiu^ /ffim/ I(MitA4n/ J/Cui^ An^ 




-117- 

iki/it lu /Mi^Un^ <Jiu^ /rm/ ^iot^ 

JUa^ MWC UiW dtAhmy MM^ A>f^rn/ ^JUC^y^Uy^ /iut 
<nt> MUniAi^^ , /irnniUyyJlU'h/ JmnMrtMdüW liAUm^ni^yi/^ 



lOrw 




(juu^üW /(4^>/ wnJt/^ 



I 



M^Vy\/ 




Mm^n/ 



MArmM^^y 






KMiMHy /yy\f M^muU/ %M^ , IM/ ik/ mA M^tW ^/JLtU', 
imf^At^yyn^UTU^A^ Ju 'fm^M^ ^AmlwiM i^Mt^M/ " ^j/vi^h^yMÜln/ 







^J^ tClJunijT 



1 






/lV¥tfWVV\^ 



h^^rpikllUyi/ Unvi/y 



fc^Xt^i JUtnil XiLw JuiJMf^^^fiJi^rn^ U*^ /tt^^W: 






f 



|n II 



N. 



I 







4yv (Mf'tm/ Ma 



/inn>~ 



UvJni /)n4i/ /u^ny ivHt^ JUütm' ÜMuUryyA^ JLa/ /k^i^ Im- 



I 






UUh^ 



\kfl*^räMf\/ 



^/ntiim^^ 



/hr^V Atu 



i 



j-J 



'Y Aiun A 



\hH/f4^ 



JhUMi^ /Wt*^' "^y^^-^^i^ ^«/jaaI/ /niA/ 4^ A/JUiU A^^^iJiHt - 
jli4U< A^ mhM(Äf lHiwn' /h^nM JljL /m/ Ah' }iUf/fmd 

U/ dm^/yv^. OL kMi 44^i^^^ vihM/ AtW ^AnJUtMMi^ 
1U\^ JlAnH< /^ Jlaix/t^¥)^ Uvn/ vU/ A'kvJ/ du/^/^ A^OkfMt 
















Pl^ 



A*^. Um ^hvwU 



-110' 

vJUfUH, AiK Ana Wiw/^ /^ imt^fhfk/^^^M 
cmn/ ^Mi^ik /mOiMJ- Iwyv j M Mm yAMyOilkw .fu^ 

Awn/ lA^J^u/fk /yruicMy d^ dvtM kJIa^^ ja/ K^ ACt 

mm 
JfJ^mk Mii py öLv 'hiM^ 4kvfv m^^ \mi^t fn%^ yimi 

1 




/t^mpUn^ d*i(f^ mU^l- oJIq ivntUUiU, t'i 



U>m/^ Aa/vW Jm ijtJ^cJU Mf^^>^ dMyUpvri^ /i^t^ jtMft" 




/l^*Ävn/ Am^^Uw /^(/hK^U^i^ A€vy%/. 

f(\.^(^'lW<^J^ ^nV d(fM^^tyyi4^ Aji^^ /kfl*Ui^, "luvt/ 



-ia. Yw^^'i^^A/i\^i/i^M^yyy^<l di^' iMiMi >mv Avi^^ di^yi^ 




Jm/. ly^MryfHV. 



^ 



I 



I 



ci%Htvttfrvw3U4^. 



Mim/ VQ^ 



-IV" 



H^^yKll/yyvfify 



AMU /)frM$v]/ . dl)y d^ illA^44^ /fi^ A^ iS 



A^dtki- ' 









IW]^U^}Jyyr^^ dxi Jm/K 



khUyV /hXW' QjM l^n^4^ M^f*4^ <ülyMfv^ Mf A>^ /i*;^ J^^ 1 







A^u 



WMLyi' 



fr 

'^l^tA^nA/ /Oiti/ wrth/ hl/ d^lMW, 







/UfK jU^ 'i 






t^ lyyi/ Ama' mM/} UMvyvi/i 'i^^^n/ • ifU^^ ^W^ 



.MU/^ /(kvJ-' itvM/ ^)iMAAiMyft^ n/kAMfi^KM,- Am^ni^fy/ dü/dl^^ A^% 
ApM/ 'Ouuu^ufM/. m^/yi^ 4^1 j9t/ 4a7i/ /hH4iHUüUA/ doukUp 



iRMOn 



~jSJ4^i'*^l 



/kJi 



'JUlMtllo 



^tti^TFFXr 




M^' 



Uhr Au/tiM^C^JtfrM/J 






tMnV JjiAA 



X 



\yyAyiÄAM^yy 



KjirtnMp' 



\'7lt^^ 



diA/ oCi 



aA^l 



I 




mMVi^lvi/l^ AiA/ (XVMtl/ A/iA^ JhUiM\^^ivry§/n^ 



dt l^i'pt 




m^ iDf ni/ ^^Jf^ Auf u 

1 ^{yuk ^^ j , I f r 



liHn/imi' 



4*^/^^' 



/v^^ 



/tn 



J^AmK^ ^Uv^y^/ A4^ hU^^l/l/ 



/y^Mt/ ^toyr>^i^^ 



1 






tumtnum/ Jln^Ti^utiMi/ 







i 



I 



i 



I 



JiA/ <Ü4 



^^wmwUi^, 



-lii- 






f 



■Ai 



4^*f* 



il i nns t^ hLk 






J^ JahUc m^yi^/numv' m^Jt^ /O^^ dct y7^4*<J^W»y4A^ 




/twdv M/V^^fv JLrwt/ 



nlM^^y^ni^iMü^uA 







&>i/ 



di/yy ^A 



\^inyyU^Yi^ 



Z/tYYrv vM^ün/t/i/y)/ 



/yyt>L44iMn/ 



^f^Wn/ 



mu^. 



JkklMk. -Jii. mk UvnL^^ UfUAlyi/ ^Uhf^ iutLv m4lyti^94^ 
AnjmiUM^^- Ju4l^ mj4i^ /mJu i'^^^ /iUni^ Ul^yi/ 



dxjWUXnhw 



itMe^jJUyt^. 



Mmtr -<r J)4¥ flud /Uk' ikwtm^ aML /huU AiUfl /fiH^Juv^ 














/du^ 4/vh/ dtA/ dmUk ' ^4k%Jt /hfifÄ iJiO(.yJtffupktr^ AU^^nt- 
/hnnm^ /ftU^ A/md cui€k m^ sdoyyyviUt, (üloc/J^U ^^idtvyja - 

hMr AA^ A(C^'yiä/ ^OMUihiA/. JILtrkMtMi ^Alti^ Af^^Ut 
^Uäk Ä^^yJut. 'S/M iH^iun -r'-*/ ^hv yivt /W^ 



-kl 









I 



I 



ÜB 



i§' 




drUi/L UAinl. 



~IZ5- 



1 



t/i^HvV lu^ 






/yt ntj ' m - ji^ mt /mlUv Xkul dmiy (M /yi^t JÜn^vim/ uU^t 
LSn/. fad Ury ImUk ' ^ hv d'AMot^ ji /t^^ ^/tdu^^'^- 

Un jvuuJt ^IfvW Y^hI ^^ A^f du dUyJL \Mitrid]J^*Uui^ 



1 "i/rnrrrr * 



/h/ij/i^ 














l/Oi'Wyyit^yt' 



^ 



/TtUh/^ 











I/^yv" /WtltWA mO^ UMul" . du/ hu dhy i'f^mA^M^^ Ai^ 



/^ 




i 



Itou^ l4\(m> MiiMd dt^ /htm^ liMXiUiM^ 



^ /«ff I i^niAt/ 4^ (min/ t 



/ 



/yw 














/\tn)/ 






MtUhvi^ 



dii/ WM/wvtvudt /ypüU Mit^^ ßM/U ^/ 



n n 



-;^ 



l^l^yUL 



f 



Md AMvh^. ddt dh4i. %du^ Akt^A^ ^ J^^i'^mulA/ 
f}v 4i^ dmd/dy>ti/dtnV if^ AfHl^ /^^ft\W 



/HAA 



V Am 



dU^i/hV JaiW dvt /mmi/d^4^V muMvi/ ^n t^^k^WWr?-' 



Il> 



1^ 



.i 



/fm^¥i/ 



diu 



t) I Uä 



du^ 






^ 4iMUi)i - 






Au A^^Jm- 



\ 





U± du ^ #^A^^>^;^ 
iLma^ ^Javw mamm, ^ w/^^hf/>^ff^ ,r^j^-..^^ 







r 



dml^ 






i 



h/vi^U^i^ 



Äw vUhUfv^ /HnH/ flM^/fV U^Uidi tun/ *iiA^nA/ hdui4 














A^ry 



A^n^ 



jfiU m 

JuJhm^ muH/ 



A(k^iV*niAi/ 1 M^^ aIwO 



/WHkv Atyth0t%44nnt^ 







"U^v^44^^M^^ . die Mh/ luAn^ *uil Aud M*^ M4 

Jty JuJi(4p^lnf Jt4di^ m M m^Und d^K^ 



%4^ dii^ W du/ ^^JLh^ - Vm^h/mUfTiil^ 









äiuJe -m 



^^ehi^iU'nUjio 



f^ 



'MU^. 



I 




i 






dW 



-US- 

%MU^^}44 JLm4^ /i/lKajUf^ 44 



-HO- 



4€M^ 



Z44m^ 



.VÜl/ %Mc%'h44 ULM4H' /l/iA^A^^M^ 44 ^^ /U^ At 
aJJLL^ mUt t^ Uikvf^ ^(14 JtU jM44i^ ^JyvJi'fyy^ 4^ütk^ 
Im/ mt^ /tm/, W AiizU /du/ ^MUi4h4imilmy)/ UnuUJ^ 
AMAAYyv%vviv\/ mL Ait ilu ^iUtL /^l ^iM lfiMt4 
4jf4fh44^^n4^l/f^^>^ HnMu^^^rtudUA- A^AUßUy /^Hil&tn^ 4*9*^^ 
^iitUil 4>^ SJuui 4UJ jUrnl 4U4 § l6 di^/ jpmk- 
VUfM^ AinVi JMMUiUtp JlAn\/U4Myy jM^JItn^. d't AhhM^ 

, 1 j , \j TT 

4yUr MU^tvy" <44^i\Mi43Ui^M' Ami/ ii^nht^ xlhiATiCU^ff^ /h^y4^ 
Mlt^l ^ 4HHA^ LuMa^ WuAt^ /rn Jh^fi^yi A4^- 

/H4tfhnfn4^ MI*^ / /h^äikfy^ Aic /nt> 'CuJu^ 4 * n It f UlfCl 

%m4c ^mH 4441^ uiiU Jo IMrij^ Mi^nJt4i/ , ,C4 /hf^ 



>€f4l#H»^ 




/Jiäl[i^r$^^ j 4ul^ M/M /^ft*/ Jui Mut Ju4 4uUh4 ^ 
4lL Sh^mL Ja WAAiy Ulk/ vULy^ 4PfU 4^ J/^ijL^ 
Uv Afltn^tkln^ , Ahn ^ntJlL du ^SUnui, iJUta vL44iil Ui^ 

/H^^i/AU^v^ 4MU^ 4^ Itmi' 

\HMimli^ " 1/414^ 4ü^ 4U*U^ ÄltTf^ At^^iJynU^ %X^uJi/^ 
/tnk/tJhmUt/ , 4i¥^ OUm/ %ß444lt ^Ikajutul/ . Mw x miiloy 



UytA^ jU^uÜii^u^^ 



Ut/ 



\ 












i 




^tUo Uutn^Mi^yuhynt/ A^I^Ant^niU /k^C^Jht^ 




^ 



tjLalim mldii dl 



'iU 



Zi4^ 



Ma, lUfUfJ J44 ViU/i^nUi JhviJo M^M^ AaJ- d^ ÄW' 
4$ n( d md Muuf d^ mlujjk^ /$hy du AU^lni^ 



/UM^uJi^^ mi^ 2/m iH^vväJc 4^< 




VuLpt/, 






Ad*\4r Aw^iti^h^f^i/mt^ , 

di4 M^iAiU j^tuL^M, 4i^yi4^ JUtAUi: Mudp f /^ d<^ 

^\€7Hlik'WAdht^ tk/ ^)*^ i 44nJM^ IuhJi^ dhi du^ 
aJmJ»^ JU^ ht^lw^i 44U/9UM- Jürw2i44iny^ 4L vJhrt€^ 

mrU ßjHuLiu^ ih^iJ^ JU^^fJu^, mJi du^iy ^Me^vnL^ 

4dlU AiU W JinLM ^*^M^ Ji^ ItMwJt^ kti^M^ 

/uiL»M. mUJ^ »iUfytdif ßJdt^tf^» 

it ^hA^ h^iUi^ dypf,/ dUiU- V4A^udyy^ ' %U^ A*td 



! VI 



I 



Jhil 4UI liKc^ lu %UjhH4^ jLuU4 %ji^4ll 4$^ 
MAt44^ /Uh^vl^ hdS /n,p>ij^^ Mut jIIm, UhU. 

duitL^ , ,b^/jC^ Ju/t/iL^ l^Ji^jÄ^ I iuMn 



LluM JlmU^s Uhtn^ J t t ^ ifWfc /du ufsi^dfAM du 

fuJt^JiJi^ S /iIm. JKk/ /i^l %mL /eJtiJUJl^^ . A^ 



U ILU 



-in- 

AJLt/j /NwJLw ^ AU^t^ (Ad- ^H^lJ^ Xjlwndi^ dt^^ 
ifyh^^ /LtmO KM/Hil. Mw OUiJi di4/ Ah/MAUCjl MMmt*i^ 

%Jf/ /U SilU AnH^Ui^j aJJU^ ^^f) ^ ^ 
JU AJUtLiiL %U^ ^/JiM/tJl' /kyld Aw iic JmX^- 

I / ^ ^ . 4t^ die *^^ P^ ^ 

Iw /iHiluuJt^ 



/fHULaJ^n^ /I^Sa^JM^. St LMm^ 4fltr AaiJc, 




Audi A jUfH^t ^^ ^^^ ^ ^^^^^ MfM. 

yU^/&4/ Avrh/ jlk fiAi€, tJlfufyiM^ W Ifi^dL /M^fM 

j^ynJL^ JukJh fiUt ^l^. S^ iU^^U^ 

Xhn^ft/ Jh^ W^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^Adu^ttdi^f 





e^c- 



AT& (fk 



dU\ffi/luAy%Mr >**** — ^ ^htnJt^ l^tti/ ^^^ M^U^ ^ df^ 
Afkn/ AU. U^ %^>Ji>v^ ^ fiKliUljlVyn^ M/i 

^o^^nvnLM^ Jim Midi IS^ , ^ ^ ^ ^ 

X^ ^^LM aLU^ aU mir ^ JfkJti, 



44-^4^1^ 



Ati^^ 



■ ■^V^-.':- 



Aikt^u^ 



-133- 







Jylu^JyfUili iw/ JUi4At^Mi4H< 



iJuJU^ tJifuiiy 



1 






J 










Miii/ ÜHt' 



JUu^^.f^U 










A^ 



/ii^JUM\Jk^f\Mtv i^^JLi mmH 



UiüfUn/ iufkuik A^' tmi t r JoA44HA^u/ i^unsL 4iJ\/ duui m^o 



d^yipd^yn" 



Ä 



/iW^ 



^44lyt/ ^tM^^li/" 






duttihUvntkrnt^ aU' WHnIk/ Jului4 (flMitl /«W. 






ju ^ UUitJU JjU 4t. Xi ^^^ ^5U^ JiUi^ U- 












/ 



/ 




l»s>s^ 







<^i^^'V' 



^.<^,•j -I^js,:;';;,', i,/r».M;>;!o,.i 



i.:;;!»»*^; 









|'^f,v;VJ;/P 






(4yyr*i^ 



AHnn/ 



'iL 



i a' // / 



■yyy ^-^ 



l 




■l Kftl^ hW //tW Aurt- 4ii\^ 



Vi; 



7 






ju ditr K^ 



'♦^f^^ j 






Jirr 



diL . J^A^ Ki'ajit^ 



f 












l 



JUäA^^ <fAU^iky^AAyA fk A'Jit ^r^'i ^'W AfP^.fjlJl" 



ALr/^ ^ ^> ^_lÄ 






/hyy 






^^ iJLtJijU. M: Xi^L,l.'llLL-%Ju.4^nLiji'.^d,y_Ja 









./. 













.vi' : -;-■ - - 









~IS7' 



If^ M 




/ . / yj 



Kt iif^\nK/t\^ry\Kcih4^ 






I 




^iSn^Uy^ 



CM' 






.AOjvy^ /for^-i^ /yym ^m^mü - M^l^triryvfyy^, U /?t^ Ml4 ffJ^ 



Jtvrr 



*^JUr 




4*^1^ — 









M Whniu hiMyt^ vl^^Ui A^Uyi^ 



Amlt 4k iyn^tUyJhß/ mL 'Vi^A/ /Uyrd i^yJU /Pt h^Jt'Ji 







144. Ar, Afny MJT^ Unj^ ivArytUryJ^, aUI _ ^l^^yytdii^if^ _ iM/^A^'-l^^^^V^^v^ 



OrMr- 












ma4k 






-4^^- 




mit. //AK AM yÄ^ 



^i^Y^m^t^u^,, 



,/»yU^^>^/' 



/ 



,m. Mi 



dik \Ul**^ /fHUi^ KHM^ ^^4<,d iJlhy^ 



fL.L. 



ivni 



J j 9 ^^^t::'!^^ if^^ t ' 




ififkfH^'C' 



' rl^yK/ s^ flUm Im a^ 'Wtk 






/likVVrv . 4mdk dk M^/Mi. J^^IhnU^AL^ 

/fC*K/ jk^vfiSn^ ditivM 4pw/ dJL^ ^^y Aw Av-n. 

/if(^ /fUi 1^^5,4. hM>^ Ki^/hn/ ^ 












inn 



» t'fe^V * 




Ji^ 










II 






(^J^ ClM^ iMI^ CU<^ A^ 



I 



A^v 



otMUl» J^ 



Or^ 









^ in ( 



4Hr>wiÄw*v ."ji^kmio^nd^^^/ftu^it^^ 






rf^f^' 










Wm 



1 



i^" 



.,iV«Ü 



r- 



^t^:^T^"rrp:»^ 



^H 



oW ^^^ry^ QU^f dla^yktV» 






trr>* 














/Umu M^ürnry^ n^>y dtn^ ^rHjLi 



/yyy 



di\ fc iiJiiSi , 






/#^ K^\i^ /Um m 



yfii^M^^tt^^ _ My m l^^^f^(^,, dAi< lauUii /vi^l /ti,^ ' uJc Ut)k X'i 






/)mf /}(-A 



ATI 



'Ulrrk^i'yr/ 



1 ^ I V 




a ti^nyiTfÜT^ t /^ 



/(hW 






n^^nMiw". 









Oll 'VuhJ M^^iii' ^eli ^y sMulni^^^^d^M^ 44;^'i^ cU 



■yiM' C cA^'nvnp^ 



MrU ^ ^^ 4u^a ,uMJ /m...A^i^ /j;Ut>i J^f-M ;*vj^i 



A4 



JH/iU1lky^/ 









^^ 



lyA^o 



JyiUyy' 






>^ KluA,udi^ 



AuJ^ 






^h^ yyvyyUK W/ /hm^ 4*vjil ^lU-f'vtf^ Aii . v>/ d^ fyi^*^ <i>V«Wi 



mWn 



<» W 



^mkW^i 



hrt 



^ JMyyI , //. 



'A ^h^ ^vi^4ttry 



X' 



/' 



"^W^ftnM- 



\ 



i 






// jW iiv " 



O^^AOr 



^y\4 ^f*i^J#7^H-w« 









•■■■ -, . .' ' ,'.. , .11 "> '.' ' 



/^ 



'.pAt-. im. 



'U^[yt4'7rf 






0**4(\iiÄ(^ 



My <iöv: hb^^H^iy»^^ .^^^fn^ IfUjfJ^y i^^nyyvt^^. 






jyyy 



mi/i. 









yyyy 







i 



^^M^ v^ 




iLUiik UUfk^JLA^ 



Ä^_>Äj- I 



.JmL MjjUU oJijyfl*^ ^tl,lU> /W ^jvMu/^.^m /uxi fuL 

MrJ. M /{^frv AM. diUMi UiK J^^C . ^jd 4-Mk 4^ 



n^^itLk^. ^ ML X.k'^ H k ^^u!' 










Avrr/ M 





^PHf^ 






ifcXm^ . 'Ä^ 4M. JU^ jUX Al^4^^ AHtvx. <fl Jlt^SfVyy' 
Jtyy vW /iAff ^/rCn4^ />m^ /^ Jii^ m^xliH^iH^. Uli (Jh. 

^A^yyKti^ /uM W>^ noM^i hHiU. llh^ /W^mL /iuJi aLi^ 



k- 



tJl/hyy 






-in- 








-}¥3- 




Mndnsiif . ijtUcM 



Uu^/- 44'^ 



1 



VA 













il 1 '^'^ lU4(yiJilvuO /Pn m l't/iU^ AM-iJf' /U'c /^mp^^. Oifl 






^ä;^ ^a^n^v^ ^JIq^jM/» 



f 



Ih 



/^W AÄ4 V^_ dt\ _Am CV^^'T (^W^ /(^... <»^ <W l/h^iyy 












JlnaJ^^^ Unr>^ Om ^hthLtk-^^AkJ A<i^...,^M j^ Ic^dh^^ j S^-H 



-y^tUÄ — M/hiSi 



V d^t/yy 



ife_._ J^/. 



dJU 



/^fTHiA^t. 




jrnMk^ 




jiLkki^ MM^-XfltM^-.^^^ J-ßL^Jh^fmik 









'yHrtyyyyy*. 



f i de 



i^Mi /Wnl idnU' ÄUml^ 



-J^o^ 



ZJo 




./iw AuuL /fci ■^iu»)niM<imi^ —Jihi^ dr ndiUdc- m<4^t*»^ ! jljj JIumJ: 






^l'TV^ 



\ 






^ ' I f ' "- A/yy 'm< ^Mk^ o^aw , Mit Mun 

I j in ^^ ^ ' ' 

m/3 /Ui Aii — ikJkii/ Aliud ^ Ai- /yy^^jUr i'^^TA/h^ ..AWi^t^JlLp^ 



/h^uc d^h 



/i/Pn fi tii/i A^y^^rrkt^^^ h^hl'utt^^^h , 






1 



T 



4*^ /^Lk u4 Aq ^'AJt^ aJ- du^ UL7IM /^^/ 






ff 



^ <W>J iArtAtMiAU . JyA 



f 



^^^ ^A 






AM^ 



M 



i 



''^yh^ 



Ju4^ 



Ji4* AK 

4 i^ iUw Wf u^^ m4 ^ li^'Ju /)/^ uu /)/r 



\- 



\ -ii 



• f ..:■'■-: ••-^-.^ ■'- • • 






. "■•■'..V . _ ^ . 



A^Jt^j^yr. i'h 



*MupoLi^Au^. 



■■«I— rr.' 









M^ H^ 



äflo^^ilsAi^ ^-yi^jUldfhltiatt^tpti^^, Jhy /> ßÜ //// «A/ ^Wi — bW^ 

/^ M^^4*^ -^^^ Ät <^*^ JUi /^/ _ M:y*^fMi^>f^^ d* \ i* < itt^ 



'/^f- 



muMi 



m 



'M^r^ 



4/^ Ar)V 



Akt^. 












-^ mh^jH^ 



L 



I '' I ' 

mAt^ Jtft — ?Ärv otiM' JuphI />mi /U^^niY ^^^Jf^ ^fHf^ JLic 



I 



jv4t^i^ /J^^A^ /}iHI^ 44 



! 






I /ojlr Jd^y/ lyiJf^J/ AMfftli'-^4t\4^ Jü- vU^t Ji ^^ Ik ' Jcry Jt/Cr k, 
Ml tn^ /h^yiA/ ti'-^yi^ iiUi-L^ AtJomiJ /hJU^ /JL Myi^ 

i äl i t fl f[\. ^^«/J >*t^fjM »t^ f^"^*^ ' V 






i'td^ ^/yyyk <.A^7^t 



'cdfyyyy>r> Jnuli/nn 



aa^rl^y - Jv/ ' .hy^i, -Äi^ ^TvJf MK(L ^ O^yityLiti l*'^ihi*L 
, vWi^ Ja^^4^ . ^luM 4a m ^v f^ ^ ^ /huiiyy ^OpU Ma.cu^ A^ 






£Ui^ 



/m^»^' ///U c4ti^^ "^Jit^mji^^ Jll'nr' /li^tij/kr UKtiU " 



A^UlU! 



/hm^4^^^-Mi4i^ Kmi^p^lTtA^U/ 



MtvJU 



A/^y^ 



cuU 






aJLth» i^CytfMJtn^^ y" r f \ ^ . 1. I i. 



/Urk /Vn»j 



%,. . '-'Cr '■■■',.*'' 



1'.. A; 



,"Ä•'^,•i.^^„'-^;:^•^'-^J 



■f. — .r-.-,T* ■'" - - - .Yl' •- ^' 



f^,M 



*>.... 









-;.'W.^ -,->-'.■, -- ■■■• -H'> 




i^i-JljlyYii ,^}y l ir^ 






X^Urvl /dwM^M/ jfUvMt^ ULMjf^^}fM/-y^^^iJk^ NAMhm UMfi'K 



*^. - 






*M4 f)Ai^^..^dij¥' .kfwnyj ßwi l^t^ii^nJt /^ynl dcM tha^Mti-^ 










Vn 



m VirnAtiU ^ /m^yri^tU. 



V 






// 



Jä^äc MhfOiU 



r- 




.4m^ 







Jki 



itsL 



"yyy v 



W^ ^ 



V* 



^^W d^i^H^JmM^^^H^Aii^d-. sj)/(kj9 X- 




Äry^f^A&i ^1/ynJy __ Ah/... M^yH/ v^l^ivyyth jm^_^M\ 



u ^ 



. -"h^M^^^^JUr^ J^aM ^Jm^d^L 



1 






<kki — Ma^ 






^r 



4/jj 




J^h^^iM \tti ./hy 






±ul 



L 






AKt /Uyyii^ Mx4^_^\l:^^Jiv , ^ ^Unnt^ i^^/ dU-hu^i. J,V 4^4 



I^i4^/y\4/ 



m 



Jrtpiaf dui Um nrnl^aJi.i.n^i^MA/' Mc< 





P^ 



/hm^ 



ff 



rA^ 



^Xv \ftHjiUw 4^u 



i^yyv 4^ 4^' 






^ipny Ai^ntftyi tk 




/i/w- J'^^^^ w 4h^3Jia^^>nJAU ^ , Mc ^L iL^tLr^ JU ^Si^^^.Lry M i^. J^ 



II 



'Y"it-M4 niiKi dtwy A^ VW ^sä&Wi Iii^ul4 m^4tn^, Ju*t^ M^kv ,ui A^ /pC 



■>hh4i^oLry ^.pytyy UJuI^^IL^J., f;Aiir<*. LiL %4^ 1MV (L^ X^ ^ Mv /L liht: f6. ^ 



L^^^^m ^.^ , >M k <!\PNiU^ ^ L^^IL^ ^r^' ^^^^ lUkmf^ aU ^ ^/^ F^. f^c^ ,<Ul,^. 



"-■r-v^-rfr^/r;.- 



r 



\- 



>— 



I 



■ ."•* ; <J^' 



.^:^r^ 



■ ^■.s-.^'.-*>oKiy*<- -^,.. 



* .1 






l^j-yti/ 






4L ^^ 



-m- 




4i^ '^■Uvtmh' I dvV A 







Mi^n44 4fUi»^^ ^U%{imi 



4My 







/U 



t 



ifl^iM^ 



4m^ 









dni du' KuJikif^ /♦mV 




; 



L/*H#V /h^tit^ 






cJU 






' uJt^ 'hufM 




/?»WX/n^ 



ßA<i ßAPiV M ^\i 4h^ ^^^ /V)ttyy^jM^ Xl^Jwi.- 










wtivn* 



i^nluHUyy^. 






/ht*tMty 




'UrrvMyt^ 



^hyjh/ 



tiM4U^ 



J L ' ^ ^ ^ / f 



'Httkky^ mA^^44/^ />9liull^ /H»^ 
J*HII- dt/9 X^tjl^ J^ ^SfJl _^JkM^^^ t A^yr^ ij^- 

d i ut U iJ m iA iu^% 'f^ < ?K u < J h f i Ji M^-^ J^ 444. aIv 
U/ AtML^ Jmom^ wJUJlr ^ J^^^ltrt' i^yJk^M^^^ 
M^iaA^tM^4^^ jJ(^^ /Uyn%^ Ai^ JU0^ jiuiV 







■ - - .'^J^'u:c--Jf.'"'i-'.." 



'\^. 



r- 






r 



r- 



r- 









-z^- 












'iif /w^. sfie 






jÖt/wj- 



dci 



eoM^ 



^Jh^t^ /^tli^kri^ /fl^( 



4 "^ '^'Yi*n'y**if^*^^*^^'*^i\y /i*^wyy^ 



^^^^>r^ A^l A^ ^VlAiU^ /iw<^ imfai^ 






-15-1- 

mlmMj^ /W^ itJ m^ ytm Myt^ /5T) . OöO , 

Ma^^io^ty. Jjtf/Uv Äiyy^ 4ii \mftr n^ mi/\^ 



444- 

flJt 




/ft»€. 




i^ dAf jt^$lUilth^ Juh>U^ ituJy JU AiA/iAtiltfU ^^l^4Mt 







p}yn^t^ 



/l'fhUt j mj^ Vidnil 4ÄV /H«u^ \]t(SrMpmK^ jLt ^l^ 



ll^ ^Jud Ar»4^ llultU ViluJ' UiJtU, 



f 



^M^THL^jitki^ Ayr Mt 



oluili/VtiTtfilyyy^ 



/fry 



jt^nv 



n^t^Ly,/ 



MitA^yttn 






/h^Ju iUi^ 



/hMiJi., . 4M , ^ 




'^UkU. 



(M ^ JaU IcJM. 4^ 44^ jUL fUii \Xl^ /k*U- 
Ai^^vH^ J'^^urjc WUilrV SUfii^i/i^, Jii. AyJmyi/ ^Ji^f^iiUn- 



Artd mMi^ ^hh^4t^ 1^ JtW ^S4ivyi4W i f M-nf^nii^V . (fw/-- ^^ ^ <lMf>^Jil^¥jc^ /fw ffli 



mm^ nLh/ MJL ßti^ mAw- ^jiUi^iMK^Htr /tffik^ Mnrr^ Jt/t^ 



MAaCl- 



W 



<- II 



L- 



f^ I 



I 



r i 



h- 



— '.-rVJ 



^-iffl^- -■f^-:- 



Jf^^^TT-- 






..-j' •«^'•S (■♦••, *"«>> - ••• » T'k^vv.Jl^f . 










Ott^^t€^hnHi4mo ifryn^ JUlW xJlUu/t ^XJm*^. Jlt ßOOiMjil^ 




7 



iA^H4^ 






\ 



^Lm*\/ ^tk/HnrvMhT^^ 






4A^t4/ ^fiiUloA/hmvilut/ /ifn/ /hUiW A/tuM^ MiM^ A4tn. /mMi^ 



Atlthm, 5^ ^ #^ 41^^ U^rti^ Jydijii^ny^ 






»v>j 



^ 



>ft -:■:. 



- :\'-.--.ii 



^^:r 



'-fyjpyw:; 




t- 



AA< ßft/wvtyiül aIo 1L^ ui^Mil' /pUrv^ /h^ ^La&y JUSftLiUiJI^ 
aIu^ A^nrd /KhH/ /ITh^ ^^^^ 4i^U^ ityrfwic Jlt<4iltl . JUt^ 



.■»■■•vV 



«•»jip«*r 



■X « -.* tr^-': '- ' 



! 



^^J^^fy<^^^u4u%Ji^ tjlUu^, 









h 



4ndyHWU, 



Jt^Pt^ l 



^ ^^htfu^ Mtl. uJlt^^ . 



^JUJm^ 



//'H/ 4rhM^ 



^ fr[«4nif>^ 0ii^^U{^ /ht/hiUhtt^ At'Urv^ ^h^ ACtU Ilt^Mtwkf' . 
Ah^JtUyy jt^^Mi^ iJtityyPt^ /t^l^iiMi^ JMiA4,i4AiJtc(il /i^^^ ßUc 

JlAMH /yrt^Mt >k?k^ ^p^^XfUu^fivvvik, AmJl JUaJi. Jut. SUL^ 
kd ßUttH^ IumJ /^^s^^ SUH- Puuuk JUi lilJi /i^iH0Jc 







Und flrtcJm. fym^g M\^ 



m^. 



I f 

MmdiW^ I nmV MlrtAw" jU M^nt< 4mL ^H>r^ Jhyr J^tjUl^ 
iL i^^rML X S^yU^ JuJiJi ^lil(ijLv V^ ^uJLh^ 



4i^p\^ Ahn/ /uni/ chinMii, ^ d^<l ^Lvt/ /^^(^^M^ X «^^i/^i&^i^ 
Am 4r>td dn^ Jdtdti. ^^^ J/t44l€V du^ 4jn^ aJL Jfi^ 

_ /Vik^. 4h' m däL. Idih^ o(tHe^ iHJ^ %mOy^ Mmd 
—Jmf Ih^Ux/rru' AnnJi do^ f^^lfL JUuitS, /i4en^ Vi^ind Vth^ 

imj)4iti^ 4nd Jhp/ AaUC^ Jidi dti Ju^ 4W. 1p"^y 
^^ Jdrt^ ^m^\ aI^ XaJk^ /iwf'/ diA^ aA^d ApJ du 

JfirtUa /UyU MMC ' „ fk f /ui atdt . Jjf Jm/ /Uc4 /*ffi- 

vUn^ ^ 4m AlUtd^^nk^ cddydd W , dti. 4mf Audi 
/iLhd A^Jidht ißi^^ UiJt^ nudd JudUf .A^hdoy/ ddlif'^JIU 



V 



t 






\- 



f 



T' 



i 



;:^\h 



■' i^*-V?! 



• r. ->^i 






n 



^■y-^y''-^:"'^'"' 



^■fryy,-.^ *•• .-i^TR*.Jf. 



'.' ' . •'' ■■'.' T JT-zir ■ -• 



^/5?- 



/C«W ß^^fiMt/ZlKty /hiMML . /d^CmAJi^ AM^Jjl« VffJl^yny U**n 
m/liMlMim MHytrU. i^nn;l(V nt»SLl^ Ju KlLwhA^^__ 



-in- 



Jk%r*^x 











/hfyuL A^ ^j^Lu. Y^ Wt ^CM ! " ^^ Jt4^4^ ^eAjJu 
nmJhr A^ ^T jUtrr>sify M,Ji^ i^-iW^ti^ (VtAitiU 4nU ^uk 

/Ift^ JlMii^yr yrU^Ji'A * ;^^ Jh. JifJ^iF Z 



-Ui/ JtKfiMi X \MUma ^HI^^tMh^^ m^iyiJti.^ *L/hh^'l'fdjk> 
— JW W4€fyf/wW^ n^yM. Üi^rln^uU^ 13/^ -^ Ai^ 

J^U, SU Xu. JU i ^^.^^ 



Ai/m/^.. -AiekUc 



wJUm^ 



/^^^^^rvtHlri/ Ai\Mn<^ 






y, ^;Vä^.Ii^^>^ ^^,;-J,5^ii^,^:. ;^^ 






-7 . ^. rf.rrr.' .•f.ijr^ 



JuL^^ 



UuA^. 



'^•V 



■■■«Jt*»"'-': 






JiMÄ ' ^ ihh /CiL Aldi mU^ /\mcuJt vxdt4yuu JtuJ!^ 



/Tip 



mliu^. 



A^yiM 



JaJ- A^ a!L .^yyy IfMü^ d^MfmtLnti 

1 W- linV 4i^ ^t^tt^itJAMM- ;(AA4Jc 4^ 









vK' 









-^>^?^^ 



tm^ 



't-f .■'■', 



«ttM /yoi^ /mM/^ JmhAi^^^pjiJ^ AoLl mittue, 



a4ikI 









vMK^ JfnsUJ' 4m4mA' 




A4 /^H/ 44M 4<hifat. ^V -ji^i XMinyyijlnt' i 

mhv WsJc^U^ ^SrhMky AJl /ultMi^ Jni^y^ JUtiUl-. IxnfUJt 

^iU^ /hfPi^Ul ^XiUfi /htdU y<V Üu^Jm aJ JiSLlniAr 
MLL %mct ^yfdßdl. /TfM yikfry^ /fnii xJlulf /WfU\kdliJi^ 

ml du449 tü^Z JaI m^ d/tli ^pyji ^44^ juuM, 



■-ISO- 












-161- 



f}(Y\do^fJt M^hiM /hvMt I MJkk W^ xm^ d^^ tUdnJtdLvp^ 

^Mhvjfu^ IX xMiA' Avtd JLliL äLv a^. Ju aIu^ dct 

JUuj^duAML jdi^iAQAJiyiALpU. ^^^^4^; dcMIc ju jiuL 

MhXKuA j d^O A4 4ila4lUyx/ /h^iJh^ OHUt. j Ih^il ^iMMAJhAft' 

i/hm- Ami AUnnJ^ J^My A^yy S^/ihJaMh^ JiS dJi (kyJjc 

I Iß . 

\iJc 



l^Mhv, 4i^4n^ uLml- hJL A^t. aIoi^ /I^aJUaIo 



XdJU. 



Aaa/ 



0*^dU^* 



A^ 



Ji/H^ 



Jac c^W ^^^llÄr Jl^M^ A4A AA^nAAnJl^rr^lLy W duA 







dmfi' d^ ^{iKAMiL d^ mukui^ d^^tMnd Jttkikd^AikJh, 

>«*'»P'^— *4Hm/ /hu^ AÄfHi^ AtdlMo^ m^^H^ynl /hnl ^¥^*^ ^(>H$Uky^ 
Anv du VitdlHtJt di4 /hAu^yt/ ^^€<;4t/ti^ /^ AA aLuU 



^fßnf ^^ '^§w^^^r^n 



11. . 



/iHti/, 



^Äuu 4^ duMnA^ du JIa,'^ Am' ^ lUM^it^^ 



t' 






11 



«-, - .1'' ■.■■' '. 






<^ÄÄVM<^Ki/4 1/- 



lUUiA^ lUM/^n^ThfCct, 



/Vvy 




-HZ' 



m ui% 









/hitrf)^ 






^^AAAi 






Iw A<vtU*y^ ^ma$n^ ^Jt^^ Ah4 A^ ZmX AU^i^ii^y. A_;H 
AkttuLv' tMwLiU LJ^yy" /ir dui^ MU, A4JL JLc 

-Äf^V jMI nivuti^ S^wiLnih/. 



-163 - 

vy\Aw4iM4iM^ , /M Ai^ dh0f^ \MiAUcU^ 'imt^y' Unt 



yf*^ WMV Kjii^f^t , AA^tfl^ ^'(44/^^ %Mi^ 



7 

MfJ^ ^m JUohI mImL auH iAjA/. A^ iU*^ Itt iU, 

Afp AuKUA/ Ktil J^ t?»»Wl>r^ 4/r^ 3uiuy fjUnet ^ JiiM/ 
/imMw /iUr^ 4»^ dtAr iJjkMi ^rn^ Akk fJUrr^ JhJm, ^HmuC 
mJL JlMJt AAi^ Am/ J^ AVCUfv^ lUp. >w MU fkJuJtJic 

MnJf fhAAAt AAlw>Ui^ aJa 411 



r" 



lOnM 



Auh^43^ 



S^yviPT^yr^u^^ 



AruuiUe^>s/^A4^ y^M^aJc^ YkH^ \XM 



^jU^i 



^/^;^ / 



fljUn/ 



AhtA^v^ 



^ %, ShiiL , aI 



n^yaÜi/ /CiScn^ /imv ^ J^e/e/ 



:>,;•■ .,1:. 



KS' ',.-■' 



.■. 1: 



-Vf 



V^'i'^^v,] 






f^cri » t 



i^iT.*^ '**k^.'^.^/7r^'in^y 



" V-VV'>- -V- 



'T^f 



i^M k <^ S^ tMiJL 4^4^ JÜU' 



MJhAyi/ 



^iii/^tv' M/tvy/ Jhifyy^ 



-ISS- 



.jlu\{U4i4<UAMPf/, JlCi JUmA^V tk^Ünnfi^ if>^ t/h^ JUlu^ 



^Ar^ynft^» 



aJUIUU 






m/ JtMLlh^ 




tJUifUi^ 



Alfluiy 




die 



AmU /iv 'W*»^ JtdsJ '^ Olf«/ /k^liyft' Mfli^ jUJtUvi/ /W 

tJuiÄn/ Jl^ JM^ ^M4iiLii fJJu/ ^twU tUliJ Mi^ 

UAf^Y'uUkan^/ nttiJ&H/ And /^yy^ fM^t,/ dU MiUuLH- 
dßfV ^^T^^/ >^<^>»<W^ M^^^^JtM 4M yJ^nAKkln^ A^UJt 

Anmrn^ Aina-m^ 4J4/ JJuUiimA^ {\tn^ nrt /CV du Ļu(i/^ 



■ffr-x^'t r :•-. -r^' 



irtnxAl T 



— ll>-_ V. Jl 









I 

r 



' JU. 



JS*^ ^isjJtM- 



t^^^nidUf /hM^ ymlriV 



4n/ 



Ja 










44-H14 






kdtü^^ 94\v^pJML>i/ ähU Myr¥ ß^ ^ Mq tjflijäl- 

Ji2i MfU^ fUL^ ^(Lp^ ^ fuiUJ^, dnLJUnu- 
JOmL Äi'^ Jf JpHi^ /fiA#C \d^ A»tf4#nH»»»^^<i/ /m¥^ A^rU 4J0 




.-Vfii ■-'■;::•;:; 






m< eyAMMW /^*f*h ^♦^W^ /♦♦»«/ AitM. /hrt^ T^A Xrn^ 

jm^ M9 irM9 /u^^m^ j^ /h^U ^nlt. % lU A4 

At^N^yv /v^ Ail dt/1' J4h4lnti Ao^flwhitntii^. \f'>^ 
/iW j4i^iU^^^fuir Ait qIi^ Uy Mu^ahi/ mJL nfnn /Mo 



.mUU- 



M^hiyvi/ 



4k»<L 



Ary 



Jtn/YiM^ Aui 



I 

I 



i 



I 



( 

I 



Aifth^ 



UiKu4 



iv^X/hxLy 



i 



Of^Mß^ ZorH/it^t/i^ y<WV ^A/JotUw 



Äi^ itn/ idut- du^ <UtUt^ 

Avni Awyp' j^^jh^ ßh^4i'i^ /$i^ du. JdiJiyt^^Jtef^ f^ dß^^ 

yild Jl4^. ^ dil X# /uJUyj^. Jii^ SUUl' /I4^ jAM4d- 

JUJd MdL. ^ 

<J>/ di^ SuJiifidryuUi^^ 14 4h{ im^ ^sHahiI d^udy 

Jh*v Tfitd i^iäd /H^. JiwyJk. AA Adi /hM ^i^eJtA44Afi/ 
aLJ^, aJL d^ SLi^ii^ ^ ^d^ 



didvi/ ' ^4 



^47n\^d€/L>^. 



/dfaui,} AM^MUA. y^ii^ xXlyndh^ 4^^nf€i^ Mi- yJirnAuUAnt 



^AA /l^- 




V (^- 



-•'<-■•■■ ■:.,!' -aj. i'.r ^-- .. 



" *• ' '*'x'-' 



:\}.-'"- 



■w'.Y 



,■■■' ■■ / ■ ■ . •■V . 



4«1mmm^ <Mt*J, ttiU MMtmUiJ', 



-164' 



-l(>9^ 



¥n^ 



hhfy ^^ 4^>wAff ^ /4^- 44^ ^W aI 



u 



,/iAfil Iw 




4MlMu 



I 



/i^ 



/0?»*V 




mv W^ Jlfikfvf /l^ ^Lft/ mdlUJttfhUi/ 



iCJt ^Icufl^i 



ü^¥i/yy i^t/Ufhif W^^ 



1 



(' 



jLj/ 



^m^, JfM$ 



^ 4yy¥i\^ 









M/ mi^mll^ 4i^%44 /dMiU^hy' dlMi^t^^i^ I^i4tjil4 



-fr 



Jfy^iyyiMMMHi^r^t 





sjmid ^H^iMc ad p^ !j*^ 



yW'^T 



ü^ ^M4 



I 



t'.,»««»^ 






^ c-rft •-• ""i"./ -■.'Y' 



I 



V- 




4J1U4 ^ 4^ Jii JifJ jhtL^ /^Hf^ /WÄt.. flJiLiv^ 

M^fu4. :__ 

im^^rnnr*^ 44*miV' ytii 4^^ l^yhA^ynl V^ ^kUdplH^ 






•>r 



„^■•.v'.^ 






-5*'/ -►'■ /*-^ ' ■ "' • • - . ■ 






y^mi /i^MiU/ ^^Mu^, 



• ■■ ■ .- „'V'l ,A ]' 



-/7^- 



-17h 



i^^JL__:M^^ U^^i 



ik^.^iMji^>^j^ Jlh 






r 



mm^s 




iUui^ 




I 

f^ M'. — A ,^,1^ — 



M/ym A^ my/ i ^y^fl /hM /irwi/ /^yy Ah*^ Ji*ih^ vipi 



\ 



^Ji^ 







fny Jmfy J4^ 1t^!^M^ 'H^^^, Jü Jh^ tht^lfu^ 4^ i*Uhyi^ 

A4 A^ iSw ^Ä\y mky üA^ 4^ ^^U^fJ^ nmAhK, 






i l s ilm^ ■ 4, ^ 



T 



^ i H % MM 



W Uf^ Mi. ^(^Mi^ ''y4fy^yJk jmlllM 




-JMl 



fi^^ HMyy kailC 






TT 



TT 



^W^H 4^ 









I JiV JW iMi^ iLf^Jlu^ f Uiy wdydd , fiii^ iin^ 4htl^ 



A JUäi' AmWi aide/, ^M ^ t i t imu/ JiA 




"•VC 3 'L 









• 1',, ;•.. 






,lr^.^._ ,.. 






h 



t 



^ ^^ (J^ i^ dlLu4 









-113- 






7 



>, 







JUfi^fJuf^ M^ 






tJjm^>^i^Jht^ 



7^' 




f 



/tH 



/9n 



Wi/ 







4^ SMt^ 



Vtf^f^l^tA^^ 



» CW /^jj/ ^ ifU^ füll 



ichAmißk jßUi flküi^ ^ /hiU w . _i^> 



r 



\hn 



i 




mJ^ifiii^i^ 



^41. imH -M ^ '^T ^ 4^ /u^ cuk /^ _ 



74M9i, f7m^^ 






^ lUpii^ /Wrt^ Ahfr/ A/h^v^fry JiHynclt' Mj^yv^ 




Ja JMfj^ nin^ /i/Ä. J/tJU " ^j(u%ii "mJI 
\ mMuAUi/ ¥^ Aid Mf*^ /^lflui>i^ miJLL 

AfV ^ wWr W^ W ^ha^ lÄtw*!^ fkniil ^liU>f^ f 
^ ^ 44W<4i^ VMa^. M^ ifilnA JJÜ^ Mi44Ji ^hmA^ 

1000 fXd^ UiMk^MiJ^ ^4U4Uu4^ ikU ^iUaMU ui/ 

UU» uttJ. cmt/t i/^/t kttdilt\ii//iiA ^ LUy4bljiäLL /ymJik^ 





t ■'■'■'< -'l^ 






'"■■■■■ii 

■-' •■'. 'j'i'. - -.■•--■- -:'V+! ■ 



I I 



yÜW iJ/A^ M/yyJid 












^;^'-fit^'.:. 



1 



^wv»^ iftU^ ylluviMV, 




h^ 



/*mMÄ 



T 



Xi ?^ Uli iU im JiaM^ w/ Miik 

'^i^i^l/ . l5lkuiU W tU l^M- fnJt ^ 1^17 



A\iludvi/vV JÜi^ 



• «ÄWl^ i5W^ .4^ ii^Mi^ 4W^ /i¥tfiW iMLvy\.if^ 4iV 






iJalU h^' t 



M^ dim/ 57j^ ^tAMlr,. 

hJMv Ix^^'ÄKlAt^ih^. h^ ^44yJ 4r /^ikjiki^ ^/^^-^ 




iifni/ W^5^> di4/ ^nditf'küiiplUk^ üd^fiAU Ud^ii4^ 
iPh IflU ^U jilM m/ 'fJTrf iluA aJ J^Mf JUmA 









Ui^^ Mvdlhy^. 













lt'"::i',>l :/ 






■■•1 :>• '"">^^» .;,/■ v'j.' ■ 



lAJ.:...\^f^^^:„^r^^ 






^'T^r";Mf 









■:,'' ;» 



»t'*'^'- 




-116- 




dii4jJt^m 



Xj..U 19^. . 



(^ 



f\rM 






^jUiW Ä^^ 



m^ sMlU/ ^/fum/ 4^ Jfi^^Uyy A^ <J 

ww^ aL ^^nUi^kLm^ ma^ Ayn^ iud vu^ UilcUh/ /ui W 

JiM^^yy)^ JU^UntiU pJd»!ik /LmiJ J^n^fnitl . A/f 



Afi± 









J/tUV /HWtWm/»^ ^ M w /W - 



^HfUfU^ AiUÜ^^.A^^ ^uU /mU ^ MiuLyv' /i^^ ^ ^^*»^ 






imy 



i4^ ^. iL /. ^ 










Arni^\L^MU 1mv cÄÄThJ^^V^a/I >^«/4ti^ Andtuy^^ IhMßoj: 

ilLi^ aL Mii ^ Jt^ /fiM^<^MfJhv ^Hhy" W^t*^ ♦^^^ J*r du^ t^ Vryy' %iMul ^UHix ^ d^ ^Kihiy^ 



4i^fy^ 



^nr am-- -i' 



AdhAfrynil "UhU 'UiuJiU I iw ^iLu^uid^ M aIU^_ . ^ 







V^h^. 












^555^^?^!^^^ 



'm'" 



^'.■*y^ 'U- 






;.A< \ » ■'■-■ ^ 



AlM^ vJinA hKyJdl, 



/+»*< 



^uA^UiK^ h jmlUtUf tH- SUic U^ ^i 



'HS' 



-116 - 

IAL ^Jjl^^ ^ i^m^^ ^Cf4i4s cmi ^uJu Milic ImCk 



cU'JdpU^fiiU^ /ÄW JhtM^'^ 



ifUyn^ 4i4i^ v^^Vh^ 4 ¥fiKiM>»^iK (Ml/ A^ AU t^'^^^wf/ 



i^. X ^^ X^f>^ V^- if^ AiUm^ vW^ f^Au 






AiAäfrmLnffi 



jAn 






AM4 V 



iLOiiMl- 



^k»!^ 



ä. m mg * O 



/^yf^ 



d^ tft 



'-^^Jti4^ 






Jma^ 4L7 ^CihiiM4 



öHi^ My /ykH^i 



.IftA/ - WhY" M W '^^WifV ^w 1/& MOh^ - JiiyvM^t^^/ A4" 



JfiMUy)/ fimdk^> »ÖmxM ^JL 4^ Mi 4\lidJdif . wL^<U4' 




Z/>ul ii4L Atdu aKl 



di^ MJ^ 



A^tv 







>Av dhy i^ M^eJi^, 

ftM diUu A^^tUMtf mAtMuf^ /y\M/idhv 




aX^'iffm^ iriUUi^ /fW U^ yiiutu di< J^^^iM d4\^ .Jm^pyy^k, mhV ^m^ Uv ^miuUy^ ^ du ^^Iji^fUiii^CU^^ 



Ji^^ m 



Vin4^ vJ(^4W /yyy 



<lij^4^tj)4^^ ^ V^^^f3^)»¥t4M^ M dMdAn4 . - Ww4^ yw Mldhi/ /U^ du ^^•^•^XJj^ Iv^^/Iu/hL^. di 

^ ymj4UUn^ MxAlMhH^ s^Mvji^ , /WWUt/ 4^ Mihy- ti&Wni«^ ^ W /hfjci^ ^ JiMiMi^ /Ur>M ^M'^ 

Afk^ cHukivi^vy^ä 4^^ft' C^ /hilLS rhd^mU^ d»^ ' MM mndl Ana^Tp^Jun /kfAidL, Ju %i/v^4 övwdi 4ad^ 



wU Jctwi/ ih<9Mi %Mt^ M MW >^ ^ikdiiM- 



VOKw%r vvw4 fuJyk ^h\yr/ 






iiv- 



'1^ 



.. *»v 



;», .y,-Vt ,;•*■■« 



A : t- t ». 




'UvhiXuUi /ÄWrV KA^^daAudui^ JtU^ m4 mitti^/^^ dß\^ 



u 



litfl 




'160' 



i^h/ 






J(y /JL Jttui^ 4^ ^U^tHH^ S^ A^ I M ^ 




ji^Cy^/hCilM /^yfMi4 jM iU^ Mi^^UfL UtUryn^ Vv^l/fiu^^ 
Ss^ymti, %Ji^ v!W^ ^ JU Sm^^^uäUd MnJncM^ 



mu 



i^i^JU^ %^ ^UtifU /W</ liuH^ 









jkm^ ^IkdlMkU' ^mA mjU JUtU MU AW ^mU ^^v 

iJlui/t^^ m 4il 4m jlilc Ijl^ mw ^^14^^^^ JJMtt^ Juam^ 

^ ihvl^ m^AA^ JmI M^ $<A ^ W^ Mi aM 4it^ 
J/A'iMift^ AyJfnJlM iJodfi^Ji^ diK n$kJt^4 4^^n/^ 

AMMtuJ^' ir W /M^ti^pli/tt^ iti /^tn^^ 4/MJ^pdlhi^ 




4i^ dji/m )i/»f lU^ im/. Jti tfm4 ^ liUä4^yyf>f^ X 

m lumu^ /\wM^ irn^U JttuU AA^JtJ'. J'(, m/ ^ c^Ä^ 

4#' f^{/)mmyv IHfUfi^^i m W^n^ jLlt^ il[2utd i^mJhy ^-j/^ 

mnU^ h^, JLiJt /Mpi^ 4^' Ah Jtu^JßH /W JUk 4k 



.'.i "■ V 



'.t— . -•Cj.-ir-s; : ,j.i'V;,.^- -'r • . 






.•,r-"i' 




f. 



■■■> <■._ 



•,, -^ ■ 



l»*''yfc,'^- 



, ,,, ■■■;-"■.■<'•:•. vT:' ,1 



'■■•V> 



-ISl- 




mm" ^ 9jUy$U du JlMni^ jLL^- CU^^cl ^fr ^ 

/kA- /w4JI/ M^jJd pUi 1 . 

♦JU- ^JfU^fh/ W- /MÄJ' /htiU %/^ diMul 44yM^%^ 






JuJui^ 



CIM4 



Mit 






jLtnilj(Ui/i/ Mml Jys^i 



SiAAu-kifi^^ 




1 



4ü{ 4M duU jbt 











■ § , J W \ M 




{y AMl 



^- 







A/hJiA4'> 



MV 



JUvMi 






*jJi 












't' 









tv;, 









^^'V 



..,n 



■'■■'- t ' „ V' * 



^ 



••<v,.>A ''-■•/ ;'-i „ rt^'^r '■^'■", 






-l&^- 



-Ii5 - 



^ /^-^i^ 



tä^^^ikc . //crt /<W lliAyf^ ^miouJc m^u^ muJt 44^yhen^ 

^ JM ^ Ä /^ 100,000 JImI a^ JU^ X>n^ AJt 



/MW/ 










iNt f', 



m 



JM/npyrj/ i^ Anviy (klMi^lfmiit 'fl/UAdt^ Au t^r ZW»fn4<' 













7 



Ji. tW oJmuv 4^ 3mi vvu^^i^ vlktiaK ^'J AiUu^rv i^yhiUi- 



d4> dlt/W Juiih Ar^ MSu tdv Am^ Jm/ ^ l^Jih ' 

fijMu{k9 /w^dL^ /^ftLll, 



. ^ 4* 1^ / mi4$L iiJt, /yyyyuUfy^ lU diMA^ry (JjyU^ . 



)JiA 4M4amUI /^ A4iyv4^ SLf^l^ ^^Vf^ ipfdJLuih Aue 

mt^AlAv,^, ^U^kul yUSyyy /hm, 4M^ 1^ Al^tvlK /W 

iLmTy- MAjhtA jt^fiA^f/t M^ auaL AiJi />nfiL Mn€^ .A jä^hJm4y*^ ftfU /)^._jJa, jli^ lu JU JmJIq 




\U 



hrfki^ 



aJUJ 






■^ffüi 



r^'".. 



j,~. 



f,*- 



♦;. 



>,-;'- r^ '■■■■■ T-'- ■.':••• i",:"-'^^*'»»' 



■j.\/^; ■ I - t • 



dt^ di^^ 



-lU- 






/^yyy 



y^^-KfVU 



Ä4n^ 



i. 



»m/ A^ov.iUuh. SLL^ ^i^tfJi^, Ju ÄU^ M^ Ik- Ju tMi€f^nvt\k4 A^M IiJk-. tt aU Am4 tl. 



'tii/Jf^CUi^rik^ 



'4^htC 



%44i^ /fiU^M<ht Um Am diAi4 SMm 



1 



»nfH^W /V^ 










-187- 

M IßiO Mn^ 




Ayy 



f}t4i^vy 



ßUymy>t/yv^ JiAMtry dil ^I^tMOiUüuh^ 






) 










Jy^' 



'T 



\}hi\^/^ d*^ \jhUtll4 Jfiucfy 






^AKxJ^Vn/^ /#< 



.^jliJl mfi^ünu^d ' ti»dr^ Vt^dhyrnfifMAL jirk 






OvJauU/ /f^i/yunmrytyy^, fJmiknd vmndßJ' Ai4- dil dkid^My 



diAy 



^^dlLi^jl 



t/Ti/yy^yy 




iimMhr Sa 



















Hf XJUUli/ /nvi/ J-iJnUMl^AmiMit' df/w dUtU^lti^d dU^ 4*ru MulU d^l'^ JW 









yyM^ /*• 



rt^th*pfM< 







duoA 



piy 



Mdül^ 



AA^y\^ 



Aiidj4Äi 



\,M ^wtU^ Ai^mUi^. Jt^ <üU€t 




n 



i/Vyy 



Iam^ dt/iV 






Air 



LJky Uir *JVi^Ap<Ku^LJu t^'yii^ du^u}^M Wi/^Ui^tUtn^ _ % ^^^^^^^^ ^ y^ ^JUibU mMt ^ ^U ^W^^vi/- 



■ \Sr:^' 




<lT"i 







- -/'.►■ •■*•. 



f.:. 



■■'— ; , ^ 



'^4*^- 



/Ht 






dvt 4nn/ Mtp, 



-IS9- 



WJ/ ' A^i^^^^t AAÜ^ /^y^* ^ Ml Jvv Uh^vXtA.y^^ ^ifC^ /K*iV 4tyr/ -ÄÄV ^Myl ^ /yv\k /^yi0n M' 




/^(LvV Vt^mk ^iffj^i^ md/' At^i^^CTkki/., dAA^ Mini 4^ Ml Jvt^ 'USwvlu^ 



inm /Uyy' it/ittJuw Jkmd My ^mJ m. 



miht^ 




rr 



n^ 



4^\ 



Mv" 



<ültiJt4^ MU4^ Jk4üL^ Ji^A^ 









M^fM^^ 




^Hi/tMiWi^^ 










_^ /M44^ Ait fl/l'di\(\^-l^^^^nyyyy uliWty dcUn^ VQXuA in- 

- JS Jüi^t. du f^ui^tU^ ^UUiif - Jy^JßJM^ A ^OtO '- ^l ÜÖO flJt 

W IH Xt%t JLk SrvcL^JU A ^^' 000 '• J3i, OOP IHJ^ 



l44/94/k%'mHy/ 







c04i#»)K4^f*WÄK^^ 



; 



imr" 



liO.OOO KßJl 







^Unt^ 






1^^000 nji 






WM 




a:v 



MtZx^ 



t;. .■e>-';ijyy 



M rf~, ■• ( JT r 



'. ^.- 



■'. J r^i . • < 



'£" 




> .; w- .-^ » ^" . ' 



:;: ■ 0. v 



. <■,-, '- • '7 t.' r — irf,-,- -^ » ■: 



-'/5/J- 



4UilfK^ 



h9¥ im>\^ li^ 






-131 - 



MUt^r mfuft ^ ^4v W J^y H^'^A^^UiPyJf^ tt^^U, 

/VVHV /H^vk^ ^ tliUi'y^^yr^y AL / I ' ff t J \ ^ ^ V j j 

^mU, . OM /hn^ du ' tM^^UniUuvvy 



^A«/. 




— -r^-t- — -y 









-M 












r" 



4^WH4 






JtewH- 



n/ 



d^t AVryyfw Im^m^vl A^J^ /^lUÜw ^ultUyy/^ ^ Au iLi. Jlm4. Mj^ iLtihtuuLiiiA my^ivL^ LlL,/ 




I 1 d ^ 




^^. ■■^/y'^;^ 






*■ 



\* -f ■ 



<J/, ^^ 



T^ J 



', -,.. ■• /^, •',-,-, TW,-;-?. ,or-. 







Jfinlitvi/ Aj 



-/5J- 



'Uu^ 









yynaryh^M4A 



f' 



tht^V^ 






/htivry 



iäfl 



MJz AryJi/w^AMfitAV . 



ihmi 



in 




..-^ti 






t'Vi/^yvn^ 



m^ — » 



itvk , Ml m>i-^^ AUM ^1A^ /HrJm 



vnAHväcA/' 



Hu ^ Jlyyi/ 






ijmJ/ IUI mli^ ywvUft, ^4^ Myykm'L 



1 ^-^ '^ 



I f 



mv^nd^rwt^ UU^^^ /Hrvd^ %vi^ AiXijtm' ^>MW AiS- M^ iiyJi4. « iiMrv . dik Al%nni.iUt^ 'p^yMfU^ ^UyyyM^ ^ f^ - ^ 



/%Mt dt/i 



Jfyi-tUu^yruo Mnil tW 



^JJU^jfi^yy' 



UyymiJT 



4^V 



4'Ä. KkLA,._^AlV^ qU^UttC mIi^ '*Äw nmv AÜTi^^^fr 'K^^ A^MtuLiJ^KU^ 






\: """r^. 






•■=r'---^, <>-'1- 



ift-.fS' i' -.-\',iy-l 






oJkhMUw'. 



-l^s-- 



x/fUl' /Vym- 



I 



ir ' i ' j) 










-rpff^ 



-d^ — y kk i/v :- 



(Jlli^yyyf 



// 



(^y U-^Y t^rrv-jthn 



Ajva/ 



<ulA4^ 









:dAii^ x^uf 4tUp(/i^ i^j 



/pfty 



JI4I1J0 



MAi Wl^iW^l/TZ-f' Mil} 



Ary 






yV\ 



, . J /h^^ Vhh^ lijyt . „ dia^ — M t*A* t ^ tirJytäi 4ov Aa^ cU^^J!^ 



Ayy>K^ /yyy 



di^ iMMhJf 



t/n^,Vfy 



%^4r*fAi^Vk 






I . 



Uni'. J^tm ^^r*iUii. UnJiJi An^U U^iMhu. h 



J 






*/ Ar^ ^-ifl 



/^fti 






\ 




i 



ir 






%Mr*k^'iMt4AJ^ 



^kA^cHt^v^r /Vi^l UhriJu^ M^l IM jviA^^f^^ 4^ Jt^lfiUi4ik4^i 



/ (// > ( { ' if — ^g*ft i fgUf» ^ M^rnl Uvnit /h^t tw'^Mt.MfU W /ftf^iUi'l 



4p>*nv^ 



lyt/yyy "O^^tL /»^ ß'i'ftn^ 






T 






■JniiJ x^^lUkry- 



/tHA /y»y 



f^f' ,^ C . . . . -/^>.44 /i!^i ^, Jluf^ ^/^W (k^JL^ Atiuyn7M^/ikk 



%ik%fk^ /W ßtfi/ JiiMtyyyy&Wvt^A^^r^ 



Am im ■ 1 1 I • *^ -* 



^^^vuvmiA 






(W<{ifn^ 









-" -, '-•*-,- ■ " -i'-'. :-. T 



{'^y ---y'y^Jii^'Ä ^^iTf-'-y-- 



m 



% 



i^yJ^i^Aut?Ukl ^ Mt, Vmit. 



J*Ui^ A^p^ IryviW jfcJt^ i%Ji^ ^ V^A^iyrJfit^X ^ 



-^191" 



Oiiic-Jl^AhMfV' Ä%/h0iiV^ /hA^^ Jt^yy^ /#A^ /(kU ^JfJfyM^^ 






aIL 7<a 




jhti^fL^ß. 4^*^ ^^A -^1 




AiMif , «y — Ai 4hv UriftMiK — Jl^ — r^ — if[t\ $,.^n-JJuii Jiij' 



'A/ 



A^jU- lAn4li4<. 










^^ 



feil » ' '?»'*^ 



i^ 



fhr: 



Jii^y h^tHKiif 



Mfhf fff^ni^nti.^ . q/r^T^***- /t/kyt/l 



.^Pyw ,/tyy>*iMH^^\^ A^jnl Ma _^ mUtprrtJr MAry*>^nH^. ^^^JUpi^v^ 4ftf>^ ^ 






6ayt< 



MdtlUn^yv^ ^JfkhtiM^i 













^u^ Um, ^m^ 



Huo4^ 



A/V^ /vjt'^rr?' 



, <mJl AiliUM AU 






>yy^ 



yMMYV '<UCf 



Mu^ 



-Jl 



<^^ m rdkJljlsnhJyilfU , ^ /^rn- Joi^Lf aJU 



^^ Jtiyy' 



I7i 



fHJhmA. 



Ur>ij4^ UyMuL Jkuli A^i nnyv" JUi4i^ /^ /ic 






^JULi^vt^ ^Mit^. /fv 4^iUn^ -^^*^t/^f^siia>^--3 ^mviUt 



/^4^ fkftjl(i4r^ 



4^ 4<yW^ 



iLfvyn^ J^PnJuv ^ aU l^Vi. A^JiryuJli^ d^4^AA KV> 0^ ^ W»^ ^iKj^.A^%^^ ^ftityrm^i^yrfW IhJLi^ÄMUl Iv^ ^ 






.■1 » . -'^i —^-.1, 






"~T.' 






"V. 




mm^-r 



4 "- ^ 



^wr- 



'JtV<4«<*«p4t«<A<t t*w/ IM-- 




xidUt/w mm/. ^ 3iMJl lulo ^'^ W ^»^ 

junJ^tyy ^ IHmU^ f^' 1&LU Al Si^mni4^ l^^U^ 



-m- 






aAI^UH'^' 



JM(4^ 



t^ 



aJu 






HAT /i/U At/yyv 



%kkti^ 



1 



tK^ 



In 






düt ßtw HK 



'^yyyf^ri^ WifnW^tyUi 






AiknAmit ^^ Aili^ hjmM^t^ %OJ^nJUvyyxy JlMft » 






7 



— /m^ 






^vy. 



'y\^ 




vM'>>^4?r3^ i 4b^._iVWw 



jJJf^MJi^ 



Aä^ 










AM^ 



/ffH 



^tryy^ /l^n/ J^i^hi^ Mi/niM' 
















SW^" Xij^ S, 



Utm 



^ioo- 






ttynf^>'My*fMt^. 






iov^m 



f^"^ 



M^ v^. 



T^ 



/ 



Ib^y^ 



M^ \L, MLk^J AtftA^f^' Xt^ ^^^ '^^ '^»''^ AV^^^ 
jlu<^LX^v JJUM 4^n4^ zhJtMnM W /h^ hJ/ dn.^Jc^' 



hU di W^ UiM4^i^ ^ 44^ /hU /W JL /hJ-JUAU- 

ÜIW/ tu sLv ML^ Zw )Juv, t aUL Jyrw 4i;oUW 9Uf^' 






x^ 



VA^ni^ AM^-Xn. .ji^ 






i 



JUuu^ 4*U^ 



/HhtH^ 



^Ll^md /VÄl^ Afl^ A^J^yrU^ Sl. . Qhl^ Jß^^ "^^^ 



JLrjJ. i iuUJi^ U ^ AJh^ Üäf^^O^fi^i^^^ /Ua 



tl(ln7nHiJ^.' m m^ Mku^ 



yjfyu'iAäM^ 






jA,JAml rKi^^Uu JLclufy, X/ /H^Jc iUv JaA\iJ 

,iiaW^mn/ aW 4iW /^ Hi'y^HvV Sekkkr Mt 




^yj^ Mi 4^ ±MM^-^kyy^ XM M i^' ^^ 
jJk Ar^ JUi 1!^ ffUi JudL^. i nmiy /Li i^ M^ 

y^4v. ^ n^ Jlr^M^ ^i^^^ -^f ^ ^^ ^ ^ 

[Mu, ^Jüii^^ ^^ff^ , f7 ^'' ^^ ^ ^ ^'' 



^103^ 









Mi^ ^lu^ 




/ / / / '/ " "J 

I 

Mc liv jJiAfy^KLM^ ikLdnti^ jUiWfn^^ h^n^ \CCtUw 4^ Kjf 
mKmV /HM litAL'f'^t^^y ./l^/yii^^.m 



Mmv ^nil. 




Sj^mn^ MM^y. ii /m^ 4t'i4 l^ ÄyiUn{iUnJi^ ^i^M^J^ mJI 



Mijlh*r9'yr\ 



h 



jn 



'MUuw7i^ny9^ 



MikiLi/^ 



'w!/ At^ ^Im^ 









--te M- 



>~ „S. .. " -.^ 






V rr •; s 



Jk. oW»^ 9-XfwiiZ^' 



jLm mM^ im/n^ hMk /%^U' 



--US- 





Mm/l jd^yi/ Avh/ /Ifißi /HSUi ^ ^/ÄjkW- A4^y>^ 

"JUn^-fji' /hicmi^, U lijic inii 4£m/ inn^^^ ^^4^vuJv ^ 
vki^tHli mvOniAl- Ayni A^jl^ 4^lpy m^ /kMß04^ U^*lh/" 



JMMjn^^Jin^/ , 










Jluh /MüUi^ ifu ^l^l/i^* /KA^h^ ßi ^j Je// ^,. , a l h' M i n uaJi 



iMc /?'W Ai^ 3iU^d. Vi miAU A^ Urvmtv IM^^^J^H^yV klytH^ 













/yti^n}/' 



Ott) dvi ^JUuJu^ n>i^ ^4lf^ 






A^'iitrytChhm^fyy, ,. ,_ ^^_ ^^^,, ,^^,4^ 






\im^ 






TU 



itfdl __Jti 




^ 




j^ 






^(f- ^/kKm ^i^tfUhr^ 



4 

^^^Ma4^^ ^ f i ^ i ' S ^tUi 5M Jl/Al M ^UlJJyJu ^ftMJLrt/fltU 



Vi^ 



,_l0'»14'/i 



]m 



iiyyV 



^4i 



TT^- 



'7r^ nfW 



^R^hikJk^jUnU kfuyy^ d^^v^ fiL 



^f>^^ \i'1^ vVti ^MLi A^KlAlr/ 





H^nH A 




ff^' 



ilryy /!Un/ 






M, Mh^ ML 4wL (uyhyiMA^i^ ^'m^yy^^_^/^& 






^^ 



/ 












.^t>v 



mih 



<L't«, 



M^^^inLrJi^ ^ Ahu/ ^^ hl IfJwn/ 



^'f^^^ilfni/vi 







zyma» 44>i- ,L 














/4fV») 



r 




/ 



1/ /hnfMo 



. clijutiO/vid^ fiw Cll^mL^ ^^^\ CU(^^ ß^rödulu // f ^»i»<rfy ^^ m* ^t Mt 









'•.o^'.j-^';' 



;*" „."ii' -■■; 










- .-S' 



.': r» T v 5?''^i^*-;»^.-n.'-^i .•';.■■ 














-Joe- 



ym$mQ a4^}^ 



/^l^^yy 4i/i^ 4tt(ß^yry^ 



lAL UüJt ßMy UcU /^^^ mjp^^^Jt^ Adfyi^^^JM^. — 






tUynl /Uin^' ^%U ßlo üUtU¥^ -i^^ ^^ 19^ ßhJ&tUi^ 



if/Ct /W ^'fuA^ /iiimUA/ vdL/ 1 Mi ^i0hv 4m^ M 

Ja, iL 



^ irr Mt ZumMcdvpru^ JL OUnuSt. JUi^\ 




Jifh.^,^4t%^ 








^'yy 



dUßä/dlnylv 



7 



&yv 



JiMfU 



/yW 



^^ 





















'W,*;.' -T.xn>^* 






d^- 



Muf AkU üUyidt^ Miyy 9jK^0pnM kJIuHV, <k/J Jt\<iH' Um/' . 

^'m. 



Vm Jkrti^ft^ kM4^ 







4/ryyi 







^ J %• 



M^ /Uynt <uii{U>y¥^ft0c /wm . iOO, OOO fmk ^M^ Av- 



^ kjlM<W^j^ ÄA.^.A'hyv^ M^yyJea^ ^MiA^vft/vvriy^n/ Im/ tudkvy, .^^ 
\ in J J t I I I I \ ^^ 

_ (^^^AmjU W 1 c?iW fm 9000 Hki v^ JcL^ 



uJ^ikl 4j2^l^^^.jMln$L., ^L^/tyl^yt^' ^JdM,^ /VLX^ duJl 



^# 




—Vi/vAvrv IllrncJ' iii/. 'jli^l Mw jkhUw 'üifülpi^tvy . ^ ^rfma 









—JniCi 



u 



'^Hiku/ 



u 









A^'t^ ehr /l^t^/vnyiMt^,, 



%m/ dii tjJJ ^M^^ M^ Jtl^Myy duui aL^ /kdiV iUiX^ JU ^iLi, 

f i f- UA . J * . V 






.Vvfki 






'JV-' 



ii^m 



-^u- 



wkw Jm %JlfUe/i^ii^uyÄi\4 , 



*■ 



/hii^LUi/ Jt}Uu>r^ /Jm yU^^i \!h^ :}tm/ /#<W' ^M Jkif4- 




ffm vt 



Hvi 



-AUrf 



itpl — ihuJtu^.-U M^^M*^ — 4M/ — hhii/iJ^oiM , /i 



r^ 






7 



//Lt /n^uJi^n^ v^i^U^uy 



/htlrnl\^ jLmU V'^fpudl' /CM, 



-JL. 44^^ 




kU 



(ULHiu/hnh^ifC ^ inu JiM4Uh T^h^ A^vyA/ MtAiii l^yni'H/' 

«Xlvji/ /iThv ^ mmw Myyl M^v^ Jffk^ 4yvi/ 7 jmun/' . 









-^13- 

- hvjU^ AiA^ M^^y^f^ il^ liliK»^ ^iiig jOi^'Ji^ ^ A äU. 
~~ JiJj^ ^^"""^ mMJ^^ S^AMI /W/^^ Ar.Ji^ 

— Ofm. M, Alk mpjd^LiMhhyfUiil ^ LfJLy^nUi^ 

-^ ml^M^ ^ 4u /imy Jht/ ^^ifiiiicJ^ fUliat/tll ^^ 



^yry 



— fmrfM[/ /Xrv' AvrvJi A^ßU 



I 



Af^ 



äM- JoA 



iA/<^&yyV, 









■/^r.-^.if^.-. 



■\i •!;♦■■- -w ,( ; 



1. 



flÜ! 



-il^i-- 



mii^ ll $yyrM ^hiü^ MaLv Ja' m¥^ /hU Mm/ Vl^¥^ 



.Ar- 





Mvvtt^ ifuMd /ny <üUiMi/ fi^mt/^ /it*^^ . d^ J^ Ihr 
ii Uk/n^ A^ A^ M>^ Mh/ ^ULtii^ JjMiU /Mi- 



h^f^^-M^ ^i^ ^UmuiLv /Ul /My /^ ^IUa^^ 



I 



M^c^y 



m^ 



-» h. 



'Mtv m^ ^^mW- 



W Mpytyy^ _^ 



<Ju 



U^-WM iti 




9iiJ/mi4^ 



An 



■vy^wy' 



miOu-MiOim^-^Jm/Jm .^mäL^^ jkw---%M(/w 



AUW. 



nft^ ^^ Um- My\jC ^v*Mc- 



Jtth44 JlChHM4<yulf I /fWi Jl^vrv^^ -^W /Vl^ M^ 

iter .IJuoJk. /mL Mi ^m^vn^ A^d mu^ iM Atl jM^' 
MiMi/ dÜm^Ml^ An^^tjU . 14 Ali Myfvy mL- /tfM IJui^^ 



m^n^mTf /hM 4^ A^Mo' aJU 4iii^ AMkUIc 



iKiM^ l llnri<i i / 9tk ai 4 diUt^yw ^JuiiJl A'i MilJU 



'fkry 



4mP 



^yr *J4fii^ lUtfU A^M4<t0i4^ 



:'---■> r.- ". i^r. 



\r !.,' •- :♦. ■' -'• 3. -1 ■■/■ -'■■ ■ 






fllAiy AaIo /fui>y MtoJkJ 



/tut» kJlMn^. J^ XMnd Mi ^ MK^ AmI /Vkyy m. lUnHA4iJU 
-im/ >W aJMIc Sd ^i 4^. Sic fJihr^ ^JU^ ^hJM/j 




AtV 4*^\4^ 4h/ AaIi^ M^ry*^ '^W 4i^i 



/tiMÜI/^, 



, MMi'M^yy' /tM(L 

WM4. hJuH4 \jU/ynl 4iw/ ArnAWi^^ /hmHy 



^3L fUl m4 JfuA, iM^l. tili ^ ^lU- Sm^ ^ 

SL^U mJt, U ^ Am^ yiml, ih^ p^o Ui- 
W *t^^y**r^ Ur»^ md MMo^ SnUp« mLL Mc^ 




duUv 4l*pt/i dtl MUwUu**»* 



lihr*t 



JU^ 






JftL 4U vKirv ^ JoU^mO /Hu/t/ ykU/. % /Wlttlo luUüi 



~Mf^ X. JL^ 4d /hj^ J^ jiiiiMJu^ SvMu^ uifiu^ 

- Iw ^SU^il ApM A/M JU %Ji U^ AiU^ mU Ad 

^3^^M ^^J^^Mn^ /flur^:^ ^^AnmUiLr^- ^J^l'^vi^li^k^JiL 



I'WA--^"^ ▼ 



\- ,• — -,-rul,i i,-- - 



t— 



y 



A^4tA^i<\/ MtiM/ 



-IIS-- 

XJjU4UUv hl/Mndi »1<J. vUMrry 



-115 - 










^hM^ AA^yt^y^ 



4^ ^U4JU.^^MmAL ^Hcik^ ^ S^rr^a^ %i^ ^iU^t ^ '^^^ ^ Lic^LJ. l^^u 



S^VlviAi 






ml' 



mjtmä^ Jm AfcLUyyy' ^iLU M^ Jn^Lkri/ diLu^* A^Mt 
4!ti/ jm/ -9J4l^ fU'-l Ayni/ kl^ynt' vmik /Vf^ \Jm11a/ 

/\/tMlmiJu^^. LI /M4>»f^ Ayi^ I Akh M M<H/ A/\/hn/ 4^ j4^- 



r 






'mw ^t^y^A^^ /m l^ li^ ^ mU aMmIi^ JdlL^ 



Atk 







-, ^ 



^ 



h - 



oMuMU^ aIw W /^i^r^t^ j^ nJu^ uJuL^. 

IKk, Iah/)/ JLü4h^ mt /W'm/ AJI^^v iMmMhi^h/ " ^^^ mdi^- 

^k^^io^vCOi/ ISIS.. Ar^ A/wJUh^ %!UA^Yni^, .l^iA/li/imri^^ hv m/ 

LyJUAi)A^yfW Je4. {4 Ulk aIU Ji ^^ Jm^ ß^ 
ijo^Jvry\Cim\l4 . ^^ l^ A»*/ \mUn^ m/ tW^ M^nl 
JvMiALnvJi'ry' /l/yyvd/ lMk^44ivi^vOfty/ MM^ /d^^^ tvHU Mit 



mlcM 



Uyf 



An^yy, 



-UJ- 



ApJc <3p40^ AtU 4a/v)/ t/lWi Afh^y^iT' 



KJCie^Ati/ 



iiMViUmii 



huL jLJu M^ LL4 "Häl AuM Vh^ i{^tu^y<liHfC diA 




^^'1- /i /^ W /^ /iw UL/ SiUfM/ 4V A J^jh- 

IkyMfi^ - 'c$Jm^ IMit^nt Ju€u/ U'^JUU ßf^yJLi^ 

^iW Qjk<^4^ /y^h^4^ äuiUl^ .i^ 4L %iAf^UA,JkLnf ' 

A<L^jn44^ W x^^ W ^ JcJlCdli/ M 



S ^/umdut^ 



.^L^^ma4(Jyvy^ 






JU4K^iMW 




./ 



^h>^i/Jt' 



/IfUumk^^ 



U 



M\/ 












i / (/ / « *w»o^ »■*«. (*(«v«- AuA tlv ^ihLinin 






■ * •,*.V'«iii'--Vi*-'i 



*■ 



-m- 



-iU- 






H^il /( 



'^iMt/ 



jdt/ry. 



^UfuihHAMY /mvr mWtV wt. 



X 






/ 




IaV M\n/. 






l^ Miyy /hmin^.^ ^JümA .J^iiA/ 



^»>*? 





ifiit AhI h^^ di/y^ mLLv jhJu^^V Mi m/ ^x^y»^. y^^. 
im/vv jpiuJLui Ack/miü^ . ,/«W /M^^m^ /hvft^ uiL jUi*i^ 

Muku/. J^ iilk ^itv My^i^ mshlW th^jLU A/U diU — 



^^^ %.3 ti^ 



JiAAyyy' 



Alk /Wy^^yr M/yyyy' AOOM/n/ Anrv" 



AiJJt X. JK/^/ dt^ ümP A^^vm 



i ^ / 'i 

^mM aJjjju jcLfy- A*uu^ aL A' Mj,/ k, 

miia^ »Weu..^ Uv ^IftlrJuy, ^ LJu m^ (h^ ^^kp^ 

Xl X;„< <%W. Ä ^^ W luM,myiyryy. Mi- -Si^y^ 

Mht^m^^ iHiLkiv ii^vJc-. Xk^Ucl jL JULv Ai.Jtd 

ItMMwkL,^ - ciUu^^UuäJjt- tvtJndl WH^Uyy' JCy^fu- 



l/4iä^»MUtn,t4/- ^tAnrnnhy-i idt^mtf diitii' ,i(i^ 



.1',...;. .,..'.. '..V- „->■' ■■■•■■• v' j'- ■■:>, ■' ,.*.r,^:"!^-- . '■ 



■ T, '-O • 



'-r,r'"JiT*.*-- 




Si^ctr^Mlm^ A J^^^ ^^^^ff¥ '^"^^ j^^f^J^'^ 



M/t^^ 



dnuM^ 




AthJlylyJc 4frJ Uli^mk W^if IdJUyV Uw Kvyyypt4V. ahy 



t 



}tMif 







Aa^. 



r 



I 



JLe «Iti 






Jiäj ii Jirmv /L^ ml M^ MuU^^^m^ Ilm4^ M^Wi 

MyJi kC MÄ^nii^ aILv^ «itttnO/ H<^^ JkiO^S^ AudUyW- 

jLv 4r;^JU^ /L ohdMf ii^ jtJuJ^ /^ (5^ ^ 

u ß ' I 

Atliv/^ Sk tot ^}haM^ mMi Iuni4^ IhMvm M- t^5w^^ 

&k mL ^ tLiUl JfJU A^ft^tViuMih/ Jh>H^ /ypU<mLv. 




\ 



AW 



VA^nkh^ik^f d^ An^ 4U/i la^txd^ixM 






-US'- 

A ikkiUUjkpyry», ^ Zf^ cj^ Mry Malt ^ X m^ 



h 



h- 



- «. - ■'■'. ■ ' .'' . ■ ' - ■ - ', 



-ir*v^, 















yTXA/vMt/yy' 



fr, 








^T 







W l/hd<k/ki^M^AtMkU 









ik\4fMi%klm^ ^$yn44 . JiHdt^ 



1 



f ^ m r ^ wm 



^frviMlyy" 



M/yyV 






4/hiM MTV 



ikAi/ äuHAv U-mfA^r^ ^aI m/i^ WUmi^ /2W i-i^ti^ 






iw AT^vilfyV 






^W/. 



(/ (/ (7 



^nvyy iDCD %Ji /^^^ittry jmc^ ,^^f^ ß^ Mki L^ /^^ 



htplAluvp' AM*y\ W. ijüw^ JiyUUio 



L 






..•,Vi- 



- -r. .' - ... \ 7%. \- . ■'■ 



M Xv^ Ja4 4tU aJI JclhU Mi. L Mi ^fuAi- JL.- 



.AtkL- 



mMoi/ . diju 4üi 



^jmv <ü4^4^ I/>Ki4)/ c4mr ÄUft/ /UvtfuMlm^ Müfahi/yyt4^ vtuJnv^UM^n/ 









l^, <ij 










jaJi^ hJfi^ m^ /m^i^Ury- ^nt^HMn^^j/- iLkTi^i^^Mtn»^ ^_ 



A^ 



•4 I u 

4 J ' ; /in / -yp 

'OmMw^^/i^^jt iii(mk /thui^. oJm^ /i^'->#^i^4f^Wt-^^ . w 







'^«'TiV 



^^Mm^iMi^S . m<} S ^ /¥^ ^'1^ . V^. 



4)JMuL /inmJi /mL 'Mlum' 



wyy 












^vnic üu^^ /^ KhA 



f 




^hUltUkU' ^hrU MjU --4«/ MfnA AT^yyrdh^ /tnJui/ 



—-loadkbe^dt^tmhilU, JlU^ jii^ ti^tJUi^yy^ 

1_ ^ iif^ ^MlHi/h4a^dlymi^ . /I^Tv /hTUh^ dLi ^M^ //«Z M' 



I 



■;j- >■< 






.-^■■--jL- .rv''"'. 






\ 



"W- 



jh/ik^.^JM ViSiHt ^ /nHUnry 4k/ d ^^^ ,^ppuhr Ahhl^i/ /fU^^ 



.Jumn^ 



Wv iuAM^wy^um^ ^^hil 




.-/hiMn^i 



itnt/iAi/ 



hl/ 



.aa.4l — /i — diMU.-mJt^'jCti^^.-.^iJL. Im dvtA^^AjdA^^jfhti^ 



h^ 




/tik, 









^(^vi' MrJi 



t 



ihyvh/fttAZr / 



Jn ihyvh/htii/- Mc <umji^y 4^. vlfü 4m/ m 







mMJa ifimrud/yiA/1 ^/ymh/ wmih/ /i^iim^._V«^w 4i^M^^»^ _ 

i\i^/iMutm/ AjChMiM Mffc ^CrMt M/ hi&ldJv AJt/uvtt JaM^ 
M^i ^mAik . JWi M^ dLui mAit/ /^ dhyu VM^ /^k^" 



__siw liiM aAI4} /UJiL /lA^Jiny" cMi^j. 

4U lA/ Am iutU M^H /hkiviiijft-, IM /^ iigm- /vm/ ditm- 

Jä^fv'mhmK tiMfMjUl/ A/u /UJh Mr Ai 'iiihtii' ^jhA k xfuf^, 

Ji^ mmit/ fü /Jft.^MmL vdLi^ l^uj^ L t y a ^^I 1<X /\U^ 



/h/UJtl Sl>VY\L 





3l^Ai A^U,^^ yyyi ^W ^ ,(jLi, 4Mc^ "^fr J ^^ ^ /e^/^H^ 




AMHi'. c\m AiMk mH^ .int 



AJLyy^ 



^4^nA 



I 






u 



•i4/yn^ 



JL U4 f^ld j sL Ihi4 nMl lU /^ U i^ 

imi^^hlUn^ 'C^SitMi^d A^^^'^Jd^ ^<^^ • , 






TM. 



>"--',iV 









4^ "^A^ft/tMryrrjUfh^n^^ /iUjCUj 



■■^r.-k^' 






^ 



-m- 






di 



-iJ3- 



■Uitrry 



ffhm Ivrv hUi^ytU /ihry^jhijtA HttL. ^ Milüi n%n4i, 



XiTJdi^ 



m <JM luJM^. jHil 



'PI 



M(lL. 



/mA/ Älw ^Ji^vi^ AhMU MkHiPrjJlyy- <u4^^h^^mC AmU 



yArt^ 



l i JiM io.m Ml- 



T 



/jfUiW inrt^i, '\li$nh /ki^ft^ , /^»4f_ , X4tAJh 4^^ 4fh^>yn4r ! 



( 




l 



4(UI jMi(. /Ury^i^ LhJii^ m^ "^Mtki Ami dn^v^ jMhy 

d^ Mt y^^Jiny jihn^i Amrn^ r-wm/ ^yy^n 'Arnm^^ 

h4tnv, LA /hMiil t^ 4t/y dhyJ^ M) jfh^JUh^ki^ AeUM, 






lipoimn, hL, hdfAmmi iu^ „ M^-Jk^p^ 







J^ih^tw^ ^ink^'._J^^AkjMA^ Jffci^ h ^^f-e^ ifv xJ^U^fu^ 






-Am 



Agtk i 



rJlkmthxU^ 



Ä^yy 






liMiJh^ -JkmJ Ayi^^^JLUfvl . iid dufyrJa^ 



i^^yTfyy 



\ 



UUr»^ Wd*n^ /^^ ^T^^ xI^^^Jlk^^^Tt^. dtl^ 




h^ IfiM 










m/k 









.i,.-,-. . <" - \' ^ •-- ..■■ , " " . 

'r;' . •■■ ■■■■:■,,■■ 



■r--^\.K-^'. v»V.- 



w?- 



! ^■ 




Wrv filh" 



>vtV 




l!f- 



'k. 



-m- 



Jmit . Mr.^ 44^yy fm^ 5^f Ju^l jjiIl mm^i^L /UAy 

. W-A^ — di^Ti^C iiJi lirrV dt 



-115- 




^U]/4i>9 



M n — ~T 1 



So 000 



(^ /4>^_ 



UOyJlfhJhn 



f 




h^lA/w' MKd^k Ak-nlL OfimpllT^ /h^sltMncJq MPwm f 











XVtvW 



/hy 






V(>JtJr<kMW 




iviMlAl 



(yw 



mß'yyjUwu 



oM y<^ 4vM Ml Mi. /d^ v^'u^ä^ /^Ui!/U7ufiL Jmdlr M" 



id^üaM^ 



lyH^ty^ 



jm 



VQumry ßt/t^ MÄ^ li-Ju^ oJ.tJt /f»^K MfJi Iti^yMlt 



1 



^h/ 



P 






JiMfryyii^ 



VAMl 



— U^MU^ /}T^ hvyW Hu!t% M^>{Jro /h^l/t^ hO/^ü^ , /iH tn^lAd^ 






liiiwiH'l'drHw :U/yil mnc dfiJ V 












Ai^ 



I ' - ^ 



ife^eAeupf- 



hV 



Z. yl^yW mti^' udr^^i^tyy' Ma^I ^diJi. di^ UithhJ^ ^^ 4t}^ 






rj'^* *''^';PH" ^^i''■'5 



QMX . U /htidl d Adi dlolA a!] A/VYvO^U^lvyyy UvmMw. 




T; t , " ' '^"f^iTfr 



1/ 



h/y<\i'p\ 



-ii6- 



^1i. 






mLJI Uii ^yJL^JijJllt 



mvA ß k ^^nhU I Avnl -^W^ AiU-ll /W XH^J^iJt^ 
iMdJ /hMh m>r^ UVivy^M m^^lcw^ flUyy At^Jl JivU^^ 






/f*^"^ "^t^^. 












ÄA/j^aijM. ^iit^ -m t i^ * ^ 



ti4mL. iMUfj/ 






TÄr tt^mL. 



/hfa/U^ 






lliaftQi/yY MtL lli/ui/^M^ -la^ JiUyypt^ 



.Jk/pj/idmnt' Jmh/ .../i^ _ htm- vifl /^i^ %M^' /cJlhiv 











M fM^ Viüiihy l^ 3iU^^J f t % r NvMMvtlL- MkhJ^-h^ /l^i 





'^**M- 



A*,/ i^y^ - Af T/kiUUlLrjff/t dAui /WläiA/ MKuUj- MA^i^ .hrMvIc 


















Ji^ifü<i4ii^n^. 



^ aM^ Mmy 



-isd- 



ou(Ml\Miülupn 



t 



/kh/ 



...i 



^- 






Ai 






dktAAA -Ct^l M da /^i mI d^^ AlUAWyJ^.ikf^yi/ V(i4^^' 





/im nflAik 



Jj^i\*i^ 















'h^ /l^ny J/rvH^ryt/tf /yy 



/Wrm/ 



.m}lMt /i/m düi/ V^Mrti^ UUt4 ^ULCUyul J-MituL ^ÄÄ Mnl^ 

mMtt4 



iUryyym^ ^UiiiJiM' ^.'IfrhH'ry A^ht^^ /hy\M*^ MC^ /^v' 

Ä^ /nuiaLi/ Muyr/ Avt^ dtW Mi^UUfi/ lt^v{/ruyri^ /uJftJhfU' 

I I J t ^ 7'^f^ 



^JU 








'a^M am tU^y)/ IfVHt JMi^- 



Af> 



imltSyyy^ 






4- 






/ 



JlnM^U/w tnhi^aUh /kntvdui/ /htütn^ 




HA^^ 



<Ji#Hi 



4t»' 



^Mt^yT^m^. MiJkJUriaL^ ^Si/vvult^ - -4f>^Jh^, 



Jmt/wHMMjuw /hyj- Ju 



./,».;.)•* ;*i;=»i"v*.^;'-V;'^-7)»i ••^— .v.«' M^)\,:f-ftn^!};3-i»~\ 



- r, , . T I , - > 



A;. -.,-•>" 



•-■yi-ri. 



V.1 ./.■( ■.,,. 



M 



n 









lAfiV 












^y 



L4i4hlndi 



r 



'imv 




m/ \mkM Um m ^lUiny^/ mMU^ Jit^^'^n^ /L^M^tr^^ 

ä M M Ja 







äai^ 




n 



jU^ft^nillkUry" 



MMiU 



/VUhowyrJ 



4/iyy 




aJJU^ 



m^ 



i 






U j diJh .m md mI /V4V ^Wyfl ti^cU rjif^ M^ ^ntt- 

^jAJmv AimJy ^^*^ M*tU /h^iMy, !ivi h/fäUn/ /h^U Ui/vkl 

aW ^Jtl/ JuJL Xf^^ di4^ JajLI fMl W InM^idl^ 

^^kh JTä^' , d du ^A4 ^iS/nn läl .(Ul Jm flMiXIi' PUvryd^YiA U^ 
— ^'j(\!U(/n, J/ihyyif /h/^im Mt 'U^M^J*^n^^(jp/yh^i!'Ut^M/U Mit KjaAii 



/id' 



aMIi iH% li 



i^AMilu^ /WUi4^. Jtf S^M /h^M- 4^PU^ /h^'iU npnm /\Mi- 







s/l-c » •« >•■• 






'^■' ■ " fTT' „■"•.> .w \^~ ^T^ '" '^y . 



I- 



tili} 



t ■ ■+ 




i 








I )t 










lim/ ^JAryj, 




ly/ l/'im.Cia^i 




JUymi diJu-Jü4mAi Aihht^^ 




<J^j^ ^M^ /tkkm^j. M4i. 










/V^nxA^ 



f^HT 






l/nHVU 






I 



it/Ht /rihtlfi^ 



.ML^/ht^ /hyy _mIL ^^^lmM]M---^-^^ 




.mUk dA}ki^\. AUihAL^ 



/tvyj^'t^ U^ Ai/yiS^^^iit^ 






/€i^^*ivn4/VK 






"v 






In^ 



I 



-i¥3^ 









1 



.JJiiMMdfidk^ ^ J^^ ^itdi ^mk^t^ ^ >A^ dkl LMLiJi 



J^ 



%Yyvlviamm^^ ^^JmJ^M ^ . /h^/Lrtr ?^. ..i^ -hL'^H^^Jg/L^ V- ^u yriM- 



äOL^-IMb^ i^yy jJtA lLvi^d^^^/>HA^ _ f\^mdt 

— wJi^iu r'IciM^' /mi, ßuuul 815 , ÖOO fjßf^ Jtid^i.iM' f 4^ ^il 



I 

/i^ dl/ xled dt^ 



-JtwaJ(4/fam' _W^>. iMjMdi^ a>M^l d^^ /yyyii dUaid dJ) dii 
— jkLtit.AUry' dmd dÄ wuiJuLri'j Mi dl- dfJJ-juyyi^hdi ^ Irf^dij 

— Blmdc^^ 4f^ dyt jhn^diUytu^Ai-m/JtM /^ti^nJh^ /hrd nMlLdd 



^ß )mlUi^4l4^Mh/L/ 7m A^l JMk^MJ^ A«r dtidUr 



,r*y;.rvw,j'; •«:■':;;■ ^-■-■.-■r'^n-A'^j ,.-?.,-:-.• v;^- 






>M/^ <did^/ri^H]m4v 



vCUA4. 



Wt' 



tT 









MA (Jji^^iMrj 



Mm^. 









vUlh^ yUHi.^ 



JKuiM AtlM I Act MAA^_ Jty)^4^.^^ AwMa' 

JhitUw (J^fzUm^ yUu\><K^i /Und ^ü^/t/ni^yyiA/ ^tJfiM/' A^^itX^At- 









ui^-M^ Im^ iihi^ 3iiUt^ /Yiii/nu^ JSt*i/ X^H«^. /luA/ 
WmA' ^?/>H^ AyvaW Mti/y^M^lUhn^ wJv^y^M^ ^ dlfyj/ 



■-."> V ■.» • 







MUvydA/ MiOrrWyilc 



i/ 



\<^ 



''Jt. Zi\ '' 



ydu^ny 



^JJL 






^m/ 



Iviywnytr*^^ 



'n^_ Ary]/ O 




*J^^\<Mr^}ii/iv du^ Jhi4<ii 




ytt^ - 






l 



^ } n y^^ — l^^>^4\^n 



•mf 




Ua 



JJmL d.. m^i* — 4i- Ja 



jAvyyfd^i^pti^ 



Mi' M^Mi-^JrU^ftV WAA/ifMf(KA^n4vyriy, JI4JL liim^ xllUftl. /hlu4iU^4- 

/KJ^V mt- Ml dt/k)^ oitiM/W iriAikLtyiJt/yy" lltiAi/ dt/\/ V{^hMk.-' 

die \mji jk^jJdcM /hrfidi/iV. miVi ^^«^ 'Wn^ Me^t^ 



„ A^i 



— /yn 




du, yjmJhliVf Uv m4milA/iUyi/ flHJinJlldk 



T 



d ßtM/ii 



S^^i^i- 




-—dk^vrmnk^I/iikÄi^ .,. 

Urh^ 4/vJI/ diiiM, itj- ^if^ri/ €^XLi^ 






mK/p^ /dtUyydt- 



my/yy flmJt: AttL__.M^^i«- UMitMe/t^ /jfdtM /^^ du^*^^ 






^-m^ 









•"^^ 






w~ 



n 



JH 



1 



V, 






(ßptwtü 







-m- 



/hytJok- . cJf liXtyx/ aIvyW du4t ^lltl^lli^ iifi^MHry^ .^^^14/1^ 



Mi^i^w ^ A^i 






^Jk^Admei^- 



lik / ^'^-^ 



^t1^ 



/fV i4i/vilk ^iUCiL chJLji/uL 



JSU A^ 



)^AL 




\ki z.W^ M'^fJt^ Ahy^ iMy</yy AhJhM/ A^ %Lb /i^it^ 

^mi^' %^Vyyyyv4^ Mi/t U Cnh^{i(\Atul^ Iti ^hrU^oUmtl^ 

Mdu^/. ä>w vkiMyy^ii. Mm /M du [Hi^Ju^ mUf^ 4tiMi 









d(/n^ <äW iJHyttyni^ ÄJk A^ dcfy ]oWi^}v 



\4nv) 






iy 



./im 4i> /2/taM mU /.AaI(, ^r^ /^ii^y^ 











'hnl /f^^' Mt-TH 



'^^ Mmty- 






f 



m^ 



JUr. 



ik/A, 



yj4^ 




flftU-. 






Jiil^ ii/i 



t 






* — ^it/ /ir LkU /i^Jid , dl im JLmh^ ^iA^Jt ^1^1 



,J-ff,f-n^ ^,>Y^yv;*y^, ,---V<' ~^pij-;f^_'^ 



" '.* /- 










^JW^'-t^'?/^, 



yrv<fl/ 



I 






-ihs- 










di't 



Ijft^ hv 








iL. II I 1/ I 

^nitöu mf^n" jfyyyd Jm lu m/ lf^Jji!k 



^JJlW AW chm<^ AAi/i /U^ yJalnli Ivh^/^ le^i»/ JfLlp,y((i.^ 




miw> 






^U>ui^ 




Ay^w< 



r 



ßynnH^n^ 



Si 










trm^ttili 



; 



f^'h^il/vy 



I 



^4 '^ ^^ 






i^ä«/ /tMi/_ 



.jiifiUrJL^M^ 



Am^ m»/^ aL /hi>U m: i^ A(^ Ai^^jIikd^Ul M. 



..i&im 4jiKm niLri ^Uui 



JjmMdl- 



..4^ JtUUl/^^- 





^ J(ji eJC 



(' 






I 



1^V 






iJlrnt ^iAJvOi^U- 




-pU 4L ^ 



(^MtL 



mUii/u SLL^^ 



lUWl/ <di^l4i^WhYC!^ku^4^yi/ 







z 



t/Ui 






k 









M^ri^^AiL, 



^fT' 



% jikU^ 



mUuyyy ^ 



T 









i • ' •w-.y" 






IJ 



-i .1 



It 



t- 



im ' ivUih t (i, < i'Tirt< i<> r, 




j^-^ro - 






JiMydi^.oJ^^ft^ ^ li^ M^UyM JfduvvA ^^h^vAli^Ht , W. 

I 




-iS-/. 






/hMiL 



r 



j 



/IVM^ /^ 



Ahyu< 







'f^^yyy ^ Ak ..M)A 



M ^m <Jlt 



mU. 



'^^»2^ /jMir ^ 









'TtmvyAuuA. 



UL 










4yni 








MkkiL. 



MtS^_ 



h*/- 









(hHAi 



^^ — 4m/__ d'J^Mi^ M/i '^i^l kuyyd^\^ f^^^ 



<f J 

/ 



& A 



^T^n ni^{h4Ur\UM^ dU Jh^TiMyyptt/ 



^Ui4 



A/ni Mi'tU /^H^ A^v 



^iW /^nrY^l ^K /n^idi ^Mmvu ^irm ZuJi ^k^Ua^- 



vA /ivi AJd^i,Ji/yf4^ diiiU Sii^dJin/^ A^d lytvhV 1%'i 

^ U^d^9 ^dt^4^ '^-AArJ' Mrd idhlrdJt&dl^vV /HA^W/yi,ltn/ , 



^^*^rV "pW^W^ '?f4W»' A^T^^tn^r hdoA^ 



Qm^ vUmL Ä^ 



'' ■ ■ ■ ' ^ 








iüi 



Murn^^U^ 



Mlw m^tdi /\mO)i4i{i^j^[^(^Hfyy^ 



/ J 

-J^^ dM/H\< f^Jl^inJipyyv4>- tt\^tJt MU/ Ju^ ^QlAptd jfniA^/li 
— WfW /Wi dcrw ^A^ Mul hUu lü'Si Uftfyyyrty/ ^M)f^^ 

— ^^^^^**^ id. dt x]LMd M du Ä/^ l}^3. ^ JL ^k^rti 









•>-7' ■»—.-' viv^'' r~T 



1 



ri 



lU^mt^/i/Ctfi^^r^d^h^ 



M 



'^! 



V 



-in- 






2^ M'ntrTnt^ 



wMl , /fi^^ 4a< W^^. -ii/ aM^M^ 



M'Yyyni'fkky Jnt mf^y'i 










¥af>^ 



MtUt 



.ßm^y^ KMiUrnkl MK^l \J<^OfyPKm U'Ju^ /'WfUk 



-4S3 - 

mLoyilJ mii^:._^4u. mLl ^dMt dt^l du Hluiy 

l^Ahiv^' ^Mi^ /hnU ^OLfU A^M^mMnt ^Wuh /^md Mci 

^^mm^U^ti^^ie^ Afiif; 4i4A M^ ^^Jmu-lid^mfLy hy dfyi/^ 










'M^^moJbdL^ Av4 din^ ^(^yy M.i 



AyJ 



^J/tUt.^. (in 

m <ükdkt^^ .UivyM. JdtjLi^ ^l A^y^iAi Mtr 



Ji^ 







miMtL. 



%mMi k \jU/nil_ 




^JMüi^ 




('Vl^tA^yfi/iA^yyyi^y 



/hia^ /ntni^ 



xIaLL 



AX 



'V^J 






—^J^Ml'Mi 



Im 



^U^/nHi^y^ 



■r' 




'WhfM um^. 4m^ 4(^n^A(i4 , dd dt /fe*^^^. 



diu' 4^Pnd HamrJUiJ Vny m<^ JUfyr^4nutV in^l Mi 4^^ 









i4»rK 



XusnnA/U Jaah/ 1/^4^ lljJnt , JUA. 














^'AM'i^ynum/ 






^AU*t 






iri^HSf^ 









■ -' f <> 



^''"'''■"T'' 






• .7 ;. ■'•^•- 



1-1 i 



H 



4 



V^^lW3'cf]/rM,tA tV . 



-m- 



-iST- 



1 m 






AUmU 











A Jmyi^ . 




i^ 






Jhi^ h.^jUJrUyy^ ^,n,l)L:ic. 







AM^ 






WyA\ 



*'Vi^ 



i^s Ju. Uy^ ui .^^ /^A^^AcU^ ^ J^ ^Mtui JjuXU M A ikJJy^ il^ 



Jc^t^Jl Ainy It^THt^, 



-miMv)/. AaA/ %My A/y)JL ^^ \ J}^. 







^H^ 



Üi 



vi wi^ ß 



T' 



in' 4rniA' 








-i 



Uli 



ihv U^ 




M^/Mch 










/J*^tiÄW AUh^^iM/^ 



.2; A^Tyci Ati/f ' 



I 



yiMn»" 



Mnl- AImC 



yJhn^ MA/ %nAxlJv^i 4]/W Ju, WhJidiAMX 



W A^ ^UA 4^u yvvvJUvük 



r 







dUm kht oil-u-v^, 



u 



Mim-.tm^ jünufiti-fi)moiA 



■ n-n. \'-f'f-' 



-^^<.»'>,, 



■ S'-T~- ••- ;' V ''\. ^ .':■'■ T'^: 



■:/■' 



1 







i 



/p Jfa^ 4/ Ai^ 



«W^^— Xl 



^t^ .^tifH 



^^AM^^ — JiL^ /^')4^yJi^_ (Jl^ü fiijic li^ui, ^^JU 
-äi!ä< Jmi^^^^Md^_ _ jA^ylJg Jlii^k^iL /fj^^*^ f^hpflt/ >^*^ 

^hf4t^ 4ä^i hMi^kJu m^^yUuVi UiÄ /du^^ w/^ A^ 



ij 



-in- 



M^yy 




/7"^/^T 



d^ w mj44Ck^ 






4^ JpffLiL 






'"t^. 






'^ (M/k^.^ Jhiit^ 



4«^ 



L:^ W. i^ 



TnäOftaa^ 






J>nfi44i4C fuJIc. Vi M^ny dmeMh m Aiiy^^h^ ^-LL^ Vifutui 

4Ut i4^%t^U^k'i^v^ lliui,0icyyv fh*/^ 




cUm^ 



/hl 4 




/^^rn4< /fl 



/ti/h}:l4 



<J^ 



^ M^9^ dy, ' M4 jM j^pI^ff^AJIc 

V^t/Ul Ai4 üLt UyA^^M^A^ Mn^ ^^thcj ity^ 






V 






Aauj 




JM Hn^n/ *Jli4^ irrw U 0,000 HUt 
W 1.300.000 tfki yU A JM4.>nUl^L 




^A/vr/ /Lh^vnh^ 







JO^ /huU- MiAyU^ 



jflAyyJl^ 



'Sjlhy 






/Uyyv JkryyyJc^yv 



I 



I 







A^iinf i9Vfyt 



i fU,U ISi^ aI 



,.f-.-; - ♦fv»»5yrV'l<^'»^c-S'*'^TAT*^' -r»' "' •' 



-r- 



■ D.. 



t 




^■>;;;■.^.•':>^:-:^;XJ■;;'V'!, 






QMntmt^n^ mi <JnMl} mJUi^{Lnm4^ . 



1 ^MhVM/i^nCu MtA QJmiilt 






Oi^vn^ 



m 

in 

115 

dl 

Jm oldk l^$ 





ut 



m 









m 

155 



// Jfm/it/iU t^il dUwwiil/ JoAijUuuv i55 

4'/ J^ cf^^^t'd kii muuJJi ^hv m miL' i^5 

Ski. iAtNuxJuut ^H 

•^CLtU^ /y^^n^ %n^n^ '33 



■r"-!-?- 






-^riiiiffti 



337 

;^7 






I 



^ liuU^ Ju di^ /HtU JiM^y l/nn' ^/. ^U^^Jm/ l^ii M- 

Ai^rfU^k ntluv iMnh^imH' AuÄ 4/i^vi^ ^iiudc^A X*iU 

_dW- uUm hk 4^mp4^^'_.lk^ AoLm^ dt^ltw nm AtJo Ji^ 

^hni //Xrv JM /äM /^'a^ Wk^'<^ ^hyiktM /HhiaU 

j / / 

4m 4A/ Auh ^ity-^ AM lUtUnL^ Mit ^Ü^vm l(JvVi/i/ /hM d. 

_ /. jk^H^^ IM yCuh MflwnJmrt/yi/ IMAJijiutlk, v^^ itMrkOf. 
. A^ Myfyy mJ- hnt Ai.^JmU "cMtryO. i/ryy 3 ß 0,0(10 




A^i/n/yfyim^i^ 



in- 



y 



hwM^ AlliijU- A^JUy^ 



Ma 



k 



lÄOAld J^OuJ M 



li/hfvt4 



idj ^J 



diui 



mlkH j U(Mc uÄ eftM/- 



i 



Am A4^ Uini- ^m JmdlM^Äti^ -. d^ ^ j'h^^^>Mtf% iun^ 



.;•, •'■'• 






:*■;> •, ' 



■M^aiiw 



Wät 



AAMvi/. 



I 



-160- 







j^km^ 



fu4h^4ji^yry}i^ MAfli^fi 



*i^nyf\ 






Ä) 



jiuii^i^' 














^.Af^ 



l 






J»^ 



A/yh^fvtkryviiV'' 



[/mrv^h^y^ 







/mA. Wt^ diA lluMnUMAtJl ^{(^m(f>vi^ ['/ ^ht4U__Jhk_ 'J^ 




Jiiryvnk^, -C-^p 



/f^^ /^^^^^^ A<u\ f^i^ ^Äm^ 

Mci Äni^ Atli ^hu 0ü^ .kJk(M^ <m/Ud .m^ifiiA^s^^ 
A; ^ liii a;^ pt^ hJi,, Jyyy ii4mMh^ 







^tJhryi 



.^Jmu 



/hmy/ 



ik mm-Ufud . /^-m-^—^f 4hiL ^yyv %fndd>CA aJ Mh(^ ^/vk»^ 







f 



I 



-.zei- 




^i^^ k^ .fW f hltt, rnüiLy: /lILdi^ Jlim ktiik^ 

fh^^t/yy d(/} 'O^htynHt^ ^l/ny" /^sUny^ IvnHU^- VlUh^ htt^yyny 

/iiA>- Ali kiJt^ lud*^ 







-. ^m^Jt 



4A/ A\^ A^/yynt ui^Vy^^dtAV^Ai^" 



AAt^kk^ 



A^ M4r)/r>ni/ /tfm»^ 



/kH^ 







^»^9mltfiv ^tk»i,ivpliyv <jU'>i^^rfm ^^4^ 







/i^m4ai^.^ Jm MUl 






1 — ;Y 

» t(lf\^HV >Äi4^ Mlyyv VMiKi^ AfyYmhy^YSi lwiiA*^^U^,iiu{u rjü' 

I ^IhJ^JUi^^^Md^^ 








m$i^iwM/iM/ , dut^^^khk^ <HM iMmAMl 



1 ' / V . 




JTI^. 



/ytM/ 






MU^ AiM., 



\ÄWi</ Mf^Mc /hMfduL du/ Vit 



lk/yn^ 



{^ 



jdJi^ /hfri y^Tyi^ ^im/uc vMit d^ 4i^ AM. fU. 



/^Jlt^iinyiafn /Jih^^^U AiLjt Ji MCiii U^ Ahkh^ /^thvlvn^ 



Uli lUyrv mfiK'i im/ . 

du §313 ti.j.^. Ji^ Jh^U xU A¥^iMLfLfy hL ulaU" 

— Äk Aft^^L Ufnyyftw Ji-ii MVfJjUn/ Jh/IaIL^ 1/ny^ JP^, 000 fU 



I' 



J^ MÄLJf^ <tJic^ /f^t^ l^ JUCilU ^ J^ JkfuJiUr^ MyJLk 



km^ (M^H^v^ryO, /yyv^ UlM , Mt dtyV iUtt Mßulv UUpv /\^^ 
I I d ff ' ^^,^ 

^Mvy/ Zw lUitlüiLy- Aiäk. Jm j^y^f ^h^ -l^' Mt^ 
^jn^ do(4 jmMt iMidlcn^ mcr oUwiÄtiA /nyil wMv^ J^nr- 









•Xr,. 



■I. ; : 'A -» ' «1 



lii*^ •r/'*j:f ■•',*-^^*r^j^i'?--^' -^vjlVif^.; 



/ 
ihn Ivv'Uhiufp Art/ ^ .Wri/VxMyyyyM'^ W^AaM- Uprrt/ Jht^/d^***t^ . 

J^iiv J^ — Jr0 /}iüilv*ic^y' tßUtL n^gi^t^a/ v (m>/ f JUdL^ut t *^ 

^mr^ /hrndfyv , ty^rU üIah /ift^fd^ Ai<4/ prvoMt dM ^___ 

Mm- 'hiU^Aui/ 'dlwii/jjifydhi^ ,W JpmM/ HifMm^ . dvd- 

m mf^M^yr]A^^.^dfJd Ja. 'dlü/ixi ,di< 'ülMt^flmdhJl 

^h^ injC Mü4^yvUih n^.WiattUw' JiMtV .UiMt dvi/}W /hm" 



1 






.ml- Uyyr]/ ^kwnii/iUw dhrv m^r nnm/ 



/W/ 




WciL 



dn 






\hi "^^iMnl^ /ikmJuL aUH-A^ . dtM /lU" duiiiv Mtiiä 
^hdy>mrvYViA Ayyy miM^du^ JrhAJU^iV ^dpAryfUyy' /Up /k^ 4/1- 
MMt dli ihmU(/ ^ A^ — A tvyyyy UitM Avd /ilu fw Ipt^ 






^ ul /ku ./%di da 



MA\/l,y JirTi/ Myyiri^'i^ 



I 






— «w /nrd(*^ Mmnli^ Jkiii^ dit f^nM^c^ m)l^il^l.^t^1^V_ 

mhYl y^M Midi i^lhMp-d Om/Lpi/ . % Ju/yyu^^^%ly>V h^ 




t 
ddiMidl MA4 IUdd{l^ / /U^i^r <uitHU4ln^_^ AfThd /t^M(Mo 

/Wyd^h/)y^m\V l/hvh/^hJUh^ iUymAi/ 4ii^ tßmn^d^X ^imtd- 

öfuxm^ ^i^ AitK HilhndiA^ inUAt^^ AyiJlüiiu <jUyidAmiy' /pvi 



MÜV. mihi' A^ ^ 



7 



UiOlM^ 



u 



A^yy^ <l 



fU^l dM^ 



Siwmiw' dCi ihtAhy Aiv^Aiunl, 4i^ odii^^hm^ . ddo diMi/ 



1 



önt^ A^U /h^'if A^yy^l/y iy>mdidlU»ykyrv»L dm^ ^^^hnl Aik 



i > 










1 



mwHdd^ /VM4/ 
Ivi/ IM€idu^ 



f 



"HdCfv^ 



Tttc /*♦»*« fhlU muM Adfc j /yyid ivH^vM/ /vdlm^f ^yu^Hn^ 

AiJ- AfvJ/dt miAdvfPt^ doy ^Vyyi/ Itudi A^K^u■Uy1du^4^y <ijA/^ry^- 







>>y\ 






Am ^JL^ m J, fjt AmM Mi, 



AMU4 m^v MtuH JoMiA 
JmihvndU' 



/Irrv^ 



SMui MiA/ Attkck/vyyir 






At/mrisLi/ zhHkA/, fltÄ A4^y\4ykyv' J^ t^Mfry^ M^ttC^ V^nii/i^ 

UM, 4^ M/yyi/ ^mi^ 9jdi jiit ^ii^^vcUklrki/ . <Jii^ luiiu^ 

Mir UJJlcJi^ Ju, jjk tij^' 






M^ 



/l^n/ 



f 



JmA^^ 



Jm. <U /mddw 4ii, /Lyn/ AuA 4^ AjM(i^%^ 



mWivM^W Jmi^ 4(LyM UiMiiyyy ^^4<^ - 4iv Aijit liU 




irn^ 






mMU^ M^ ML /...,„ ., 

miliiJc^ 4yyU A4f LI Omt ÜJil .^ Jko /uA 
^/h^ ^lo/ ^ /hfT Ait> VrmAl^ 4IW fUlJU 4n*</ Awi^ 4^ 

Mi^ d^ yuiUi/ /»A«^ Lmyy^ /yyv ViA^vAi^^/Ui^ ^^^i^iU^^ 



tC VAOy^yU^ 




IhollbiA/ M^MIk/ UmvV 



n jr 




M l^ /Yii^ Avil Aü' /ynU/ /U MiÄl 2m/ %^t/uJ^fJLMi4Jlvu' 

ß^ nmU /W njry\/ ^JrU^uJ^'Ji JmLU^ , /yvf 

/hmf ^kfu " AuL /Im ^d- /Un^ /mVy/ l^iHyyi/ > 



ISS " 






mi^n/ VM/m^^JU 



I 



Mul^, Wivy^j^.Ji/^ ,ia»/ mIu.^ J}^3 

liiryvUuynA^ MaÄ/ m^yÄitJh^ /dwiuAiidäry. %yMUll^jJlulu 



dh^hf^ 



4w 



/yyw 



4^ Unt \hifuMUt /ifM/ UlvA^yyUiC, >j4i^ JIh/cIuIh^ 



Qjk^i/yyvmyyrth^atA/l A^A^vi/y V tHU,yyCUyruy ^hJ^p^V- flhyyy AmÄ' &<^ 



■ 







\S 





^»>¥iy 



&nr 









v.y 







MuH 










Ut-i 






<ÜUni4^ /MU4^ A/i4 ivywwiti n^rv/ Wt^ WHiAhM^jU QMjUv 



AmX 




au^i_ 






jM</. Jw- Ilm^^nlcJUyyr^i 



M^ 



1 



/Mm/ 4^ 



jm/ <MMif^ 












^hy 



jTuC &rii 



mii^X^üHik^ tiy^^4i^Jk nMhjdJcr lyuAchvCU^i ijt^yn^ fwf 



T 







/>fUW[^tf^n' S4^yvtu^At l/tmxUyM^ /TÜim^/Hn *iy)i/^4^ -p^ mu. 



/\/ywiy An i/Cw 



W Unxil^JU 



truJiüMA /Vkm^u^i/troi/ndtJlvi/^ 'MK^ 









y^/yrytA/rry' ' 



ithn^ülHfk^ 



/ytnr. 






T 






im» 



-Hl- 



~lll- 



'h 



/ 



iMM^m^ AltiMM' {rrWi4i^ , .t»»fi jLyV %nY,\^i 



]iPyytH^ ^ /f.?^' 



VK' 







/!KU4/hil rmthJivt/ MhM , ^Jc^ Apfi'm^v/' vv^iMiuiyt^ ^Mi^tl-H^ dMc 

MU^/W A'^iJ^lMi _,/^^^W ^'^ ^4) liM^tLyy^, 
mp hitt ^hdd /t^ An Md ^lUndi^KK MmucUw Wthyn/yyyynv^ 

n^P^y^ m^c^ J}Ai tL Um Mi- aU^ ^tt^^ntUt^ Uaa. 

yUmfi <UA^ fm^, l^ /}^4/i J[^ ^ m^ N\6. V^ 



iyi' i(AV ytt kn^uyy^trU Xn^Jc ^ AH JiS Aai ti,j4^Uy>yi^JJt - 
- ^]H)Y Jn^ 70 fflJcHy^ ^^ 4^ ^€tyy1fy^ MU^U iLoiüiJ)'- 



7 



. Jbu^ii i_<l^W IJL AryJ- /ud jL / 



v^yM^nM^ hv Jl^^U>y$^ . q}^ Ul Mhi 




/^♦ffrz?'' 



;"^ i hi/Uvi 



tVl/yrt 






? 



/ 



000 '^UMirnyf^ ^^tAtJil, 












'^k^/i^^ Ji0 d!4ii4ti^ 



iivM4iMhJuy A4^vt^ 'VtiMthy jiM^nvi/ vi^iM^tJlßJL 



Wf A^Uu vUivLmjL xkU LU W Jitu-m^ '^i/ß^M, JUiJh^ 



'^V' 









'_/!,>• 

,',1. 



7' r ^' 



♦V' 



-^13" 



^^ lU uMi/yy*4^ hl/ ^hHiJLw , >JA4 fyy>p Ai^ dti- 



A/Mfhi'ry^ 




lAMi^ J(4y uAMSn 



'^^Vi^-. 






1 ryfj , -J7^- ^^4^j^A^^ 



iik A '^y 










wKMi^ /#;>^ AiLmv Üdiyyi^ 






1 



MtiiU^, % 



dLA44H^ ^ - iTHf duH' 







>4 ArtM /Vyviit 



^}/iliWy»\ 






^Y M4 M)A, 
ftmAW mUiAA/ M/ytiLlt kM ^^f^, M ^ A'>y<H/ytyrTn^fH4^ 




^^Jk^ym/ Aiöv .Ln^ MMMi^^k Sm^vA. i^hidtJi l,u^l 

- IMj^tki^ A4c.. A4- ^ 4^ ' ßu^ ^rii^^^iÄL /tyt24^ ^^ .^^.#h^ 
I 




•yy^ 



^'VhnrtA^V, 



ksAOM 4my 4H1/ 4i/fri 444^)^/ h^^iUyJc Mk 



-=Vv 









1;vr^..:'; 



■■~y-r^~y lyr ■»■ 



ImtrUr}/ dt^ ^.(hniA^yy^ jt^'^yi^tfJlih^, _^ityi^ lUymtW l^3i 




4\JUy 

cm^ ^bA^ch-^^uJU' sJßAsU^Oi, J^SfUi^ Ay^ir^' Mf^t^f^fi^^t^, m^tV 

^TAfhn j^l Ah^ mi/kv' WM llV MVlih^ AHi}y' VU krr*^^ 

/vyvym ^-mW krwvM . . ___^ 



-m- 



A^rvviMmiyy' iU^^ Jyip^ MtlU^^ jär^t^it^ (ii^J-My 



} / ' T I ' ^ 



VJ 



\ 



'\!fy/' 



V^^jmi^^ . dk A^ /f^l<^ ^vv4^ -CfnlfUn^ 












^ ^. d^ llmy dil miv/J^fll - ^^ Mhiluulh^ Xhvf- dtnr iii^ 
. d^nfvhV /h^*f jfd^J /hnn/lt ^ IJ9 ^ fLi4d' , *n>Y ^uUt^ 'lunju 



'^'t 



/hfUmAtfm^' omdh 






1/'. 



4ntn llUwvtMn4'l^^ /tml mn^ni^ UUlxi/>ry mUhypiL\ Ui Mm 




IM MdJc 



31 ^hrd sltdc^ 7fJ. ii /sm/ /W ^nvfv mii^vi^^yjt^\ Ja^X Am^ 






__^i^ A^i AiiijLd 4^*^ JiJdlhy , A ^ *Jt^ Jit 

MM VlAxi^jd**tr Umyj^k jtfou/f 4^d A>y^) 

'^fttü 'Li Jmt^Mt^ du </ii^ jfy^ Mi mt^A'klh^ 



'juA/ 






MMmt/ . 41 U 4/1/ /hnn4ykM 



I 




i 



\ ~ns- 



u^ 



hp 



(trti ^^~CU, 



JM 



^K 



Kw 



JU^ 



filiiMt 'iei/r,^ /yiAm m 






\ 



^l^MUiirk^ (MLditmJki/ VQSt^i^ai^n/ Ui/ d^yntrn^ U-d* 



tS(fH*n^ 



i] At^ lUtjt M W^yyy^i^^^jm^iil ^ JuipJfi W V^^U^ 



4M n. 



Jtt^ 



HO 



I 



^■i4i^yyy 



^t4hKei4y 



VtiAMil^ 



AM^tvU^ iJUvtUi /M^ />H>ry /fl^^/il m^JU Vh^ 4hJl4^*^i d^ 
thvMUw /Mit, Alt ^A^i^^y^K /hn^ finn^t^Urr^ jU* flA4hUf}l^ 






M. ^ ^y^^ 



Jtkvtm^w^ 



^yyi/ ' 






r 



^tm' 



.... _ / ^ / - VfM^^n^p^^ yft^hMyu^ . fltul Ät^yri/ ^^^»»^ 
4Um nifilJsMOiM /l^- m^^Ut^^yi^ ^^'HT AAjC^Myy lJnAto^_ Jmdhi^ 

m^i 



^rry 






hv 



^0} 






Vk' uß • 



^¥4^ 



Mm ' 



OimUtU j ^4tM VÖAi^fiyn/ 



M^TfPt^ttr 



/ 



^ 



7/ /if^X W^^äU'^.maaLl^^ ihaM JSh}^ ApUl^Pvi 

5] Ahk fUL 4UJI/ Mm^ ^ikMU JhOiM /^ dUolf^ 10 ^ 



mUt l^rJaJm- Jm h^nir iM UlJJ^ W<ii44<Lryntf^. 



/VYV <^ht^l^ ^ xji\jUQ flj-MftM 



^muUti/. 



I 



■i] A^yyt 9J^m^kniu ^i^ wt ^^Ohnftii^^ ^ioJkrn^j^^ii, -JiMll' 



J7^ iMnaivi^ry An/ dem/ n^i/nt^^y^'^ü ^ mu, ^iiMiiyyfllc^ 



3/ /^l^hi/ qMfl^rrvf MpjV 4)yvt^ C%»^ ^yy^l 



"1 



ir^ Q, 






I 



Sj M-^ VAiUi^y^j^ Y)^'^ ^"^ Jliciyh/tMlyYvK %^^yvu¥yi/ *t Vßj\\^ 



tVn 



^i^Aiw^Kyry 



^Jl^^ IIa. f ^P*y ^Hryvr'ifiAt^ 







"ImA W dilm^ii^Ptv^ ^ Alt Jk th^HiMkdi^ oftAhy^ ^onJn (Jiuxy 



cm/i^ dteoTt^t^ /}i»^ /i^iyvJdi 



fJL 



/UH 






! 



i 



I 



/htig 



/}lA^ /• 



't' 
du- 



■yy-p 








/iyy ^miOyi^-n,Z4kt^ 



iW^M' xJU'ii/i.o^p/phyint 



UlKH ^' 4^»!, 3^ '511) 1h^A^Aft^(<t,,K^ ,^/ ^ JtX 



3 













^yrtv 



Ai 



T 



Vrtv V 



5', COO fl/til Jfi fyfyi^^ei,udtit 




v*^A^ 



^w JÄn^^ yJri^ Mh^ Ah^ diihntM' MrU UyH4y 



4 Um ^ jlk ui 



i 



^ 



IMivyynj' In^^^mlni/^pflnyvyrUrv' /h^fi X^etA* — -i m^^ ' / 6f — g^^ 



\yid4Lv ll/luLy /Un^ Arv nXiU;tJtry^ ^i^tUktUry ^ di ^.;>^ 



-i6l - 






l¥F " 'J ff^t^fiif 



aAm^ 







t 



Cii^rv 4C/K^]^_. ^ Mi^ww 






-ccii /kyvd/ ndi/ stAhml. mmn^ 



^ 



M Mit ikh^JLntL /Lf mM^Jtli AyyJ/ /JL^ 1/mJuuJ ^ 



/ria^ AM)t iIJm^ dil JhUt )jf /Un^tyj/ mHit M^ 



-m- 

I .. ^aLM 'MU m. 10 

i - ^üLU ' oKlu fk. // 

HMJu. L3 , 

3m/>riA^i^^/tLL fk.3 ^ 



^dlAA4riVyrA VClii 



Tf 



tiuJf /^ei 



mv. 



4t?i 




0Ui«ä/Xr- /hAn^ J^^ icä^ ^^ J^ oJmßuU j<Jt\^ 



Any 



viuAftuw , f^lMi 



7 




W 



S^ttW9lf^ 









^MI(M^ %tyytMtHiji^ U^WtJhV 4uMl^ 



dmyy 



rypfy^ ii^l/ 



VH 



jt-un. 



i/ym/ 



/lOk 




Ai^yrAi^ 



.MU L % 



ImM/hiäÄi 



hv 






JllSi/yyiiu^ 




^lar 









T 







•i, 









&lACh/ V^Mvkt^Uyyv'. 




> % vti'H i 



^^^ ijhmM^ ^Uum .Uv. c^M. jf£'^_^<^ ^- j ^^i^ ^IjJm ^MtMi W, km kyU Au,l>^ 3{,'j^ 

It ^,^ Jüu i JiJ- .*y. w (^ JGu^ Mi/( -^^^^ ^ ^-»f u u^ u ^u^. ^l lU- 






Ä. 



^w 



I 



MVMI' %! 



kl 






Vvn/ 



iihMl4Ui^yt^- i** Vfill^ntvUy Julf 



I , ^^ ^ ^^ ^^wOj^ tU«^ i,^ _ 1/r,. W_3W_i^^ ^<^ W ^ «,^J^ 4^^ X»^. 



i,' 






ymi^ dit Imr- --4^ -~;$4Qi^££224't'^*--'^$M4fL 




vm^ 



mMc 



tu LU iw jt^oUpu^ , ^ d»n k 100. 000 ^ ' ^- ^ ^- ' "«' - '' 



Svy^ Mtu^/ lUft n^Hr M- 



^JUncT 









vt- -^ 



^l-Mr^ 



L ' 






J * 










I 1: f 






'A^w^ 



A*Mm( M ^m/. 



(mhy IaIU' /JyiU A^M-^li^ A/nk^ 

Mrd $W/iiLJl aMIi^ Afnmt^^ ^tU/ ^im^ ><4ȴ ImtmC AtrT- 




^^tu/ UinvtiJU ^.^ W .u^^tk,ty <JtiA mlttdi^ 



Ail^fth^yv^ (AA.ii^Mi.'y^pJUviM ' 



^jh/*-»" 



/in' 



^L J^iJlU JSw^ Alf J^g^^^t^*^^ 1U^ Jt^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^ XiJuiU imy 1.100.000 flUi. 



^/ ^/ m^ (mi(\\4/JlrQiJdi^h'(Li 4itU4 





J- 



-n1- 



■ f 






■yri/ yf/kV 




ij UiiJfJM fk.J^ Uni 



Mul i SSS. 000 lliojk 



^/\}iyV JllMry jJU MHT AfJpU'^y; 



yr\/' 






mmj^Ktf 



vW/ {W€'m^^ 



p^i^Mi^ , 



i'n/ 




I 



UU*^^ 



A/yyy^ 









__-#>< /mi mUn^i.^^nddn^ifu^ 4/Pr^d Myy W^MpfiUk If^n^ M- 
^h^ ^,mihv' ¥k\^' }fiLi^vil A/U 4; iiepJlt,, ÜmL Amrv 







J^'t oMm^ sJüUi^m Ji Jlcm/i ^ dvi Aüh AM /fw^ V^- 

\kMdi^- Mi liLiM JaÜuJ /m>M\Pw l^Hi^ Aini AKUlp dCt 



4Uik ufL^ /H^, ßyni Ulc miSytryy/ ^l^ M'yM\ m 



IW /Lm fltiu Ja. lUtii J^^iMfW n^>J*y . /Im«/ 4/u '^^(JlAJi 







jlfu ß^y^^ 



L 






— (L^V a^iUk Alis <k^ K^, (jJll^U IW i^r^^-^^U-Än^ 



U 



S'OO.OpO Ülwik yyJL JUt^ 

fW^flmif M/^]Au\/ A4li/yV . JU^nf' Ui 



M^tUuM. ^^t^Juajuivtiuty. müi jfiiMua/ llfrki. jOiJlvtJiL —^^ k^cLv Mma/ ^a /^ IcuhtM in' Am ml^ 



/Ur*^ jÜ^vi^vW 



^iM^pviv^^^ qßuitl /$nMdi^ nf^ÄtU Mvi, Mit %^iviL^ 




'^Ai/vy 



f 



-xm Aynl ^M mA^ihAoJMy, Sh aML Aui /^yyll ^Mn^ juMth 









mL iUii^uyy^ y^MlniLAjuM^ Mi Mi^tU- 



Cl^/yM\Al Mt <3ULi^ 






JkMltdtlt . XrJr Aitir ityy^fi/ iV^Mv^uMv AiMiMM^ 






— And^hmy^/^^lijr ^dMy4 nrtJny U44^ Mm A* J^MLn/ 

^Imiil aLv JU- MiA aL Aua Mu^ Jknl h>ü<L^ Mtr ~^^ ykiMkh/. ^umj^. \Atji. IhM^^t^^^. W Mm jfi^^JLM 

h d'i444MtU ^ ^%aLfV Ah^.Ji^L tlS mM l^kjn^^ himM. diu itdmM iu^JiU lin^iMM ^KM Ui-yviA/ M^ 





^i4iiilJt /yLyy .l/yyiia ^'yWhKi^ 4h/ MT/i/' nA^tM üi^i- 

iM.m/'i MA4W A/Jldui^ 



/tmi .'iLyy Ht/mL dt'il MälhiiJv mKndit /Uih mwn .ü^i^ Mu^ 










/, 



Jyyyyyyynryi, Uv liwiyw VIAkonJ- ^yy \jlü^^ ii/i/hiA/ 4^, 

'm\ UiirniQ/M^yv m mmM^v iLaUHi (jUh'nl 4a> ¥ /ht > M t p p ^ 





./ 









. l,.., 



imL 



VkoLAnir ^ yi^Ji^i^/K^ 



i /^yyvi' 



/i^kv 



m^ 



kyyy m{l4 /^7^^^ vknJiM Mr^l /di UuMt^ Almti ikUt 






jlUiiUnin/ My 

^ Sic liuk 

_^ /n>tv II. l4vM II 'JdrUH^ 




4^^hC 



4ry 



/m lUcU 'inrhf^ 10 . 2pym II, <iJihyi<W 



StMl/yy 







// 






41^ yUi%A{{f' 




l^id MyyMh^^ O^mt^ A^!^ ^ AVyyW^ jltif^ yW- J^ih^. 
^^j^f T/WÄ4/ Am^ /hAÄ Myw W^ÄU^f MU 4utQ4^ /Uf 






JüCikp /hM t^ VAM/ /Mtn- MJiiinv, Md^ dii^4/m lii^7iflc 
-—lUiMMYv dti llluji4^^vmvy^4^ dto ■ ^liiujyi^iW /fnJ- JicilA^mn/' 



/ 1 



'f 







ywk/t^ <IMUt4^% Jfldk A^^if AiU.4^' Um-yv U^ihum^ 
J f t /f I i I 11-/ {ji JitM^ j (^(y*^A^ ^ 

Jj. 100, 000 tlkl /m htk/Uiä A>v^ JL/ , ^mJt^^ Uh 

10,000. 000 fkk, i.jtJk^ iil L IrJffO, OCC flUi ah4 

--y- fmIhAAm' j MA/ /Unn dtry UtW /yicu-iy Jvivvf duv" vkwiA^ 






/hfjMUn^^ 






Mrn¥\^ /\lWu /h^ /tut^ PhfMU jtmMf Inm^f^ ümn^ 



I Ji 



'^UM 



<^lMu^ /Kw#f At^yn^ «■ 



^^-hVHf^/yiM/^ 



u 






I 



Jwtw^-, 






J 









Ut/i/ni^^ JterM^ 






4^ 



m/mAMftAl 



)(/Wmmim'yy^' 



«^'»a 



vtUrv u^i^/H^yy', dit 






Jjä'iM^ /hyy 4tihi^ i'mry^ imArydirV AvrvJL MAih 






.^ .... . Ä>^ 

mr>/ Hl f i>' Aü ^ itf/ - nef l tn^' w>tiW - j^m -/ifM- — )U4 ^ ^iMi 



TTnm 



^^ — yet/f/ 



^a^ — VtimnM^fp^ :>»> 



n4r 



I^H^' 








-7^ 






l^ 



rrt^ 



L 






Mr 









W <lMf94^ 



f^ 



imy 



Amt CUM/ ^1444^ 




rMii 






/l/li4fi/tr)' 
Ah^ QUMry tU^Mfi^ /hylw ^Wi'^M^m^ i ^v /^ \!iaM oUd^ 



I 



I 



\t 



,vm/ 




viAli ^' 



^Hikdvl4^ji4^ ^^jUi^MH/Md^ 4ivlt4<JJUüht ll<UcdiHi^*^ /h^kiAr^ 

(J ^ ^ 



/^^ l-fl^ynii^' ^i*^ ^y/ fy-ni'UH/ 



t4fy*ni 



iHm^ 



i^/h/^P\mdj^i^ <JliuU /kUi^jL 



.Ahit. 






QmvMi 



^ 



Vkr/.--. 












IL. 



i-^ii^ h^iM- " 




i 



/Väv. Jk^iW dt^ vhmAA^ ^fy^/udi . Uyy Alm' /^fyri^iAJ^dL^ 

' {j j ' 

MA/ QjllMmhuii 4/ynd A^ . yhri- 







r^mM U4 - , 



d\ 



^ 'A/VV iVn^ 



^ytftr>yyjhYy^t 



/Umt^ <? 




,rnw^^^ ^**^ 



I 






^ 



■MmC , M^ 4/^ OmMi/ ii^Hh/ % /V /l^T^^iAnÜ^^ryj^ 



I 



/tAt^\ 



4v^ dk^ iiAMh/ nmi^^ ..iMid/ d^^^j^ Aikyv^MÜ. mJm- 




AÜCA^ 1^/71^ 



T.tr 



^/mtCWv ^Um«iM.Hf^4^mHt^ 



A*^M^M^ 



/J^ IM^ mMüLhvl/ l^^^mn^p^ ^nrJi J^ J$n^ /^ 

Jb. 










AMA/ 



lu /hm 



/ihnä 



4ttv i^ihHukmO^VM^ 



AÄnmAv %M 



h^ 






An«i*n/ 'ßi'M^ yMrvnUi:^ JJic. Ml UtÜ Ji&^^Ü^J^^ 







/d(4f mi liMMiyt in 









yMiry 



I 

Ayi^' /ymf Miny 



idL/ W fppiU W /H' 000 fflJ^. ^§c>m fJfJ aU^ 



y 



i/t H4 /"iryy 



IL 000. PCO fflanik. 



/4li4 



^ /^ 



A>rJf*uni 



■ivy^K' /)^A^i 






ihf Ut^A4A^ 




. . -- I '^^^ ^^ /yytrf^^ ., ^ .., 

fMMM/Jil ^^^voIhM^ dtQ MiyV Ui^i^* A^\Uf HvfVi ilft^^Mi-^ 
Ai^^ya^ ULUri/ jUJtUjUMythP^ißJyi , M^rnL AvJu^ ^i^, 



yy>jO/JM{ 



.'^*^tikht^p^ jindM^i" 



iWiATiV 






\wi^^ 



^ aiMhmh /hrt/ ^ /fnvf V1a^ luo^fMi dU^H^ AtuiliiU] 




amaU Km^ 






Ain/ 



7 







V 






diu Jw^^^y/rMut /h/M ihl/htfi^ndjui' AudU^yy^ Miuk' Mt^ 

Ui^uUf myy dti ^miuhL'ycl^ ninJi jOui4 /tyt^/ 



^$i^ 



,:T(W1 ■■i-^rv- ;■■>♦'. 



rii 



ÄHllk yUv MniJUrMX^L 



M^:U 



\4A/ 4^1 



-^95- 



i'CKdiyyyl^ ^ 



cit^^rrUHyyi/^ 



'na- 



iIVl^O/^ 



"300^ 



^^^ jtUJuJL^.jmy lODo 'frki. jii,^ di^^j ikkl^ 



Iwyr^'^M/ /hy^ /hiM) /iKyk^ 









'Ah'miutAt 



^Wh^ 



^rW/ ^eUTy MM^Myn^M- MU nvito öK^C^J^^ J^ 















lUfmy /tlt/yy ^lUdi/iiriiiiU'ivm'}/ oU^mri 



7 






/>^ 



HM/yUvV /MMt^yy. J^ <vlik^JM^ Mi d^iH^v UHtii Uhiiy 






w 




%y\ /hft'rmi m^Mnrh ^fi^Uy]/ //fev ^äfii 'l^if^ Jil Ä^^- 



i 



nukt^ Aym^ hJL, ti li^yJäk ,uii aI^ ^m^ ' /htti 



-301 - 



/lach AUru" ißfi'inätoiifi^ jt^MuM" 



-501 



%t&i 



j j I 

J'kiM^ Jkvt^ Am JiiU^lji>^(iiJiA^ iunJ, Miid m^ dt>tf- 



Mm ^kfify /hfh/ /U^J-HfhCry^ 




(AhA^^iyhtLiJcU AU4/U- A 




m 



^li^i^hm^ffLi XUi/^U ,mdi^ JiAti^^ irwiU' M^u. 

^ W' jUihi^ii^ jM<LJ{in^ /(^yMtJyllii^, 



Jkik m^^ kMMm, ^Unm- W myiiyi/ 



7 






I 



dßSf m hiyl^' /HiMi^ Ml^-htit dn^^AäU W: \!m nJc 




mm 4/yvmnLy ^ 4^ — MLcL^h 7Ü>tr din'' /^ 'Cwy ^^^i-'U 

I I i'If (! 

A/ymniJhv 4nJ!/c .ik /Ud. am 1W iUy^^trt MJ^yy^f/yJu/ 




mM/t/ 



'>K 



r- 






Jky^ dvt^-Jlm 



v^ 



wMmm 



i 



vrvtiwrmn 



»•«*^-i- 






i 



Tn:)- 



yyV 



JiidiA^ <d44hi IcWy J(J*^m^ lUcipv^fA^dL S:^i 



fr. n^ J/n9t Jr vLf^i^M/ 



/fn/ 



m 






I 



mfvmidv , A^m/ ml ^Ivu^, .myi/ M m 




\W/ 4v^Mli y^' 4^/Wmyyl^ 

MliA^ /hx^ii^yy Ain^A^P^i Ju diJivil Ht/\, Mr i^ ni/yyy 
MtUnm (jiAm . Mo .uii^ml-Tnhlw^^v dt^ mtJJoMyri/kllt 



',^Y 






A^ 



^}mrüryy 



^ 



t) 



^Ah aJmcS' ^J- O^i^iPvtM^^t 



-^Ok' 



I 

] 

4 
4 



I 



muA 4 dLuid^ /iftAA/hMU . 4^ dlf^ ^ AV14IW diuOi/- 
my (iLuk^yy^ Al\MJi4uh ^l^iuU/ duy^ vUAJo^^nvüilc^' Jt4^ 



V 



W Aüvu/ytuf/f^ , 416 



tmuC Aüil J(/hy d4m\' tUiiMUH luUtM , 4^/^ 







AirvUy "^/^lilfi^ jtHhffUf^ Anffi/^' , M^^C 



^.¥^ m 



/!m dt^ 1/Mm/ AlUt4^ iLHifi/ W odit i^f^- difd^n^ 
MU' mrAa^ %irnuJa^ l^^U^Jt/. ffL^ MU4nJiJt^ 4U 



4h/ 



IljL^ 



f^vM 4/«/ Ui^ 



AhM^ 



4^rhif^v^ 



r 



t 

I 
I 
i 



I 

i 

i 



4 

i 

I 

i 



-^OS'- 



i}\ULL AixmM AimiA^ ^^ m^ m^ jMcuJv ^ 

44UM/ ,■ M Uvi4f PlJft^^ die4tAy l^yihUJL^ n>uuU' jt 



Immfvnjt^ ^iUViiJtt/' ^* * m tV 4n^ JM m. intuJi 4»V2^ 
mr iuvJv i^fw Milk <Jmpf^ ^ mS(- Jti/h/ lil'i <iJ- 



^ M^ mit /pi/H^ dimA 4Ji(kJL^ uSihMtA 
-. 4tJ^ uhAiM /hv du lUAjUjj'^ryt^ ^oidiK^ 








mjpr: 



i« 

. * - 

11 



!| 



/fny/ 



.yw 



<Vn^ JUikr. lUi/ Ji'hUUh/ A4nMh(^ <dhJiMU<f 



-JOS- 



iA>JL 






UJfy yJhml' aa4 




4<L4 mJU Aiik^l JoiJlu , W JjkAH^ JL ^UlyJl- 
Am IJil AW ^ MA 'ikki^iLAUhf HUüUi/tr M'H^ 

n §ß II ' ^ ^ 

jAJik Ahyi4^ JIhU Jfy^vcL. 

lim S. ,Lp/ IM 4U(l(^ 4/. hM(i ^ 




I ^ n 






/dl 



vWtfm- 



rhAotu^ 



4 AJ^ k^M/^ij) aI^ An^Avid^ 



mUAJk^ 



jU 



\a^ 



^nv 



^14/ At HiiiA ' U /htAim ,'(h/*\/i.'oJL l*ny Mnvi^ft/ %nAcuJj^ 



/tfiü 



m€/. JU <zi'-^ 



^W4/ Mti 



öiiut LirM 



lluU ^OuJi 



Vuk^ A^ ^44^ , d4i m Us^uU noM /A*w 



I 



Ami^MW 







f 



A^U^yyTA^ 



f 



/yi^i^ Anw di/jv ^mmJhUujM^kyy^ 



JUMi4t dio \MMff^ . mf /M Uoi U^h/ Mniiii/H4L dtl^ M-" 

J6wA^ UiMUky . vUi' AlhuPtry' <lM4Art'L A\MiMJt 01/ . Mßi 








I 



<lMVrfU4u^V A^KrJk All Uur dtA^ illm ^v 4A^uUn/^ 



1 






HOPSE HAIFI. clean. »a;! «nrt maiie, &up- 
pIie-5 urgcnflv required fnr defence 
Orders. We are actual users: best pricc, 
prompt rash. THOMAS MITCHELL and CO. 
PTY. LTD . 360 Lonsdal^-st. , Brush Manu- 
'facturcrs for R8 yi^ars. 

HOPSE HAIR rlean, man? and tail. re- 
quir^d for nrst-nt dffence ordrrp; beßt 
price. promot ca£h. John Zevenboom Sr Co , 
brush manüfacturerf . 33.T Elizabetji-Rt .. Melb, 
Establlshec over 80 years. 



■iJ. 



Vii-", 



•.-^,^. 



/ 



^SiMiAi J&4^ i^_ M.Uf\lt%i*JiiA^ Jni^fJ- ^^^Juh^ ^i^'n ^ 










t 



/ // 



/i/^H^t^^4^My^y jl'r^^^ 






iM^rr^ 



Jh0. 



'hm^ 









Mffc^ dtA m^nA miiA <t <Ji(M^- ml /3u4 Ju^ hM- 




I 



AJ^ttt/ 











'I^MMm^ Mi. Snui. LU i)rm^. i^ *rnt>L^ 



I 



Jet 4iMn$/ mwfi 4 JjUh/ >h/ ^ dJj M /hpd ^d^444m^ 




\ L 



my^P vftmklJyi^ A4/v>*Uyv^ vKi^kid^l^ IfMr oiAt^^pMl 



mV 







u 






-311- 



4n^ 



4vr A AmV jU ^JUfUfiL 



I 






m^if LvyyM^^ Jd iCvii evA^ ^kuJi dn^l 4^ 
'^^ I 4niuii Ad ^^:h.^ _ij^Ac ^di /)^ 4unv ^ 



^mti 



iMtUyMnyi^ \nU^/^voJLyi/, 



/M^ 



fUfk /hml« Ü^Hll 4^^Jll4M^kiC' 

SdM^hv /}un% 44^m<ht ^^^^wiLyl ^WiAtn/ Ah^'. 'tl4 4vj^ 



%P1^ 



/^fjw44 aUm^ I M Äry tJUr ^M^ Mrm</yyt^ /fuiufJh^' MP 

MUivnJ*^ I mi /A^ 4i/^ r^kfyrhf- Mi^m^-i^' ly^^^^^ /ü^ 

r l iL 

luy/^^g«/ ^ • l-m>i f — ^k A^ — ^ — off »»' di^t iA^l4im^ iJfmK'jt. 



^U^rmmiyy /ffh^ /UÄ'^ /i^/ //</ j 



'iJcihAfyy^ M^ 4*^^'^ ^tJiJh^ j /^ 



jh^ it^ivt^ 



1 



iMH^U IC'hriJc^r tl J\t^Y^mk M^ /H^ 



/l'Vyri/ 









-313.- 



^f^M*A4t . <3k4 /jvUiiiUj/ AMcMt 



^(^.iyUuljA*f^ ddi^ 



'^w-m'Vry ■ •»■P 






Uy^ AMyhJt^ Xyu^, i Utk Uii I^AUff hkUO^ 

wr AwJi/ Arv/ mhiUx^- ^j^ X^Äeu/ . ^M 













Myydy 



Aynr 



.tj4^ 







iMvm WivfK k <ij{Am/ JuiyitJu 










44^r'y^i^i A^v lUUivfl M^^ikU Mlk^v ^ . n-hl /tnh'tiHk^y 



\v^ ^^ 'fMWi'^v/kn^ 



Ai^yyylli 



I 



f 



I 



(j ä 

UU. Ilv ^4/>f; fuloHf^ niil^ h^^ tv^^ mJ %J<^, 



typCiUw\ MCt/yy^nt^- /k^Äpn^ A 



^-rt^lLii 



-mln^h: M^^Hilw\ >^Ä^ 



i/i^XKOM^Um Aiiiit AM^ Vi^ 



L H< 




MnHU^. , - r 

a4 



UmiUb'^ ohtTy^Jnrc 



fx-j u'm4fmK'3 /^^^>^iiM 






Ui 




m JmfAj^ M^iU 



V f}^ 










-.Irwfh m/HiM _.4^ M ^^^JMC' /hLJi^Uw My^Uf*^ 4^ 



\M^\i^ Au4 mfMttt^yV 



UL äuH^ li^t 'Utk ^iiJL^üMpyn^. kl\KMhv Antt dU .- 

/mm ,U/m Avv^ d^imw A^th^ ^^L AUHt/7mi^^ /y^ M 



-ijö:- 




4^0/^^ Jiui^ iimit Imtyv du qTäm 








/Ptn/ im// ü-mL UuV A^lniW viimnckyi Jvi AmI /ty-.ii jj^ 



%M/yy\A^ Uihv' UmXtJo M</, ^4fyn AW Äk tJliJJ^f^tli^^ ' 



^^^'^p^p*^ 



A^dd U**UU^ du ^ 



\ 






Hti . 



In ,c I f ^7 



,%ihi/n4i/yy A^nvnH 4^ A^^ .Ui^ /mJ^Vi^ 



\i4^' /Hviniih^n^ , . ifyyr/ />unk 



iM'UCvtM/^ 



.r>v 



^.m\MM^> c4 AJi^ /)vM ^Ut*o /y\4M' 






Mii i*i^.L^i^il^ jii(^ ^wui iMj mlry mAmut JLjM /und^ Ji^M^ %^Ut^ 



. U^UkM m, UynA^^ _ ^ 

AM^T/ /CVn^ÄH^Avy /Ji^^ytCicU /"^nfl^, ^AiMhi/ /hU\Mn^ 






/I4^i 



^TH^Umi^ /ymr A1\^tf(^' <Jltr94in^ h^u^'m /h^^' A^yv^i^h^ 






%ItkyJ m^ dCU'^ AM 




MM]/ M 



^mndt 



I 



/ 



/ho 



m^ 



'im seu 













iU 



/ 



n/i 



A^m^^ao/./ii^ IknK JO^ A^ini^m^ /llAidiU^ hu- Uv dl^ 






ÜfJyf^ Jf^Ufi^lv A^^ , /^^ '^ WJmc^<^^rn^/l ' 



/^nUn/ ^Ui/ l/dfu^^i 



f 



Jtk-;^' ■fJimui^ *iJUi/i^ l^hi/H^ iyyy dn/hi.fH4^yri/ jM • 






^.m 






\ 



9^ /Mir Afn/ /. <lWi4av 






Ui4M,,yn€.y^ Ü ^Sd M 










/mwUie^. 









dtMt/n^ 







7 



ow 



mUUyV 



^^^hiw vlAifdn^r^ /JCfil AliyMy' VMi^^t4^%U^ncU^a^yi^ 




My^Hv 



— /inn*v 



/Wt^ 






ZH' 



ulu^. 








\ 



-3^1- 



I 




/fW' 



Jif^fWi^i^ /mmty" AvnJ/ mM^ M^ WlJf JuJIc djhml 

hak- AMS^ jOuJ MtH^ mAMJuW 4Wni^ W^M^f^y ÄW. 14 

JJk 



^nnv 



A^eLn, 






AMiJir /mwi^y <^ Mu4^ !W*#v#Äf^f#^ . mit Uu Ain$t%^ 



f 



iJ^ j m^ JL/ Xtn^ Ik/ WiM^ ^Ktv ^HiU/ ^io^ 

A^Lhv- jl^ ^iälul MiwV^ MjU" An/ Jhfu^ tMJ^ U/ 



tthJao uJmJL hnAm/U^AAMuitn/ ^ 






M 



fM- Jß MaiAmU a^. ^t mMir%l Wyk 




/iUtV 41^ KÄA^^ jfi^ Aw. mw Ai*il Jm /V41' WU^ ^JßiW 



^MiH/ ^\^^ 'LjM 44U vW I4^*p^ ^Jl^ 4e^^^ 
- Jf^HMktmf^ lliV ^JöiK fV»^ ^flf^ iufM Myil yW^ mJtti^ /ANW- 

\ JLi SfcTyt^ Mim^ f^^jh/;^!^ JMS I 



?i^ A*V 



Ui^ 



Vit» 



















fntM^il iUeUi^ Htm 



u4JiMi4 



MiL l^ kL^yy. tm dli^^i^ 




^73 ^CijlUi/ Jt^n^i^p/ MtkU 

Mj9^Mp Mhau/ AhJhJ /hhi^ /cki mi^ilhfij^ 

^W^ jiÄr M^ MJ- M^vi^ W AxlJy^JtUi^ iUt^ aIm^ 



imuU M^^iviH/ ßjli^ ^- 

^JL^MI aU aJ ^lu^ ii^nMX hy jyrJu^ 
JjkiM iUUn/ lULA^ aIt pU A flM- 

Sif i^ /^«♦n/ A^ aU ^ ^^^ Ja. J^ /my 






/J*ir%t»K4i' 




hd 



vim^ 



^hw ytt/ 



Jlt^-h^miMtr 



/iMiy 



JULi 






\W Ay^U^n^ 



I 








J^ntJLlfyLw 



/PrrU mutJ^ 



/hp 



itf^utnU />><UV ^UUUrU Jü^MMt 






^♦n/ 



M^ym/ 



I 



Jlj, 



U 



y. 



1^1 m 



Mn^ iU^huAi/ytdh^ &/ /hMuJUn/ iMu^, SuJkm WHfy 



\ 











/hi^uh4^ AAmiM/, Ji fC i^^Ju <AWi<- ^JllU4<k 4f oJia/hiZ 
'uLM Ai4 niM^^ /ffM^^W', aÜuJ^^p mM^ M^_ 



vJU^mkU "^p^A^, St ^wM^. ^ A4^ rnnti. VCUil M/ 





mind itMiy aa^I ji^iMri/' A4J' m^AH^^fc m fu k ^L 

r ^ Jt^py- JiJM JlUnt ^M^M^iMr iM^Y" ^^ 






_ /ml MMnv AnhiMi^ MtC liiltUvJhy jMkIi^(^Hp IMä^Jj- 

^ JU jdw^ ^^ ^^ AA^ iUm^ mJ' \fjt^ j^ 

- fi/1^ Jm V^hu ^fdl Aii^A /Wtiiu^ivi/ AfuCM^ ,uäin/. 
X JmMvy AaJL ^ 4m^ ^L^f/ aJ du, ^liMJiiPi^tt^^^ 

w %^K^ au^ dt4i ik^O^^nM ^¥^t^^' ^ l^M 



^W^ idi diMW AvfokfMnfCitW M^' . tß W#— ^te^ 





-«3i7- 



M 



Jr. <din/uf ^h^ iupiuk y^t^^rk /hu/iduv. %ift J^yyrul Mt 



. UmiX 



MüLUhY 



dl^ nf J^ a^ iv'^ ^ ikt U ' i^iAtnl ^hJl- <^ «^^^ Affh^ A4 aUi^ _ ,<W 

chlk'J/ AV\^ CiMi 7«^ mM mJl^ #^ ^ nvU4 m^ \ X^v^iJJtiW ^rrW toM^ 




/Uih /t^*^ 













Ai'trfyynin^, 



luhl Imm^dU ^ Mf4dU . 'W Mai ^hnA tJUiJtl k _i 



\ A^Hj*^t 




aIL 3{tM^ i^ J^ 




AlM^y 



" i*iU — mtvJk^ , Aivnv' Jtittut^ xHMy vaAm^ Jl^ 



ff C ( (/ ,^^ - ^ ^jt, ' 



, !'♦»»• /!/*»»«/ ^Uf^ AM 






/!21 



y 






% 



i^n^ Mv^ 



/fptU jLm/ .mUn^ 






ni^ntl/' 



JlU<W7^jUi/ fiiMtn^ Mi, ^hi/ d(A ^^^»/»wM**/ JUv Ali W 
Ui^hl/I/ AptfAnrjlf /lutri /dar 44u A<?f<^*^ fu^i^i^HiAvy , ^ 
A4u/YV ^4^ /HrrC lvvi(/ ''WlMw tJltilt, /Ufyy uMUf/ynfjify' 
Li mV^i.idu^ I n'U. ulk ^7S W ^7/ ^Pmh Cj /CnAjuiL^, 

4 /hA^ MuUh^ yUdi^ /iw mw mtuh. /ilty%^ 






-U 



jpryy i^^yvtk' 






/^n/ 



JU' Aul 4^ Arti/d4J(/\ttMy^ aIU 




^ 






/t^i^ 



^uU^ mUmd 



^f<h/\JitW /Uik 



/fn- A^^vt^ /Wv*^' 



SiUjLklti Aji^ 4^^iiM^ 






ijky^ 



'M' 




44 AiAttfrt^ 



Ad /Ut Mf^ uMMj4,y,J^ I4i^ j J^ -M^jju_ 

'^M ^ Äcji AtfjicUJytUi^^ 

^ /im< A4 ihn/ A^ Ju^ iLrJlA/ JLl Jluj^ 

aU ML/ duJfuJt^ juU jJIp <h^j^L yU Mi 1/JU^ 

^mwl Om^iß^ jlini iu^ AA JUeu< Jmll /ümK^ uUä^ 

Mt// *Mt4lv>/ 4M A^^l^rJL^ A^^ M^^Mlu/ <Siil Ajimjf. 

IMi^tni^UMyOMÜ hMLj^ivAlf^y/» 

Ly AUt/ Atm-tl Al^nvhtlLv ^^m^»y/ Ai^ Ahf^^lhfn^^ 



>fc A^ 




/yh^ 



- 3^0 - 

<LM AUi ^Sr^iäUm^uih aJ')^ W jUm HiO A\äU m^ 
Auif- Al'whr/ JUAkdj^nr a^ *M^c J^e^y/ . 4Ahu^ wJii/io^k Ji^C 

m^ MJLA Ahia^ SipdAU'MiL/ Ai.yv m^ aJL/ Jh'uii 

_^ /in — htkuJLf M^ Ai^ JLi^ vMJLeUiA Mj XlcJiM nM*< UiM4^ 

^A)l' UM /hnhi^' ILn 30. 000 fUJi Mi^JL' /kA aMi^^ 

ü J y ¥< I 

n^äTJLA iLJ.] 4/, II Mti^JfL , Akt Ad^OAf^ ^Uhi^tM^'.hMcr^ 
fy^Mc JLld^ KÜJl'ip^ A^itHtiU mAAUw ^^d Am v^^ 4^ 

iU. Aul ^ /♦«/ dü^ iJh^ Ai^t^tw' fJIJi^ Afyh/ /'^^O,' 

^. yßU K4Ail*t^ f^^ ^^^ '**T ^^ yjltxfr 
^ f^y/yvJkt m/ tÄW AaW . dfii dlAAM/ >w. A4 Ui" 
^HAffe/ aIo \%J(^^ihf{A<M A/vrvl AALjJLd aU Lhi^AUciK ^ A4 

^J^ illdt /utU dhi/ <^4mJm^^ diw a^/ m^ aL/ Jm4{- 



z 



A^ \ßudc /imd 







'^Y5;iV 









V 



_ A^tü ^ift fi-Juff^ ^*yny 4U^i^ /^*)^^ /:t*^itfi^ ^-fßiCkc^f 

tiitrU>L>t/ . alte )i.p MdiU^iyy Afr. )t^ yyV^iv^ ^<^y 

I U^ j^*y*^y v^lf^ Mu*, i-nX /^/ / •« S'^^A^ 

Jitif^HA^ ' tlfkr- A^mUr^-ilh H*^^^ U^Jh(.rfC^ It^tt:^-^ 

_ /lyn^'ky' 4*lr^*if'i4^ , /'h^i^ii J!i^^t,M ,4<i^(- Xi^f^4^u ^-f^^ 
- /f. Ää4. lUS ^- H. Mn jd^ /5^ /^///ö^/^/''^/-• 



ft-t^ 



•>', I'.. 



B^d-adKÜSHBiaHtfl 



m 



/füt t^vH^ijLVpiiJ, >44 



;* /hfirl/xM*^ fJUlv^yt^ 






■m—- 



u 



u. 






Jit /Ü^H^ if^'btr/' fLi^yy 



¥fi*d^^ .^^^U^h /Li^^^yy' ^^niyt 4^t /iL^ 



^x^^/^ iLut KJ^U ^J tüU'ny^j yiuikl 



yti 



Uhr yOUi. A^^^^^ ^U^k^ 4*i}i^^ fj4f^€^ i^yv ^^'hy 

d,i Ui^iJ^yy yi#Wc. 7u^/,iij AiUU yLLii. y^t^ilk 

-HnyhMrhir /W 'WJ/ ^y^ Jl^/ii. ^ Jikj. 

^i, füi^Hst^f iij/HP 1^^ 4Üi. • A^/M 44fH^ ff^^iO 
fin^n4nr) ^L4t Ji^fU^ ^ 4iLh /Wt iii^^Ac jlhl 



iujfUJ^0 JM.- tSJi k^U^ AnU iUj j^^j^^ ßdn- 
t\ iim Jit^^^nt^ yf-i, Z; 0\,^t. Mhj Mi'^ lidJl 4/ci 



U/m^yfH^UC^yr' yyni^^lpyriyit^r^^Jf^^i^ 









f * 



-■>v-» 



I 






r 









- SH ^ 



i^uti-n-' 



4Uvi4'y J^l^r^^^^ IlM^t ^yrtiC /Uir'hcy^i^^ 




H^H^i^Mf'J^^ 



I 



y-^ 7>»i^^ ut^ 



hti^^ii.j.^t^ 



J^- /i^Hlh.j!^, 



1 



Ji4^.^li.^ /ykn,i ,tLj^') 



T"^ 






r. 






%v>^i^ th^'r "Jl ^Uüu ^^Lkn m^U, J^y j^JJl/^ ^ 



/''UitmK, ytypT r/ X'. ^ f^Ln- /h-^U .4i^i^ ^^/j 









Ah^ Hh^ JMtr %clkt^^ ^&nMlnty VttUd A;94Myt/^* .4A^ Ac A¥^ /U44^t^ 

AJiUlk aU J^^ aU ^kidfuM^JUL^ /aL^ m^ ^Ir^ l$nUl^^$4LUiMtfl 
A^^i^MM' 44^ Aiä$4i Ju^juvt, 2$/^^ A»^i, JkUy ^ ^jU^ a;^u^^ /Vt /ee. 

ßf^fn !Jk^'H^Jl A^UMJ- /HfU^, %MfAlsi /W^ Mh A44^)^ ^s^fi^ A€>^ /t^ 
jt^pn^lt^jl A^ Ai^fU^ aM- 4jUh^ 0lh^ /HH^ ^ j/W*^^*^^ AnUA^Mtf. 



ArMA^^ 






Wim 



i< 




337 

^/l^tn^f A tf m UU ^ S4urJt^f /^^ du aUo dArJM%H^ 
tLy" l^ Jh.'^itU lirr XirU M^m^ .^f^ fu^^vi^tluMm, 

aum. 



33S. 



a4*^^ JkiH. jm n4t. .mf Ua . yfr^ JuU ^ ]JU }fi5 
3 1 7/31. 

lim y!,u4^ jU 'SUÜJiitii,^ iU- 'kt^ J^kik. jßlU 



! 



fhhi^ ^ Tit. JU^_A^AA7i/si ^ L^fi^uTU ^ 

^U^ luiUf» aU^M Ali* f^Üi4^ IfV A^^ "^ 

^JW^ 1s^ W ^^ttA^ J^^MJ^y^^ 1^ Ar J^'if A^l 1^ 
7?*#^ Aj/^^^ hi lUft^fn^ A-^^j>M. A€^\ ^^^^tf^KUih^ 

/ 
"K^- vlm^ Api^ ^ v^ >^t,W^^ .W JOdd^f 



# 



3y^ 



2^0 









4iic nUii^'y% c/>/^ yCiy^ /^Ju^ /H^, fÜ^Vl v* Tu^rrtC 






Khu^ 



;^1/^ ^^ 4A^ d^ 4^t ß^^ ^ • ^^W- A^^^ ^'U7& }uUMU*tCj^ ^^yL^ 









e#«^»^ 












V 



/ 



JiryH4^ /((.Ui J^f^ /^*^ 7^11»^ t-^^^ty^x ^S^ec^i-^ O^ 

li^4% /^^ ^ An />j^, /^ Je: M /i^4 n^^C m< 
' AfHl'i^ ah/ m^ ^J^t ^ Z*"^ J^/'*^ '»^^ 

! Atu^'4 A^^ /^^ W ^'^^ y^^/An. ^ÄJi^M 









(f r^ 



. ^ r;ii*t* Aü^ tlA^^ft^ ^ i)äi^j4fj$^ ^Uifj/u^/iJie, 

^ Jv^^k ^W ,1fW^ .#^ ^>^ /7>^ ,11^ y€i 

4^A /^^^^ /^^ /^^^^ ykeu^j /fit /4!i;; (t!^^ ii 
e-v«9x^ /x4i' /Wi •f^ /h*y£e dft- ^^t&ytJt^ 4t/. 

Mti*>^, %Uu*i- /*L^k ?^ %*^ ,dit4. 1 7/a 



_ ^''Jl^ />»^ j[^U/?^»^ /*9p^tYH "^f^^^^f^y^ ^i^^^t. 



^ -» 



%v y^i^/^/ /^^*v/4« «^H^^ /^<^ ^ /?i^ Jf .,Wr<r Ai- 



^ '^7^;^,^ »^*^ ^^^ft ^ ^ AU^fi^ ^/iic 



Y^ffH ^>f^ ^/put^f 



/vy> /f^ 



^S!^^l A^ 



V^ 



^n/i'yH^ 



AiM^^ h"t CUi^Jt 0^^*^^ tUj /^^z^WJvC/- 



^' 







L /i^> A*ii- /lUt, K^^^^f- , /*<i»fti*»*«t ^< /i«ldV./*ir/. 



M / ^ t % ^ M 









1 




^ ^^ *^ ^ .Ua y,.u M, ^ ^4^ 

i 



^^#//*v ^'"^ß^^ ^^'/ /%i 
f f 

i^^ -TJ^ '/k*^i ^>u<.^^ ^^^f^ Aih,4^^ ^yf^^ 






«!=L«!-™!!^!1^^^^ : ^'"''''^ bemerkswarte Monate meines Lebens. 

^s w^r im Mai 1935 als ich mit meinem Ä am PranKenstein PosUmt 
vorbeifuhr. Meine gute Freundin Gi^e Lobisch Kam grade aus der grossen 
Tuer des Amts *iuf der ßahnhoistrasse. Ich rief ihr zu : - - Grete komm, 
steig einl- Sie antwortete kurz und schnell: - Weiterfahren, weiterfahren? 
Ich konnte mir dies nicht erklaeren. Mir fiel auf, dass Grete ausserordent- 
lieh verstoert aussah und ein hochrotes Gesicht hatte. Meine VerwuiMerung 
ueber ihr Verhalten sollte sich bald aufklaexen. .Am Nachmittage des 
gleichen lages rief mich mein Freund Dr. Inmann an und bat mich, sofort 
zu ihm ins nntonins Krankenhaus in der Hermannstrasse zu kommen. Ich 
fuhr sofort hin und fand Grete in einem aufgeloesten Zustande. Unter 
Traenen stammelte sie nur:-»'Fuercnte^ches ist gesciien, Fuerchterliches. " 
Als sie sich noch einiger Zeit h M^ÜX^ hatte, erzaehlte sie: r» .^s mein 
Vater heute morges ins Amt ^Sg - er warftfer-Postinspecktor - waren bereits 
zwei Gestapo-Beamte anwesend. iSie erklaerten meinen Vater, dass ünzeige 
gegen ihn vorliege aus folgenden Gruenden : - 1) Ks waere aufgefallen, dass 
er[il8 Beamter den deutschen Gruss "Heil Hitlerl*' verweigert habe. Zu diesem 
Punkte erwiderte mein Vater, dass er keinen Grund gehabt haette, den deut- 
®^^^*^9rÄrp^^ 2u verweigern. ii*r habe seiner iJ^rinnerun,; nach den deutoe^^w 
Qrfma immer gebraucht, wann er wirklich ihn einmal nicht angewendet haben 
sollte, so sei dies aus alter Gewohnheit durchau^absichtlich geschehe». 
^K^^^^^^^ Sammlung zum Winter^dlf swerk habe er ct abgelelm t /deinen Beitrag 




en. Zu siesem Punkte erklaerte mein Vater, dass er eine groessera 
Familie und,^seine Schwiegerei ten im Haus habe und mit seinem Gehlt mit jaskem 
Pfennig zu rechnen habe. I^ur hieraus sei söin Verhalttin zu erklaeren. 
3) Er gestatte als Beamter, dass seine Tochter mit einem Juden ein Verhaelt- 
nis habe. Zu diesem Punkte, ei^;iderte er, dass er bereits seiny Tochter 
den Verkehr v<|boten habe, dass seine Tochter dreissig Jahre altKi^^d er 
keine Macht nrehr ueber sie habe, Kinernder." :ve9tapo-Beamten erklaerte :- 
••Wenn Sie keine Macht über ihre Tochter haben, wihaben diese. Lassen sie 
ihre Tochter sofort hierner kommen.* So wurde ein Bote nach der in der 



- 2 — 

SchuetzenstiÄsse gelegenen Wohnung gesÄndt und Grete kam sofort ins Postamt. 
Mit '•Guten Tag** betrat sie das Zimmer, worauf sie mit "Heil Hitler;* 
angedonnert wurde. Ihr wurde vorgeworfen : - "Sie haben ein Verhaeltnis 
mit einem Juden" worauf Grete antwortete "Wi^einen Sie dAs?''. Huerueber 
brauchen wir sie nicht aufklaeren. Wir werden es aber sehr kurz machen. 
Sie haben eine Krklaerung hier zu unterzeichnen, dass sie nie mehr mit dem 
Juden sprechen werden". Hierauf Grete : - "Muss das sein?". Wenn Sie sich 
weigern, werden wir Sie an einen Ort bringen, wo Sie lernen werden, wie 
man sich zu verhalten hat". Gemeint war damit ins Konzentri^tionsl^ger. 
Sie legten Grete ein Schriftstueck vor, indem sie zusichern musste, nicht 
mehr mit mir zu sprechen. Grete war verzweifelt, ich nicht minder. 
Grete fragte: - "Was soll nun werden?" Ich konnte keine ivn twort geben. 
Ich dachte an meine alten filtern. Vater war 72, meine Mutter 62, an Aus- 
wanderung, an eine Militaeraiktatur, die riitler beseitigen koenne. ich 
konnte nur sagen; "abwarten eine Loesung wird sich finden. *• Trotz dieses 
Verbotes sprachen wir uns im Juni einmal in der ^rtohnung von Menzels 
Schwester in der Sternstrasse 108 in Breslau. 

Grut<d und ich hatten eine gemeinsame gute Freundin Kaethe Reichel. Sie war 
die Tochter des St^^dtrates Alfred Keichel, der eine Kolonialwareni*haiudlung 
in der Nit^ertrasse besass. K^^ethe Reichel hatte geplc^nt.Anf ng Juli zu 
ihrem Onkel Pfarrer Scholz nach Laehn ins Riesengebirge zu fahren. Damit sie 
nicht allein den Urlt^ub dort verbringe, federte sie Grete auf,' mit ihr zu 
fahren. Dies geschah auch. Käthe hatte mich verstaendigt und mir nahegelegt/ 
auf einen Besuch auch nach Laehn zu kommen. So nahm ich unseren Perce Arrow 
und fuhr nach Laehn. Vom Postamt in Schoenau rief ich Kaethe R»Tcnel an 
und wollte sie verstaendigen, dass ich auf dem Wege nach Laehn sei. Kaethe 
war c^ber nicht zu erreichen. Eine Schwester des Klosters versprach mir, sie 
zu verstaendigen. Als ich nacn Laehn Kam, liee ich den W«=*gen am Markt stehen 
und ging z\;l. Kl oster. Aus einem Fenster im ersten Stock SÄhen ^ Kaethe 
und Grete hinaus. Auf der Strasse stand ein Schwester, die zu Kaethe sagte:- 
"Äin Herr hat aus Schoenau angerufen, dass er auf dem Wege nach Laehn sei," 
Ich hatte mich hinter einer an der u^cke stehenden Telephon- Zelle etwas 
versteckt; trat nun hervor und sagte: - ••Er ist schon hier.* worauf die 
Schwester ausrief: - "Das ist ja ^wie in einem Roman. 



t^'"-' 



- 3 - 



Ich uebernachfete in eineiP Dependance des Klosters. Am naechsten Morgen 
fuhren wir drei nach dem etwa 30 Kilometer entfernt liegenden schoenen 
Goldentraura bei Marklissa und besichtigten die dortige Talsperre des Queiss, 
eines Nebenflusses der Oder. Am Nachmittag fuhr Kaethe nach Laehn zurueck, 
waehrend wir nach dem etwa I50 Kilometer entfernt liegenden Luebbenau 
ansteuerten. Luebbenau liegt im Spreewald, einem durch viele Kanaele und 
Wasser Strassen durchzogenes Gebiet. Die Bevoelkerung ist wendisch-tschechisch. 
Wir hatten hier zwei sehr schoene T«ge, die aber durch die i^ngst. von der 
Gestapo ausgefunden zu werden stark gemindert wurden. In unvergessl icher 
Erinnerung ist mir die abendliche Bootsfahrt die uns durch einige Wasser- 
strassen des Waldes fuehrten. üs dunkelte und Grete bekam ün^si^iiKmser 
Faehrmann des oefteren wiederholte:- »»An diesen Abend werden sie oefter 
den.*' Kr brachte uns aber unversehrt nach Luebbenau zurueck. Am naechsten 
Morgen setzten wir unsere Fahrt nach dem etwas noö^j^lich von Luebbenau 
gelegenen Luebben fort. Wir besichtigten den Ort und das dortige Museum, 
in welchem mir besonders ein kleines Oelbild einer bild schoenen VGratf in 
Kielmanseck, einer angeblichen Geliebten Napoleons in die Augen fiel, Grete 
wurde hierueber etwas verstimmt. Am Marktplatz assen wir in einem vor dem J^^ 
aufgebauten Tschanigarten Mittag. Ks war augezeichneter Spreewaelder-Aal 
mit weisser Dill-Sauce. Ein starker Mercedes der Wehrmacht hielt neben 
imseren Wagen und einrecht freundlich gut gelaunter Major orderte fuer 
seinen Fahrer ein Glae sehen Bier. Damit kam '^ unserer schoener und letzter 
Ausflug zu üJide. In gedrueckter Stimmung entdeckt zu werden fuhren wir nach 
Liegnitz, von wo Grte ihre Fahrt per Bahn nach Franxenstein fortsetze. 
Die Angst aber segen das Gestapo -Gebot gehandelt zu haben, blieb bestehen. 
Gluecklicherweise hatte es keine Folgen, trotzdem mir einmal unsere Konto- 
ristin Fraeulein Idc-Maria Opitz sagte, es waere aufgefallen, daas Fraeulein 
Lobisch und ich zur gleichen Zeit einige Tage von Frankenstein eS2i*^t 
gewesen waeren. 



- 4 - 

iis war Mitte Juli I935 als mein B^reund Dr. Ihm&nn mich anrief und mir 
sagte, er habe fuer die aweite Haelfte August eine Vertretung bekommen 
und moechte mit einer Touristenfahrt nach Amerika fahren. Das war 
damals eine etwas ungew5hnlich^w#i%e Reise. Ich solle natuerlich wie 
in frueheren Jahren mit ihm fahren. Ich lehnte ab und sagte : - 
••Nein Wenzel, fuenf Tage auf dem Ozean seekrank sein, nxir um die 
die dortigen Wolkenkratzer zu sehen und dann wieder fuenf Tage seekrank 
sein, das ist nichts fuer mich. Wenn Du Athen mit der Akropolis, 
Istambul mit Haggia iSophia oder Aegypten mit den Pyramiden waehlen 
wuerdest, dc.nn kaeme ich mit. Von Palaestina war dittis3% keine ßede. 
iJiS war damals Kein Reiseland. Also ueberlege Dir meinen Vorschlag. 
Aber Wenzel blieb hart. Er habe schon fuer diese Zeit eine Vertretung. 
So schloss das Gespraech mit den Wortenlj^lso dann im naechsten Jahre, 
i^inige Tage lese ich in der B'rriaicen stein Muensterberg Zeitung. In 
Liegntiz wurden sieben Juden wegen Rassenschande verhaftet. Sie sehen 
ihrer Ueberfuehrung in ein Konzentrationsl*-ger entgegen. Einen Tag 
spaeter eine aehnlich Notiz von der Stadt Hirschberg. im Riesengebirge. 
Ich bekam Angst, obschon ich annehmen konnte, dass ich auf Grund des 
im Mai von der Gestpo erteilten Verbotes^fgesichert war. Trotzdem rief 
Wenzel an und fragte, : - "Wann geht Deine Reise los? Ich komme mit." 
worauf Wenzel erfreut sagte ;- Das /reut mich, warum auf einmal. •• Das 
werde ich Dir nocn sagen. Ich wusste dass unser Telephon ueberhoert 
wurde und ich konnte ihm nicht sagen, dass ich Angst habe- von der Gestapo 
verhaftet zu werden. Ich sagte es ihm dann persoenlich. Immerhin ich hätte| 
ein Angstgefuehl una ging nicht auf die Strasse. 

Es war am^. Äugst • Ich hatte im Buero in der Mederstrasse euen meine 
Untschriften auf die ausgehende Post gegeben. Als ohn inizuklopfen die 
Tuer in mein Privatkonto geoeffnet wurde. Vor mit stai.d der Polizist 
Goradza im Helm und ^^gte : -" üch, Herr Doktor, was soll werden, wenn 
ich Leute wie Sie, verhaften sol'\ ?*• Ich sagte ihm; -'•Sie wollen mich ver- 
haften? Zeigen Sie mir zun^echst Ihren Haftbefehl.** worauf er mir antworte- 
te: ~ ••Ich habe keinen •*. Ich sagte ihm "So einfachist das nicht. Bitte 
setzen Sie sich. Ich werde sofort den Herrn Landrat anrufen.'* 




AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 

Phorie: (212)744-6400 

Fax:(212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Data: 12/21/2009 



Sys#: 000198685 



Box: 2 



Folder: 9 



.n'i 



( / y 





^-- '^ -ti^.. 





•«r* ' 




/ 




V 




y^^A^ 











c^-r 




4 . /f ^* > 



C t_ ^ 



r i 



>^^ 



^ 



>:i>:* 



/ 



y .* 



, <? ^ 



(» r' 



/ 



/ 



y 




l( 



I 



t» 



POLSKA RZECZPOSPOLITA LUDOWA 
URZAD STANU CYWILNFGO I 

Nr USC 1 .00a/64t -I-pon^ 



Wroclauj. dnia 5.1 ^^.9.rj^.^Q-.J33M.ff. 



Zasiriadczenie 



Urz^d Stanu Cyinilnego ire Wrodaiuiu za^iuiadcza, ze irydobycie aktu ?.S9.P^'. 



(nazuia ahtu stauu cj^unliiego) 



Simon Victor 

fnaztuUko i imi^) 



zmaxlego ^V ^ a. ^ 

[jgJSaSaaHK dnia .26 ..stjczilia j,^j.^ .1.945 ire...lrp.ciawiu, -^^^- 



nie moze nastqpic z uiuagi na brak odnosnych ksieig. 



ES 




2-c^ KierowQiica 




hieroanik Irz^du Stanu Cyujttnego / 



W.D D. - 783 - 9.5.56 — 5000 A5 



POLSKA RZECZPOSPOLITA LUDOWA 
URZAD STANU CYWILNLGO I 

Nr USC 1 ...008/64^-1 .poiu: .^. 



Wrociauj, dnia 5.1 siegp.nia.J.S.Gir^ 

i 



Za^tüiadczenie' 



Urzc|d Stanu Cyiuilnego lue Wroclaiuiu zaötuiadcza, ie luydohycie aktu .~S°~7*!r... .*!?.. .!!?....?!?.. .."!*..,.!!?.,.*■ 



Simon Victor 



(natui* «kiu tuou cj^U'iinego) 



••#••*■* — ■— — »•■■^■■■■•■>»——— ♦—» 



(n*EU)Uko 1 imlc) 



•• — >•*•••—»*•»>■■•<»»——*»• 



big.^TOTC?in.n ...26..s1:ycznia ^oku ..19,45 u;e.....Wr.oc,lawiu,., 



liic ipoize nastiipid z utuogi na brnk odno^noch ksi<ig, 





Z-r« Kierownika 

hierownik Vn^u Stanu CyiuHnego / 



W.D.D. - 783 - 9.5.56 -- 5000 A5 



• POLSKA RZRCZPOSPOLITA LUDOWA 
URZAD STANU CYVVILNHGO I 

Nr usc 1 ooa/64. -I .poil^. 



Wrociauj, dnia 5.1 sieii).nia,. igs^r. 



ZaSuDiadczenie 



Urzqd Stanu Cyiuilnego tue Wroclaiuiu zaSwiadcza, ze luydohycie aktu ~.S9.^r'. 



(nazuia aktu stanu r.fjuillneßo) 

zIssLjhk dnia ....?ö...stj:czrLia 



Simon Victor 

(nanuUko 1 iml«) 



roku -19.^5 u^e... Wrpclawiu,. 



nie moze nastc^pid z uiuagi na brak odiio^iiych ksiqg. 



ES 








2rCp Kferownilca 



»•■■■••■»*»•» 



Kieroiu 



• ( f> ^ 

Jiiik Urzcdti Stanu CyuJitncgo 1 



W.D D. - 783 - 9.5.56 — 5000 A5 



• POLSKA RZECZPOSPOUTA LUDOWA 
URZAD STANU CYWILNLGO I 

Nr USC 1 OOa/64^-1 .pon^ 



Wrociauj, dnia 5.1 sierp.nia..196^r. 



ZaSiuiadczenie 



Urzqd Stanu Cyinilnego ire Wroclaiuiu za^iDiadcza, ze irydohycie aktu .?.S.9??*T....r*...'!'...."r... "!*... ."!"...*■ 



Simon Victor 



(nazuia aktu staau cy^wilneRo) 



(naziuUko 1 iml«) 



rÜ^wSK dnia ..2.6...stycznia roku ..1.9.^5 u)«. .Iroc.iawiu,., 



nie moze nastqpiö z uwagi na brnk odnoÄnych ksiqg. 



ES 




2-r^ KierowniJca 







•K.Cr' j-'C^ -! 



••>-• ■• ■'**»*»fc»» V »^J«»— >««■-■««< 

Kleroujnlk Urt^du Stanu CyuiUncgo 



f 



W.D D - 783 - 9 5.56 — 5000 A5 



POLSKA RZECZPOSPOLITA LIJDOWA 
,URZAD STANU CYWILNnGO I 

Nr USC 1. ..00a/64^-I^pon;' - 



Wrociauj, dnia 5.1 .?i.?.?E5i.?:...19§.^r# 



Za^Luiadczenie 



Urzqd Stanu Cyiuilnego lue Wroclaiuiu za^iuiadcza, ze luydobycie aktu !^.S9.^y^^...!!T...T...T....'T...T...T 

rjlJL™.rLJr...r....~....r..r --Simon Victor - - ^ - - 



<n«ziii(iko 1 imi«) 



zmarloßo ^,- j . 

znirfüTangK dnia ....2.ö...styc.znia roi-u .1.945 uje„ Wr.o.c.l.awiu,.....-...-...-...- ..- ----.- 



ES 



liic moie nastqplö z uiuagi na brak odno^njjch ksiqg. 



W.0.0. - 783 - 9.5.56 — 5000 A5 







2-c^ Kierowniia 




^ierou;nik Urtcdu Slanu clyüuioego 



f 



^^ 




POLSKA RZECZPOSPQLITA LUDOWA 

Powiat 

Poznaniu-ötare I/Iiasto 



Wojewödziwo •. .■• W 

URZAD STANU CYWILNEGO w 



Odpis skröcony okfy urodzenia 



1. Kazwisko 



Victor — 



) ^ VlMW«k P ■ « 



2. \m\q (Imiona) 



riara .^-^^-^*.^*, 



jedenastego czerwca tyslFyo osiemset 



3. Data urodzenio 

o siemd zi e si^te go dru .":T..'rT."::.7....1.1.?. .9..»1 ^8.2... .. 

Poznan — .. ^.-.-- ._- ^ 

■4. Miejsce urodzenia 



5. Nazwisko i imi^ 

(or-o) 



Victor Lloritz ---^ 



zowüd ...^A^P.iep.. 




6. ImiQ i nazwisko rodovve J^^© On.Ora. O.Qhn.. 
ift*' •■ ■- zavvod 






Poswiodczo siq rgodnosd powyisjego odpiju 
2 fresciq aklu urodzenia Nr i. .0:0 y . . . . 



...332.... 



ll/ * ; ••?■•• -"ü^?vNI/> dnia 



196 5 j.. 







O El ,j rf 




I Al/80 g 





'zfwo 







Powiot 



'R2AD STANU CYWILNEGO w Poznanla-Stap« Mla 



dpis skröcony oktii uredMnio 



isko Tiotor 



*mic (imiono) 

Dato urodzenio l^^^Äas^öl^o o«erwoa 'krsiao oaiamset 
liaiiidsieal^teco äro^iai^o 1 1 . s .Bß2 

liejsce urodzenia ^©™ÄÖ .__. 

iwjsko i imiQ TlPtOX MPTyP— — ~— 

(oje«) " 

~" ■■■■■•' i.x.mm. ZOWÖd JCapiaC^.Mw.ii.m.u.n.iKff.... 

r 

^isko rodowe .?^.9?^" ^©^ — - 

zawöd "^ 



♦f«*cl9 ofcfw urodienio Nr TPv.9. y.ß.?.. III 



'^•rbowq 



M.linio' -i«'P^« 



MSW - M-« — s«m. 1 

1115 — LDA — 4.4.6S — 1.^4M 



kl. m Aim g 





POLSKA RZECZPOSPOLITA LUDOWA 

f O ^^ Powiaf 



Wojewodzfwo - 

URZAD STANU CYWfLNEGO w P™a-i iir .^^,re r'i 



Odpis skröcony akfu urodzenia 



1. Nazwisko "^ssel ' 

Ol-/.. X ^alOiiion ./iktor 

2.. Imi^ (imiona) „ 

3. Data urodzenia ^^"^^^^m. .::..^nia tjSic^C ^-'ip-, .,^ 



set clnrnpr^o ■ 

vO ^ -O- . r- 

-4. Miejsce urodzenia .^°^?.^ii..:. 



15.1-2J9°2.r. 



5. Nazwisko i imi^ -^ "C ..v.>3.SS6 

(0|C0) 



rpl. 



-Tow6d^.°*^^^^...^P-<=^alista 



6. Imi.Q i nazwisko rodowe ^'' '^^■^."^t'. 

(molki) 



a \"ictor 



zawöd ■ 













Poswicdczo s»^ rgodnosd powyzszego orfpisu 



z freiciq oUu urodzenio Nr ..."T.TT-trrV / Od. 



■■■-•;^-^v<-: ! S\ ^^ ^'' *.^ A :^ . . 'i /rze t,nj a 

•-. f ^- ■, önio 




196 



J 



r. 










' E-OMECKI K WU 

'^^üt-f- t.DJ\ — 2J.1.6J -^(Jirtoü.öüo — Pap. pism. kl. III Al/80 g 




ROWNIK 

tanu Cywllneoo 



//M. U 




SPOLITA LUOOWA 



Powio» 



URZAD STANU CYWILNEGO w ?P?Mjalu--Stare Mlas 



Odpis tkr6cony oktv iiroclxenio 

IS sei — 

... ^ Salomon llJctor. 

/)iC (imiono) 

oto ürodzenia ^^?'^^^^'^®f ^ ^«^*^^* J^?.?^^^^ 

ru«ie«.o ■ ■ . ■■ ' 1 5.12. 



leisce urodzenia Po.gaiai l . ■■ . ' .. ■ .. ?; .?..■ ' .. r ..". ' .". 

.,..,:,L^ : :^:^ Är.Kassel Karol 



ozwisko i imiQ 

(oica) 



iawöd ^T®^??"? .?P.?.53?.?:M^ 



zawöd 



I tf«4clq oktw urodzenio Nr 4.223. ...y...0.2[ 



;dnla^ «^"P^^ 19(? r. 



KliROWNIK 
I 8t«p« CfwIliMf« 





POLSKA RZECZPOSPOLITA LUDOWA 

Wojewödzfwo f V Powiat 



URZAD STANU CYWILNEGO w ^^™^:^^1^^^^^^.. ''i^sto 



Odpis skröcony aklu urodzenia 



TT- 



1. Nazwisko ' 



Hassel 



2. Irniq (imiona) ^'- ^^. " - - ; _-- 

3. Data urodzenia ■^■''^.^:^'^.^^^^.J^'^.^^ 

4. Miejsce urodzenia ■■■^.07r'rxyXU....:..:7. ^ 

dr "assel TCarol - 



5. Nazwisko i imiQ 

(0|C0) 



:awöd ..M':^.^.^2...Sjt:ec ja^^^ 



6. Imi^ i nazwisko rodowe ?«I^.i,äOr.^a.ta....ffiQ.tor... -..::.-. 

(motki) 






' Z a W O O • rr: "TT. .-..:. . .fttnfntir. ..^r« .-ttnr: iTi-m .Trum. 









Poiwiodczo siQ zgodnoid powyifzego odpisu 

^oü '^98 

z Iresciq ok»u urodzenia Nr.. J^.. ..... 










^•y^; 



••>7 



t lTt^ii Pap. piäm>-lö. *rt 'Xiiwg 



rlV-C^ 



r. 



LOWNIK 

CvMrllnego 




Powiof 

'RZAD STANU CYWILNEGO w ^^^^^^i^Stare Mi 



Odpis tkr6ceny aktv uredz«nia 



azwisko 



Kassel 



imiona) 



Elza - 






iiejsce urodzenio ^«^^^^f ~:i 

wisko i%imi^ Rössel Karpl 

(oje«) 



rr- zowöd ..■'■® '^^^" ^^ °.^' sli sta 



nozwisko rodowe 



Maipcorzata Viktor 





I^OLSKA RZECZPOSPOLITA LUDOWA 



Wojewödzfwo . 



O 



1.^ 



Powlat 



URZAD" STANU CYWILNEGO w .£o.^r,aaiur.. Stare ..riasto.- 



Odpis skröcony aktu urodzenia 



1. Nazwisko 



Victor ■ 



'Uly 



7. Imi^ (imiona) 

3. Data urodzenia ''^Wl?/I.7;ie ste^O... sl^C zrl^ 

.aiedend/:ol.esiat.e.go....s.:~.rf.st';^..r.o. : 2o,4-* 1^?£.. r. 



4. Miejsce urodzenio 



Po sn 



ai 



5. Nazwisko I imi^ .Vlctor. .fJarUtz. 

(0|C0) 



zaw 



o ^1, 



öd ■h:^isG 



6. ImiQ i nazwisko rodowe -'-^.^Or ora, JO;;m._ 

(motki) 
" ZQWÖd 






/^■^ 






Pojwlodczo s«<; zgodnosd powyzszego odpisu 
z tresciq okfü urodzenio Nr '.^.J?. 



,-^VJdfl^a 



./rze^nia 



/ '.^/O. 



196 ' r. 



I^ROWNIK 
Ur4nd'M-3tanii CioMrilnego 




i 



SPOLIT 



Powiof 



D STANU CYWILNEGO w ^ °?.^*??:^^*H.?...Ma 



)clpit skröcony oktu urodzanio 

7iotar 

I 

.hiQ (imiona) ^i^^y .."'^"^ ~ir~~::.rrrzzrr.: 

siedemdziesi^tego szrfstego ^- 2o.1. 876 

l w •» 



liejsce urodzenio 
ozwisko i imiQ 



Poznaii '■ - 

Victor Moritz 



.mtQ 



i nozwisko rodowe..?^?.°f^5??« .^..9!^ 



(lIMlki) 



zQWöd rTT! 



t »r«*dq «ktu wrodzani« Nr *^< J S~7.^ 



31 llpca 



«rbowq 



ICIEROWNIK 




llMr-LnA.-. 



m Aijii 



'"^wm^ 






POLSKA R2ECZPOSPOLITA LUDOWA 

Wojewodztwo a.rQQ.iaw3.kie...-- Powiaf?a^}^PYfice oln.sk:ie 

URZAD STANU CYWILNEGO w ...SlaMQwiGach ..MSök ich. 

Odpis skröcony aktu zgonu 

I. DANE DOTYCZACE OSOBY ZMARtEJ : 

1 . Nazwisko K .Ä-S .S. 6 1 ^ --.--.---.-------?: - 

2. Imie (Imiona) ...JuliuS., .--.---.--•---.----••--.■-: — 

4. Dafa urodzenia ^^...^.'^^... ''''-'',''--••— — - 

5. Miejsce urodzenia ■■^^■^?:^..~~~"""~"~ 

6. Miejsce zamieszkania ...Z^bkcw.loe 3. l.c|8Jk.ie.... ---"-.— 

II. DANE DOTYCZACE DATY I MIEJSCA ZGONU- .. 

1. Dafa -•- -trsyäziesteg.©.. rjaja. .t.y.si%c...D3iemset daieo- 
d zi.c^sl^,teg.o....Qa.^le^o . —--- 2. Miejsce .Zafek.Gwice ...Slc^skie 

III. DANE DOTYCZACE MALZONKA OSOBY ZMARtEJ: 

t. Nazwisko Ka.^3.e.l....'^.rrr-'.,r'.rrTT-.''.'r.'rrT.rr.rr-.r''r.rr.TTrr.'r'.'r'.rT 

2. Imi^...J.0hanna ---r-r------------------ 

IV. DANE DOTYCZACE RODZICÖW OSOBY ZMARtEJ: 



1. Nazwisko . . 

2. Imi^ (imiona) . 



1 c i e c 


M a f k a 












' ** «■»«^^w mm w^ mm mmm ^m m^ ^mm^tmm ^m «■»■im 



Pos«*^iOdc>d St? zgodnosc powyzszego odpisu 



Miciice 
no oplol? 
skorbowq 



z tresciq oktu rgon» Nr 



8.2. ,1898/59. 

ZEibk<iw.ic9. Sl^li.^ie dnia 24. 3ierpnia|96 4r. 



\ , mp 



KIEROWNIK 

r'(K!^5K2>*^y>^i'nVg^ 



MSW - M-15 — zam. 3307/PWÖ/L4/CWD 

3135 — LDA — 5.10.62 — 1.000.000 — Pap. pi^m. kl. III Al/70 ff 






POLSKA RZECZPOSPOLITA LUDOWA 



Wojewödzfvvo • '" . '■' ' :V 
URZAD STANU CYV7ILNEGO 



r.r. Powlaf.!^.:i)^fe.:-X!.ip^....51-iSki^^ 



vv - 



v^ .:. 



Odpb fUrocvi-iy akJü zgonu 

I. DANE DOTYC2ACE OSOßY 2MARLEJ : 



I. Nazvvisko 



1-711 



2. Imig (iniionci) 

3. Sicsn cywiifiy 

A. Dola urodzenio . 

5. MieJDce urodzcriio 

6. Mlejsce zafnieszkania 

II. DANE DOTYC7ACE DATY I , ., 

1. Dolo ... 



A ZQOHV 



2. AMcjsrc 

l!l. DANF DOTYCXACE MA170NKA OSOßY ZMARtEJ 

1. Nozwisko 



?. In 



ML' 



W. DANE DQTYO.ACE rO' -iroy/ OSOBY Z/mA:j,lJ: 



1. Nozvvisko 

2. Iml^ (imiono) 





• » ! 


c 1 e c 




M a > k 




• a 


•'— « 


















" T. .T TT. 




•» — »—*« 



na oplo!^ 



Pw^Alccfcib >j«r«goo'n'j:'; powyz^^cgo odplju 

n2 , V98/3?. 



i Iffscio O'iu /"jona N* 






O ' 



mp 



^ ■ 196 •• r 

KIEPvOV/NIK 
Urxocfu Sf&r.v Cywllnego 



MSV/ - M-15 — 7.Hm. 2'40~!V\vh 'iJJCy; D 

31o.'j — I.DA — 5.1Q.G2 — l.OÜ'J.CiJü -, Imd. p..;;;i. kl. ffl AI 70 ■' 









POLSKA RZECZPOSPOLITA LUDOWA 

Wojewödztwo .."^.®°.^«''^.^.i«...,.-— Powiof .^.^.^'"*"^°®. .^.^^«^.^® 

URZAD STANU CYWILNEGO w ■..^^^^^1^^^^...?}"^^.^'^^*, 

Odpis skröcony aktu zgonu 

I. DANE DOTYCZACE OSOBY ZMARtEJ : 

1. Nazwisko .^ ■...S , 8 e 1 _— — _— ________^ 

2. Imi^ (imiona) '^ '^^"^ .——'—— ———Z~— 

A. Data urodzenia 82 lata — — — —- -— — — « 

5. Miejsce urodzenia ^^^^.^^^...''''.'''''r'''":^''—'^''':'" 

6. Miejsce zamieszkania .."^^.^^®^i^® ^^M^.^®...~~~"~"- 
II. DANE DOTYCZACE DATY I MIEJSCA ZGONU: / 

1. Data P.^?.^®2es*J3iarca tysia^^^ dziewi^cset pi^tna- 

Q.:^®«« 191 5.-r— — 2. Miejsce .^^^^®^^^®...2.1^®^i« 
in. DANE DOTYCZACE MALZONKA OSOBY ZMARtEJ: 

I. Nazwisko ^^^^®?-."""""~.--~"-~"-~-""~^ 

o I ■ Julius . 

z. Imie ^ 



IV. DANE DOTYCZACE RODZICÖW OSOBY ZMARLEJ: 



1. Nazwisko 

2. ImiQ (imiona) 



O 1 c i e c 


M a t k a 



















Miclsce 
na opJof^ 
skorbowo 



foswiodcrd sie jgodnosc powyiszego odpisu 

2 Iresc.q oktu'^Qtonu Nr .55 '191.5/39» 

2q..t)kß.wic.e Sl^ski? dn.a . 2.4....]3ie.r.pji.. 196 4r 



mp 



KIEROWNIK 
Virzj^ Stffny Ctf^lpA^o, 



MSW - M-15 — zam. 3307/PWH/Lz/CWD 

3135 — LDA — 5.10.62 — l.Onn.OOO -^ Pap. piäm. kl. III Al/70 R 




POLSKA RZECZPOSPOLITA LUDOWA 

URZAD STANU CYWILNEGO w ....^^.^^'.''!'.^^^^^^^^ 

Odpis skröcony akJü zgonu 

I. DANE DOTYCZACE OSOBY ZMARtEJ : 

I. Nazvvisko ^^..3....^ S e 1 -.™-.-^-—— —„-.-„„«. 

9 1^-^ (• ■ \ Johanna 

z. Imie viniioncij 

4. Data ur'odzenia 5^. . l?v't>i —. — "T.'^"".'~.TT~.~.~''.'^.'".~!;T.'^~~.'*.'~"'"''"*" 

5. Miejsce urodzenla ^.^^:9.^^^^..'^~~'^.""''"^ 

6. Mfeisce zomleszkania • ^^^-^^'^^V ^^-.^.-i^...."~~".'-~~ 



II. DANE DOTYCZACE DATY I MIEJSCA ZGONU : 



sto^o 1915.-r~ 



2. Miejsce 



III. DANE DOTYCZACE MAtZONKA OSOBY ZMARLEJ: 

1. Nozwisko ^^?5öi .— ---"~--:~—-: 



2. I 



mie 



Julius 



IV. DANE DOTYCZACE RODZICÖV/ OSOBY ZMARLEJ: 



1, Nazvvisko 

2. ImiQ (imiona) . 



O 1 c i e c 


A\ a f k 



















**• 



'w. 



Mlcisce 
DO op'ol«; 

tkorbowo 



-•■ • Toswioaci'o ,'>.!r '7fjodnosc pov^yiszcgo odolju 

-^^ ■ i ircsco o)v.a'zqc,!: Nr .53- /'^ 915/5 9 • 



/ c 



4 \ .* 1 

<^,jf .i^w,. .o±;i.,-.».^i.l9 cinia • -"- x.tlX!,»..U.« 196 *^v 

l'5>\ • 'o/ KIEROV/NIK 

• ^^ ' \^'' UrxQtiü Stanu Cywünego 



- t ^ p 



MSW - M-15 — zam. 3307/PVVH'L7-/CWD, ' .r '\>^ y' 

3135 ~ LDA — 5. 10.02 — l.COO.OüO -^-i.'^P^ pi^ih.' Kl. IlT Al.Tü R 



.,.>T-,7, 






ÜESKOSLOVENSKA S O C I A L I ST I C K A REPUBLIKA 

MINISTftSTVO VNITRA 




<= i NV-61/19360/4-63. 



ÜMRTNi IIST 



V knitt umrti (ümrtni motric«) motri^nrho obvodu 



P r a h a !• 



.j«st zaptöno. 



0«n. in4sic. rok 
o mi»ie limrtt 



30.8,1943 - tficötöho srpna tialc 
devot aet ^tyficet tfi -Terezin 



Jm4no o pf(im*fi( 



fohlovi 



Uo^ 



Pov*Mni 



BydIiiU 



Pavla Hir sc hledov6proz»ViktQrov6 



ienskö 



vdova 



V matrice neuvedeno 



D^n, m^ntc rok 
o mi»to norot«ni 



Spandau u Berlina»N^mecko 
lO.lOae?! Poznan - PLR 



imäno a pfijm«ni 



PMiina Binni 



Mofic Viktor a Leonora roz.Kohnov6 



Miito a dotum 
pohFbu (kremoc«) 



Potndmky 



tuberkuloaa plic 



Terezin »data neuvedena 



V Praz« dne 



25.11. 



SIVT . M tM . (C 4) 




ä< 



vadouci odd4l«ni 



<r- 



/ 



Sir«i 2n-«277-fca 



tJtü^lt AXDiniJAQOe AX2M3VOJ20)«« 

„ AilTiMV OVTlIllTCIMtM 



•cd-^\odeei\Xd^ 



Tili ImtiimO 



ubovdo orfinShJom ( 



Wi*imi>) )timu »ximl V 



.onMqox }2«{ 



• X Ä d • 1 <I 







Ävpioi^LLV» SOI . Ävobe 



0^809$ 



«Tobv 



onsbavusn soIiJ'aii v 



oaEosrnSM-ßnilisa u xia5 



^^ - nsnsoSt XV8I.0I.0I 



ÄronrioM.sort BionosJ b ttoJ'ilV oi^oli 



oiXq eaoluilisöuf 



Bcx9bBvuen ä^ä5 - nissieT 




)n*l*bbo }9uob«v 




?%\ •^^- 






)A«ml)5^ o 



bi*l#««<) 



Miibra 





(«iMOYOn otaim e 






orfM«(m«s A5lboi 








itMRI Olli5MS 




■ - ■ 



•nb •xoi'1 V 



c«<tis»rrc u,»2 



. S4 n 



prowadzonej do roku 1932 



Nazwisko iimui T i c t Q T Ida , M^f *na Kassal 

Imlona rodzicöw i nazwisko panlenskie matki ■ö»*-*« i ^^ « dOBa Oflilm 
Data iirodzenia ....X2.ft...fjJULjiL...X8./D... miejsce urodzenia PozxiaA 

Stan cywilny zawed — .^ 

Zamieszkiwakw Poznaniu Q4 JU^MsS^t»^ M S.ftJnX^lJiS&t mf^^ 

do...XM||cau: 



Zamieszkiwakw Poznaniu 



W»6 



63 ,. 



P<ln lttVn-l«f|t-«^ fS-K- 



WypiK kartoteki archiwalnej ewidencji ludnosci m. Poznania 

pröwadzone] do roku 1932 



Nazwisko i imifj T .1. e...t..o. r SlJMm 

•imiona rodzicöw i nazwisko panienskie matki iO?^ - 

^)ata urodzenia &•. ..X« .1068. miejsce urodzenia Poznan 

Stan cywilny ^pflOÄty zawod älJXiMMJC . XulMCgr lÜL 

^mieszkiwa! w Poznaniu Od ÄTOdMXlia dO^ 1^ 

3^89-0895 P02xiaJii 1893^*1900 OexrOiauMn^^^i^ 
13^X^1921 JQnDiialdoÄaiiyiAB«!^^^ 



-v ** " 



• •■«••U** •••*»•#•••«•* ftf»«*««»'««***'« 4 



Poznan* dnia 



tl-K- 



-Pap. plAm. dix- 






«tS^J^^^V^ 



prowadzonej do roku 1932 ^ 



^ Imiona rodzicow i nazwisko panienskie matki Pf^^** 2 dOBIU Oofall 

if . • 

^ Data urodzeüa ia*r„?*. .Ifi74 nüejsce urodzenia i?<>»PÄ4 

• Stan cywilny ^^^^ __ 

I Zamieszkiwal w Poznaniu Od J»X1!!<l«eXlla dO '9.IX.1Q20 g^ , »yiaal /lf^»np 

dD!...lBr»lnas*. 



_ Poznan, dnia .?^ .'"*«6n^ 

l^tU-nni fS-K-t-oat-Pap. plAm. drz..iNt 



63 ,. 




AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

15 West 16th Street 
New York, NY 10011 

Phorie: (212) 744-6400 

Fax:(212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Date: 12/21/2009 



Box: 2 



Sys#: 000198685 

Felder: 10 



Momm 



Sterbeurkunde 



Sonderstandesamt Arolsen, Kreis Waldeck, Abt I Nr. ^44/1 97 1 



wohnhaft in Berlin-öpanäu.u, [;arktpl 1 -/-. 



um "/"■ Uhr -/-Minuten 



istam^O- Juli 19.43 -/'- 

In Theresienstadt -/- 

verstorben. 

D. i.e. . Verstorbene war geboren am |0# Oktober 1 871-/- 
in Posen -/- 



D ""/"" Verstorbene war ""/•" 



'^' --^-^^^%. 






24. Februar I971 






..sVtS- 



Der Standesbeamte 

I.V. 




Sterbeurkunde 



Sonderstandesamt Arolsen, Kreis Waldeck, Abt ^ Nr. 553/l9^P. 

Marp;aret.e K a.s s..e..l.,. jjetor^^ — . 



wohnhaft in l^rnb erg , T^ennr^r-rtra;: e 6, , 



ist am 2?. Fet ruar ^94 5 __ ,^ 



Uhr Minuten 



verstorben. 

D .?rß Verstorbene war geboren am 'IS? M^i /18?4 

in -Posen. ^ 



D-le... Verstorbene war ..J.it^^....yQ_n Karl K^ 




A r o I s e n , den Ife. J^ei 1^65 

Der Standesbeamte 




jT''.';" .'' 



■■■''-"'■■■— ?^ 



G 



Sterbeurkunde 

1 Charlottenburg, jetzt 

i-u 1 u 1142/1 918 

(Standesamt '-'^arlottenburg von Berlin Nr ) 

Kurt Hirse h f e 1 d , - - - - - - - - - 

_.„__«---------- mosaisch, - - - - 

wohnhaft in ..Charlottenburg, Sybelstraße 2?, - -...-...-..-.. 



ist am T® • ^^^o^®^ 1918 -— - um ^5 uhr ////^/i/ti// 



m 



Charlottenburg, Augsburger Straße 66, 



verstorben. 

D er... Verstorbene war ^^//^h/W/ ^6 Jahre alt , geboren 



in ....Berlin.^ -....- - - - -....- - - - " -....-...- - 



D er Verstorbene war ledig» 



Berlin -Cbarlpttenburg , den 5. Oktober 1.9 



(Sie 




Der Standesbeamte 

In Vertretung 




&^^U^CX^^CCCC^ 



Fl 




L' 



Geböbr 
b'^'^nhll 



Inn I 432 — Sterbeurkunde G 
Mat. 2905 # A 5. 300 000. 4. 63 l^) 



ft I j ftj.t-vi«' •> ■ r 






Q 

Sterbeurkunde 

Für das Entschädigungsamt 

(Standesamt S p an d a U - von Berlin Nr. ..^.?7^/^ 963) 

•-•--- Kur.t H...i....x 3 G ii....r e 1 d -...- - - -...-...-... 

"" -■■■■- - "■ -•••-.••- - - -...- - • -....mQ.sai.ach.^.z.ul.e.tzt 

wohnhaft in '^P^:^^.^.^.» -..." - - Z....Z Z Z...Z...Z Z Z "...."' 

ist am .30 .Juni 1918 - - - .^^ 12 uhr .50 Minuten 

ffl ..i? Feldlazar 42 der 183..Inranter Division 

vci'ot Q r bQft . ZU Beauland Ferme verstorben. ------ 

D e.r Verstorbene war geboren am 1 6.».Qkt O ber 1 89.7 - -....- 

in .Spa/idau., jetzt Berlin-.^panviau. - -...-...- ....r...... .. 

D..e.r Verstorbene war ...nicht yerheira.te.t..« - .-.....- - -.. 



Berlin - ÖpandaU - -, den 2.I. AU£^USt 1 




Der Standesbeamte 

In Vertretung 



..r^x^^A^ 



X 



ivia« 



Inn I 432 — Sterbeurkunde G 
Mat. 2905 # AB. 200 000. 2. 63 ^ 



STERBEURKUNDE 



(Standesamt I Hannover Nr. 2.6^^/6^) 

Franz... Wilhelm. .Heriiiann...Kajß.e.l,....- 

wohnhaft in .^annover ,. . Sedan 18.^.. .-...- ..-...-..- 



ist..am l.^.Aprll 191.7..- .-.-.- r-..-^^------Lltir----Miiuitfiji 

urlbekannter Uhrzeit 



x^xT^3^tBkx In ...MC-hn-eiaemüh-l. 



verstorben. 



D er Verstorbene war geboren am 7«Jl^li 1895 

Der Verstorbene war nicht Verheiratet. 




annover 



^ den 22. Oktober 1963 



Der Standelbeamte 

In VertrA^ung 




(Helm 



Gebühr; 



Kassen-Nr.: VkO 

____QSr 



.v«' 



tte^^-" DM 



Verlag für Standesamtswesen GmbH., Frankfurt a. M.- München H 6212-36b 



CM 251 



Berlin den, 11. Mai 1965 
Sehr geehrter Herr Dr. Kaaael! 

Im aelben Erbbegräbnia liegen die Eltern: 

?Sb°L^fi^?i^li?»S^^2^5?e iichtwitz 

UhZ isiiuig'f ^S!cVbg':l§J?^8^?,«^-^--Nr 97546 

i^g^'ilnfs'ffj^lalgö !|?f ^^^^^ 

l7^9'^19?7''BSd?«5A^'^°K§lf4geb.9.4.1888,geatorben 
iiim^Jalo'k^'^SSdSi^iliuJJfr'lsJ^'^ ^°^^^'s ^^li"' 

Den ünkoatenbeitrag in Höhe von DM 10.~^ «ollen Sie una bit 
laut ante«. -stehendem Stempel ükerweiaen. 

Wir begrüßen Sie und zeichnen u ,. , 
ObTwisuno > hochachtungsvoll 

r'putschfä Notenbank. Bekomark «onlo-Nr. 11Ö0 fcti <•► 
-,.i. ,,> nerlin-CharlottBnbupg,Hard»nb«r8«tP. 
j-,Tf...:>r.cn;igunoBn! 



iohs Gemainde von GroQ-BarllB, Barll* 14 
' '»ihurgap Str. V 



Jüdische Gemeinde von Groß- Bar: 
Friedhöfe-Verwaltung 



bischer 



i^iSlhllt |1| *t 




JÜDISCHE GEMEINDE ZU BERLIN 



Körperschaft des öffentlichen Rechts 



Hauptbüro/M 



Gesch.-Z,: 



1 BERLIN 65, den 
Iranische Strafie 2 
Fernsprecher: 46 47 72 u. 46 35 23 



25.2.65 



Bescheinigung 



Aufgrund hier vorliegender Unterlagen unserer Friedhofsverwaltung 
Weissensee bescheinigen wir, dass Frau 

Anna Stoessel geh» Victor, 
geb. am 12.1.1869 in Posen, 

am 21.9.1942 in Berlin verstorben ist. Sie wurde am 29.9.1942 auf dem 
Jüdischen Friedhof Weissensee - N IV/^/lo9 742 - beigesetzt. 

Die letzte Wohnung war in Berlin-Charlottenburg, Waitzstr. ^7» ,^ 



e r 

oupt' u. SteuerbOxoi 



Bankkonto: Berliner Bank, Depka 33, Konto-Nr. 2320 u. Berliner Discontobank, Depka F. -/Postscheckkonto: D^)kk^(^!£iij3i7 16 




/ 




3330heini'^'n -<> 



Die Fa,ntlienj3r^hc.ltni3S^ ö.cr FarMte Kassel ir Fr'>rkfin^tr^-'r> 

loa Kamte roch ,ii^ l^oSnuttp.r Kcrpel.'^^p ^n^i.ne^ :'''■' "-^V-n^ nur p 
Sohn'? hatU,ncvnltoh Landgerichtsrat Hugo Kassel in mim^^STimö 
Kaufmann JüKOb Kassel in Fr-anhenst ein/Schlesien, 
i?}^lW;.y!fJZ ^'i^^serichtsrat Hugo Kassel noch lebte, harn er all- 

'^f^L^i*?!'^^* ■'^5"''^ ^^'^1-^*^ -■•"'^ -'^ertönz-ött mich Fra^Kenstetn in 
ochlesien zu seiner iMtter und seinem Bruder nit FamilV\ 

^t^Kt^r'^lS^f^^:'"'''' ^'' 0^^^rt,äaß wn ihr noch 

Dieses bemnde ich als geborene FranKenst einer in umf Icnnlohriae 
iTsSaSie^ .l.naßs-töii-f,. der Firma ßruo, & Kassel in F^i^ikS^ 

Bad HarTünirg , den 2^.0iitoder 1964 g i 




ßerdieinigung aue Öcin Verzeidinie öer Getauften 

der evang.^Iuth. Kirchengemeinde Lister Kirche zu Hannover 

lahrg.: 1921 Seite 41 Nr. ?? 

Name des Kindes: Simon, Heinrich Hugo Franz Ulrich 



Geboren am 26, Juli 1920 
ist getauft am H. Juni 1921 



zu Hannover 



Eltern: 



Julius Simon, Landgerichts rat 
Edith Bianca geb. Kassel 
Hannover, Gobenstr. 18 



Bemerkungen: 



Ausgezogen : 

Hannover, den 27. Oktober 1954 

Ubbcnstraße 23 Qj, 



Evang,^luth. Kirdicnbudiamt Hannover 



Zur BeglauJ>is:ung dei:,jj^dieinigung; 







Ev.-Iuth, Gesamtverbünd Stadt Hannover 



Fernruf: Sammel-Nr. 2 39 51 • Postscheck-Konto : Hannover Nr. 135 
Sdiedkonto Nr. 30002 bei der Sparkasse der Hauptstadt Hannover 



Unsere Nr. 

uJh./.if . 



Ihre Zeichen 



Ihr Sdireiben vom 



In jedem Sdiriftstüdc anzugeben 



Hannover, Ubbenstr. 23 

den ....7..f..-..5.ez..54;.. 



B e s h e i n i 



o ^ -^-^ o • 



Wir besoneinigen hiermit^ dass lierr 
Pranz Jlrioh Simon, geb. am 26.7.192o 
in Hannover laut Kartei des Sv.-lutn. Gesamt- 
Verbandes Stadt Hannover bis zu seiner AbmeL 
düng am 2o.lo.i::34l von der Brabeokstr. 86 
naoH iiermannsburg der Ev .-luth. X.andeskir«he 



angehörte • 



; 







r*..r:,7V»:>:?,'V^ 



^»&^:..- 



,^> »■' V f h*' .rr- ■ 



: » • ».T- ^•■_ ■ ■ ««['(■a 



yj^-^w.ig.-^> 






87 II 442-445/50 



/^i VhCi'tC 



Beschluss 




In dem Verfaiiren zxnn Zwecke der l'odeserklärung 

1) der ;«itv7e Ida Kassel, geborene Viktor, <j:eb .12. 7-1870 in Posen, 

2) der l^itwe Edith Bianka Simon geb. Kassel, p-,eb.27.7.1892 in BochA) 
5) der Ida Henriette Hildegard Sii.on, geb. 8.11.1923 in Hannover, 
zuletzt vv'ohnhaft gewesen in Hannover, Brabeckstrasse 86, hat das 
iimtsgoricht in Hannover beschlossen: 

Die Verschollenen 
Ida Kassel geb. viktor, Edith Bianiva Simon und Ida Henriette 

Hildegard Simon 
werden f ...r tot erkl'.rt. Als Zeit_.)unl^t des Todes der V^.j: .. .^llenen 
wird der 8. kai 194-5, 24- ühr fest jestellt. 

Die i^osten des Verfahrens einschliesslich der 
aussergerichtlichen Kosten des Antragstellers trägt der lUachlass, 

riciitsgebühren werden niedergeschlagen, 
"^■^annover, den 22. iviai 1950 
Das Amtsgericht , Abt: .87 

gez .Dr . Flach, AmtS:^:^eriont3rat 
:i.';t: 

J'i ^ s t !.;s an,^ es teilt er 

er der Geschäftsst;~lle ae:; . 




VJ ; ( 



acn; 




HAUPTSTADT W HANNOVER 

- Schulverwal tang - 



Hauptstadt Hannover. 



Schul ve rwal ti^^^^^ 



nover. Po$tfa<fi 



Herrn 

Dr. Pritz Kassel 

P.O.Box, 2023 S 

Melbourne, C 1 
Australien 



^ /f///*sf: 



(20a) Hannover 
Ihre Zeidien Ihre Nocfirichf vom Unser Haustut Unsere Zeichen 

26.6.1955 3171 13-80 31. Okt. 1955 

Sp/Kö 

Auskunft über Franz Ulrich Simon 

/ Wir übersenden Ihnen die Abschrift eines 

Schreibens des Oberlandesgerichtspräsidenten 
in Celle und hoffen, daß Ihnen mit diesen An- 
gaben geholfen ist. Ein Lichtbild ist wieder 

/ beigefügt. 

Der Oberstadtdirektor 
in Vertretung 

^4- Oji.^^ 

Stadftrschulrat 



Fornruf Konten dor Sfadtkaise 

86661 Bankkonfon: Sparkasss der Hauplstadt Hannover Nr. 1732 - Landetbank Hannover Nr. 59^ 

Landoizeniralbank NIedertochien Nr. 27/168, • Potlscheckkonto: Poiticheckamt Hannover, 



■.TT:,->>,'^a-—V'¥.V''-' •■)''' ■•-•>irrv •-'-,■.. iV". 






Ir»^^iV>?Jvi^7vv^'^»T%^^^^T^ 



G 

SterbeurkuBÄe 

-^tandesamt .W e d d i n....g-- --- von Berlin Nr58Ä/1946 ) 

• : Q^iJLll.g E^rMline Agnes....B....r u c k 

!^]^.J:JgD.;?. rZr. 

wohnhaft in .Ber.li.D.^. Qt^wistr. 11, -/- 




ist am .1.2.. J anuar 1 ^4 6 -/- ^^ ig uhr -r Minuten 

in .?..?.?..ti.^..* iD.....i.t!£.?.£.....y..9..hnunKi .-/r. 

verstorben. 

I> .12. Verstorbene war geboren am 1 .?. . ...„A^r i 1 1 86.9. 

in .§.^.2iP..!. rZr. 

D i.?.. Verstorbene war .....!^..i.t W.e Y.O.n . F ^ ]_ j_ -j^ zz'z.zz.. 

B jr u c .k.^^ -/- 



Berlin .^...., 






»••■fltiwt«tt««niaitaaa*«*aii 




Gebühr bezahlt 



., den .IS.- Jul 1 1.2.11 



Der Standesbeamte y| 
In Vertretung //« 




Inn I 432 — Sterbeurkunde G 
Mat. 4732 # A 6. 300 000. 3. 69 Q] 



•■\f--'*f, '•'. r- 



.•^,f'-'-'M •^^•:^ 



j-, -1- -iy*.. .-.•.r»^s.',fSr'.T *'• .^■''?».v: *"f -''Tf'»?,"' ■■ f^.:v "^ 



G 1 



Sferbeurkunde 

(Sondersfandesamf Arolsen, Kreis Waldeck , Abt . 1 , 1951 Nr. 888 ) 

Per Apotheker.. Ge.o^^^ F i n g e r, ^ 



wohnhaft in ' Berlin, Ziethenstraße 1, 



Israeli tisch , 




ist 



.i.^...S.^P^emb^^... :^95.2^ um Uhr . Minuten 



in Auschwitz __ 

Tagund:'3tiinde des' Todes sihd'""ühb"elcähht""; 

per Verstorbene war geboren am 5 • Februar 1895 



verstorben. 



in Frankenstein in Schlesien. 



Vater: Max Finger. ^ 



(Standesamt . _____^_ Nr — 



.M^**®''/ Slsbeth Finger, geborene Brück. 



D er Verstorbene war — nicht — verheiratet . 




Eine....Zwisc.henzeile . 




Arolsen, den ^^6. Oktober 195I 



Der StaDdesbeamte 



Staatsangehörigkeit: DeUtSCh. 




>v/ ■■;-S'.»,-;«'«|-i*;r ■ 



G 1 



Sferbeurkunde 



(Sondersfandesamf Arolsen, Kreis Waldeck »Abt .1, ^93"^ Nr. S88 ) 

Per Apotheker ''e^ Finger, 



'JK — -j • israelitisch, 

JJM<H*U^ •■ 




wohnhaft in Bopün , Ziethenstraße ^, , 

•^♦:«^J:^..^^P^^^^^^ ;^942 ^^ ^ Uhr —«Minuten 

verstorben. 



in Auschwitz 

Ta^ und Stunde des Torfes sind unbekannt. 



D ^r Verstorbene war geboren am 5« Februar ^1895 

in F-rankenstein in '^^chlesien. . 



(Standesamt "-^ ■ Nr, \ 

Vater: Max Finger. , . ^ 



Mutter: ülsbeth Finger, geborene Brück. 



D ^r Verstorbene war — nidit — verheiratet • 




Eine Zwischenzeile. 




Arolsen,den ^^- Oktober ^^^l . 



Der Standesbeamte 



Staatsangehörigkeit; ^eUtSCh. 







-■* •V,Ty;>. 









~ T..->"r »• 



Sterbeurkunde 



G 2 



(Standesamt 5 ? ^ ? ^. Z Z ~ ~ Z. " Z....Z. Z Nr1 ^l/l'^^A 



Der Viehhändler Abraham Gehen 



wohnhaft l5 ?£l?Ä»...*'^^ 1^6 ^»Straße 4 



# 



st am 



24. März 1934 9 3« 

um -". Uhr ::'.Z.. MiRuten 



in 



Emden 



verstorben. 

D— Verstorbene war geboreiTäWr .....i.!^ ?M 6..!?-. Ir^.^.d war 63 

Jahre 11 Monate alt. ------------.«. 



D ?.?. Verstorbene war — nicWr — verheiratet 5.^. ?.9.^?.^.....^ ^..^..^.® ^ ♦ 

geborenen Pleßner ------.---.----»« 



Emden 



, den IS. Juli ^^_ 50. 




C 252, Sterbeurkunde (ohne Elternangabe) 

Verlag für Standesamtswesen G. m. b. H., Frankfurt am Main 



|C252 





?.^.\1; '■■i*'= 



.yy-'i-'-r--- 






I ^„"Wi'.-T;.! \ • ■ 



68 IV 662/29 




Begl. Abschrift "betr. die Verfügung 
von Todes wegen der Eheleute 
Landgerichtsdirektor Julius Simon 
und Frau Edith, geb. Kassel, zuletzt 
wohnhaft in Hannover, Brabeckstr. 86 

Eröffnet: 28. August 1929 nach dem 

Tode des Ehemannes 

Eröffnet: 19. Mai 1951 nach dem 

Tode der Ehefrau 

Bas Amtsgericht Hannover, Abt. 68 
gez. Kirmes, Justizoberinspektor 

als Rechtspfleger 




Herrn 

Br. Eritz Kassel 



"G-renroy Court" 
11A Redan Street, 

Australien 



ST. KILBA, S. 2 



^•V';';,*iti>,i5' 



{VMIK^^V^-Slijflr /^*^/;^-r -o^ri<;y.):j^-,;^-5.v 



■';■' .'<^ru;/^>.•p',^|rv'■,•:^>s1■»^^^j^4'•<J^ :<'.:- ^/■<*'^i^;f;'''iiL'?*:*!"^;'i';''^y!fF/''''i^,*'''^ 



0, 



^ ' 194; 



'f 






Ä^ />i^ .X/2 /^^/ /^ i^^i^ >,^E^ yi^/^ •^ A^-/%^yi^ -z^ ^^^^'^ 




i^/ U*' 



/^ / 



A,^^ 4.c.<^ 



^.^^^yi^y^ /^-^V^ ^,^i^!V; 



e-^-^ 



y^' 



/2/ / ^ ^ ^ / i^.-' /'>? /• /<^y^ ^y^- ß^^ 



^ 



A^A /Zj ^.^/r.>^>^^^ /2y ^<^ 



• 



•^ i^'^/if ß^t^^A^ /^t.A^ A^^i^y^i^y^ 



V 



''*-«^ ^'^U^ ^^J?f^*,^ü^ y>^ -^' 



> /i^^^4^ /^z^^ y^^Uf 



^ 



r^H^ du^f^"^ 



^t^ 



/^l^ i?^^^-*»*. 



^ 



^ 



/w >*^ 



^*/ >***T^ y'fe;^ ^ 



^. 



/^-* 



.^' t^^« 



^iV 






'^»^ ^<-< 



i^ /^\*^ /S- 



r^>*^ 



^ 



"'>-• ^;^ ^>^ ^NL;^W^ 



/r^ y*;v' /^- ^^ 






:-5C.^ 



Av 




^<c^^^ ^ 



'/ 



V^J</ ^-^ ü^^ 



/i^^ /Z^ //i^^ 



^^^y^ 



A^ 4 



^/ /u 



urt-Af 



-^4*«_-."/' 






yW ^^ÄV 



>> rb:^H^ 



<4^X.V 






^. 



't^ii^ 



^ 



/^ J5<- />^> 



^ 









/^ ^^%^^^ ^^'^/^-^y yx 



/^y^^Z^^ 



iU^W d-^ — 






;^ 



5?*^y^ 





V 







< 



''ft'h^ 1 1- 










RU/i 

1 "^^0 r 







-*"• ; .■.^■.i\'-.v^ (c*n 



,('■••«■• 









^-^ 

(;(«'>- 



9t^^ ^^S^^JE^** 



^ 



k/r^A^---^ 



(-U 



^u^^/iu 



^te'^ 










? -r 



^^%^^'-^' 



A^i 



Z^ ^ 



/^^>-- 



^^^>^v^^.Xcc ot 



,U.f'>^ 



OM, vC " ^ < «^L/Cu Jt 



i A * 



/ 1 i j(>^^ 



>( ^t 



.^ c^ J u'^U.CC 



^/ 



/ 



->^<->L>^ . tL/' '-^-tc 



»»i^/ 



^ 



# 



> iu.->^rt. 



,>(■ 



rz 



'^.^ 



/ 






^ V y - y 



V -u ' V 



*<^ < 



•/• 






^ ■%^«*i(M.V% 






7f/7t^/V/ 



r/. 




x^ 






^ 



»*' ■ i'.rtoc 



«I* 



^^/ 



'1/ 



i%r,T-j> • ■ ;, --<,■-,- .•t". . ■ -t'-, 



?_v n j'7-,T ■- Mr-<^-\'?.'T-''''-- 



■i ,, .<:imv.j-..«s»','>-. »-ff • 






Fotokopie 
Ui0 vorstaneoae ^jfe^ölßtt srimmi rrm (^f»r it^. 

' Urschrift #org&le»t%n Hseoiüf^irj^ 



Hannoviff, der 



28. Llai 1957 




(••■'itzel) 
jüsazaongte^fellter 
*i» Urkiindsbeamler der 6e««häfts«te4U 

Tps Amfsoencnts 





f*«; rtTSiUtiSi »,(-,'-, #;>'/.Sv"' f^t^VW V/». >i '♦ .-.'i^rf^ 






B 



(/ur Aussiellunv.' 'k? KrnfikflMf» 



'A^r 



K m » > Hfc . .*^>* 



I dmilicf 






Mcldebiatt für die polizeiliche Registrierung 
und die Ausstellung einer deutschen Kennkartc 



i^gf'-f 



t 





^'amilienrjr^ 



V c? ^' 



> . 1 



# 



Vornamen 
erw. 



(Rufndmen unlersireichen) 

gesch 



2. 



Oehu t$oyt 

1 MJlionsKind le^ 



• ^. 






(Mondianame dusschreihcn) 

y/^ ^/^. o (/ £. 



lyenf-^ 



sreus ^eKierunwÄf'*/ k und, wcrm Ausland, Slaai) 

v,.^i»T— * Bei bcsfclitnder Ehe tiheschlieDung mit :.Tr:. 



fS. 



e 



i.'f»<Sfer Beruf. S £^ S^ // 7^ ^'^ ^ 
Wohnort: %£ A/A/ £^A^ 

Wohnun^*^: 



am — in 

Evtl. früherer Beruf; ^^ -^ y^ '^./^'^l'^ ^^ 

.Seit wann'.^ ^J.^..Ä.^:/.9y..^.. 



/ . 

8. 



Staai-^rt" 
Wohn- 

V\oh^ 



keil'') 



(5frd!*<^ M«u»nummer) 



t- 



>m 
vom 
vorn 






y^ 



4 -^ h 



IS 









9. An frNHi/<-ilichen Ir. ȟu-.iuswetsen t^f.ni^e n heute 



^ ^ v^t^O^K^S AC<>^ 



(An) 
(An) 



/ 



'^herule Anlei 'vilfsorfe seit l.juli W42, ansvrenommen Werirdieiiöi : 

4^ /<:r:^^'' c...4r / csj^ 

i. ,94^*. '^As^//~^J/^/^^y^'^/f'i 

*S y. ,94x5" li^.^.Aysc/f^/rc^. ££^' 
r 5. VC 2, c Ai /-^ e. ^ Äj 

-ix). A. 194*: <£^.i C/»'<i/'fei:^t' 



^ t»lS 



1 i ' hia 



"*>. aufgestellt aifi 
auhvestelit am 
dU5ivestellt oni 



M . J 



". y^ 



von 
von 
von 




>' Z^ 



10. 



(An) 
5i^*»cheinigun>f d Nr. über uie 

*"' 1^-J<^ erfolvrte Abwnbe des Meldebogens zur Durchführung des Gejsenes 

flt>er die Befreiung vom Nanonakso/ialismiis und Militarismus lege ich vor. 

Ich vtrmchere, daO ich die xorstehenden Angaben na/h bestem Wissen und Gewissen gcmadif habe 
2 Lichtbilder sind angeschlossen. .^ / 

(h^P^^^^'i^ , den .^../-' P 1^4 <p 






r. 



.^^3g^*^...'^:ü.,. K. 



') 



*) Nicht Zuirc(Tcti(lr» ist zu sircidien. 

») Hier ist ein ctwat^r Schriftsicller-, Thcafc-, h ui.sMcr- und Arfisfennattie. sowie bei Geistlichen und Oiuiüscn- 

fi der in d'e»cr Eis-enschaft geführte besondere Warne anzugeben. 
^ d«i «ficfcrf#ei»*r Su«"»«'^^« H<iri«keit sind silmtl( tx' Siaafsangchörigkeiten anzui^cben. 



im id«'* 



nkancfi 



^ 



n 



Aniras?. 



Unfcrtchri; 



^^M 



Von der C)i Krw i .» i 



f 



1- Nachweis über i^iV P. 
^ , "^'^ ^^''^^^ "'^d d.e SuatsanKrh. 

ü Der MeldL'Pnichri r. h/w ^i „ 

Reisend/.^ \r. 

Hcimalschcin Nr 

^"5usv>esreIIf am 

StaaLsan^rehörigkeirsausweisNr 

au "^y • - 

b) Die übersehenen iJchfbilder;,^^^^^ v, ,,,„n , ^ 

c) Die Unfers hriff ^..r q «Kf^ <rjwon dar. 

dj hs besfehen — k-pino -7 r ■ 



». 



-^•Pflichtigen 



/^ 



irn 



VOf 
VOI 



^^ehtirde) 
KehÖrdr 

(Beh< r 



•) 



'■f^v* 



"^^ ^^^ Ttes-Mt^^ 



»'•^air^'eht» 



f\Sf)M 



^'csralr;^j^föt4< — -^ 

CicsichLsform: 



n. ^«rsonenbeschreibur.jf 




Farbe der Au^en. U^ *«H*♦^~..„.._^ 

^<J^I)e de.s Mdarc^- Ik-ii iiI , , ,,,! 

Llnvei-diiderliche Kennzeidien: 



ijeijbrd! 



Uli - 



Veranderlidie Kenn/eiche 



n 



\ 



*) Nichi Zulre 



•€^||[| 




K 





# 



-'^Il-t— -c. 



Yc. 



cO-£— ^^ de: . '-■X^-W. 

Be.inifer: 



Bchördt 



<^ zu sfrcidien. 







J^ 



5C m n 





u 



3 

1 3 



3 
CD 
CD 



^- f^^r Kennkarlenbevver' .>r h .♦ r 

derlichenUn.ensd^if;.,;'^ £S;; 
derlichen Mn^eLabdrücke v^vebcn 



^jQhdriicke y.vebci, 



Kennumiiier: 
2. Rr hdl an lnld,rdsaMs\, eisen ..bgeKeben 



w 

n 



'1 



3 

o 



Q \ ^ V # /' - 



■Ä'> 



'•mpr osbestitigung 






den 



^4 




X 4 




r^is\f^\ 















7^^^-^ 




wywww^ 



\ 



jß^lT*-' 



4 



68 IV 164/22 




Abschrift 

betr. die Verfügung von lodes 
wegen der ffwe. Ida Kassel ,g^b., 
Hannover, ^rabeckstrasse 86 

Erörfnet am 1. Wivz 1958 

Das Amtsgericht Hannover , Abt #68 

gez. rli'üger 
Hechtspfleger 




Herrn 

Dr. Fritz Kassel 

342 Jeaconsfield Parade 
St. Kild S.2 

Melbourne 
-rt^ustralien 



itm 



^. .*;-.••<". .-I^^ -:'&■• 



1 1 ■! ' -r'.^'<it-'.'j 



'\:~f ;'■)— tf- 



,-7 r •-"■■.'■; 



„V^V>;j':*v:--.''.!>,;,,i/'qg5*F-:v,.r,y;>^^ i,',w 



..>? ^^ 



^'J^otQriat|. '??efli(ifcrl. 



- i 



^^C^ / 



Er*ffnJ 



Uas Amtsg«ricnt 



/^ 



ü^-^-^t^ t-^ 



^uak. li.ear,V''ek,ei 




^. 



*k,.#»^x^^^ , ben 






y}.i 



^or mir, &<m 9l»tar 













^■^0ey!:r-^ ^<f 




mir otn l>«rfeR 



Momt 




crtlftrtt , «im «^ * k M^^iot ■ 



^ 
> 



Tii;:ri^;*'(';^ii:J*^^K:?n^ ff,if^i:->''\->^^V;^'''^r''*'*^'''i''^''''^''''-T'^"-'''^'^ 




.^ 

1 













U"b erMrff , bo§ biefe oc^irift 
l'^fen ^ffliUfn tnX\)o\u. 

3ct), ber -OJotar, ^>abe bie ^d,rift angenommen unb 
fteUe bie erfclgte Uebergabe ^»iermtt feff. 

TJorfte^jenbe« T>rotofoU mürbe be^ (^rfc^ienenen 
»orgelefen, oen bt^ felben genehmigt unb oon ifjy-- 
unb bfn 3<ugen eigen^änbig unterfc^rieben. 




0$ 





■'.■1 'ir^t^.'l.y^.yr f^' . -.^.,,■••^^<l- 






:^-.:^ 



}^ V» JT <>' 






--> . Jo M-miimim 



itlllA ■. I 




ßefcheinigung aus öem Verzeichniö öer Getauften 

der evang.^luth. Kirchengemeinde -^^^^J^^®?...^.^^^^ ^u Hannover 

Jahrg.: 1921 Seite 41 Nr. 73 

Name des Kindes: Simon, Heinrich Hugo Franz Ulrich 



Geboren am 26. Juli 1920 
ist getauft am H. Juni 1921 
Eltern: 



zu Hannover 



Julius Simon, Landgerichtsrat 
Edith Bianca geb. Kassel 
Hannover, Göbenstr. 18 



Bemerkungen: 



Ausgezogen: 

^Hannover, den 27. Oktober 1954 

^Tlbtenstraße 23 q.^ 



Evang.^luth. Kirdienbudiamt Hannover 



.. -^^ur Beglau^ung ^er:,^dieinigung: 



4j 



%. 




El 



GEBURTSURKUNDE 




(Standesamt I Hannover --- — ----Nr, 2710/l920) 

Heinrich Hugo Franz Ulrich S i m o n - 

ist am 26, Juli 1920 - «« 



in Hannover , GrÖbenStraße 18 - - - - - - geboren. 

Vater: Landgericht srat Julius Simon 



'Butter: Edith Bianca Simon, geborene Kassel - 
.^.?..i^.?.....^.PJ:inhaft in Hannover, Göbenstraße 18, 

Änderungen der Eintragung: 





Hannover, den 27» Oktober ^9 5^ 



07-21 
1094.11.53.5000 



DER STAN d/sB E AMTE 

In Verin:'et 




I '). , ,.!_'■ ' i:,v. - , 














o 



o 
o 
o 
o 

i,r\ 



OD 



G 1 

STERBEURKUNDE 

(Standesamt ^ Hannover *" *" - - - — ^ — ^^ 433/13 ) 

-Der Landgerichtsrat Hugo K a ß e 1 - • 

mosaisch, -------«-.-«« 

wohnhaft in Hannover, S edanstraiBe 18, - - - - 

ist am 2.JJ'ebruar 191 3 »vormittags um 2 Uhr - Minuten 
in Hannover , Se da nstraße 1 8, - - - - - - verst orben. 

Der Verstorben e wer 39jfegRx:»Ki 39 Jahre alt ♦ - - 
in Prankenstein in Schlesien, - « - 

( Stande samt — — — — — ^«— «... ^^ — « « j 

Vater; Kaufmann Julius K a ß e 1 - 

•■• ^mm ^i^ ^M» ^BM ^^ ^^m ^mm ^^m ^^ — _ ^^ ^■■b _^ ^_. 

Mutter: Johanne, geborene A- i e n e r - - - 

D e r Verstorbene war - 3fiieW - verheiratet m it Id a, g eborene 

Victor, ------«« 

•^SS^*^^^ ^^N. Hannover, den 15. Mai 19 5 3 

^ % •?*'*^, %\ DER SJANDESBEAMTE 

« rc^/"^/?" ä| An Vertretung 



St. 



Geburtsurkunde 



E 1 



<Standesamt.J?chl51 - Mitte - - - - - ^^^ Z.. Nr.l^.^/ll) 



Franz Wilhelm Ilermami K a ß e 1 



ist am Z- J^i 1Ö95 



in 



Bochuia 



geboren. 




Vater :....KQnigliclierL^^ B.}X£0 JiaQe 1 , 



jüdisch., v/ghjihaft in Bochom - 

* Mutter: ?..^.?^.....?r.?.ß?.l B^.]^.?'^^^^^ YiC t OP , jÜdiGCh, 



ivQlmiiaft .in Bociiuan 



Änderungen der Eintragung: 



Ileine 




(>( 



:P^ENNiG 



160 




hO vuaimsi eiO 



' — (Riegel) 



Bocliiim ^ 20. Oktober 

, den 



Der Standesb 



In Vertret 



A 51. Geburtgurk^de (eheliche Geburt). 

Verlag für Standesamtswesen G. m. b. H., Frankfurt am Main. 



19. 



48 




A 61 



r— •(■• -j^i" ■• -%s. --- »»V*-« 



\-^'.-^-^ --jj.j— Jt-xl. 



•;•«— r'»'"''^>.<r V-r-fT^t'"' ■"*.^*'^'- •^'*^><^-iV' 



gliai -Kassel, Fritz 
KS/ks 



Form No. 1 5. 



THE FOREIGN SERVICE 
OF THE 
UNITED STITES OF MERICA 





Dr. Fritz Kassel, 

Kitchener Camp, 

Richborough nr Sandwich, 
Kent. 



American Consulate G-eneral 
1 Grosvenor Square, London, W.l 

Ootober 28, 1939. 



-4 



Sir (ASejcbOB)^ 

This Consulate General has received your 
registration for an immigration visa in which it 
is noted that you have previously registered at 
the American consular Office in fiemlXa,. .Q:e.r.nig.ny, 




A c^nnunication is today being addressed to 
that Office asking that your alleged registration 
be offioially verified in order that you may be 
given the benefit thereof and your name entered 
on the waiting list maintained at this «ffice 
as of the date of your original registration. 

As soon as verification of your previous 
registration has been received, you will bc 
notified and given further instructions as to 
how to pr^ceed in the premises. Please do 
not forward any documents to this Office until 
you are requested to do so. 

Very truly yours, 






(.-. 



John G. Erhardt 
American Consul General. 



811,11 - 



Form ITo. 16 



THE FOREIGN S^WICE 
OF THE 
UWITED STATES OF AT.IERICA 



American Oonsulate Oeneral 
1 Grosvenor Square, London, \7.1 



ifajiVifTj ^ . 



1940.. 





"Dr, "^rit% llaosel, 
Ilitcihener Crnp , 
Lichborougli, 

Sir (MadaiTi) : 

The American consular office at . I^eq^lin ^as 

notified this office that yoii had registered there for an 

Immigration visa ander the . (Jrorii^n • . quota on 

. Jsnu?'ry. 19 ,. 19oi' ....•/..• Aocordingly, your name has 
been inserted on the waitinr list maintained at this office 
as of the date of your original rogistration at Berlin. . . . 

A fev/ months before your turn will be roached you will be 
given an appointmont to appaar hare for prelimdnary examina- 
tion. In the meantim.e, it is urgently requested that no 
further commur^ications be addressed to this office regarding 
your Visa application, 

The Consulate Genoral is unab] e to give you any indica- 
tion as to how long it will be bofore your turn is reached, 
for the reason that it cannot be foreseen how many applicents 
who are ahead of you on tho v.'aiting list will be ablegte 
qualify for visas. 

Und er no circumstances may tlie case of a visa applicant 
be taken up out of it.s proper turn v;ith other rogistrants, 
except those classes who enjoy preforence in the'allotmont 
üf quota numbers as explained in tho Information form Ictter 
originally sent to you. Thereforo, you may rest assured that 
your rightful position on the waiting list will be scrupu- 
lously obsorved. 

If you removü to anoth'a; country prior to recciving an 
appointment or if you *.>.b indon your Intention to omigrate to 
the United States, l-cindly :...ot '. y this offico aocordingly. 



Yery truly yours, 



V^^^-^^vt ^ 



Jahn G, Erhardt 
Consul General, 



THE FOREIGN SERVICB ' 
OF THE 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

4MtB»CAN CONBUtAT^G£:Nfc;hA4^ 
^.ONDONe ENQUiMSL 




m 



^"CO. 



f '^- 



I 1 

Vx 



1940 






i#>" 



.tji»>»m 



.j^r- 



,,v-r-vsc 



Dr. Fritz Kassel, 

■ Kit Ollis na 1 ' 0» 



«^ 



. 37l-e^-^U^ 



»igfe. 




S^^^*^ 



^^ 






IN REPLY REFER TO 
FILE NO. 811.11 



IS 




Kassel, Prltz 
JEC/drg 

THE FOREIGN SERVICE 
OF THE 
^ UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 



.*■•% 



DEPARTMENT Or STATE 



f- 



m 



% 



American Consulate General 
1 Grosvenor Square, 
^undon, W.I 




>p^pril 12, 1940. 
Dr. Fritz Kassel, >»n4^. -JfJ. /^. -/if^, 

Richborough, 

Nr . Sandwl ch , Kent • 

Sir: 

A üopy of your letter of March 20th, addressed 
to this Consulate General, with enclosures concerning 
your registratlon for an Immigration visa has been 
referred to the American Consulate General in Berlin. 
Should a reply be received from that Office conf irming 
that your registratlon may be considered as of an 
earlier date than that already given, this office will 
be pleased tc notify you to that effect. Otherwise 
your registratlon under the German quota must be main- 
tainod on the waiting list as cf January 19, 1939. 

Very truly yours, 
For the (lonsul Genera 




r*:» 

t 





Callahan, 

an Vice Consul. 




AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

15 West 16th Street 
NewYork,NY 10011 

Phone: (212)744-6400 

Fax:(212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Data: 12/21/2009 



Sys#: 000198685 



Box: 2 



Polder: 1 1 



^■■■^■^ ^:'^U'^^- 



.■^r.js-:^^ ii-^^t^P^Wm 



Guckloch zur Synagpge 



Kuriosa von den Juden in Frankenstein 



Alten Unterlagen entnimmt man. 
1 cJass in dem schlesischen StäcUc-hen 
i Frankenstein die Synagoge am 20. 
Dezember 1860 eingeweiht wurde. 
, Es war ein einfaches Gebäude, das 
I beiderseitig an Wohnhäuser ange- 
I bau! war, aber sich durch seine 
^ Rundbogenfenster im Parterre und 
im ersten Stockwerk, sowie den 
I Rundfenstern im zweiten Stock- 
werk und der Andeutung mau- 
rischen Stils von den Nebenhäusern 
I abhob. Aus der "Allgemeinen Zei- 
tung des Judentums" von 1861 
stammt ein Bericht: "In der letzten 
Sitzung der Stadtverordneten wur- 
der der Antrag der jüdischen Ge- 
meinde, das zu gottesdienstlichen 
Zwecken erbaute Haus in der Nie- 
dergasse so lange von öffentlichen 
Lasten freizusprechen, als er zur 
Synagoge benutzt wird, genehmigt." 
Über die soziale Struktur der 
luden in Frankenstein liegen keine 
Erkenntnisse vor. aber eme Stati- 
stik zeigt uns noch ein Bild der 
Seelenzahl jüdischer Einwohner. So 
ebten dort vcu 1887 bis 1892 rund 
1.^0 Juden; die Zahl nahm ständig 
ib, bis es 193.^ nur noch 47 wa- 
rcMi^ Religionsunterricht wurde den 



Kl 

di 




UÖ^ fO f^\ 



f 

o/u 




auch schon die 
Die Gemeinde 
Friedhöfe. Der 



sc ho 
bestand 
Chewra-Kedischa. 
besass noch zwei 
alte Friedhof befand sich beim Gü 
terbahnhof und war von etwa 1814 
bis 1880 belegt. Am neuen Fried- 
I hof befand sich ein Wohnhaus mit 
j angebauter Leichenhalle, in der 
der Leichenwagen untergestellt 
war. Die Wohnungen dort dienten 
dem Svnagogendiener und dem 
Friedhofswärter. 

Dr. Fritz Kassel (jetzt Austra- 
lien) beschreibt ein Kuriosum der 
Svnagoge: "im zweiten Stockwerk 
des Nachbarhauses, Niederstrasse 
8, wohnte meine alte Grossmutter 
Johanna Kassel. Um der 86 Jahre j 
alten Frau nicht zuzumuten, zwei j 
Treppen hinunter zur Strasse und 
im Tempelgebäude wieder zwei j 
Treppen hinaufzugehen, hatte diel 
Gemeinde gestattet,, ein im Durch- 1 
messer etwa fünf Zentimeter rundes 1 
Loch durch die Trennungswände | 
zu bohren, durch welches meine 
Grossmutter vom Lehnsessel aus! 
dem Gottesdienst folgen konnte. 
Nach Beendigung der Gottesdienste 



wurde 
Idurch 



dann immer die Öffnun« 



einen Stöpsel verschlossen." 

Derselben Quelle zufolge wurde 
die Synagoge in der Pogrom nacht 
des 9./ 10. November 1938 innen 
zerstört, wobei sich eni damaliger 
Amtsrichter, der der SS angehörte, 
besonders hervorgetan haben soll. 
Das Gebäude konnte nicht ange- 
zündet werden, weil es — wie 
schon erwähnt — zwischen Wohn- 
häusern lag. Nach 1938 wurde ein 
Umbau des Gebäudes vorgenom- 
men, und zwar sind die Jrei run- 



- 1 - 



# 



# 



Iä Sc hl es i sc he.. Landes liej^t eine alte Sleimstadt. 
Fraukeßsteia ist ihr Naae. Efeuainraagte LiauerÄ, voa et^a 
einem halben Dutzend i/i/ettererprobter T'irme uiiterbrocheÄ 
imringt die xlltstadt, ia derea Sidwestseite die alte Burg 
liegt. Seit der Jahrhuiadertweade ist die Stadt :lber diese 
Llaueria i^ soh:ielleÄ Teupo herc.uspiewaohsea, aber der auf 
eifieia Hügel liegende Altteil d#^.iit-i4tieiithLllt doch die 
charakteristischen Baute». Darunter aiLimt der "Schiefe Turü'! 
die ersteüe. Stelle ein und mach ihm fährt auch die Stadt 
•den ä^a^a Beiaamea :"Das Schlesische ilsa". Dieser Turm war 
ursprjÄglich ein ?/arttum der im SOjährigea '^riege zerstöri 
teil altes Burg uad mit dieser auch durcfh eiaea anterirdisek 
schea Gang verbunden. Bei einaa Erdbeben soll sich der äiä 
Gruad des Turmes auf der Gelte aach dem Gaag zu geser.kt 
habea, so daß er eiae schräge Stellun bekam. Da mit seiaem 
Biusturz gerüchnet i^erdeia auute, fiag maß an, ihm abzubre- 
chen, doch wurde diese :.rbeit nicht fortgef'lhrt, soaderm 
im G-egeateil der Tuna \yurde la senkrechter lUchtung/vdeder 
aufgebaut, so daß er eiae» Buckel aufweist. Seit laager 
Zeit wird er als Glockenturm der katholischen iSirrkirche zu 
St.Äiiaa benutzt. Das zweite bemerkenswerte Gebäude ist das 
Rathaus. Es ist im gotisc .ea Styl auf dem Gruad des altea 
durch dea Braad voa Fraakeasteia im Jahre 1859 verßichtet( 
Rathauses hergestellt. Jähread die Uhr des ;iathauses mit 
lautea Schlägea dea ;ibl:.uf üie wiederkehreuder Stuadea ver- 
kiiadet, fol^,'t einige Sekuaden später in bescheideaea 
dumpfea bchlägea die alte Turmuhr des schieiea Tumes. 

So hatte sie aa eiaem Jintertage uad zwar aa IQ.Dezem-i 
ber 1897 /2 2 Uhr verk'iadet, als ganz ia seiner Nähe b« iia 
dea flach dem Markt zu gelegeaea Riaghaus Nr.l ia der zweite| 
Etage bei dem jüdischen Kaufmaaa Jakob Kassel ein Kaabe 



n 



• ^ . T rlii-^^l 



■^'1 








geboren wurde. Ei» Soa»tagsjua/^'e sagte die -Ite Hebamme Biel 
die sovaiele» FraakensteimerB zua Lebe» verliolfen Ii^tte. Die 
Freude der Lltera aber dea laag ersehaten StuaMhülter war 
groii. V/eHiger erfreut war sein 3/2 Jahr altes Schwesterchea 
Blsbeth, der das aeugeboreae Brüderohea aua mal garEicht ge- 
fiel. Uad daait hatte sie sicherlich recht, deaa aeugeboreae 
Kimder siad trotz der ichöaheitsbeteueruagea vor lltera uad 
Verwaudtea nichts Aazieheades. Karl Georg Fritz warea die 
Voraaaea^die der Kaabe erhielt^ uad uater Ifr.215/1897 wurde 
er voa dem altea Staadesbeamtea Schnalke ias Geburtsregister 
eiagetragea. ;.m 2ü Dezember faad ia der Syaagoge auch altem 
I^^thus die Zude statt, warea doch die Biter» des Vaters fromrj 
uad aohtetea auf die streage luaehaltußg aller religiösea 
Vorschriftea, währead dies bei dea Bltera der Llutter weuiger 
der Fall war. 

Aber aur kurze Zeit koaate sich der aeugeboreae 
Kaabe aller vier GroJeltera erfreue». Bs war, als weaa seiae 
Geburt eiae Ablösuag der beidea Großväter bedeutea sollte. 
:m S.Februar 1898 erlag seia Großvater mütterlicherseits Liax 
Brück ia beste» Maaaes.lter voa 56 Jahrea eiaer Gürtelrose. 
Mit großem ?omp uad Aateilaahme der Bevölfeeruag der Stadt 
wurde er, der auch Btadtverordaeter uad Llitgliad des Krieger- 
vereias war, ia eiaer Gruft beerdigt. Iha folgte bereits am 
20. Llai 1898 der "roßvater väterlicherseits Julius Kassel im 
Alter voa 83 J^hrea. Er starb aa eiaem scrimerzhaftea Bl'^sea- 
leidea mit hißzugekommeaer Altersschwäche. Besc'.:eidea, wie 
er gelebt hatte, war auch seine Beerdigung. :>eiBen Grabs;,eia 
aus schwarzeu schwedisches Graait ziert das Jort Schillers: 
"Arbeit ist des Bürgers Zierde, Segea ist der i.lühe Preis." 
Umd Segea war auch wirklich seiaer Mühe Preis. Er hiaterließ 
seiae« beide» Söhae» eia beträchtliches Vormö.jea, das seinem 

» 

jüaj^-ere» Soha uad Nachfolger ia Geschäft Jakob geaaaat 
lacques es eraöglichte, seinea Plaa auf Umbau des II:.uSijruBd- 
Stückes Kiederstr}[3e 8 durohzuf'ihre». 




- 3 - 

Uimittelbat mach dei^ Tode seines Vaters fiig er üit 
deta Bau an. Die Ziiaaer in der erstea Et:^ge vmrdeia durch 
seiiem Freuad de» Mauremeister Qlatzer 9i??t%eT erhöht, die 
Deckefi mühevoll iia die Höhe geschraubt und für seiae jumge 
Frau i^ der erstea It.'3ge uitd fär seiae liebe alte I.lutter in 
der zweiten St-^ge eine moderiae lelle V/ohaaag hergerichtet. 
Etwa 17.000 Mark hi^itte der TTmb ^u verschluageÄ, '2nde 1898 
erfolgte der Ilmziovon dem Riiaghaus lir.l aach der läeder- 
Straße 8. Hier verbrachte Fritz dea größtea Teil seines 
Lebeas. 

Die Schwester zweier Aagestellter im Geschäft Martha 
Völkel fuhr iha im Kiaderwagem auf die Promeaddea, welche 
die Stadt .uagebea. Eiiiige alte reasiOB'are Häael, Cxorisch 
uad i^edü^^ welche ihre Spaziergqpage auch um die Promeaa- 
deaaalageia machten, freutea sich über dea muitterea Juagea, 
faadea aber weaiger Freude aa dem Sc||t?esterchea, welche dea 
Kaabea aber wohl nur aus kiadlichor Zifersucht zu reize® uad 
häasela versuchte. Martha Völkel verstaad es ausaahmsweise 
gut die Kiader zu erziehea. Sie legte ;7ert auf sorgfältige 
.ausspräche uad lehrtea dea Kimdera aette Lieder. '^L orl e 




sitzt im Luftballoa'» , "Heimat, Heimat, Heimat, wie bist Ju 
so schöa, könnt ich kö:;iat ich, kö.iat ich Dich wiedersehea'*, 
"Schiffleia auf blauer Flut" usw. Diese drei Lieder solltea, 
zum Syiübol für dea Kaabea werdea. 

Auch die alte Großmama Kassel giag gera mit dea 
Kiadera spazieren. Aa "rla^B^viiTig^i e daaa zum Bäckemeister 
Stephaa aa jlag uad kaufte Aaisküchel. Das wa ^ eiae besoaderj 
Freude. für die Kiader. 

Aa Haus Iiiederstrauie 8 ^ar nur eia kleiaer Gartei 
ia welchem die Kiader spieltea. Buater Glaskugela zwischea 
dem Roseabeet, ii«a Stei-fmüttchera, Nelkea uad ^^eseda, HerZ' 
cheasträucher uad Feuerliliea wuchsoii uader dea altea t^k^- 

-j^aua^üavergeßlich war der alte Nachbarschmied 
Göttlich uad seia IJieter, der Schuhmacher Lux, der bei Be- 
erdiguagea im Kriegervereia dea Taabourstab trug. 



- 4 - 





Aber eiMeit ..rger hatte doch der gute Lux, der vor* uns 
"Lux-Ta-Ta" geaanÄt wurde hervorgerufem. Der kleiie Pritz 
trug aUÄ'ackst RöokokeÄ UÄd Lux sagte ika:eiiß JuÄge wird dook 
keiae Röckokea trage» und hierauf lestaud Fritz daniuf liös- 
okea zu tragei. Widerwillig gab die Mutter laoh. 

Große Freude bereitete es weisn die Eisuder n^ck den 
Burggartea eiigel .de» wurde». Dort katte bereits der ver- 
strorbeiie Großv -ter aätterlicberseits von dea Reicksgr::ii^it 
Deya ei» große» schattige» Garte» gepachtet. Es war immer 
sekr »ett, we»» die Ki»der da»» mit der jlttgstea Sckwester 
der Mutter mit der ^'T-i»te Ille'* dort spiele» konnte», üi» 
großea Ziadruck ai^ckte hierbei i» der lbe»dstuadea die Burg, 
i» der es "umgeke»'* sollte. Tatsäoklick körte ma» üuch ei» 
öuißipfes ?Ilopfe», das ber von dem Böttcher der Tc.Äte Piager 
kermikrte, der dort Tonne» für de» Versaad des Ma<f'»esits 
>Äerstellte. Sitte bemerk easwerte Ersohei»u»g war der *:lte 
Burgwarte -Otilge, der de» Fr»ide» die Burg zeigte U!sd mit 
u»tertä»iger MieftG sei»e Trinkgelder eiasteokte, uäs Ei»der 
aber sckiiapfe»d verschecukte, wea» wir zu nahe aa sei» 
Rui»eareick kama». 

TJ»terkalb der Niederstraße liegt die i<eustraße,i» 

welcker sick das Pe»sio»at d«T Maria-Hilf befiadet. Dort gab 

es- auck ei-»« '^pielsckule, i» welcke klei»e Kinder kiagesohic 

wurde», ua de» Elter» die Be^^ufsichtigung zu erleichter». 

Ick weiß »Uli nickt aus welche» Motive» heraus, aber ick weiß 

daß ie% ei»es schöae» Tages dort mck uatergerbacht wurde. 

Große Afigst bereitete mrr die schwarze Tracht der ßorroaäeri 

V 
»e». lek fiiklte 4ich reckt unglücklich i» diesem Heia, dies 

wurde auck dadurch nickt gemildert, daß die gute Sckwester 



"Vita'», die i 




, sich 4eiȟr i 
der räkre»dste» Fora a»»aka. Die Sckultiscke wäre» durck 
rote Stricke abgegrenzt, so daß kei» Ki»d über de» Strick 
kiÄauskommea durfte. Ki»derspiele uad »ette Ha»darbGitea ias 
besOÄdere Sticke» -uf Pappdeckel u»d Si»ziekarbeite» i» 



m 



m 




- 5 - 

Papierware» die Beschäftigüag. BiMal im Jakr.faid ei» 'usflu/ 
»ach Zadel mit Kinderfest statt. Bli»dekuk-Spiel, bei dem er 
ei»e» mit Sckokolade»taler» gefüllte» Hase» aus Pappdeckel gm^ 
war die Hauptattraktion. Der Rückmeg erfolgte gege^ Abead mit ^" 
LampiOÄS. Ger» gi»g er aber «ickit i» die Spielschule u»d es gab 
jede» Tag Trä»e» eke er kL»gebracht wurde. Ei»mal wurde er aber * 
auf ©i«a «ette Art aus dem Zw3»ge der klösterlickea Schule e»t- , 
fükrt. Sei» zwei Jahre älterer Vetter Pra«z aus Bochum, der ait 
aei»e» Elter» u»d sei»er Schwester Edith i» de» Schulferie» ift 
Nach Fraakeastei» kam um hierbei vor .llea die alte Großmuttel zu 
besuche», kam nitte» i» de» Spielu»terricht herei». "Ich soll 
m8i»ea Vetter abhole»" sagte er der Schwester ia seiaea iäiedlichefsi 
westfälische» Dialekt. Die Schwester ließ auch Fritz aastaadslos 
mit iha gehe». I» Wirklichkeit aber htitte iho aiedea-ad dea Auf- 
trag erteilt. Er selbst 1^ agweilte sich uad holte sich tut diese 
Art Gesellschaft. Die beide» JuÄgea buiimelteÄ durch die St-^.dt umd 
die Proae]giädea-.nl..geia uiad kaaeiR sich als große Herrea vor. Zu^ 
Mittag Twurde der Fall voä de» beide» Eltemteile* kerzlichst be- 
lacht. 

Osten 1904 wurde er ia die ev::Ägelische Schule auf der 
Tuchaacherstraße, die. bereits seiae och^vester Easbeth besucht h'iit 
te, angeiaeldet. Sei» erster Lehrer ^ar der alte Kamtor Hoffa jäm, 
der es wirklich gut mit iha ueiate.UÄd a» den er immer mit großer 
Liebe uad Verehruag zurückdachte. Veim erster Schultag war aber 
eiae große Eattäusckuag. Der ei^te Uaterricht war zu llade uad der 
alte Kastellaa Teuscher, der voraheraus ii der Schule wohnte, 
brachte eiaaa groi:iea feerb U'äschekorb ait dea schönstea uad'buatQS- 
•tea Datea ia das Klasseiiziaaer. Die größte uad schubste D'ite bekju 
sein L:itsch";'ler Erwia l/eak vom Riiig. Linien, V/aradtke, Beck uad wie 
sie alle hießea, folgten. .Schließlich bllebea aur zwei Kiader ohno 



Geschesik: ei» gai^z araer Ta^^ge, bei dem ^^^ ^^^rn v 



errautlich 




HRvnrf 





- 6 - 

das Geld gehabt katte«, etra^-s zu ksufea uad Fritz, bei welchem die 
Bltera aagenonaea hatten, daß diüs«. alte Sitte, die Iii«der a» 
ersten !ichult:.gü voa Lehrer bescheßkea zu lassest, in Portf^.ll ge- 
komae» vy^r. Als der :.lte Kaator die enttäuschten Gesichtchen sah, 
öffaete er, um zu tröste» seia PorteaonHaie uid dr'ickte den beid(m 
KiEderri je IG Pfeai^ig ii die Händchen, Fritz ws^ erzeählte dea 
Vorfall zu Haus üftd-isar aber nicht grade sehr glLlcklich als er ai: 
nächsten Tage vom Kantor Hoffaaiam ia der Schule eiae Ta : el Schoko- 
lade bekam, so wie er sie zu Haus iiaaer gesehen und bekoauen ^hr:t~ 
te. Eilte sch'Jne Düte hätte er lieber ^ohaut, niuUte sie ber ver- 
schmerzen. Er '^cJim und fühlte schoM danals eine aadere Stellung 
als die aaderea Schüler eia, zumal er aa evamgelischea Heligioas- 
uaterricht rächt teilnshia. 'Sollte diese Stellun..- nickt s-abolisoh 
für Sein späteres Leben werden ? 

Pfingsten oder -^ber zu den großer. Periea des J:üires 
19C4 reiste er niit Möt4«y seiiaer Mutter und vlchwestsr n.ch L.ndedi 
ia der Grafschaft Gl^tz. Für die Ciader wurde d s Kifidenaädchea 
Ida Teich aus Llüasterberg mitge normen. Hiater dem Kurplatz wurde 
ia der Villa Pologae .ohriuag genoiicien. Es war ein c^röiieres Hus, 
das in der spa^t eren Zait häufig sei;iea : p'eäadert hat. ::ufälLL 



gerv;aise wohnte in Erdgeschoß desselb n Hauses liuks von der Eia- 
gjagstür Fräulein Clemer^tiae Volkraer aus Er- r^konstei^-^ mit ihrer 
Scliv^ester. Die beiden h-tten in Erankenstein zwischen dem Koloni-i 
ware;::geschaft von Tschoütscnol und der Eapi.;rh .ndluHc^; von Taschitz 
b- ein Eutz- u^d Eutgeschäft- und h;:ben in spiatorer Zeit :.us 
./irtschaitsnötea durch Gasver iftung ihr Lebea geendet. - - - 
Der Aufeath' It von Eräulei 'olkii r sollte ^b or ■- ;u eii f"r "ritn 



verhängidsvoU werden. i:.r .iußte die oteimn.^ der .ugü-i i.„ i..rea 



-,i 



Ei 



r i -iideck :'iünü r,<^i llü , h ben und ir.iGniwelche ".räua.röi 



» 

en vor^^enounea h..ben. JeJenfulls \iux sie d-_iit lortig u 
diss de... inaiiraädc'T- Id:, 'jeich' ^^'^ '"-^Is ,;.:,'bt 



^ 1 .- 



CJ 



;: t 






ai' . rin .nf ^-i 



- 7 - 



vor do;.. aust.. r: :. teilend 



pr-.ng u " auGri.f :"D.-S ist j 



herrlich'', i^rit 






v?jr iiGU.jiorig versucht, .ach 



U.,. ,1- 



s 



\j 



X 



rs • 



Uy 



eit 



c ^us SU i:pri:.,-sn 



r\. 



c-> 



'^ti» 



g' 



ll 



fö\ ll.i 



ili;öi3a uucl i. r 



noc:i in: Zi-iner ^O' 



TH 



n 



u 



1 







1 ^ 



^* ■* - ■ -f/-i 



i 



uur Ecke eii 



rot 



^' i- 



.±>OL 



s 



c .A. r. 



rutsc: 



b3r JUS ur!d fiol so u: l'^cli 



lieh Liit ^"ler : tirri i.uf die bsid 



.bretter 



r i 



i 



eit 



•li 



o 



e den weich3n Knochen br o^ 



71 r> vn 



und 



•> Q-i '•• v^,, -.» ,--. *-< 



^ 



r\ 



,lo1 






61 



7-^ 



-1 



''uf öl I 



i';3nvji, 






r 1 



.1 u 



uu 



>T 



;1 



rr.~\ -^ 



T-> 



-vi 



r r< 



1 



u 



r 



rst 



'r.Gottstoi 



rholun^r. 3r Icictcte 




die wrste HilTe. Mit jineia Taschentuch band er d..s bervordr'ickend 
Gehim zurlck u-ad orndaete lasigSc^ure Toa^rdaioschläa^^a an. Die 



e 



Q War gaaz ia dar Nähe und so kou-tea Medikc.. 



' • v» 



O iA <J 



TT 



Gr- 



b^adszeug schnell kGraugosoh ff t vy^rd 



'.■> ' 



KaUi.% O Ö 



hr tröstlich waroa die 



^ussiclitou Dr.Ootts ..inü .licht. d 



tO 



r arklärta 



^- 17 (3i 



m Prit:: -dt 



-DOUUÜ 



d. 



:o 



Oüll 



1 "1 J- 



\j --u 



wu-re aiixl ist^ns 



a 



v^ 



iit 



3u reo 



d^ii ei 



.4. ■ ^i.lAl 



ochüas-rditter iü x3js 






I 

iri:^ driigen f?''rd6 und 'x^ahnsiiüic^ h 



werden würde. Vo 



X ^ r 



.rad^ 



aÜ 



vi '^i.l 



■ij^zi; 



.11 



.vurdc sofort sein '^c^tbr verboaudi.'t 



o" # 



f^oSC 






h..it6ii g ic t 



Wc^r. ^r k 



aü SO-..Orb 



T 



iGck ua] bruchte Tritz ai 



1^ T ^7 1 

1 U O x;. 



ok 



• 



il --. u 



ü. 



/X Z ml 



G w^i 



ulit^r ait. li 



'- ' ' 



u; 



rr .:5 



ri 



-L 



..b 



r üi383r uad t'c :.1_ 1 ,^ 



•-* n*'^ ^-' 







V V ^' -I- ' 



^.'» ^ 1 



c::- 



,i 



jlkiiöc 



X i. «J Ij v^' U. 



i ^.UiJw'r di 



o Ü 



(."< u -i" 



OA j.tU 



rb^ 



e u..tt,dsr ITiif.ll kai 



•i^ 



r^ii 



II 



^u^LvvJ-lü :3ar Pol^rfe 



•jf • 



Der L^nd3ck..r ^uf^ath^lc wurde \..l 



>ch durch oi 



ß- 



,i 



.ufre^ung gestört. 2ia furclitb.ros Hoc:... ..ner d:. 



1 



1^ 



O XU 



riß viel^ 



T) 



r:?c .... 



ort, Gchweuut 



jü 



h ol 



v-i. 



U. 



U .^ k V v.i X *.•• s-» '. i *.ivU 



Sachen vo.. 



a ^^. 



! n 



üC 



1 r 



i-i. • X 



ier 



^.t ;'Urdu':: die 



IIi;:u0h..., r durch dis 



x--,"I 



:.rvvaersi 



ij> 



v-.±U 



vo : l^r 



jo •>. 



x'i^ei .ni 



G-'^* 



,rat 



:iiS 



chaten T.<ge gritzsns ^^.Ur von ?i :_3Q4tei. u; 



.Iw- iw. .X V., JL U 1 



1 



V. 



dorf bei Lc.ndeck aifc dör 



>U ..1 



.:o 



i- - 



d: 



X ,x 



»i 



u 



den ' t .r ^.uf d 



er 



i-ro 



::it;G ] 







1 



T uji 



J. 



1 üh t 



iiB ra b 



± U'^ ii.O;-ii„iw 



di 



I - (11 H . vm'äi )r^ 



., 1- 



-"*• ^^ ^v> f-o u luü ! 1 e 



' i %.n 1--^ 1 % 



i.' r 



^x i*iu.wgc; uybri 



1 -» 



o 

o 



Vorgänge, die uucli f 




faiid. Die Hocliv^assergjf hr ist dann später daroli uin ot ub.oköii 

hinter S^iiten büseitir^t od^r ziii.. .1 :Gt .ns ^ ..ildsrt \/ordi,;.. 

la diöser Zeit ai:t\viv_. ^Ib^j . -^jj. .;iulaLic:;G r.-,.=o..af tliu^..^ 

: -' üpäliare Leboiia vo:.: l'ritz -dclio oliu , ^Ivr- 

floß bloibQu sollten. Die büidsn LGdergescIialta M Eaalicli das väter 

lioka Gase üft Julias Kassel ia der Eiedarstr ^jg \md das das 

Geschäft der Großautter uatterlioliorsaits LLx Brück, ^a welcheni 

an RiagS 
ducli die Söhne Oskar Brück und aruno Brück b..t.alc^b war: , :: rh'. 

sie scharfe ^-ickurrema, die ...uch früher bereits zun eineni gs- 

spannten Verhältnis vo^ Pritzeas Vater uad desoeii ochvaegervater 

Max Brück geführt hatte. Der Grovstfer Brück wurf Fritzens V ^ter 

iiiimer vor, er verk .<ufe d.„s Leder zu billir:; uad u.-uhe i\.ii i:o:ikurre;>E 




Durok langhaarige V^rh tidlu:igeu wurdea die beidesi Piraem zu einer 
Gesellschaft zusaniaeiigeschlossen. Beriten wurde Pritze'^s Vater 
durch sei^iieu BochuMor Bruder deit Laadgerichtsrat Hugo Kassel, der 
c.uch ä«» aa Gesellsch'-f tsvertr g eine anregende und antscheideade 
Rolle spielte. Das Gesohäftslok:l aa Markt wurde ufgegeben und 
hieein k^ia eine Conditorei von Rispler, der ain kurze Zeit später 
die Musikalienh ndlung jreuad und später ein Bi^nkh-us "'ogt folgte. 
Die Großuutter Glvra Brück schied aus der Lederhancjlung aus. Als 
Reservatrecht blieb Fritzens Vater die I^ir:.a Julius K^s:^€l vorbehil 
twü, die aber nur als jell-IIäute und Daruh....dluac^ gar"'hrt wurde. 
Das btaaiiik.^pit-1 der Beugogr' ndete^ Pinaa:"LedGrh ais Brück 3: KaSvSeL 
^esellsch... t i^it beschränkter Haftung in Frankenstein in ocalesierf* 
betiug >ii 265.000, an walchea Fritzeaä Vater lait ... lla.ooo, sei* 
Onkel Osk^^r lait ..ü 100. OOC und sein Cakel Bruio uit ..l -jCCCO be- 
teiligt w^ru' . ;)ia ueu^^c-r i.idets Firma w..r eine der bedeutendsten 



Lederhandluageia des Deutschen Osteias, deroÄ Huiidsch:;ffc bis aao 
Ostpreußen hin -uf reichte. In einer Ledarzeitung von 1C€4 var zum 

Beispiel diiae ..otiz, i. yalcher os hieß;, dali d<5r .arößts t 



^^^I. pu ö Ol 



/ 



«r 




/ 



- 9 - 
, clor jei^^ls Berlin verlassen hätte, an die I^iraa Brack & :: srel 
gec^uügsm sei, Es warei dias drei .feggo.. Leder. Die Pirsia ent- 
wickelte sich überaus gut, da die beides trJkQrsn Firmen häufig 
gegeneiÄsader gearbeitet, sich häufig _o,.kurrenz g^^.^cht h tt..i 
uad lum .ait vereinten Kräfte- rbeitan ko-^te:. Häufig hörte laaa 
den einen Iiihabor sagen, der )Chahmachcr X ist ..uch dein Kunde. 
Er hatte uir fest zuge3:gt, er ist nur aeia Kunde und k uft nicht 
VOÄ Dir. Aber diss^r Fall tr^^f meistens uch umgekehrt zu. Der 
Schuha.cher hatte bei beideia gek':uft, eine Kim agen die ndsre 

-us^^spislt und beide .iigepuapt ! P:^r Fritz i;7ar es von Be- 

dautuag, daß in dem Gesellsch ftsvetrag ein K..ssus enthalten w-^r, 
i\ welchaa iha eii Recht zur ^eschäf tsf nhruag vorbeh Iten wurde, 
uater der Vor-ussetzuug, das er uiiidest^ns ein Kr in der Finaa 
vorher göcirbeitet hätte und das ES.LeUeasjahr nbersc^iritten hätte. 

^ber kehreji wir zurück zu seiner ochulzeit. Er war kein 
sehr guter aber eiaigutar Schaler. Is besonders eindrucksvoll i.. 
ersten f^chulj jhr eupf ...ad er eine ZaubervorstelluKig, die i» eiPx 
Waaderzauberer in Klassenziiasier abhalten durfte und bei weloheu 
dieser eis kleinjS hellgelbes .ätzohen aus einei T-Schentuch 
hervorzauberte. \:i<. gera hätte er cuch soe eiia Kätzc.^a geh.bt. 
Dana Lichtbild ervortriige .^it schönen buateÄ Bildern ms dea laeuon 
Test.aent. Diese Lichtbillervorträge f!:ndoa ebenfalls iu Klasseia- 
ziaaer, daaa ia der ilerbergie zur Heia t uud in Konfiruiatioasziauer 
beiQ K:,stor Besig ia deia altea losterc^ebäude aa der ev.agolischün 
Schule st-tt. 



f i _ 1 



George bereitete iliij in dieser Zeit sehr seia ., chb jr 
Liägaus Scharltach. Im Nachbarh us war die Sya^goge uatagebr cht unJ 
der ..aator ocharl .ch h^tte eisiei^ einzigen sehr venvöhntea •)ohia ait 
döit schön.^n H-^Uc^n Mügi^us. Magnus durfte nicht mit den .äderen Kii - 



V 



V 





- 10 - 

zusamea ia die Schule gekea, sonder-' vo'. seiae» Vatsr priv-t vor- 
bereitet. Die Jangeas mögo« «um Magaus gehäaselt hüben oder iha 
soBSt wie ßahegetrL,ten seia. Ivkgaus klatschte dies seinea V-ter \xrü 
dieser kam ia die 'Jokule und beschws.rt9 sich bei K:mtior Iloffri.na 

iber das BsHeh - dar '^ch'iler sainesi Sokae Magaus gegenüber, wobsi 

er Fritz als dea "Rädelsführer" bezüiohnete. Die S^cke ging .ber 
doch kernlos und ohfie Pr'lgel aus uad so kaa er mit dea blossea 
yokrcckea davoa. Deaa t-:tsächlich war es weniger eiae Kränkung des 
liebea Magnus .-Is vielaohr dessen •Jbareapfiadlichkcit. iä^J^kr« 
spät9T=s©llte=§r-soeh::eisa=i=iäea Seh; rl chs vmrden kurze Zeit da- 
rauf von Prnkeasteia a^ch Beuthen ü/S versetzt, wo er den 'ostea 
eiaes Friedhofsiaspöktors bai der dortige?? ■^'yuagogengeaeinäo cin- 
aahci. 13 Jakre später aber sollte ia_e--us noch eiaaal den Leböas- 
weg des Fritz kreuzen. Die Mutter des Magnus war siae=;cfBa=^ in 
Bayern gabl'rtig and da di3 Eiisder schon in dc.n-ligcr Seit Lriof- 
m;.,rkGn s jlten, waron die Bayerisclien ."; n d^s licl. , 



.. -r jias 



sehr begehrt. 



Cstorn 1905 wurde «^i Pritz in dia zweite .Ilasse ver- 

setzt. D^B ochulziuaor lag ia der ei-ston Etage ii.xh der Tuchia..chej> 

sträue hin..uß :iber der ..o:i:-i:: les Kastelluas Teuscher. Die 

Laistußgea mußten sich derartig gebessert h b;:n, daü or deia 

z\7eitem Flatz erhielt. Große-- Jindruck si'.chte es ..uf ih::, :.a>: ' c 

erst. i_.l ait Mute schreiben zu d "rf en. Die :..^chief ert: f el k . ia 

de., iiiiitergrund und die ^'Herzelf edern'* die er f'.r 1 Pfennig pro 

' tPok von Loiiskyn ^ ierh ., ■ llarg k^^ulte, hatte i. , h...... 

y 
n fliehende ..irku.. ^. 

i*-i sc . i.:.,.i c\l. _c- 

ju'^..^j."o .ul i..uikai'eriP*iig uus, Ji 
In i;r.^.n.g^lu oinc^ äfigs \;ür' 
c^ - , ^ dt oi- l..u-;v:iL: 



b- --L^ - 



uQ ^rg 



r auersterst 

-rs i icf 

:ollv-,rno" In 



chu: 



cc 



- 11 . 



:in '-^arron a ' .'Jru 



u- ■ ikafar flo , '^^xrö' 



C' ■ n 1 r» -^ -t« 

i.X M. X t^ X J. , 



1 t 



• t T '• 



Siti MitEc:.ll-:r h.tt.„ c1^;j :':Llßtch3n geöff::..'. ' .- -i- ■ ;or 
Hoffaann lieli ^^ir' ' i ~r vi- -i-v ?»n ri ^ < ■.--. t^,, ;,,,._. ,^, ,?.„•;,,, -i 

Mit der "''ssetsung in die dritte ¥1^2sq -wechselte auch der] 
Lekrer. Das dritte uad vierte J.ihr lar- dus Klasseozianar ii 
BrdgöscLoß a,.cli der Hofseite zu. Der Klassenleiter Lekrer Saek 
üilköla 3i.chs pflegte währead des U..L.rriclits ssiuo Ziatrugucgea 
iu Elaspenbäohcr zu ...u^^.. uu.; .aJcr^ ArbaUa zu orlGdig, .. Zr 



a-clit^ dioli d^s Leboii dc^durc'-i be.u^ia , d. 






.tz VOa 




J «rL A J. G X'ii X 



■ O 



lic;i3. './c^xj^ sr J 



—i -.L u^ uv .^ i. _^ b s-/ 



n OS ruhi i... 



\^. >— 1 v^ 






1 1 ,-. 



i..acr y^r, a^gto ;r ..ar;"aoch ei,..!" u.J ,i. 
3atz uoc. .X ..^1. So vd.uuruolta o^u^ d^ü ..piül einige Mi^le bis 
.uiforaoi-u :"... ■. .,i .1.' Iure'. U. .:ort3:"Ii.„k.r wi-d3.r" 
erüöozLo. I.-. diuscr ".i' .üi.lt d 



r» 



sr di 



u 



u^ 



ZI 



-1- nX 



J- . — -. lix 



/■i> 



' ^ wl ^X 



•>' U. J. . j. ^■.- 
v_> 




Jc;Ck^l aufgesogenes go'ruexteö Bild vo 

die .am^r 
'urf^irsto.-, ■ .o uP t^isi© eineL b.;üo:id:r; 

GroLiuii . rg..x . r-e^^^l ^^^^ ^jin^iu Trua ' " rl Iri 

[rußlicL "i rjuilerci. Di. .iud^r li.Gtcn 
J stückten ili . LLiblix.i-.. nnl;.. . ,,1 i : 



1 'ruok u^ 



Vurar^.^üut . .j.ae g. 



Frösclie c. ef.. 



Racnen ..it düiian sio d:. dio '^röscL.. ...... it „uioii 



^ \~ 



"^1 n • 



1 



-- JL >«/ 



a.. 



j. j 



• • '-^ i-LU vi-. 



A X >> kj 'oX .i.lU i.ii...^ 

.ipf-.ug g^xd^ds ..ä.>i^ ei 



X«. 



Jkul u 



■> T • 



-u . i. jv-. ou XX 1 

tr^fe des 



b^uioTü erschiäii iV dc^liur .uoli voll unJ c,.,nz gorocnt. 

^ . . , .. i^ liintafea Flur der Sckiilci 

-^118 weitarö Eriunorung bildet die"-t;..ade''. Dissos \,?..r 



Qiae wo.dg Ir/gianisch. „inrichtun- uä..aiü:. .i..^ ^uw.rliulx grdn 
^jstric:. . -lolzbotticn i ...loLd.. Tri..k;..3Sjr w..r und ..n dearan 
'^eite ^ aw-i ::8tten öich Zuei nri ,kbjoh:r bcf^^nde:.. ' i i. ; - 
der pllegt., k.s .Tri.J:vv ... jser ...acn ^Is ;:a^dev\/n^^^^r su b- iitsen. 
Dio .nrng-l, die d.w.n folgte ist verötändlin^ . :'rits :ber \vu8ch 
vJicIi dort \V6^.. .i. Häade noc:. b..,atztv ^r di 



' W . X. 



J- X X o 



, > ■'...• I \ -v^ ' \ \ -j 

-^ "<-j.*-v»xr-,x X 



t I 



V., i , , / 



iuü oer 



f. =1 ^, 

^ -^^x xv_ 



l1- 



- iz - 



± 'JJL . iX 



• 




sck^r Qia ^'l* s .0. JblicL ..-1 .3 ach zu . 
iih.. x.i..^'üi..j.^^us zu suaickö:!, die diuse uit Jc^^k gerii 

Zaa TurnantGrrioht wurde 'bor die Heustraße a cL 



.1^ i\ 






der 



alten Burg Marschier b, in di^^en Hof sich d:.s Turngüriet befand. 
LIit deiii Pariser ^inzugBa-ir^oh wurde daan wiodor n^oh doR ''chul/^c; 
bäuda surü.c''3i rochiert. 

Di... ..ohLiung V0-... c:iuIiUucher JjUX iis der .iaaderstrc^iju 7 
*'beraah:..i ia dieser Zeit ein Altertioshllndlor Gellrich, niit djsse 
oöh^Qia Fritz gern 'Lus^aii^n war, i)ic J.iilie st .inte ...us S^^chsen- 
.\lte;iburg. Als besonders gern go^i^^h^a g8s::>ieltes Spiel w;<r die 
Feuen^ehr. Der Qu-rtensc':! ach wurd : 'i'iufic, i.. ■■ ic^ii^it gesetzt, 
uad die vori^bergehenden ^gestellten ger^ bespritzt. 11s eiiiaal 
voa den Ledergeschäft alte alitarhelLie gek uft worden waren, 
trugen .lle ungens zur Peuerwehribung die Ilelsae, die ihner: iiat'i 
lieh viel zu groß waren, ^"'r Fritz h:^tte die Schneiderin in 



u ... 



bo.rh ,as - r. u G-briel eiiie noLte scliwurz. üuenvehrj^^cke ge rbei- 
tet. 

Eiam.d a:s&kt«= s...gte V.aJter Gellrich, er 21'iße Ä.:.ch Reisc/j 
zagel gehen und fragte :ritz, ob er .itkoiiinc . nolite. Fritz ^; :; 
ohne zu fragen it.Htid Oor AusflU:^ :A-. "^bor 'itolz, durch .>j-. 
wuiiderb..re alte n. pelallee n ch lieisezagel. Di .-^np..l.llee ist 
inzvdschen durch junge übstbäura. rsetzt und der Ort IMsez:;;cl 
der GöuiCinde Ba.rw.lde einverleibt. ./ Iter Ge'lrich !n. ttc dort 
beiia ocln.^ider zu tun. Dasn k .m d^r T'okweg und es z d^-^^^te s.cIj. 
daß •» der Ö/2 Yji l...nge 5iig doch atw..s nuviol f"r Fritz w r. In 
ütolz J.XI der :^r'!cke wurde längere R.st gniuoht und aide kamem 
die TaMgens abends ..n. Ua Sorge der Item war groß, doch die 
Freude, daß .ii^s dsr •Jun.'^o wijder da wr lie.. ,. eiterungen ver- 
ges£^en. Den nächsten Tag durfta Fritz iafolgL. 'h-^i ■c'tr^j.iUur^u 



nicht in die Schule gwuea. 




m 



- 13 - 

Bia große Freude isurde Fritz durch die :.ÄScliuffar4g eines Zickel 
okeas gea^clit. Eia kleines Hr^lsbaftd ait ei^er Glocke wurde dem 
Tierchea ougöi^iuclit. Die große 2uii9igUÄg= Tierliebe brachte ihn 
:.ber eiaea kleiaea Uafall. Eiacs Tüges i^/urde er :uls sr iiit der: 
Tierchen spielte fortgcrufaa. Er lief dieia schrialea Garteaweg, 
der ait Döckstsia^a^^sasgei^gt blauen und rot a Dachst oiiiem aus- 
gele^rjt war eatlaad. Das vereias .säte Tierchea aber lief erschreclhl 
aaok uad brachte Fritz zu Fall. - 

4» 

la dee -Likra 19C4 - 1906 hAto sich d. s Ledergescliäf t 
eseatlicli vergrößert. Die Läger , die zua Teil aoch ia Riagh .as 

\r. 3 befandea, solltea iijch der Niederstraße verlegt werden. 

Li wurde desh.lb eia gew Itiger Bau voa zwei Lederkellera geplaat] 
(6te3ea Vorbild die Berliner Ledsrläger äarstellte. LIit deüa Bau 
urde Im Jakre 1906 begomiea. Die Gartenerde wurde ia dea Syaa- 

.oogengartea vorlbergehead geahrea uad tiefe Keller ausgegraben. 

llclaiateress at waren d ^bei mittelalterliche Fumde voa Kacheln 




Li. 



• 



m 



- 14 - 

Brüslau. Ei»ss Sohöiiaa Tagcis erscliia» deslitrb Jlerr Lluaguidirek- 
tor Lrwiia '•Hiitze uit siiem großem Korb vom ^Tlea Tellera li 
Frankeasteiia, um die GegsÄStäada ei 21z ut aus che). Sr sagte os 
ist air bak'-iaat, daß sie die Kiichelia nicht gertverk ufea ^o±-~ 
leii, doch k.be ich ihnea so schonG aadere Sachen ^tgebri^okt 
daß sie sie ::air fär d-ns Museoa wohl abgeben v?erdeg\^^is ; uck 
dieses .:.bgelehsit wurde, erbat er die Kc.chela, ua si^ii davon 
Abdriioke machen zu dürfen. D-s wurde geneh^iigt. Als '-)er die 
Kachel-^ zurückkc^aen, sn;herx sie Fritzend Mutter etw s v'Vandert 
aus. Sie fragte Herr» Direktor Hintze, Sind d.s die OricU,!. 
kscheln oder die Abdrücke, wodur.uf er unter Erröten erklVto^ 
in, d<>s sind nur die 'bdrüoke. us Lisbe zum Museum vers^liv 
^r eine strafbire Hi:-r.dlung. Er g ;b dan» die Orignalfuade sr^Aer 
köraus, schrieb aber in seine Moa:tsschrift. ''Leider konnte v| 
•3ich Herr K-.ssel nicht entschließen, die Originalsticke dem 
Luseuii zur Verfügung zu stellen,' so duß de» Kuseua nur Abdrücke 
tugänglich geworden, sind." Die'Oriagale waren d:nn Innge Jakre 
ih Frankensteiner Heia tsauseua susgestellt worden. 

^ Bei den Bauarbeiten war -uoh die kleine Ziege ia Wege. 
1 
Sie sollte verk uft werden, doch g b dies b^i Fritz der ortig« 

Iräüea, daß sie zunäckst ia Holzschuppen ia Nachbr.rk'us Nr. 9 
ante gebracht wurde, ^'iaes sch"5nen T^ges war sie ober verschwu 
den. Sie wjr verkauft worden. ■- 

Dafür erhielt Fritz ein scköaes Silber braoziertes 
Dreirad. Als w::r eine große Freude «i* ia Kurven durch dea Hof 
zu fuhren uad dabei die laingel tüo|tig ia Bewegung zu setzen. 
Ein Sehr guter Kunde des Geschäftes wur der Lederhändlar 
Beyer, Qus Langenbielau, der bis- Lederposten bis M 40.000.- 
kaufte. ,\ls er auch einci 1 zua Ledareinkauf ia Fraakensteia 
war, sah er ^'ritz auf dea Dreirad durch dea Hof fahren. Das 



Hsd gefiel ihm so gut, daß er sagte, so 



eia R r) jnnnU^r. A ^1. 



w ü J.U a. 



^ißfmm- 



^M* 



/ 



.i 



# 




- 15 - 
auok für Heinea Sohn Erast. Da er ainöÄ größerem apßteia Leder 
kaufte wurde iha das Rad mit zugegebea umd Fritz w« um tröstlich 
Bimige Zeit später erhielt er über * für ein größer^ Oreirad 

% das ber aickt so schön war, wie d s erste. Es wsr air schwarz 

I T 

I lackiert uid hatte keiaea so gutem Sattel. GresohäftsitteresseÄ 
gimgem ebem vor Paiailiemfreuden. - - - 




\ 



Der gute Kumde Beyer k.^^tte ber später eimea tr uriges 
;mde gemomaem. TTa Kosten zu spare a kam or mit dem Pihrrad 7om 

L !^.-';oabielau über H^beadorf m^^ch ?r':^keasteia. Eimatackä s^k er 

< 

ii Habeadorfer Teick eiaige Krebse l^ufem. Er Packte zwei Kribse 

.chtsakmemd ia seia Toscheat^.ck, ua seiisen Jußgeii eimo Pi^eude zu| 

l\ 
a\fchea. Die Be^atea des Grafe^i Seydlitz-Ssmdretzki sahem aber 

I hieltem ika ^m. 

dk| Tat uad i¥aektöa=:Beye;r--sur^==msöig9^ Er gab sofort die Krebse 

hAaus uad weit« eatschuldigte sich mit seiaer TTakaantais, dab 

da^i^Ä irgendwelche ,7erte wsrea. Trotzdea wurde die fet aage-- 

\ 

zeni;, M Tage vor der Verkaadlumg f.".ad aaa dem soast grurJ ri- 



ell|t Mtiü erhäagt ia seiaea H-jus. 

Ia dieser Zeit g b es eiae Heike voa Paailieafestea. 
Zuatckst heiratete 8«k«i=©«kgFr=9im=F3fÄtti»ia=sdi4k-S€taa« Taata 



Friada Herra Abrahr^m (Abbi) Cohea -.us Harsweg bei Emdem. Bei der 
Hochzeit trug Pritz Mit Mr-afred K-stz die Schleppe der Br-ut. 
Dii Hochzeit f cad ia Tialsufs Hotel statt. Die Peasterbretter 
dh Saales warea stark v erst übt uad laage 2eit aickt gereiaigt 

i" 

worden. Ge -jU so wie es seiae l.iutter ait dea Dieast-nädchea zu 
aichee pflegte, wischte Fritz dem St üb fe= allerdiags ait dea 
aiuda w^ibea Glaceleder-Haadschuehn ib - uad zeigte voller Stolz 
Bjiae schiiutzigea H^adschuks der Mutter ait i er Üeaerkuag "Siek 
Hial so schluckt k-be® sie ^-t üb gewischt.*' 

Pritz »piöit« trug als Zwerg eia Gedichtokea uf, das 
ait den Vfortea beg^^aa:**IchkOMae r us dem grüaea W>ld, wo fersck 

uad Reke lustig spria.c^aa." 




AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

15 West 16th Street 
NewYork.NY 10011 

Phorie: (212) 744-6400 

Fax:(212)988-1305 

Emaii: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Data: 12/21/2009 



Sys#: 000198685 



Box: 2 



Folder: 12 



• - " 



/i^t 



^^U-) ^^^'n^TTTty^ t^n^ y^'i^tT^ ^ti^^H^ y)ip^^ 
44^ /#^W ^i^n^ J^^H^T^^^ //i ^^u^tli-^ /yv»^/ 



/l 7^7t^^ 



I, Gerry B- Gilbert, of Portland» Oregon^ hereby revoke 
all wills and tostamentary dispositions heretofore made by me, 
and declare this to be my Last Will and Testament: 

ITEM 1. I desire and request that xay remains be placed 
in the vault belonging to my family in the Home of Peace Cemetery, 
San Francisco, California, and I giva and bequeath to Congregation 
Emanu El, San Francisco, California, the sum of Two Thousand Dol- 
lars ($2000.00) IN TRUST to use the net income therefrom for the 
perpetual care and upkeep of said family vault and the family plot 
on whioh said vault is looated. 

ITEM Z. I give and bequeath to Congregation Ahavai Sholom, 
Portland, Oregon, (tho synagogue of which is located at Park and 
Clay Streets in said City) the sum of Five Hundred Dollars (|500.00) 
IN TRUST to use the net income therefrom for the perpetual care and 
upkeep of the grave of my Grandmother Miriam Gilbert. 

ITEM 3. I give and bequeath all my personal effects, jewelry, 
and books to my brother Alfred J. Gilbert, to dispose of as he s'ees 
fit. 



ITEM 4. I give and boqueath to my sister Josephine G. Blum 
the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100.00). 

ITEM 5. I give, devise and bequeath to my brother Alfred J. 
Gilbert, all my right, title and interest in and to that parcel of 
land in Clackomas County, Oregon, knovm as Gilbertdale Farm, and it 



mmmmm 



tr»»-> i^ m $ U w M mt m v 



is my dosire and I request that said farm shall always bo known as 



"Gilbertdale Farm." 



Gerry B. Gilbort 



Page 1, 



Information »ovght »s to the 
is'^uf of 

PAUL BRÜCK 

(son of RosR Biurk .nd brother 

of Franz. Trudo and Hclf-ne) 

who resided in Görlitz. Silesift. 

oermany, aDout 1932. 

Pleft.se rontact 



/. 



ITKIJ 6. I giv© and bequeath to Congregation Emanu El, 
Sali Francisco, California, the sum of Fivo Hundred Dollars 
($500«00), with the requost and upon th© condition that said 
Congregation have Kaddish said regulär ly for my Father, Isaac 
Jacobs, my Mother, Clara Jacobr,, after her deoease, and for my- 
seif. 

ITEM 7. I give and bequoath to Congregation Ahavai Sholom, 
Portland, Oregon, (the synagogue of which is located on Park and 
Clay Streets in said City) the sum of Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00), 
with the request and upon the condition that said Congregation have 
Kaddish said regulär ly for my Father, Isaac Jacobs, my Mother, 
Clara Jacobs, after her decease, and for myself. 

ITEM 8. I give and bequeath to Leon M. Levi Memorial Hos- 
pital, Inc., Hot Springs, Arkansas, the sum of One Thousand Dollars 
($1000.00), with the requost and upon the condition that said Mem- 
orial Hospital have Kaddish said regularly for my Father, Isaac 
Jacobs, and my Mother, Clara Jacobs, after her decease, and for my- 
self; and this gift is made on the further condition that said Memor- 
ial Hospital erect and maintain a suitable tablet, in some appropriate 
place on its premises, commemorating the said gift as "The Isaac and 
Clara Jacobs Memorial." 

ITEM 9. I givo and bequoath to the Sanatorium of Jewish 
Consumptives' Relief Society, Inc., of Denver, Colorado, the sum of 
One Thousand Dollars ($1000.00), with the requost and upon the con- 
dition that said Society have Kaddish said regularly for my Father, 
Isaac Jacobs, my Mother, Clara Jacobs, after her decease, and for my- 
self; and this gift is made on the further condition that said Society 
erect and maintain upon the premises of said Sanatorium at Denver, 



Gerry B. Gilbort 



Page 2 



Colorado, in some appropriate place, a tablet commeraorating the 
Said gift as "The Isaac and Clara Jacobs Memorial." 

ITEM 10. I give and bequeath to my Trustees hereinafter 
named One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000.00) in securities 
(that is, Stocks and bonds) at thoir market value at the time of 
my death (or in cash, if I leave insufficient securities), IN 
TRUST for the following uses and purposes, to-wit: 

(a) Said Trustees shall hold and manage said trust estate 
to the best advantage thereof , and I vest my Trustees with all the 
power in respect to the management, care, investmont, reinvestment 
and exchange thereof which I might personally exercise if living, 
intending hereby to givo to my said Trustees power to handle and 
manage said trust ostato as they deem for tho best interest thoreof • 

(b) From the net inoome therefrom (which shall include in- 
terest, dividends and profits) said Trustees shall pay to my Mother, 
Clara Jacobs, if she survives me, the sum of Five Thousand Dollars 
($5000.00) per annum, during her natural life, payable in quarter- 
annual instalments; and in the event that the net income from said 
$100,000.00 trust estate shall not equal said sum of $6000.00 in any 
year, I direct that the deficiency be made up as hereinafter provided 
in Item 19 of this Will. Should said net income exceed said sum of 
$5000.00 in any ono year, such surplus shall be distributed by my 
Trustees in the manner hereinafter provided in respect to the dis- 
tribution of the net income from said §100 ,000 .00 trust estate on 
the death of my said Mother. 

(c) After the death of my Mother, Clara Jacobs, or after my 
death if my said Mother predoceases me, the entire net income from 
said $100,000.00 trust ostate shall be paid over by my Trustees to 
my Brother, Alfred J. Gilbert, during his natural life. After the 



Gerry B. Gilbort 



Page 3 



death of both my Mother and my Brother Alfred J. Gilbert, 
or upon my death if both of them predecease me, the entire 
net income from said §100,000.00 trust estate shall be paid 
cTer by my Trustees, one-half thereof to my Brother, Caston 
J. Gilbert, and ono-half thereof to my Sister, Lillian M. 
Lang, provided that if either said Sister or Brother be not 
then living, the share of the income which such decedent other- 
wise would have recoived shall be paid to the sole survivor of 
the two. On the death of either said Sister or Brother, the 
share of the net income which she or he was receiving or was 
entitlod to receive shall thoreafter be paid to the survivor 
of the two, On tho death of the Inst survivor of my said 
Mother, two Brothers, and Sister, or on my death if no one 
of Said four persons survivos mo, said $100,000.00 trust es- 
tate, with all undistributed income, shall be paid and turned 
over to the Föderation of Jewish Charities,Inc. , of San Fran- 
cisco, California, as its absolute property (but for use with- 
in the Unitod States of America only), with tho request and 
diroction, however, that said Föderation pay over and transfer 
to the Community Chost of San Francisco, California, secur- 
ities or cash to tho amoimt of Ton Thousand ($10,000.00) 
Dollars, for application by said Community Chost to charitablo 
organizations which aro not coi stiltuont societios of said 
Föderation of Jewish Charities,Inc. , of San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. All of said payments of income shall be made by my 
Trustees in semi-suinual instalments. 



Gerry B. Gilbert 



Page 4, 



ITEM 11. I give and bequeath to ny Trustees hereinafter 
named Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($15,000,00) in securities (that is, 
Stocks and bonds) at their market value at the date of my death 
(or in cash, if I leave insufficient securities) IN TRUST for the 
following uses and purposes, to-wit: Said Trustees shall hold and 
manage said trust estate to the best advantage thereof , and I vest 
my Trustees with all the power in respect to the management, care, 
investmeht, reinvestment and e:;cchango thereof which I might person- 
ally exercise if living, intending hereby to give to my said Trustees 
power to handle and manage said trust ostate as they deem for the 
best interost thereof. Tho not income therofrom (which includes 
interest, dividends and Profits) shall b.3 paid in equal semi-annual 
instalmonts, to my Brothar Caston J. Gilbert; and on his death, or 
if he predecoases me, the not income shall bo paid to my brothor 
Alfred J. Gilbert, all in oqual semi-annual instalmonts. On my 
doath if noither of said brothors survivos me, or on the death of 
tho surviving brother, if only ono survivos me, or on tho doath of 
tho last survivor of said brothors, if both survive me, my said 
Trustoos shall pay and turn over said trust ostate of $15,000.00 
to Tho Board of Trustoos of Tho Lcland Stanford Junior University, 
Palo Alto, California, in trust to use and apply tho income from 
said fund, which shall bc Tmoci :ii: rrvH ISAAC AND CURA JACOBS 
SCHOURSHIP FUND, for the os'^ aMirJ aiont of scholarships at said 
University to be awarded co worthy students in any department of 
said University upon the recoüLnendation of the President or other 
ranking executive of said University. 



Gerry B. Gilbert 



Page 5. 



ITM 12. I give and bequeath to my Trustees hereinafter 
nejned Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($15, 000,00) in seourities (that is, 
Stocks and bonds) at their market value at tho date of my death (or 
in cash, if I leave insufficient securities) IN TRUST for the follow- 
ing uses and purposes, to-wit: Said Trustees shall hold and manage 
Said trust estate to the best advantage thereof, and I vost my Trus^ • 
tees with all the power in respect to the management, care, invest- 
ment, reinvestment and exchange thereof which I might personally ex- 
ercise if living, intending hereby to give to my said Trustees power 
to handle and manage said trust estate as they deem for the best in- 
terest thoreof, The not income thorofrom (which includes interest, 
dividends and profits) shull le paid in cqual semi-annual instal- 
ments, to my sister Lillia?i M. Laiig; and on her death, or if she 
predoceasos mo, tho net frooMo cUfill ho paid to my brothor Alfred J, 
Gilbort in equal somi-annual instalmonts. On my death if noither 
my said sister Lillian M, Lang nor my brother Alfred J. Gilbert 
survives mo, or on tho death of the survivor, if only one survives 
mo, or on tho death of tho last survivor of said Lillian M. Lang 
and said brother Alfrod J. Gilbert, if both survive mo, my said 
Trustoos shall pay and turn over said trust estate of $15,000.00 
to tho Rogonts of the ünivorsity of California, Berkeley, California, 
in trust to uso and apply tho income from said fund, v/hich shall bo 
known as THE ISAAC AlTD CLARA JACOBS SCKOLARSHIP FUND for tho ostab- 
lishment of scholarships at said Ünivorsity to bo awarded to worthy 
students in any dopartmont of said Ünivorsity upon tho rocommondation 
of tho President or othor ranking oxocutivo of said Ünivorsity. 



Gorry 3. Gilbort 



?czo 6. 



>■ 



ITSI.I 13. The ultimate gift provided in Item 10 hereof to 
the Said Fedoration of Jewish Charities,Xnc. , of San Francisco, 
California, is raado out of respect for and veneration of my Father, 
Isaac Jacobs, and my Mother, Clara Jacobs, and as a memorial to 
them, and shall be designated "THE ISAAC MD CURA JACOBS IffliORIAL 
FUND"; and as a condition of the accoptance by any Institution, 
Organization or society to which any part of said fund may be given 
or applied by said Föderation of Jewish Charities,Inc« , or said 
Community Che st, or of any gift, allotment or donation, such In- 
stitution, Organization or society receiving such benefit shall 
erect and maintain a suitable tablet in some appropriate place on 
its premisos commemorating said gift ns "The Isaac and Clara Jacobs 
Memorial." 

ITM 14. I give on.c hequcath to the American Church of Holy 
Trinity George V, of Pf.ris, Fr^nco, the sum of Ono Thousand ($1000.00) 
Dollars. This gift is made out of rospect for and in veneration of 
my Mothcr, Clara Jacobs, and is made on the condition that said church 
orect and maintain a suitable tablet in some appropriatc place on its 
premisos commemorating the gift as "The Clara Jacobs Memorial." 

ITEM 15 • I givo and bequoath to the American Eospital, 165 
Boulevard Victor-Hugo, Neuilly-Paris, France, the sum of One Thousand 
($1000»00) Dollars. This £;ift is mado on the condition that said 
ho Spital orect and maintain a suitable tablot in somo appropriate 
place on its premisos commemorating th© gift. 

ITEM 16. I givo and bequoath to the Jewish Orphanago Home 
of San Francisco, California, Ono Thousand ($1000.00) Dollars. This 
gift is made on the condition that said Orphonage Homo erect and main- 
tain a suitable tablet in semo appropriato place on its premisos com- 
momorating the gift. 



Gorry B. Gilbort 



Pcgo 7 



ITEM 17 • I give and bequeath to Forest Home Gerne tery. 
Forest Park, Illinois, the sum of Five Hundred ($500,00) Dollars, 
IN TRUST, to invest the same according to the laws of Illinois and 
use the net income therefrom for the purpose of covering with ever- 
green plants during the winter and placing pink carnations, on 
grave Decoration Day (Memorial Day) each year, on the grave of my 
departed wife, Edith Allen Gilbert. 

ITEM 18» I give and bequeath to the Board of Trustees of 
the University of Southern California (or to that body which performs 
the functions of said University of Southern California which are per- 
forraed by boards of trustees at other universities) at Los Angeles, 
California, the sum of Fifteen Thousand ($15,000,00) Dollars, IN TRUST, 
to use and apply the incomo from said fund which shall be known as 
"Tho Morton Brooko Gilbort Scholarship Fund" for the ostablishment 
of scholarships at said University to bo awardod to worthy students 
in any departmont of said Univorsity upon the rocommondation of the 
President or other ranking oxocutivo of said University. 

ITEIÄ 19# All tho rost, rosiduo and romainder of my ostato 
of ovory nature and kind and whorosoover situated, and all the 
property of every kind over which at the time of my death I shall 
have a power of appointment (including the power of appointment 
given me under the trust deed dated the 29th day of May, 1928, 
executed by Alfred J. Gilbert, Gerry B. Gilbert, the first parties, 
Sadie B. Gilbert, the second party, and Equitable Trust Company of 
New York, the third party), I give, devise, and bequeath unto my 
Trustees hereinafter named, IN TRUST, howevor, for the following 
usos and purposes, to-wit: 

(a) Said Trustoes shall hold and msinage said trust estate 



Gerry B. Gilbert 



Paj^e 8. 



to the bost advantage thereof , and I vest my Trustees with all 
tho pov/er in rospoct to the management , care, Investment, rein- 
vestmont and exchange thoreof which I might personally exerciso 
if living, intending horeby to give to my said Trusteos power to 
handle and manage said trust estate as they deem for tho best in- 
terost thereof • 

(b) And, first, my Trustees shall pay to my Mother, Clara 
Jacobs, from the net income thorefrom, tho amount, if any, by 
which the net incomo paid to her from said $100,000.00 trust estate 
provided in Item 10 of this Will, shall fall short of $5,000.00 per 
annum. This payment shall bo made ojinually. 

(c) Socond, my Trustees shall pay from tho not income the 
sum of IVenty-fivo Dollars ($25.00) por month on the first day of 
oach and ovory month, to each of tho following benoficiaries during 
such beneficiary's natural lifo, viz: Sarah Jacobs (wife of Saul 
Jacobs); Minnie Cody (daughtor of Esther Myers); Holen Wertheimor 
(daughtor of Sam and Ruby Wertheimor); and Floronce Arfeld. And 



my Trustees shall pay from the net income tho sum of Fiftv Dollars 



••^»•««•w 



/ 



($50.00) por month on tho first day of each and every month to Miss 



Elfrioda Brück (daughter of Clara Brück, deceasod), of Frankonstein- 
Schlesien, Gormany, during her natural life. All of said paymonts 
are to bo free and clöar of rny estato or inhoritanco taxos levied 
on Said gift, or on account thoreof, by any governmont, state or 
othor toxing authority. 

(d) Third, in the ovent that my Mother, Clara Jacobs, 
survivos mo, my Trustees shall pay the remaindor of tho net income 
from said rosiduary trust estate to my said Mothor, not less often 



Gorry B. Gilbort 



Pago 9. 



than somi-annually. On the doath of my said Mothor, or on my 
doath if sho prodocoases mo, said romaindor of said not income 
shall bo paid to my Brothor, Alfrod J. Gilbert, not loss ofton 
than somi-annually; and on the doath of my said Brothor, Alfrod J. 
Gilbort, tho rosiduary trust cstato croatod by this Itom 19 of my 
Will, aftor doducting thorofrom and rotaining sufficiont principal 
to yiold the not incomo roquirod for tho payments directod to bo 
made in paragraph (c) of this Item 19 of my Will, shall be paid 
and turned over by my Trustees to such charitable or educational 
institutions outside of the State of Oregon (but for use within 
the United States of America only) as my Brother, Alfred J. Gilbert, 
shall by his Last Will and Testament fi.ppoint; and in default of such 
appointment, my Truf.tees, after making said deduction to take care 
of the provisions of paragraph (c) of this Item 19, shall pay and 
turn over one-half of said residuary trust estate to The Board of 
TruGteos of The Leland Stanford Junior University, Palo Alto, Cali- 
fornia, in trust to use and apply the income from said fund, which 
shall be Icnown as THE ISAAC AND CLARA JACOBS SCHOLARSHIP FUND, for 
the establishment of scholarships at said University to be awarded 
to worthy students in any department of said University upon tho 
recomraendation of the President or other ranking executive of said 
University, and my Trustoos shc.ll pay and turn over the remaining 
ono-half of said residuary trust esta';e to the Regents of the Uni- 
versity of California, Borkoloy, California, in trust to use and 
apply the incomo from said fund, which shall be known as THE ISAAC 
AND CLARA JACOBS SCIIOL.IRSHIP FUND, for the establishment of scholar- 
ships at said University to be awarded to worthy students in any 
department of said University upon the recommendation of the prcsident 



Gerry B. Gilbert 



Page 10. 



p • 



or other ranking executive of said üniversity. In the event my 
Mothei*, Clara Jacobs, survives me, but my Brother, Alfred J. Gilbert, 
be not living at the time of her death, said residuary trust estate, 
after making said doduction to take care of the provir.ions of para- 
graph (c) of this Item 19, shall at her death be paid and turned over 
by my Trustees, one-half thereof to The Board of Trustees of The 
Leland Stanford Junior üniversity and the romaining one-half thereof 
to the Regents of the Üniversity of California in trust for the estab- 
lishment of scholarships as hereinbefore provided. In the event that 
both my Mother, Clara Jacobs, and my Brother, Alfred J. Gilbert, pre- 
decoase me, said residuary trust estato, aftcr making said deduction 
to take care of the provisionti of paragraph (c) of this Item 19, shall 
at my death bo paid end turnod ovor by my Trustoes, ono-half thoroof 
to The Board of Trusteos of Tho Loland Stemford Junior üniversity and 
the remaining ono-half thereof to the Rogents of tho üniversity of 
California in trust for the ostablishmont of scholarships as horein- 
boforo provided. 

■yvhon and as ofton as any part of said rotained portion of said 
residuary trust estato can bo disponsed with by roason of the death of 
any beneficiary named in said paragraph (c) of this Item 19, the part 
which can be dispensed with shall be paid and turned over by my Trustees 
to the charity or charities or üniversity Trustees or üniversity Regents 
to which, and in the proportion in which, the remainder of this residu- 
ary trust estate was by my Trustees previously paid and turned over, 

I direct that in determining the part of the trust estate to be 
retained by my Trustees to take care of the provision of paragraph (c) 
of this Item 19, due regard be given to a possible decline in income, 
since it is my intent and purpose tnat each of the beneficiaries named 
in said paragraph (c) of this Item 10 shall roceive the monthly payment 
provided during his or her entire lifo. 



Gerry B. Gilbert 



Page 11. 



^ » 



.* *' * 



ITEM 20 • Such ultimate gifts to charity or for the estab- 
lisliment of scholarship funds provided in Item 19 of my Will, which 
shall bo mado from assets from the trust fund created out of the es- 
tatc of my Brothor, Morton B» Gilbert, deceased, are made out of res- 
pect for my aaid Brother, Morton B. Gilbert, and are made as a mem- 
orial to him; othervjlso, thoy aro made out of respoct for and in 
vonoration of my Fathor, Isaac Jacobs, and my Mother, Clara Jacob s^ 

ITM 21, I hereby nominate and appoint my Brother, Alfred J. 
Gilbert, and Edgar Freed of Portland, Oregon, to be the Executors of 
this my Will, and in case the said Alfred J. Gilbert should not survive 
me, or in the event of his decease or incapacity to serve, I appoint 
my Brother Gasten J. Gilbert Executor of this my Will in his place 
and stead« 

ITEM 22. I hereby appoint my Brothers, Alfred J. Gilbert and 
Gasten J. Gilbert, and my Sist^r, Lillian M. Lang, Trustees under this 
Will« In the event of the death or inability to act at any time of 
any one of said Trusteos, I apvoint Edgar Freed„ of Portland, Oregon, 
to act as Trustoo of this my Will in his or her place and stead. 

ITEM 23. I direct my Trustees to keep the assets of my estate 
insured against such lossos as they doem advisablo and for the best 
interosts of my estate. 



IN T/ITITNESS WIIEREOF, I have herounto set my hand and soal this 



27th day of Decombor, 1932. 



Gorry B. Gilbert SEAL 



\ 



The forogoing Instrument, consisting of twelvo (12) typowritten 
pagos, including this pago, oach page being identifiod by Testator *s 
signature, was signod, soalod, publishod and declared by the above named 
Gorry B. Gilbort, as aid for his Last V/ill and Tostamont, in cur prosonco, 
and in the prosonco of each of us, this 27th day of Decombor 
1932, eind we, at tho ?3(imo timo and place, in his presonco and in the 
prosence of each othor, at his rcquost, have herounto subscribod cur names 
as witnessos. 



Gilson G. Blake 



John Wirth 



Residing at Dept. of State, Washington D.C. 

T^ns'l^Hi nc nt ' o Aüierican Con^'u"' at*^ 

Goneva, Switzerland 



PcgG 12. 




AR 7229 



Bruch-Kassel Collection. 



LEO BAECK INSTITUTE 

Center for Jewish History 

1 5 West 1 6th Street 
NewYork,NY 10011 

Phorie: (212)744-6400 

Fax: (212)988-1305 

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org 

URL: http://www.lbi.org 



Date: 12/21/2009 



Sys#: 000198685 



Box: 2 



Folder: 13 



m 



mi^^ 










stj 



-r-,-^' 



\n. 



■^A 
















•fr 



.Ä< 



^GQLäilii' 







aU Kh>uid' 

: inok Qüicv« 

«/id^diki* 



«UÄc^CU- 



a- ^3iLd^' 
cÄLdia NkSd • 
QLLCk uc,wr d»^iiv 

QLUCk U^JLQHd* 

(^ • duoaj^ (;^av * 
c,-d»^' , 
i4qi^i/l<;,t;9l 4wMH^^' ««a«(ci;uQ* 



) 



mm 







LA 











E>^H 


1^1 




^H 


C^'fl 


^^^^^^^^^^1 






- Vt 



-C 



r ■ , ;l^.- - . .>'— 






ijtHtt-'-fk--.,- ■ .•»-^■r;...— i-^^j^^i/irprj.-y ir Ww-.-.,:. . , ' ,r?;r-«-',r r-. . ,/-—"f, 'r:*t^<'- «*t-"' "■?••''/■''.* 



:^j-^ _-,:i- 



••-r.;.-;K*"'''*" """ 



*»r 






L'.L CSJLNl • 

KCLua L\»as'l • 

JNJL.tc'J.^Lrf CiL • 

d • r^u5.t:cÄur • 

a- c.:7L'ur/iL 
i * cu-iL\.r.tL • 

4 -i^'.Le-^'i'ii:.' - - I 



^v 









c»ot; Gi;d.l- 
a- lundÄuadk* 

LXC«v6^^Äl<ucd. • 







u*j;i(i cwLj^l rwi.a L»diua.l) 

L'/Tll c/. 

^?^fiJ :4;.r (wua cUcU) 



W»ULfÄ. ciLiur • 

^' :«CMC»5radv 
*5^>*:N'f rdk * 



lkcä:^!) 



L^ 



i • a • dN'L'l • 

d;Ql Jnjl'I • 
^;dNl a>icdN\uc?4i • 

^^fL/f (1, U4wf;a wd • 

>•- Äidd/fc • 



U^LL 



^d^c ffid.fL (^jua duc/f :; 
Mk5, .N'v,K'aKrad • 



l^CLCÄLC 



eL\;4a ds'U'l • 



• x' 



»r..*«t.,-^^ 









.« 1> 



L.l. 



III 






( 

I 



:..VjWv,'J. 



^mr 






Tk 



_ ^ iKJLJi 



t 



C,/Iiul ItflUlifii* 



\^ 



^ 



UICIC* 

a* luadÄnöck» 
Q' a^L^^' ■ 

c,aL d^fcdroCÄLirÄ. • - 
c,Hda u%L J CmuiQ MIEfi 



i> 







4 



u 

u 



I 






«^J^^—JB*» 



t 



¥ 



m*^ ^^^' 



•A^^Oi cal« (iiutftJldiuai) 
L- a»imo(MMiLAo«iÄjiitfuA) 

JW^ t^ («UQ cufto4> 
MOi^diiiliU* 






,^/' 



'.1?' 



^ UtfLCNl « 



ttAtj<;4jai^ 



i-a'dW» 

currud uacaM • 
i^UL rAoJMi: 



tfiLoi^ arc/frctur (oji) j Kda* 

*Ädi^ aidifu (nuo duari) 
•tfdc uÄQÄfa (Hua uUäII) 
«a; ca.Q uA(;U * 
*Ädc caa Hit^cfä • 
w»o*^ atfL<^rfodv' 

L'kUlUiiQwftdl^Od«' 

• ' Ut0tfce4ur (mo <MM>) 
er* ^t (»luo umAmM^ 



^ - — 







cAdtf 

9^10 Q«<,d («ua uAu4uii) 
1 * t4«i^<i«ua "%^^,mj 



.'i 






JUI-. 






^<J 



I 



!if 



w»«V- 



.V-ftYrr, 






:;4 

Mi 



JÄLL LWCwCÄL ClCJl 



'-»^ 3 DU* 




.A 






:l^qc^.m • 



ÄL/(<:jL'.cLrt CiL • 

a* civiCi.rÄL 
i* ac^L'k^r.tL- 
a;.^?'.a c lncäcj» 






IL/fJ* 

a* lundÄuadk* 

(:,rfuwl daLiuadK'uadk* 

C^c ds5j;s!l- 

(:,aL d/^cracrtur/fi- • 
CNwia L'.cJi 'Kuc :-■ ' 



iJw« 



» 



i»i>9faMl du«aÄl (mwQ cAc-Äfa) 

l* L* d>4L'l* 

i' r diiü!' 

iwc,i(i cälAI (w^a LftdUiaa) 

uj^CiLi (:,aL (j^iQ dÄurii) 

U* ds*L'|* 

NkRd l4CX {^K^Q CUa<l) 



u^ 



d^Ol d^L'i • 

Äc,dNl oÄcdKiuaa • 
cwcL^c, lUkCiaaiid • 

a>jw.u aL*Jcd4rjKKU' 
«;xÄidd/fL' 

^ dwUlCLLy^* 



NCLua u/rasr/fL* 

NkULhJV. CILIUC • ^ 

äv,::l :., N^^-i^Kr^dk* 
wÄdKC 5ld.tL (Nua duc^l) 



< , r» *« • 



^ik;Ii • 



UkLia UciQ wfidj5fc><}adw • 
MCLL'Q /irr^f ;/tn-/lL • 

utü. KCLUO iÄ;N'aj5}radw • 

WCLCÄUC • 

QLWa d<JL'l • 

a • (^/fiu (i^uc vM*--, ^*>.<^d) 
G- (;/iii. -.. . »fl" «*.<!) 



^ji^ao Q>i;d (j^iiQ UMU/Iul! ) 



V 



I 
t 

I 



4 



^0 



..>• M 



11 - I I j i ^w . -j^vL-rs-^' 



m 



1 



[f 



4i 




^^•^.- 



T0iiSiif!m 



La>»^ Gau» 










ci4v;3 UvLA ('Mi.a 3«^i; 



I 



.-Ä/frif ■«f-?^ -^ 



-itf^-j^*' 



♦It fJ* 






i 






^Mf 



##** • 



4>A 



'wlWl*'^» 



4 • ^ 



JÄ<i.r OÄufL (MM} UÄLUfi/fl) 

Ä9fa^duicM((i,uorÄ<:Ä«i) 

HÄc^tU ziKM r«uo LÄAua^) 
uii;ili c,UL (^Juo diKru) 

U«dN?L'|' 



KCLua 4!;.'fr.fi. • 



«^Rd ui<^ («i,a curcM) 

t-'ÄJ. w.Äd Mldili (Nua Ü^;4I) 



l(lLd«Ll.tv 



i^UL 






d<;ai dKL'l • 

"'^ n<| ftAiCii'iij 



( • 






a^c^c:, CL.a (j^i/fCj - 

tf:u>j^arc/frctLr(a.Ä)c/fda' 
^c wNujajWuadi' 
kÄdNC Äid^tL (Nua durc/ll) 
4Ädc L4/faj*fa («ua ixuiauii) 

Wide ca.a lu^cii • 

LiUa UiQ vÄdNCWOd* 

KJ5d iwc;öa)>cad% • 

mcLCÄuc • 

«• iua/irc4cr fMi^.r aju^) 

^ Ciidd- 
GL/lrcua*" 

*,-a)<ia'id/i](n-iuia4.Kiuai) 

c,-c,/fiurrau»j<irwiwadAJLr/i) 
(^NUQ 3Äc;d (*)ua uiÄLi/iüti) 

»• CulO(;iufL- 



^^ » 



•f 



TUI- 



"f^^-^^W 






^ 



^"^ 






.1? 



• "t 



i^ 







'•4'. v'^y 







» 



i 



M 






^, 



tfUAa MIUB^• 

a* aou^.' 



üiayc* 

.■■ ■ ■ "i 

Q' lubdAuGlii* 

c^do Odui fi^ md) 
ofeiio I mnmi - 

üc^mm mm 



# 












4 



f5 



# ' 



.^* 



«• a»Jmo(HiÄyteaAJuftiA) 



« 



CfOMiJKM* 




iui 



MadM(äA<Muaü)cAull) 



4Mw flti^ fßffiCtmOök 




if^kfimd^ 



i- a* di*d» , 

UHOOdLOdU 
«ouk; oruaqva • 

CiMuLiH.'üNlAul* 







^tCi>j^ curc/trc^f LT (cur) ( Ada* 

ac*iMaautiiod«« 

•ÄdAc ÄulÄ\* («ug duwi) 

uu^ UHQiAdraiod*' 
Had iA<j)a)to^i * 

lÄCLCfiUC • 




S ' «AoftdiO (it« Ulkend liiucU) 

^0 «ikd (nuQ MAU4u(i) 

.»* oula^u^L* 



'.,• 










'^. 



&r 




% er . ö'-^'Jt 









^imi 






njt^$rsmff) 





^m^mi 



firr 



(t<rf iminpiimi 



^füfur^. 



•r/-TT " i tC 






^Liil 



f. a. qvjni» 



IJCW^' 



^a^j. vAi^jJtf^:' 



nurr 






^^f^^ 



^ n 



*J 



fi^fT 



w\i^ ftttt («fö cntcTf) 



. oim ( 

•r.'^a q^nf , 

f>fCrC3P£ • 

tmqfyfviCii^tQ^. 
Hcrno tm^t^ft^tnif-; 

•Ijq»^ ar«ptr {h^q qnic^j) 

rc i0nea^ffaq'. 

vr'w^ a';C-»itC'^rt (er«) Ü x^. 

Hcrna rjno^r, 
^a>JI ryra * 



v^ 



f. 



% 



•?^DDn (!fnü-i;;D >c{<i{<D 



' ?■■ 






'lx^^^?D 



P»»»«v.» 






^ -pNp DDJ-);; ni;?n 

•I^D^J -)^SQ jNO^in -)1K1 






■■■*«-* 



(J'^j/aONTD Ü')H) -)»ND rilTS 

; . -J-li/DJ^^pJN-lÖ .1 

• Vtii-^^2 .b .^ 




y J♦■■w«r-^■.. 



^■-»:flf- 



^♦* *"•>•*■' 







— IV — 









pVn nO^B' D1M (»l-INlDiy-in D''Nyr)bNU D^"V«>N 




• V^^T 






pnyiyD 



(N'lÜÜ^i D^IN) ^^Np I^Ji'.- 



%4k 

V . 



V'i/'>1 -D .H Vi;;n (;»L:^*);;:yD o>)^) c'^-)^ ^:s'2 



.'?tinQörp..a 



.Mi;-*? .p .p 
. ;;pj^* 11. 



. piTLOit*:?«!! ^: :np 






U^ 












HT^ wia\ (Kffd cn^stKff) 



t'ra :> 



;ci^ er« 













■;^C3'2:ifr;^- 



wr 



nvr 






«nntcrtynrif. 



Lw^ 



\(. r. rvjon. 









3J<T«(^ 



r.vr »?.• 



i^rroT^ 



ßi^rr^jj' 









I 



\c. ^uff («r<3 '«M) nurr ^tTtaa q^nt- 



wrr» 












f^rf rrm a^^'^c' ^«^*^^ • 

. ar^^ t"a>5rq . 



< 



•I 



— VII — 



(«i'iffjrurii dmn) DMpw^ tfrn 
. yimv Vjncnvj l^viCsV 

. -ivmvbK^ in D^t» 

."JVJODVp TND 

. n<oirn DHia« 
♦ |(<ow ojnNo aniDM 






(wrii^i d^n) d^ä **W!n 

(DDV35-v:eür'^)iirtSo)ra -o 

(ro^nNi D^iN) rj-i^-üv^*?^ .p 
. lytc'^Np üni3tt 

( Ditpy' S'Tl^J 

(i>wjn3ni crwOyüVDO' pinM 
('?r"^DNp pn^w 

3 Mach«cir ir«m. t 






¥ 



/■^nr^«oyopy 2 

{hvy^ C«^»») m^-^D ^WJNT 

.'pDJM);" -^c'py 

•">yjiy2DN^r r^-N 

^K^ ?,)p>lj py^^f 

• ]t<^^'^yz i:nj 

(rü»n^<*-i omn; jndjjv j^^y; 

• IHCDp'Tj JN,-N^ 

(KTO^I^M*) D*1N) J'iy20-iJf«T' . "> * 

(•-rj^lC)'« cnr<i rtspi^.yj 2»NpNs 
(iT^^-nNi D^l^; "yp^3-'p :ipN^ 

• iWC'r.vp DNpNi 



^^.y.'. r ^f^'^***'^^) :3ffH^ Tun 



"nyn 



na^Tcv^ 



")-)yn 



• lyMü^iTD -»yijNorv'rw 
.(Ncnn >»^'^« 

.nvVoüy-i "'^-u 

• INcynn f^oya 
. bynDjyr«^ jNDy'r'KT 

• l'üvnin j^^ryi 
.DyT*?n3 ^rcwT 

• lN^y3 r^n 

. D13f<pH^ ^^^W 

. D"»yV^n3 DNp.s' 



;^-T 



'por^iy 



•♦V •* w "* 



.•^•^J^« 



. p:iü D{<^üNo 
."•ßy^ lyijyo 

(Vyj-DNi) N-Mr 

(.y?MD d'in; i^"«\nc icbi --yn 
(WN-«.p ' - • ^ 







y ■ " 




v^ii&u^^ 




'mm»i' 



mr 



«p »F ..«ip-y^»^ 



F^, 









Wirr 






^flßP^ 



mrr 



mrr r?af aw'^r {wo cW'CvtO 

^c^(rI.«f'^:^1^cw) 



^^HMNKJ 






lli M. 



c^nic* r*j/rcw«[r, 

trrtr a^^crs^i* 
r/n» \s<Hr'Utir . 

' . Ci!»troc\irc (#5f*o r«friSTs) 



tK'otrtäif^ 



iMuJ^ 



q • l^cc^^tn^f^ («ro rwrtro) 
n. QHqa«f (uro 'förwri) 

l*iwr ^iirdinMr (»i«rr^)** 

nVT wriaycnrr qijac'jjrrt. 
ncrnaqy^Sttr. 
*«iq fWcoirc* 
fr»q o^a {vtrö pjosts^) 

••nrrimwrt^ 

crtf ojrra»! . 
IT n^fr^- 



rrcntr wtfq>jrn?r. 

•"'•^fijMl^^irJncr) 
•writ^ ;- 

•^qc^:*«'!, _ 

'Hfrnc'tnHttaijf. 
C'cqnrosq'H» 

^ cm .( wo rrrwff) 

cn^ncTf aaq. 

cwr qiicNttiir* 



-mm' iwi 

«rar; cm qt^^^.,^,,,,,,^^ 



nrwiaur (wo fwtnc^ryttnr h * o . rwwcwn . 




— IX — 



— vm 




.^V.^-T:^r 



(nittyr« 0^1«) 2i<p«^ c^^ 

.^pDjnßKlCf .T 



•nyn 






.iv'jSd 3pjn 



•nW» 



^n -T •« pjmcT' 






'V* 






^PnVil 






.^p .b .^ 

.p^ .n 
• mw • » . t 

• inwp^D^c V;no(f? 
(WD D-^iw; "«aNp^^ rijnK» 

• »ji«!*^ Bn\"l 2Np«^ 

• ^^♦n pn^N i^DD^ 

• WP l^?2'^ ^^iwQ 
* »):t»n psrw "^H<Q 

'Pt*^ o .0 

*)fl«n3t»nyi3N ,j .0 

»)j<:«n trvn "tho 



^»iWöOT^p D>wS* 
• imp it^ 

Jn^P . n . D 

♦Ajnwbpr D»'''?y 
• ypü'ü crnyiöy 



r i- L.-»t- 




• I^^^D^<p{f• D-Q^< 
^* '^^ (INoßß^n pir« 

oi6^^P DNJV3 

.^ßyt> ^Nnaj 

.Dip>(D Tß#n 

• P^P [>*oß^ip BnM 
.it>;;ßjjn^-i i6n>n 

• Dv'^VD .^ .n 

• t3D3iyn löDon 

o;;i3yD a^;><f 
(iniN-«Di|« D^«) ;n^ f))fi^ 

(")r>ny:') *?jaiD a^«p<r 



T>^n 



i'.: 



^w^ 



nn3D n!?>n. 

jri^ ?pV^. "rtp ?irP "Tp^ 1P* 



•^X — 



-»593 1 13^0^ IP»' rcTD«! tSt r^« ;[ui3 t y " t rh n^ 

r.^S^' v^ ^-^ niT-bp "^r-^o^* cr<?7r^y i^^^l^lB^ 

^w pnr TTv CT" t* "*'^*^ "^"^'^ '•"**^ "5"?^ r 'T^ T^ 
nn röfn o'C^c*'*^' x>'i -^^ '"* ^anj itjjin J?m|n S<n pp^ 
-f Vnj . nsn^o toy irp^ D'Tt: n^ h^-^ tcooi nto« ^-^on -r?^ 

^^, rm^-<^ ^ r^H ctm: nno ^3-1« oW? "^ "f<* 

,,^... ,..**^^ .,,<*•- ^45'->« -^"r* ?r'r*'*n rr*^ ■'^''^' ''^^ 

.CT>p'nrnn^ n^ ->; 15»'^. -^wv ^^^ nx^ t^S^ 

OT'lf???^ D«r3 Db;y2 TD87 P« «Hgi TJtffS^ CtlJJ W^^^* 

:ir^»c :j nl3? T»"¥^ »>•'?• -.nyi«» fnj 'p^ ^ HJJ^ ^{T^ 

y^ ^^- . -^ nojjb 3V^ ^^BfTR n^ry *» - : ♦ JÜTT'^ 



.•^ PTH •^ijrn 










} 
^ 



i 



l 4 




m^